Category Archives: Discussion Paper

The long shadow of Stalin: Mistrust across former USSR countries. GLO Discussion Paper of the Month April and other GLO DP’s of April.

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month of April 2019 provides a historical explanation on within-country differences in levels of trust. Specifically, the paper finds that the lower trust levels present in former USSR countries can be traced back to the system of forced prison labor present during Stalin’s regime, which created terror and mass repression, causing individuals to lose trust in neighbors, institutions and society at large.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: April

GLO Discussion Paper No. 344, 2019.344 Stalin and the origins of mistrust – Download PDF

by Nikolova, Milena & Popova, Olga & Otrachshenko, Vladimir 

GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova and Olga Popova 

Abstract:   We show that current differences in trust levels within former Soviet Union countries can be traced back to the system of forced prison labor during Stalin’s rule, which was marked by high incarceration rates, repression, and harsh punishments. We argue that those exposed to forced labor camps (gulags) became less trusting and transferred this social norm to their descendants. Combining contemporary individual-level survey data with historical information on the location of forced labor camps, we find that individuals who live near former gulags have low levels of social and institutional trust. Our results are robust to a battery of sensitivity checks, which suggests that the relationship we document is causal. We outline several causal mechanisms and test whether the social norm of mistrust near gulags developed because of political repression or due to fear that inmates bring criminality. As such, we provide novel evidence on the channels through which history matters for current socio-economic outcomes today.

GLO Discussion Papers of April 2019

344 Stalin and the origins of mistrust – Download PDF
by Nikolova, Milena & Popova, Olga & Otrachshenko, Vladimir

343 Intergenerational Mobility: An Assessment for Latin American Countries – Download PDF
by Doruk, Ömer Tuğsal & Yavuz, Hasan Bilgehan & Pastore, Francesco

342 The impact of Brexit on International Students’ Return Intentions – Download PDF
by Falkingham, Jane & Giulietti, Corrado & Wahba, Jackline & Wang, Chuhong

341 Labour mobility and interprovincial trade in Canada – Download PDF
by Aziz, Nusrate & Mahar, Gerry

340 Should I stay or should I go? Migration and job-skills mismatch among Italian doctoral recipients Download PDF
by Alfano, Vincenzo & D’Uva, Marcella & De Simone, Elina & Gaeta, Giuseppe Lucio

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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April 10, 2019. All GLO Discussion Papers of March 2019 & the Discussion Paper of the Month suggesting that return migration improves social norms in Mali.

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month in March finds that girls living in localities with return migrants in Mali are less likely to be circumcised. This effect is driven mainly by the returnees from Côte d’Ivoire, suggesting that, in addition to punitive action against those who practice Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) or information campaigns, having lived in an African country where FGM practice is not customary is equally influential. This is evidence for the relevance of social remittances through return migration here by improving social norms.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: March

GLO Discussion Paper No. 329, 2019.

Female genital mutilation and migration in Mali. Do return migrants transfer social norms? – Download PDF
by Diabate, Idrissa & Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine  

GLO Fellow Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, Paris School of Economics.


Sandrine Mesplé-Somps

Abstract:   In this paper, we investigate the power of migration as a mechanism in the transmission of social norms, taking Mali and Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as a case study. Mali has a strong FGM culture and a long-standing history of migration. We use an original household-level database coupled with census data to analyze the extent to which girls living in localities with high rates of return migrants are less prone to FGM. Malians migrate predominantly to other African countries where female circumcision is uncommon (e.g. Côte d’Ivoire) and to countries where FGM is totally banned (France and other developed countries) and where anti-FGM information campaigns frequently target African migrants. Taking a two-step instrumental variable approach to control for the endogeneity of migration and return decisions, we show that return migrants have a negative and significant influence on FGM practices. More precisely, we show that this result is primarily driven by the flow of returnees from Cote d’Ivoire. We also show that adults living in localities with return migrants are more informed about FGM and in favor of legislation. The impact of returnees may occur through several channels, including compositional effects, changes in return migrants’ attitudes toward FGM, and return migrants convincing stayers to change their FGM practices.

GLO Discussion Papers of March 2019

339 Monopsony Power and Guest Worker Programs  Download PDF
by Gibbons, Eric M. & Greenman, Allie & Norlander, Peter & Sørensen, Todd

338 Personality Traits and Performance in Online Labour Markets – Download PDF
by Mourelatos, Evangelos & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas & Tzagarakis, Manolis

337 Out-of-Partnership Births in East and West Germany – Download PDF
by Jirjahn, Uwe & Struewing, Cornelia

336 What Is the Value Added by Using Causal Machine Learning Methods in a Welfare Experiment Evaluation? – Download PDF
by Strittmatter, Anthony

335 Returns to Investment in Education: The Case of Turkey – Download PDF
by Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Psacharopoulos, George & Tansel, Aysit

334 Conflict Exposure and Economic Welfare in Nigeria – Download PDF
by Odozi, John Chiwuzulum & Oyelere, Ruth Uwaifo

333 Assessing the impact of off- and on-the-job training on employment outcomes. A counterfactual evaluation of the PIPOL program – Download PDF
by Pastore, Francesco & Pompili, Marco

332 Maternal Health, Children Education and Women Empowerment: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from India – Download PDF
by Chatterjee, Somdeep & Poddar, Prashant

331 Exchange rate, remittances and expenditure of foreign-born households: evidence from Australia – Download PDF
by Hasan, Syed & Ratna, Nazmun & Shakur, Shamim

330 Walls and Fences: A Journey Through History and Economics – Download PDF
by Vernon, Victoria & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

329 Female genital mutilation and migration in Mali. Do return migrants transfer social norms? – Download PDF
by Diabate, Idrissa & Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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March 18, 2019. All GLO Discussion Papers of February 2019 & the Discussion Paper of the Month

Morocco, a North-African country that has become a major emigration hub to Europe, has seen many calls for political change over the last few years. The Discussion Paper of the Month of February is using micro data from that country to confirm that social remittances induced by international migrants are drivers of social and political change in the context of Morocco.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: February

GLO DP 309 International Migration as Driver of Political and Social Change: Evidence from Morocco – Download PDF
by Tuccio, Michele & Wahba, Jackline & Hamdouch, Bachir

GLO Fellows Bachir Hamdouch, Michele Tuccio and Jackie Wahba.

Abstract: This paper focuses on the impact of international migration on the transfer of political and social norms. Exploiting recent and unique data on Morocco, it explores whether households with return and current migrants bear different political preferences and behaviours than non-migrant families. Once controlling for the double selection into emigration and return migration, findings suggest that having a returnee in the household increases the demand for political and social change, driven by returnees mostly from Western European countries, who have been exposed to more democratic norms at destination. However, we find a negative impact of having a current migrant on the willingness to change of the left-behind household, driven by migrants to non-West countries, where the quality of political and social institutions is lower. Our results are robust to also controlling for destination selectivity.  

GLO Discussion Papers of February 2019

328 Short-Run Health Consequences of Retirement and Pension Benefits: Evidence from China Download PDF
by Nikolov, Plamen & Adelman, Alan

327 Tracking the Sustainable Development Goals: Emerging Measurement Challenges and Further Reflections – Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Fu, Haishan & Serajuddin, Umar

326 Public Employment Decline in Developing Countries in the 21st Century: The Role of Globalization – Download PDF
by Gözgör, Giray & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

325 The Nativity Wealth Gap in Europe: a Matching Approach – Download PDF
by Ferrari, Irene

324 The Evolution of Factor Shares: Evidence from Switzerland – Download PDF
by Baldi, Guido & Pons, Martina

323 Timed to Say Goodbye: Does Unemployment Benefit Eligibility Affect Worker Layoffs? – Download PDF
by Albanese, Andrea & Ghirelli, Corinna & Picchio, Matteo

322 Beyond the Average: Ethnic Capital Heterogeneity and Intergenerational Transmission of Education – Download PDF
by Chakrabortya, Tanika & Schüller, Simone & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

321 The Growing Divergence in U.S. Employee Relations: Individualism, Democracy, and Conflict – Download PDF
by Norlander, Peter

320Innovation, Automation, and Inequality: Policy Challenges in the Race against the Machine – Download PDF
by Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger

319 English skills, labour market status and earnings of Turkish women – Download PDF
by Di Paolo, Antonio & Tansel, Aysit

318 Improving Access and Quality in Early Childhood Development Programs: Experimental Evidence from The Gambia – Download PDF
by Blimpo, Moussa P. & Carneiro, Pedro & Jervis, Pamela & Pugatch, Todd

317 Motherhood, Migration, and Self-Employment of College Graduates  – Download PDF
by  Cai, Zhengyu & Stephens, Heather M. & Winters, John V.

316 Whither the evolution of the contemporary social fabric? New technologies and old socio-economic trends – Download PDF
by  Dosi, Giovanni & Virgillito, Maria Enrica

315 Are there gains to joining a union? Evidence from Mexico – Download PDF
by  Gutiérrez Rufrancos & Héctor Elías

314 Home advantage in European international soccer: Which dimension of distance matters? – Download PDF
by  Van Damme, Nils & Baert, Stijn

313 Twelve eyes see more than eight. Referee bias and the introduction of additional assistant referees in soccer – Download PDF
by  Verstraeten, Olivier & Baert, Stijn

312 Works Councils and Workplace Health Promotion in Germany – Download PDF
by Jirjahn, Uwe & Mohrenweiser, Jens & Smith, Stephen C.

311 Does Society Influence the Gender Gap in Risk Attitudes? Evidence from East and West Germany – Download PDF
by Chadi, Cornelia & Jirjahn, Uwe

310 Immigration and unemployment in Europe: does the core-periphery dualism matter?  – Download PDF
by Esposito, Piero & Collignon, Stefan & Scicchitano, Sergio

309 International Migration as Driver of Political and Social Change: Evidence from Morocco – Download PDF
by Tuccio, Michele & Wahba, Jackline & Hamdouch, Bachir

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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5 February 2019. GLO Discussion Papers January 2019 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month explores the vote on the Swiss minaret initiative in 2009 as a natural experiment to identify the effect of newly revealed reservations towards immigrants on their location choices. The research finds that the probability of  immigrants to relocate to  a municipality that unexpectedly revealed stronger negative attitudes towards them is significantly reduced in the time after the vote. The effect seems to apply to all immigrant groups – Muslim, non-European and European -, and to be stronger for high-skilled immigrants.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: January

305 The Deterrent Effect of an Anti-Minaret Vote on Foreigners’ Location Choices – Download PDF
by Slotwinski, Michaela & Stutzer, Alois

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                      GLO Fellow Michaela Slotwinski

Abstract: In a national ballot in 2009, Swiss citizens surprisingly approved an amendment to the Swiss constitution to ban the further construction of minarets. The ballot outcome manifested reservations and anti-immigrant attitudes in regions of Switzerland which had previously been hidden. We exploit this fact as a natural experiment to identify the causal effect of negative attitudes towards immigrants on foreigners’ location choices and thus indirectly on their utility. Based on a regression discontinuity design with unknown discontinuity points and administrative data on the population of foreigners, we find that the probability of their moving to a municipality which unexpectedly expressed stronger reservations decreases initially by about 40 percent. The effect is accompanied by a drop of housing prices in these municipalities and levels off over a period of about 5 months. Moreover, foreigners in high-skill occupations react relatively more strongly highlighting a tension when countries try to attract well-educated professionals from abroad. 

GLO Discussion Papers of January 2019

308 Technological Unemployment Revisited: Automation in a Search and Matching Framework – Download PDF
by Cords, Dario & Prettner, Klaus

307 Gender, culture and STEM: Counter-intuitive patterns in Arab society– Download PDF
by Friedman-Sokuler, Naomi & Justman, Moshe

306 Time preferences and political regimes: Evidence from reunified Germany– Download PDF
by Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus

305 The Deterrent Effect of an Anti-Minaret Vote on Foreigners’ Location Choices – Download PDF
by Slotwinski, Michaela & Stutzer, Alois

304 Tropical Storms and Mortality under Climate Change – Download PDF
by Pugatch, Todd

303 The Post-Crisis Phillips Curve: A New Empirical Relationship between Wage and Inflation  – Download PDF
by Voinea, Liviu

302 Marshallian vs Jacobs effects: which one is stronger? Evidence for Russia unemployment dynamics  – Download PDF
by Demidova, Olga & Kolyagina, Alena & Pastore, Francesco

301 The World at the Crossroad. Demographic Polarization and Mass Migration. Global threat or global opportunity  – Download PDF
by Bruni, Michele

300 The Belt and Road Initiative. Demographic trends, labour markets and welfare systems of member countries  – Download PDF
by Bruni, Michele

299  The unprotecting effects of employment protection: the impact of the 2001 labor reform in Peru – Download PDF
by Jaramillo, Miguel

298  Measuring the Statistical Capacity of Nations  – Download PDF
by Cameron, Grant J. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Dinc, Mustafa & Foster, James & Lokshin, Michael M.

297  Inequality and Welfare Dynamics in the Russian Federation during 1994-2015  – Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Lokshin, Michael M. & Abanokova, Kseniya & Bussolo, Maurizio

296  A Beveridge curve decomposition for Austria: what drives the unemployment rate?  – Download PDF
by Christl, Michael

295 Health, Cognition and Work Capacity Beyond the Age of 50   – Download PDF
by Vandenberghe, Vincent

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org

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GLO Discussion Papers December 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month examines the potentials multiple language skills have for employment and wages in a globalized world. The research finds in the context of an open and multilingual economy that language training improves employability, but the skills are not sufficiently rewarded by higher wages.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: December

Discussion Paper No. 289 Evaluation of Language Training Programs in Luxembourg using Principal StratificationDownload PDF
by Bia, Michela & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Mercatanti, Andrea

GLO Fellow Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

Abstract: In a world increasingly globalized, multiple language skills can create more employment opportunities. Several countries include language training programs in active labor market programs for the unemployed. We analyze the effects of a language training program on the re-employment probability and hourly wages of the unemployed simultaneously, using high quality administrative data from Luxembourg. We address selection into training by exploiting the rich administrative information available, and account for the complication that wages are “truncated” by unemployment by adopting a principal stratification framework. Estimation is undertaken with a mixture model likelihood-based approach. To improve inference, we use the individual’s hours worked as a secondary outcome and a stochastic dominance assumption. These two features considerably ameliorate the multimodality problem commonly encountered in mixture models. We also conduct sensitivity analysis to assess the unconfoundedness assumption employed. Our results strongly suggest a positive effect (of up to 12.7 percent) of the language training programs on the re-employment probability, but no effects on wages for those who are observed employed regardless of training participation. It appears that, in the context of an open and multilingual economy, language training improve employability but the language skills acquired are not sufficiently rewarded to be reflected in higher wages.

GLO Discussion Papers of December 2018

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

289 Evaluation of Language Training Programs in Luxembourg using Principal StratificationDownload PDF
by Bia, Michela & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Mercatanti, Andrea

288 Bounds on Average and Quantile Treatment Effects on Duration Outcomes under Censoring, Selection, and NoncomplianceDownload PDF
by Blanco, German & Chen, Xuan & Flores, Carlos A. & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso

287 Anti-Migration as a Threat to Internationalization? A Review of the Migration-Internationalization LiteratureDownload PDF
by Hatzigeorgiou, Andreas & Lodefalk, Magnus

286 Some unpleasant consequences of testing at lengthDownload PDF
by Brunello, Giorgio & Crema, Angela & Rocco, Lorenzo

285 Does Money Relieve Depression? Evidence from Social Pension Expansions in ChinaDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi & Wang, Tianyu & Busch, Susan H.

284 Media Attention and Choice of Major: Evidence from Anti-Doctor Violence in ChinaDownload PDF
by Bo, Shiyu & Chen, Y. Joy & Song, Yan & Zhou, Sen

283 Elite School Designation and House Prices – Quasi-experimental Evidence from Beijing, ChinaDownload PDF
by Huang, Bin & He, Xiaoyan & Xu, Lei & Zhu, Yu

282 Commuting Patterns, the Spatial Distribution of Jobs and the Gender Pay Gap in the U.S.Download PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

281 The Effect of Self-Employment on Income InequalityDownload PDF
by Schneck, Stefan

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

GLO Discussion Papers November 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) deals with the sources of inequality in East Africa. It concludes that promoting equity in education requires policies that go beyond raising average school quality and should attend to the distribution of school quality as well as assortative matching between households and schools.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: November

Anand, Paul & Behrman, Jere R. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Jones, Sam: 2018. “Inequality of Opportunity in Education: Accounting for the Contributions of Sibs, Schools and Sorting across East Africa,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 270, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE – Download PDF

Abstract: Inequalities in the opportunity to obtain a good education in low-income countries are widely understood to be related to household resources and schooling quality. Yet, to date, most researchers have investigated the contributions of these two factors separately. This paper considers them jointly, paying special attention to their covariation, which indicates whether schools exacerbate or compensate for existing household-based inequalities. The paper develops a new variance decomposition framework and applies it to data on more than one million children in three low-income East African countries. The empirical results show that although household factors account for a significant share of total test score variation, variation in school quality and positive sorting between households and schools are, together, no less important. The analysis also finds evidence of substantial geographical heterogeneity in schooling quality. The paper concludes that promoting equity in education in East Africa requires policies that go beyond raising average school quality and should attend to the distribution of school quality as well as assortative matching between households and schools.

GLO Discussion Papers of November 2018

280 The Financial Decisions of Immigrant and Native Households: Evidence from ItalyDownload PDF
by Bertocchi, Graziella & Brunetti, Marianna & Zaiceva, Anzelika

279 War and Social AttitudesDownload PDF
by Child, Travers Barclay & Nikolova, Elena

278 Younger and Dissatisfied? Relative Age and Life-satisfaction in AdolescenceDownload PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Baert, Stijn

277 Relative Age Effect on European Adolescents’ Social NetworkDownload PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Baert, Stijn

276 Work Hard or Play Hard? Degree Class, Student Leadership and Employment OpportunitiesDownload PDF
by Baert, Stijn & Verhaest, Diete

275 Industrial relations reform, firm-level bargaining and nominal wage floorsDownload PDF
by Giannakopoulosa, Nicholas & Laliotis, Ioannis

274 Labor supply and the business cycle: The “Bandwagon Worker Effect”Download PDF
by Martín Román, Ángel L. & Cuéllar-Martín, Jaime & Moral de Blas, Alfonso

273 Reaching the Top or Falling Behind? The Role of Occupational Segregation in Women’s Chances of Finding a High-Paying Job Over the Life-CycleDownload PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

272 Arrival of Young Talents: The Send-down Movement and Rural Education in ChinaDownload PDF
by Chen, Yi & Fan, Ziying & Gu, Xiaomin & Zhou, Li-An

271 Family Unification, Siblings, and SkillsDownload PDF
by Duleep, Harriet Orcutt & Regets, Mark

270 Inequality of Opportunity in Education: Accounting for the Contributions of Sibs, Schools and Sorting across East AfricaDownload PDF
by Anand, Paul & Behrman, Jere R. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Jones, Sam

269 Trade and capital flows: Substitutes or complements? An empirical investigationDownload PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Domnick, Clemens

268 Son Preference and Human Capital Investment Among China’s Rural-Urban Migrant HouseholdsDownload PDF
by Lin, Carl & Sun, Yan & Xing, Chunbing

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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GLO Discussion Papers October 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) presents a remarkable review of the growing economic and epidemiologic evidence linking air pollution, cognition performance and real-world decision making. All by a leading expert of the field, GLO Fellow & GLO Cluster Lead Xi Chen. Further, the paper relates to an outstanding GLO workshop in Hong Kong on climate change and human resources consequences.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: October

Chen, Xi: 2018. “Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision Making,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 266, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE – Download PDF

Abstract: Cognitive functioning is critical as in our daily life a host of real-world complex decisions in high-stakes markets have to be made. The decision-making process can be vulnerable to environmental stressors. Summarizing the growing economic and epidemiologic evidence linking air pollution, cognition performance and real-world decision making, we first illustrate key physiological and psychological pathways between air pollution and cognition. We then document the main patterns of air pollution affecting cognitive test performance by type of cognitive tests, gender, window of exposure, age profile, and educational attainment. We further extend to a review of real-world decision making that has been found to be affected by air pollution and the resulting cognitive impairments. Finally, rich implications on environmental health policies are drawn based on existing evaluations of social costs of air pollution.

GLO Discussion Papers of October 2018

267 New Education Models for the Future of Work ForceDownload PDF
by Pastore, Francesco

266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi

265 Drivers of Labor Force Participation in Advanced Economies: Macro and Micro EvidenceDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

264 A Cohort-Based Analysis of Labor Force Participation for Advanced EconomiesDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

263 Low, High and Super Congestion of an Open-Access Resource: Impact under Autarky and Trade, with Aquaculture as IllustrationDownload PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

262 Brain Drain-Induced Brain Gain and the Bhagwati Tax: Are Early and Recent Paradigms Compatible?Download PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

261 Labor Market and Institutional Drivers of Youth Irregular Migration: Evidence from the MENA RegionDownload PDF
by Dibeh, Ghassan & Fakih, Ali & Marrouch, Walid

260 Public versus Private Sector Wage Gap in Egypt: Evidence from Quantile Regression on Panel DataDownload PDF
by Tansel, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin

259 Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?Download PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

258 Marriage Market Signals and Homeownership for the Never MarriedDownload PDF
by Mundra, Kusum & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth

257 Economic impact of STEM immigrant workersDownload PDF
by Baum, Christopher F. & Lööf, Hans & Stephan, Andreas

256 Does Regulation Trade-Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction EngineersDownload PDF
by Rostam-Afschar, Davud & Strohmaier, Kristina

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

Is female breadwinning unhealthy for partnerships? Not broadly, says new evidence for the US and Australia

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month (see below) from all GLO DP’s of October (see below) presents new evidence on the association between female breadwinning and the quality of US and Australian partnerships and their stability. The good news is that it is not widely negatively related.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: October 2018

Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S., 2018. “Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 259, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Using Bertrand, Kamenica and Pan’s (2015) original data, we find that female breadwinning is significantly associated with partnership problems only for older women in cross sections, but for younger ones in fixed-effects specifications. In more recent US and Australian data, female breadwinning is associated with a modestly higher dissolution risk and a fall in some measures of reported relationship quality, but mainly for young people in cohabiting partnerships and men in less educated partnerships. We suggest our results reflect changing norms plus market dynamics arising from the ease of access to superior partnership alternatives for women who out-earn their partners.

GLO Discussion Papers of October 2018

267 New Education Models for the Future of Work ForceDownload PDF
by Pastore, Francesco

266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi

265 Drivers of Labor Force Participation in Advanced Economies: Macro and Micro EvidenceDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

264 A Cohort-Based Analysis of Labor Force Participation for Advanced EconomiesDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

263 Low, High and Super Congestion of an Open-Access Resource: Impact under Autarky and Trade, with Aquaculture as IllustrationDownload PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

262 Brain Drain-Induced Brain Gain and the Bhagwati Tax: Are Early and Recent Paradigms Compatible?Download PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

261 Labor Market and Institutional Drivers of Youth Irregular Migration: Evidence from the MENA RegionDownload PDF
by Dibeh, Ghassan & Fakih, Ali & Marrouch, Walid

260 Public versus Private Sector Wage Gap in Egypt: Evidence from Quantile Regression on Panel DataDownload PDF
by Tansel, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin

259 Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?Download PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

258 Marriage Market Signals and Homeownership for the Never MarriedDownload PDF
by Mundra, Kusum & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth

257 Economic impact of STEM immigrant workersDownload PDF
by Baum, Christopher F. & Lööf, Hans & Stephan, Andreas

256 Does Regulation Trade-Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction EngineersDownload PDF
by Rostam-Afschar, Davud & Strohmaier, Kristina

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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GLO Fellow Michele Bruni, Beijing, studies the long-term implications of demographic change for China

China is much younger than Europe, but ages much faster reaching and passing Europe in due course. Michele Bruni, EU Expert resident in Beijing and Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) analyzes the consequences of the significant demographic changes for the Chinese labor market and welfare.

GLO Fellow Michele Bruni, EU Expert, and  Resident in Beijing

GLO Discussion Paper No. 222 Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF
by Bruni, Michele

Abstract

China still lags behind Europe along the path of the demographic transition and therefore is still much younger. However, due to the speed with which the fertility rate dropped and life expectancy increased, China ageing process will proceed at a very fast space and around the middle of the century the population of China is projected to be as old as that of France and the UK and older than that of the USA. The paper evaluates the labor market and welfare implications of this process, also by an economic indicator of dependency and socioeconomic burden.

Interested in other GLO Discussion Papers?  The GLO DP series for free.

Interested in other research on China? Recent Papers on the Chinese Labor Market

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Recent Research Papers on the Chinese Labor Market

The School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China (Beijing) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) currently organize a joint conference on the Chinese Labor Market. The place on 20 and 21 October 2018 at Renmin University of China, Beijing. On Sunday October 21, Klaus F. Zimmermann, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and Honorary Professor at Renmin University will give a keynote speech on “Recent Labor Market Research on China”. In his presentation, he will draw on three sources: (i) His own published recent research work in the area, (ii) papers made available in 2017 & 2018 through the prominent GLO Discussion Paper series and (iii) the papers on China published in 2017-2018 and online 2019 In the Journal of Population Economics. Zimmermann is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics, the leading global academic journal of this field.

Klaus F. Zimmermann

A. RESEARCH PAPERS BY KLAUS F. ZIMMERMANN

Relative Concerns of Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 81 (2012), 421-441. (With A. Akay and O. Bargain.)

Self-Employment of Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, International Journal of Manpower, 33 (2012), 96-117.  (With C. Giulietti and G. Ning.)

China’s Latent Human Capital Investment: Achieving Milestones and Competing for the Top, Journal of Contemporary China, 22 (2013), 109-130. (With A. Constant, B. Tien and J. Meng.)

The RUMiC Longitudinal Survey: Fostering Research on Labor Markets in China, IZA Journal of Labor and Development, 3 (2014) (With M. Akgüc and C. Giulietti.)

Remittances and Well-Being among Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, Review of Economics of the Household, 12 (2014), 517-546. (With A. Akay, C. Giulietti and J.D. Robalino.)

Sibling Influence on the Human Capital of the Left Behind, Journal of Human Capital, 9 (2015), 403-438. (With C. Biavaschi and C. Giulietti.)

Remittances and Relative Concerns in Rural China, China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 191-207. (With A. Akay, O. Bargain, C. Guilietti and J. D. Robalino.)

Risk Attitudes and Migration, China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 166-176. (With M. Akgüc, X. Liu and M. Tani.)

B. RESEARCH PAPERS IN THE GLO DISCUSSION PAPER SERIES (DP numbers and links for free access): 2017 & 2018

Chi Chen, Yale University Zhong Zhao, Renmin University Michele Bruni, EU Expert

242 Unintended Consequences of China’s New Labor Contract Law on Unemployment and Welfare Loss of the WorkersDownload PDF
by Akee, Randall & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

238 Returns to higher education subjects and tiers in China – Evidence from the China Family Panel StudiesDownload PDF
by Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei & Zhu, Yu

222 Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF
by Bruni, Michele

204 The Power of the Government: China’s Family Planning Leading. Group and the Fertility Decline since 1970 – Download PDF
by Chen, Yi & Huang, Yingfei

177 Technological catching-up, sales dynamics and employment growth: evidence from China’s manufacturing firms – Download PDF
by Dosi, Giovanni & Yu, Xiaodan

159 Do Skewed Sex Ratios Among Children Promote Parental Smoking? Longitudinal Evidence from Rural China – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi

130 Do Migrant Students Affect Local Students’ Academic Achievements in Urban China? – Download PDF
by Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell

127 What Drives Spatial Clusters of Entrepreneurship in China? Evidence from Economic Census Data – Download PDF
by Zheng, Liang & Zhao, Zhong

120 Where Are Migrants from? Inter- vs. Intra-Provincial Rural-Urban Migration in China – Download PDF
by Su, Yaqin & Tesfazion, Petros & Zhao, Zhong

80 The Heterogeneous Impact of Pension Income on Elderly Living Arrangements: Evidence from China’s New Rural Pension Scheme – Download PDF
by Cheng, Lingguo & Liu, Hong & Zhang, Ye & Zhao, Zhong

56 Happiness in the Air: How Does a Dirty Sky Affect Mental Health and Subjective Well-being? – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xiaobo & Chen, Xi

53 The Impact of Social Pensions on Intergenerational Relationships: Comparative Evidence from China Download the PDF
by Chen, Xi & Eggleston, Karen & Ang, Sun

37 On the exposure of the BRIC countries to global economic shocks  – Download PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Dreger, Christian & Dubova, Irina

32 Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance  – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin

C. PAPERS PUBLISHED IN THE JOURNAL OF POPULATION ECONOMICS: 2017-2019

Journal of Population Economics

Three decades of publishing research in population economics by Alessio J. G. Brown & Klaus F. Zimmermann; Journal of Population Economics (2017) 30: 1, 11–27

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Report of the Editor-in-Chief, 2018

ONLINE forthcoming

How does internal migration affect the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind? By Juliane Scheffel, Yiwei Zhang

The dragon cohort of Hong Kong: traditional beliefs, demographics, and education by Yan Lau

PUBLISHED 2018

Informal search, bad search?: The effects of job search method on wages among rural migrants in urban China by Yuanyuan Chen, Le Wang, Min Zhang; Vol. 31:3, 837-876

The intergenerational education spillovers of pension reform in China by Cheng Yuan, Chengjian Li, Lauren A. Johnston; Vol. 31:3, 671-701

Run away? Air pollution and emigration interests in China by Yu Qin, Hongjia Zhu; Vol. 31: 1, 235-266

The heterogeneous impact of pension income on elderly living arrangements: evidence from China’s new rural pension scheme by Lingguo Cheng, Hong Liu, Ye Zhang, Zhong Zhao; Vol. 31: 1, 155-192

PUBLISHED 2017

Quality of migrant schools in China: evidence from a longitudinal study in Shanghai by Yuanyuan Chen, Shuaizhang Feng; Vol. 30:3, 1007-1034

Sibling gender composition’s effect on education: evidence from China by Xiaoyan Lei, Yan Shen, James P. Smith, Guangsu Zhou; Vol. 30:2, 569-590

China’s family planning policies and their labor market consequences by Fei Wang, Liqiu Zhao, Zhong Zhao; Vol 30:1, 31-68

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GLO Discussion Papers September 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) presents a new method to estimate non-pecuniary returns to adult education.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: September

Ruhose, Jens & Thomsen, Stephan L. & Weilage, Insa, 2018. “The Wider Benefits of Adult Learning: Work-Related Training and Social Capital,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 250, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: We propose a regression-adjusted matched difference-in-differences framework to estimate non-pecuniary returns to adult education. This approach combines kernel matching with entropy balancing to account for selection bias and sorting on gains. Using data from the German SOEP, we evaluate the effect of work-related training, which represents the largest portion of adult education in OECD countries, on individual social capital. Training increases participation in civic, political, and cultural activities while not crowding out social participation. Results are robust against a variety of potentially confounding explanations. These findings imply positive externalities from work-related training over and above the well-documented labor market effects.

GLO Discussion Papers of September 2018

255 Natural hazards and internal migration: The role of transient versus permanent shocksDownload PDF
by Pavel, Tanvir & Hasan, Syed & Halim, Nafisa & Mozumder, Pallab

254 Globalization, Structural Change and Innovation in Emerging Economies : The Impact on Employment and SkillsDownload PDF
by Vivarelli, Marco

253 The Impact of Compulsory Schooling on Earnings. Evidence from the 1999 Education Reform in PolandDownload PDF
by Liwiński, Jacek

252 Transitioning towards more equality? Wealth gender differences and the changing role of explanatory factors over timeDownload PDF
by Sierminska, Eva & Piazzalunga, Daniela & Grabka, Markus M.

251 The Wage Premium from Foreign Language SkillsDownload PDF
by Liwiński, Jacek

250 The Wider Benefits of Adult Learning: Work-Related Training and Social CapitalDownload PDF
by Ruhose, Jens & Thomsen, Stephan L. & Weilage, Insa

249 Social Cohesion and Labor MobilityDownload PDF
by Zimmermann, Klaus F.

248 Fertility Transitions in Developing Countries: Convergence, Timing, and CausesDownload PDF
by Papagni, Erasmo

247 Country of Origin, Earnings Convergence, and Human Capital Investment: A New Method for the Analysis of U.S. Immigrant Economic AssimilationDownload PDF
by Duleep, Harriet & Liu, Xingfei & Regets, Mark

246 Who Benefits from Local Oil and Gas Employment? Labor Market Composition in the Oil and Gas Industry in TexasDownload PDF
by Cai, Zhengyu & Maguire, Karen & Winters, John V.

245 The effect of self-employment on health: Instrumental variables analysis of longitudinal social security dataDownload PDF
by Gonçalves, Judite & Martins, Pedro S.

244 The effect of culture on home-ownershipDownload PDF
by Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

243 Is Unemployment on Steroids in Advanced Economies?Download PDF
by Di Bella, Gabriel & Grigoli, Francesco & Ramírez, Francisco

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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GLO Discussion Papers August 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: August

Drydakis, Nick, 2018. “School-age bullying, workplace bullying and job satisfaction: Experiences of LGB people in Britain,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 237, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Using a data set that contains information on retrospective school-age bullying, as well as on workplace bullying in the respondents’ present job, the outcomes of this study suggest that bullying, when it is experienced by sexual orientation minorities tends to persist over time. According to the estimations, it seems that school-age bullying of LGB people is associated with victims’ lower educational level and occupational sorting into non-white-collar jobs, especially for gay/bisexual men. In addition, the outputs suggest that for both gay/bisexual men and lesbian/bisexual women, school-age bullying is positively associated with workplace bullying and negatively associated with job satisfaction. Additional results suggest a negative association between workplace bullying and job satisfaction. However, the outcomes show a positive association between the existence of an LGBT group in the workplace and job satisfaction.

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge & GLO) is the Lead of the GLO ClusterGender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes“.

With GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, Nick Drydakis is editing a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market“. For Details. Submissions will be accepted until March 30, 2019.

GLO Discussion Papers of August 2018

242 Unintended Consequences of China’s New Labor Contract Law on Unemployment and Welfare Loss of the WorkersDownload PDF
by Akee, Randall & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

241 The labour-augmented K+S model: a laboratory for the analysis of institutional and policy regimesDownload PDF
by Dosi, G. & Pereira, M. C. & Roventini, A. & Virgillito, M. E.

240 Workers’ awareness context in Italian 4.0 factoriesDownload PDF
by Cirillo, Valeria & Rinaldini, Matteo & Staccioli, Jacopo & Virgillito, Maria Enrica

239 From Engineer to Taxi Driver? Language Proficiency and the Occupational Skills of ImmigrantsDownload PDF
by Imai, Susumu & Stacey, Derek & Warman, Casey

238 Returns to higher education subjects and tiers in China – Evidence from the China Family Panel StudiesDownload PDF
by Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei & Zhu, Yu

237 School-age bullying, workplace bullying and job satisfaction: Experiences of LGB people in BritainDownload PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

236 When the market drives you crazy: Stock market returns and fatal car accidentsDownload PDF
by Giulietti, Corrado & Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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GLO research initiatives on “Sexual Orientation and Work” & “Gender-based Violence”

The GLO Cluster Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes headed by GLO Cluster Lead Nick Drydakis focuses on the state of being man or woman (gender), which is typically used with reference to masculinity vs femininity rather than sex, the internal and personal conception of oneself as man or woman (gender identity), and sexual preferences (sexual orientation) and their effects on wages, employment levels, occupational sorting, and workplace evaluations. What is seen as gender-appropriate can change over time, and gender assumptions are interpolated by cultural, historical and regional location.

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

GLO Cluster Lead Nick Drydakis

Among a number of activities (MORE), the GLO Cluster has prepared:

  • A Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market“. For Details.
  • A number of GLO Discussion Papers on “Gender-Based Violence“.

Gender – based violence is a very serious but under-researched issue.

Researchers affiliated with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have now provided a number of scientific papers to respond to this challenge. Read the following abstracts of those contributions. Download and read the affiliated work.

GLO DP 171: A fuzzy approach to measuring violence against women and its severity – Download PDF
by Bettio, Francesca & Ticci, Elisa & Betti, Gianni

  • We develop a scale of severity of violence against women based on fuzzy set theory. The scale can be used to derive fuzzy indexes of violence which account for the prevalence, frequency and severity of violence. Using the results of the survey conducted by the European Agency for Human Rights (FRA) we find strong congruence of ranking between the proposed scale and three widely used alternatives – the Conflict Tactic Scale, The Severity of Violence Against Women Scale and the Index of Spouse Abuse. Unlike existing alternatives, however, the scale that we propose is based on objective information rather than subjective assessment; it is parsimonious in terms of the amount of information that it requires; and it is less vulnerable to risks of cultural bias. As an example of the uses to which fuzzy measurement of violence can be put, we compute fuzzy indexes of intimate partner violence for European countries and find a clear, inverse correlation across countries with the degree of gender equality.

GLO DP 109: Male Education and Domestic Violence in Turkey: Evidence from a Natural Experiment – Download PDF
by Özer, Mustafa & Fidrmuc, Jan

  • We utilize a natural experiment, an education reform increasing compulsory schooling from five to eight years in Turkey, to obtain endogeneity-robust estimates of the effect of male education on the incidence of abusive and violent behaviour against women. We find that husband`s education lowers the probability of suffering physical, emotional and economic violence. The only aspect of violence not affected by spouse`s education is sexual violence. Schooling also lowers the likelihood that the marriage was arranged against the woman`s will, and makes men less inclined to engage in socially unacceptable behaviours such as drinking, gambling, and drug abuse. We also find that women whose mothers or whose husbands’ mothers experienced domestic violence are more likely to suffer violence themselves.

GLO DP 107: Attitudes towards intimate partner violence against women in Latin America – Download PDF
by Bucheli, Marisa & Rossi, Máximo

  • In this paper we analyze the factors that explain attitudes towards intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW) in 23 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Analyses of IPVAW in LAC are relatively scarce although there is growing concern about this problem in the region. We aim to assess the effect of individual and country characteristics using data from common sources for all countries. This work contributes to the sparse literature dealing with methods that attempt to assess the effect of macro variables. We perform a two-step procedure. We first estimate a logit model at the individual level, we calculate a measure of relative approval of IPVAW at country level and we use this measure as a dependent variable to estimate the effect of macro variables. Our study finds that most LAC patterns at individual level are similar to the international ones: approval of IPVAW is higher among women, people in rural areas, people in a disadvantaged socio-economic situation and individuals with some particular cultural characteristics. Unlikely international evidence, attitudes do not differ between ages. Our findings at country level show that approval of IPVAW increases with poverty, fertility rate and equal gender outcomes. It decreases with internet access and, with a lesser degree of robustness, with the time elapsed since the enactment of women’s suffrage. The most novel contribution of our work is the study of the variables at country level.

GLO DP 96 Stigma of Sexual Violence and Womens Decision to Work – Download PDF
by Chakraborty, Tanika & Mukherjee, Anirban & Rachapalli,Swapnika Reddy &Saha, Sarani

  • Our study is motivated by two disturbing evidences concerning women in India. On one hand, crime against women is on the rise while on the other, women’s labor force participation rate (WLFPR) has been declining over the last three decades. We estimate the extent to which the decline in WLFPR can be assigned to increasing instances of crime against women. We argue that an increase in crime against women, increases the non-pecuniary costs of traveling to work, particularly in a traditional society marked by stigma against victims of sexual crimes. Our findings suggest that women are less likely to work away from home in regions where the perceived threat of sexual harassment against girls is higher. The estimate is robust to various sensitivity checks. Moreover, the deterrence effect of crime responds to the opportunity cost of work on one hand and the stigma cost of sexual crimes on the other.

GLO Discussion Papers
GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers July 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: July

Goel, Deepti & Deshpande, Ashwini, 2018. “Social Identity and Perceived Income Adequacy,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 232, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Economists are increasingly interested in subjective well-being, but the economic literature on perceptions of income adequacy, which is one of the factors that shapes subjective well-being, is small. Our paper fills this lacuna in the literature. We utilize nationally representative data on perceptions of amounts considered as remunerative earnings from self-employment in India, and examine how these are shaped by social identity, namely, caste. We also investigate if institutional change such as the introduction of an employment guarantee scheme alters these perceptions. Finally, we examine the relationship between caste identity and actual earnings. We find that caste identity does shape both perceptions of income adequacy as well as actual earnings: lower-ranked groups perceive lower amounts as being remunerative, and also earn lower amounts. Further, the employment guarantee scheme alters self-perceptions differentially for different caste groups, but in more nuanced ways than our ex-ante beliefs.

GLO Discussion Papers of July 2018

235 Selling hope? A review of current youth unemployment initiatives in CairoDownload PDF
by Pettit, Harry

234 Defining and Measuring Workforce Development in the United States in a Post-Bipartisan EraDownload PDF
by Holland, Brian

233 Flexible Work Organization and Employer Provided Training: Evidence from German Linked Employer-Employee DataDownload PDF
by Campaner, Annika & Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe

232 Social Identity and Perceived Income AdequacyDownload PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Deshpande, Ashwini

231 Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in DelhiDownload PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Barooah, Bidisha

230 Reflections on wage-settingDownload PDF
by Zimmermann, Klaus F.

229 Will you marry me? It depends (on the business cycle)Download PDF
by Bellido, Héctor & Marcén, Miriam

228 Immigration and the Health of Older Natives in Western EuropeDownload PDF
by Escarce, José J. & Rocco, Lorenzo

227 The Effects of Political Reservations on Credit Access and Borrowing Composition: New Evidence from IndiaDownload PDF
by Ao, Chon-Kit & Chatterjee, Somdeep

226 Self-Employment Can Be Good for Your HealthDownload PDF
by Nikolova, Milena

225 What Women Want (their men to do): Housework and satisfaction in Australian householdsDownload PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

224 My Choice: Female Contraceptive Use Autonomy in BangladeshDownload PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo

223 The Long-Run and Gender-Equalizing Impacts of School Access: Evidence from the First Indochina WarDownload PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Hoang, Trung X. & Nguyen, Ha

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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New GLO Discussion Paper investigates how life satisfaction of couples relates to the allocation of housework between them.

Does a fairer allocation of housework make her feel better? A new research paper by Gigi Foster (University of New South Wales) and Leslie S. Stratton (Virginia Commonwealth University) on housework is just freely available as a Global Labor Organization (GLO) Discussion Paper. A core finding of the study is that “when he exceeds housework norms, she is happier with housework allocations, but is less happy in broader dimensions.”

Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S. (2018) : What Women Want (their men to do): Housework and satisfaction in Australian households, GLO Discussion Paper, No. 225. PDF Free Download.

Abstract: The time allocated to household chores is substantial, with the burden falling disproportionately upon women. Further, social norms about how much housework men and women should contribute are likely to influence couples’ housework allocation decisions and satisfaction. Using Australian data spanning the years 2001-2014, we employ a two-stage estimation procedure to examine how deviations from housework norms relate to couples’ satisfaction. We find that satisfaction is negatively affected by predicted housework time, and that women’s satisfaction, but not men’s, is robustly affected by their partners’ residual housework time. When he exceeds housework norms, she is happier with housework allocations, but less happy in broader dimensions. We suggest several reasons for our results, including that housework is more salient in women’s lives than in men’s, that housework in general is not a preferred activity, and that some degree of gender-norm conformity in regard to housework can positively affect women’s life satisfaction.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers June 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: June

Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2018. “Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 215, Global Labor Organization (GLO). PDF Free Download. Forthcoming: Journal of Population Economics

Abstract: This paper studies the effects of immigration on the allocation of occupational physical burden and work injury risks. Using data for England and Wales from the Labour Force Survey (2003-2013), we find that, on average, immigration leads to a reallocation of UK-born workers towards jobs characterized by lower physical burden and injury risk. The results also show important differences across skill groups. Immigration reduces the average physical burden of UK-born workers with medium levels of education, but has no significant effect on those with low levels. We also find that that immigration led to an improvement of self-reported measures of native workers’ health. These findings, together with the evidence that immigrants report lower injury rates than natives, suggest that the reallocation of tasks could reduce overall health care costs and the human and financial costs typically associated with workplace injuries.

GLO Discussion Papers of June 2018

222 Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF
by Bruni, Michele

221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar

220 Unemployment and Marital Breakdown: The Spanish Case – Download PDF
by González-Val, Rafael & Marcén, Miriam

219 Self-employment as a stepping stone to better labour market matching: a comparison between immigrants and natives – Download PDF
by Ulceluse, Magdalena

218 The Role of Human Capital Resources in East African Economies – Download PDF
by Urgaia, Worku R

217 The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls – Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna

216 A parsimonious model of longevity, fertility, HIV transmission and development – Download PDF
by Gori, Luca & Manfredi, Piero & Sodini, Mauro

215 Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks – Download PDF
by Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos

214 R&D, Embodied Technological Change and Employment: Evidence from Spain – Download PDF
by Pellegrino, Gabriele & Piva, Mariacristina & Vivarelli, Marco

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

 

GLO Discussion Papers May 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: May

Nikolova, Milena; Nikolaev, Boris N., Family matters: involuntary parental unemployment during childhood and subjective well-being later in life, GLO Discussion Paper No. 212, May 2018. Free download.

Abstract: We are the first to examine how parental unemployment experienced during early-, mid- and late-childhood affects adult life satisfaction. Using German household panel data, we find that parental unemployment induced by plant closures and experienced during early (0-5 years) and late (11-15 years) childhood leads to lower life satisfaction at ages 18-31. Nevertheless, parental unemployment can also have a positive effect depending on the age and gender of the child. Our results are robust even after controlling for local unemployment, individual and family characteristics, parental job loss expectations, financial resources, and parents’ working time when growing up. These findings imply that the adverse effects associated with parental unemployment experienced at a young age tend to last well into young adulthood and are more nuanced than previously thought.

GLO Discussion Papers of May 2018

213 Microsimulation Analysis of Optimal Income Tax Reforms. An Application to New Zealand – Download PDF
by Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Hérault, Nicolas & Mok, Penny

212 Family matters: involuntary parental unemployment during childhood and subjective well-being later in life – Download PDF
by Nikolova, Milena & Nikolaev, Boris N.

211 Just Like A Woman? New Comparative Evidence on the Gender Income Gap across Eastern Europe and Central Asia – Download PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo

210 National Identity under Economic Integration – Download PDF
by Chiang, Chun-Fang & Liu, Jin-Tan & Wen, Tsai-Wei

209 A nudge to quit? The effect of a change in pension information on annuitization, labor supply and retirement choices among older workers – Download PDF
by Hagen, Johannes & Hallberg, Daniel & Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella

208 The Last of the Lost Generations? Formal and Non-Formal Education in Ghana during Times of Economic Decline and Recovery – Download PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Hammer, Jeffrey S.

Successful GLO team:
GLO Managing Director Matloob Piracha (University of Kent, right) and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University, left).

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GLO Discussion Papers April 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

Discussion Paper of the Month: April

Djankov, Simeon & Nikolova, Elena, Communism as the Unhappy Coming, GLO Discussion Paper No. 192, April 2018. Free download.

Abstract:  We show that Eastern Orthodox believers are less happy compared to those of Catholic and Protestant faith using data covering more than 100 countries around the world. Consistent with the happiness results, we also find that relative to Catholics, Protestants and non-believers, those of Eastern Orthodox religion have less social capital and prefer old ideas and safe jobs. In addition, Orthodoxy is associated with left-leaning political preferences and stronger support for government involvement in the economy. Compared to non-believers and Orthodox adherents, Catholics and Protestants are less likely to agree that government ownership is a good thing, and Protestants are less likely to agree that getting rich can only happen at the expense of others. These differences in life satisfaction and other attitudes and values persisted despite the fact that communist elites sought to eradicate church-going in Eastern Europe, since communists maintained many aspects of Orthodox theology which were useful for the advancement of the communist doctrine. The findings are consistent with Berdyaev’s (1933, 1937) hypothesis of communism as a successor of Orthodoxy.

GLO Discussion Papers of April 2018

207 How valid are synthetic panel estimates of poverty dynamics? – Download PDF
by Hérault, Nicolas & Jenkins, Stephen P.

206 Selective immigration policies, occupational licensing, and the quality of migrants’ education-occupation match – Download PDF
by Tani, Massimiliano

205 Long-Term Relatedness between Countries and International Migrant Selection – Download PDF
by Krieger, Tim & Renner, Laura & Ruhose, Jens

204 The Power of the Government: China’s Family Planning Leading. Group and the Fertility Decline since 1970 – Download PDF
by Chen, Yi & Huang, Yingfei

203 Impact of delivering iron-fortified salt through a school feeding program on child health, education and cognition: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial in rural India – Download PDF
by Krämer, Marion & Kumar, Santosh & Vollmer, Sebastian

202 And Thou Shalt Honor: children’s caregiving, work and religion – Download PDF
by Mazzotta, Fernanda & Bettio, Francesca & Zigante, Valentina

201 To Impute or Not to Impute? A Review of Alternative Poverty Estimation Methods in the Context of Unavailable Consumption Data – Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H.

200 From Elitist to Sustainable Earnings: Is there a group legitimacy in financial flows? – Download PDF
by Charles, Aurelie & Vujić, Sunčica

199 Hours Worked of the Self-Employed and Agglomeration – Download PDF
by Cai, Zhengyu

198 A Tale of Two Tracks – Download PDF
by Asali, Muhammad

197 Growth Dynamics of Young Small Firms: Evidence from Tunisia – Download PDF
by Arouri, Hassan & Ben Youssef, Adel & Quatraro, Francesco & Vivarelli, Marco

196 Immigrant Category of Admission and the Earnings of Adults and Children: How far does the Apple Fall? – Download PDF
by Warman, Casey & Webb, Matthew D. & Worswick, Christopher

195 The Effects of Foreign Aid on Refugee Flows – Download PDF
by Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Langlotz, Sarah

194 Will Urban Migrants Formally Insure their Rural Relatives? Family Networks and Rainfall Index Insurance in Burkina Faso – Download PDF
by Kazianga, Harounan & Wahhaj, Zaki

193 The Impact of Compulsory Education on Employment and Earnings in a Transition Economy – Download PDF
by Liwiński, Jacek

192 Communism as the Unhappy Coming – Download PDF
by Djankov, Simeon & Nikolova, Elena

191 Towards a European Full Employment Policy – Download PDF
by Ritzen, Jo & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

 

Successful GLO team:

GLO Managing Director Matloob Piracha (University of Kent, right) and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University, left).

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New Research Shows: Small, Young Companies are Driving Job Creation – Also in Tunisia

Due to its huge relevance, the relationship between firm size, firm growth and firm job creation is heavily debated in the industrial organization literature. A core theorem in this context has been Gibrat’s law suggesting that the proportional rate of growth of a firm is independent of its absolute size (Gibrat, 1931). However,  the existing studies (mostly for developed countries) are rejecting Gibrat’s law by finding that smaller and younger firms grow more than larger and older ones.

In a new Discussion Paper of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Hassan Arouri, Adel Ben Youssef, Francesco Quatraro and Marco Vivarelli show that this result is also found in the development context using data for Tunisia. The implication again is that small and young companies drive job creation, suggesting priority for those firms for receiving  public  support.

Hassan Arouri is associated  with the National Institute of Statistics, Tunisia.
Adel Ben Youssef is associated  with the University of Nice Sophia, Antipolis and GREDEG-CNRS, France.
Francesco Quatraro is associated  with the University of Torino and Collegio Carlo Alberto, Torino, Italy.
GLO Fellow Marco Vivarelli is associated  with the Universita’ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.

Hassan Arouri, Adel Ben Youssef, Francesco Quatraro & Marco Vivarelli, Growth Dynamics of Young Small Firms: Evidence from Tunisia, GLO Discussion Paper No. 197.  FREE DOWNLOAD: Download PDF

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper is to investigate the growth dynamics of young small firms (in contrast with  larger  and  older  incumbents)  in  a  developing  country  context,  using  a  unique  and comprehensive  dataset  of  non-agricultural  Tunisian  companies.  Our  results  suggest  that significant differences between  young and mature firms can be found as far as the drivers of their growth  are  concerned.  The  key  finding  being  that -while  consistently  with  the  extant literature  Gibrat’s  law  is  overall  rejected -the  negative  impact  of  the  initial  size  is significantly   larger   for   young   than   mature   firms.   This   result   has   interesting   policy implications: since smaller young firms are particularly conducive to employment generation, they  can  be  considered  good  candidate  for  targeted  accompanying  policies  addressed  to sustain their post-entry growth.

Titles and free access to all GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: Selective Labor Immigration Policies Matter in Canada

Europe is discussing how to improve the labor market performance of economic migrants and their integration chances. The Canadian immigration system is often seen as a model case. Is there an earnings benefit depending on the selection channel under the economic classe? In a new Discussion Paper of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Casey Warman, Matthew D. Webb and Christopher Worswick provide strong empirical evidence that selection matters. Using Canadian data sources they find that relative to the Family Class, the Adult Arrivals in the Skilled Worker category have earnings that are 29% higher for men and 38% higher for women.  Child Arrival immigrants landing in the Skilled Worker Class have similar earnings advantages.

GLO Fellow Casey Warman is associated with the Department of Economics, Dalhousie University and NBER.

GLO Fellow Matthew D. Webb is associated with the Department of Economics, Carleton University

GLO Fellow Christopher Worswick is associated  with the Department of Economics, Carleton University and CReAM

Casey Warman, Matthew D. Webb & Christopher Worswick: Immigrant Category of Admission and the Earnings of Adults and Children: How far does the Apple Fall? GLO Discussion Paper No. 196.  FREE DOWNLOAD: Download PDF

ABSTRACT

Immigrants  in  many  Western  countries  have  experienced  poor  economic  outcomes. This has led to a lack of integration of child immigrants (the 1.5 generation) and the second generation in some countries.  However, in Canada, child immigrants and the second generation have on average integrated very well economically.  The study examines the importance of Canada’s admission classes to determine if there is an earnings benefit of the selection under the Economic Classes to:  (i) the Adult Arrival immigrants and (ii) the Child Arrival immigrants (1.5 generation) once old enough to enter the labor market.  The study employs unique administrative data on landing records matched with subsequent  income  tax  records  that  also  allows  for  the  linking  of  the  records  of  Adult Arrival parents and their Child Arrival children.  It is found that relative to the Family Class, the Adult Arrivals in the Skilled Worker category have earnings that are 29% higher for men and 38% higher for women.  These differences persist even after controlling for  detailed  personal  characteristics  such  as  education  and  language  fluency  at  21% for men and 27% for women. Child Arrival immigrants landing in the Skilled Worker Class have earnings advantages (as adults) over their Family Class counterparts of 17% for men and 21% for women.  These Child Arrival Skilled Worker advantages remain at 9% for men and 14% for women after controlling for child characteristics, the Principal Applicant parent’s characteristics and the parent’s subsequent income in Canada. (Abstract marginally adapted from the DP.)

The paper is forthcoming in the Journal of Population Economics. The responsible Editor has been Klaus F. Zimmermann.

The study is in line with earlier research on entry category effects of migrant’s labor market performance. For an analysis see a recent review paper:

Zimmermann, Klaus F., Refugee and Migrant Labor Market Integration: Europe in Need of a New Policy Agenda. Mimeo. Presented at the EUI Conference on the Integration of Migrants and Refugees, 29-30 September 2016 in Florence. Published in: Bauböck, R. and Tripkovic, M.,  The Integration of Migrants and Refugees.  An EUI Forum on Migration, Citizenship and Demography, European University Institute, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, Florence 2017, pp. 88 – 100.

Titles and free access to all GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

Journal of Population Economics

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Does Foreign Aid Stop Refugee Flows? New Evidence for the Policy Debate From a New GLO Paper

In the recent heated public debates in Europe about how to control refugee flows to Europe, it is often argued that foreign aid should be helpful to moderate such migration. In a new Discussion Paper of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Axel Dreher, Andreas Fuchs and Sarah Langlotz provide strong empirical evidence using global data sources to suggest that while exogenous aid encourages recipient governments to support the return of citizens, we find no evidence that aid reduces worldwide refugee outflows in the short term; however, the authors find effects in the very long run.

GLO Fellow Axel Dreher  is associated  with the Alfred-Weber-Institute for Economics, Heidelberg University; KOF Swiss Economic Institute; CEPR; Georg-August University Goettingen; and CESifo.

GLO Fellow Andreas Fuchs is associated with the Research Center for Distributional Conflict and Globalization & Alfred-Weber-Institute for Economics, Heidelberg University.

GLO Fellow Sarah Langlotz is associated  with the Alfred-Weber-Institute for Economics, Heidelberg University.

Axel Dreher, Andreas Fuchs & Sarah Langlotz: The Effects of Foreign Aid on Refugee Flows, GLO Discussion Paper No. 195.  FREE DOWNLOAD: Download PDF

ABSTRACT

This article is the first to systematically study whether foreign aid affects the net flows of refugees from recipient countries. Combining refugee data on 141 origin countries over the 1976-2013 period with bilateral Official Development Assistance data, we estimate the causal effects of a country’s aid receipts on both total refugee flows to the world and flows to donor countries. The interaction of donor-government fractionalization and a recipient country’s probability of receiving aid provides a powerful and excludable instrumental variable,when we control for country – and time-fixed effects that capture the levels of the interacted variables. Although our results suggest that exogenous aid induces recipient governments to encourage the return of their citizens, we find no evidence that aid reduces worldwide refugee outflows or flows to donor countries in the short term. However, we observe long-run effects after four three-year periods, which appear to be driven by lagged positive effects of aid on growth. (Abstract marginally adapted from the DP.)

The study is in line with earlier research on South-North refugee migration. As Rotte, Vogler and Zimmermann (1997) have shown in their econometric analysis using refugee migration data to Germany, the issue had been discussed before. Short-term measures would not work, a long-term perspective would be needed.

Ralph Rotte, Michael Vogler & Klaus F. Zimmermann (1997), South-North Refugee Migration: Lessons for Development Cooperation, Review of Development Economics, 1 (1), pp. 99-115. Access.

Abstract: Migration has become a major concern of European development policies. By improving socio-economic and political conditions through development cooperation, a reduction of South-North migration flows is envisaged. This new approach is examined by analyzing the causes of asylum migration from developing countries to Germany. The econometric findings suggest that support of democracy, economic development and trade will not reduce migration, at least not in the medium-run. However, restrictive legal measures work. Migration control by international development cooperation therefore seems to need a long-term perspective.

Titles and free access to all GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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European Development Research Network publish special issue on Migration & Development: Research & Policy

A high-profile workshop organized by the European Development Research Network focused on how migration and migration policies can affect economic development and studied the policies that strengthen the benefits of migration for both sending and receiving countries. The event took place at Bonn University on December 5, 2016 under the leadership of Stephan Klasen (University of Goettingen), the President of the European Development Research Network.

The keynote speaker of the event had been Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and ZEF, Bonn University), who is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

GLO Discussion Paper No. 70 Migration for Development: From Challenges to Opportunities – Download PDF

by Klaus F. Zimmermann

Background paper to the keynote presentations to the European Development Conference 2016 on “Migration and Development” at Bonn University, December 5, 2016, and to the 22. Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) Conference, May 24-26, 2017 at Sapienza University of Rome.

The papers of this event have now been published in French and English in the Revue D’Économie Du Développement collecting also articles of GLO Fellows Hillel Rapoport (Paris School of Economics), Dean Yang (University of Michigan) and Tommaso Frattini (Milan University) and were discussed, among others, by GLO Fellows Toman Barsbai (Kiel Institute for the World Economy) and Melissa Siegel (Maastricht Graduate School of Governance and UNU-Merit). (See for more details below.)

 

 

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Romanian evidence on fertility preferences: How the 1966 abortion ban has affected next-generation demand for children

How do fertility preferences transfer between generations within families? In a new Discussion Paper of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), GLO Fellow Federico H. Gutierrez (Vanderbilt University) provides evidence using a historical event, the 1966 abortion ban in Romania. Current fertility preferences of individuals are negatively affected by parental experiences with the ban.

Federico H. Gutierrez: The Inter-generational Fertility Effect of an Abortion Ban: Understanding the Role of Inherited Wealth and Preferences, GLO Discussion Paper No. 167FREE DOWNLOAD.

ABSTRACT

This paper studies to what extent banning first-generation women from aborting affected the fertility of second-generation individuals who did not face such legal constraint. Using multiple censuses from Romania, the paper follows men and women born around the 1966 Romanian abortion ban to study the demand for children over their life cycle. The empirical approach combines elements of the regressions discontinuity design and the Heckman’s selection model. Results indicate that second-generation individuals whose mothers were affected by the ban had a significantly lower demand for children. One-third of such decline is explained by inherited socio-economic status and two-thirds presumably by preferences. (Abstract marginally adapted from the DP.)


Titles and free access to all GLO Discussion Paper


GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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Eastern Orthodox believers are less happy and have less social capital, a new GLO study shows.

Relative to Catholics, Protestants and non-believers, those individuals of Eastern Orthodox religion seem to be less happy, have less social capital and prefer old ideas and safe jobs. In a new Discussion Paper of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Simeon Djankov and Elena Nikolova provide strong empirical evidence using global data sources to suggest that this is support for the received Berdyaev hypothesis of communism as a successor of orthodoxy.

Simeon Djankov  is associated  with the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK and the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics, USA.

GLO Fellow Elena Nikolova is associated with the Central European Labor Studies Institute, Slovakia, the Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburg, Germany, and University College London.

Simeon Djankov & Elena Nikolova: Communism as the Unhappy Coming, GLO Discussion Paper No. 192FREE DOWNLOAD.

ABSTRACT

Eastern Orthodox believers are less happy compared to those of Catholic and Protestant faith using data covering more than 100 countries around the world. Consistent with the happiness results, the study also finds that relative to Catholics, Protestants and non-believers, those of Eastern Orthodox religion have less social capital and prefer old ideas and safe jobs. In addition, Orthodoxy is associated with left-leaning political preferences and stronger support for government involvement in the economy. Compared to non-believers and Orthodox adherents, Catholics and Protestants are less likely to agree that government ownership is a good, and Protestants are less likely to agree that getting rich can only happen at the expense of others. These differences in life satisfaction and other attitudes and values persisted despite the fact that communist elites sought to eradicate church-going in Eastern Europe, since communists maintained many aspects of Orthodox theology which were useful for the advancement of the communist doctrine. The findings are consistent with Berdyaev’s (1933, 1937) hypothesis of communism as a successor of Orthodoxy. (Abstract marginally adapted from the DP.)

Titles and free access to all GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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A Full Employment Strategy for Europe: New GLO Discussion Paper of Ritzen & Zimmermann

Why not be more ambitious? Ritzen and Zimmermann suggest coordinated labor policies for a European full employment strategy.

Jo Ritzen is Professor of International Economics of Science, Technology and Higher Education, Maastricht University, UNU‐MERIT, Graduate School of Governance. Klaus F. Zimmermann is Professor, UNU‐MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University; President, Global Labor Organization (GLO) and Research Fellow, CEPR.

Since years, Ritzen and Zimmermann have discussed the development of the European labor markets as a core factor behind Euroscepticism, which has been seen as posing an existential threat to the European Union. Therefore, European labor policies need to become more ambitious to fight unemployment. In their new discussion paper, Ritzen and Zimmermann outline the challenges and perspectives of a full employment policy across Europe: “We need a full employment strategy for Europe!”

Jo Ritzen & Klaus F. Zimmermann: Towards a European Full Employment Policy, GLO Discussion Paper No. 191 FREE DOWNLOAD.

ABSTRACT

Full employment in the European Union member states is a challenge but feasible, also in downswings of the business cycle and during stages of increased robotization. It requires labor legislation that ensures flexibility and retraining, responsive labor sharing during the business cycle and to individual life cycle needs, government interventions to supply supplemental employment and revamping dual education. The future of work is better ensured with coordinated European full employment labor policies establishing fair work conditions based on long-run business strategies as well as a fair distribution of national income between labor and capital.

http://www.klausfzimmermann.de/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/20180328_115952-2.jpg

Jo Ritzen (right) and Klaus F. Zimmermann at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht.

In 2017, Jo Ritzen has published a related book on: A Second Chance for Europe. Economic, Political and Legal Perspectives of the European Union, Springer Verlag Heidelberg.

Titles and free access to all GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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