Category Archives: Post-18

GLO President Zimmermann is also EBES President

As of 1 January 2019, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann also serves as the President of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES). EBES is a non-partisan, scholarly association dedicated to the discussion and publication of business and economics research and aims to advance the economic and business knowledge and the profession. EBES encourages plurality, freedom of expression and multidisciplinary. While the focus of EBES is the Eurasia region, the membership covers all parts of the world. MORE DETAILS.

Zimmermann had received the EBES Fellow Award 2018, was already a member of the Executive Board of EBES and a member of the Editorial Board of one of the EBES Journals, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER, since 2017). In May 2018, EBES and GLO organized a very successful conference together in Berlin. In the summer, both organizations had signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) about establishing a long-term collaboration on educational and research activities. GLO will support paper sessions in the three conferences, EBES is organizing per year. This year, the events will be in Bali, Coventry and Lisbon.

EBES publishes two research journals, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER) and the Eurasian Business Review (EABR). The EABR with GLO Fellow Marco Vivarelli as the Editor-in-Chief just got accepted for inclusion in the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) starting with volume 6, issue 1 in 2016. The editorial team of EAER works with a similar ambition, since January 2019 under the leadership of Dorothea Schäfer as the Editor-in-Chief.

EBES and GLO will both greatly benefit from the collaboration”, argues Zimmermann. “The motives of the two organizations are truly global and with a similar academic spirit, while their various strengths are complementary. I congratulate Vivarelli and his team to the great success and EBES for getting Schäfer for the new role with EAER.”

Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin is the long-term driving force of EBES and one of its Vice-Presidents, Marco Vivarelli the Editor-in-Chief of EABR. Bilgin and Vivarelli are also GLO Fellows; Bilgin is further the GLO Country Lead Turkey and Vivarelli the GLO Cluster Lead ‘Technological Change and the Labor Market’.

Ends;

GLO-Interview with Alfredo Toro Hardy about his new book on the Latin American view of the future of globalization

The book: The Crossroads of Globalization. A Latin American View. December 2018, 232 pages: World Scientific. More Info.

The author: Alfredo Toro Hardy. GLO Fellow, Venezuelan Scholar and Diplomat. More Info.

The Interviewer: Klaus F. Zimmermann/GLO President. Hardy and Zimmermann have been both Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Resident Scholars in Fall 2017. Zimmermann has written the Preface in the book: Text.

Alfredo Toro Hardy and Klaus F. Zimmermann enjoying a lovely evening in the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in 2017

GLO: Globalization seems to be under political pressure around the globe. How does it affect Latin America?

Alfredo Toro Hardy: Two powerful forces are measuring their strength by acting upon globalization.  One of them pushes globalization forward, while the other hinders its advance and promotes its demise. At this point in time, it is not clear which of them will end up prevailing.

China’s economic umbrella and Asia’s middle class, whose expansion is estimated to represent 80 percent of the world’s middle class increase up to 2030, remain as the fundamental driving forces of globalization. On the other hand, though, we find populism and the displacement that disruptive technologies bring with them. While populism creates boundaries and discourages free trade, the Fourth Industrial Revolution advances towards a decoupling between developed and developing economies. Under these two very different but converging impulses, globalization is bound to loose ground.

Uncertainty hinders Latin America’s strategic vision. If the future entailed a re-launching of globalization, it would seem obvious that the region should follow along its lines, positioning itself in the best possible terms so as to increase its potential benefits. However, if globalization is entering into a declining phase, Latin America would need to look for options.

Latin America faces, therefore, not only a dramatic uncertainty as a result of forces beyond its control, but also the need to anticipate, to the best of its abilities, unforeseen events to which it will have to act or react upon.

GLO: How can Latin America adapt best in the future?

Alfredo Toro Hardy: As said, Latin America finds itself at the crossroads of the pro and the anti globalization forces. Were the rules of the game to change now, the region would certainly suffer. Uncertainty, however, is an even greater challenge because positioning itself and planning ahead amid conflicting signs, becomes extremely difficult.

Globalization emerged as a result of political intention and technological feasibility. Now, it finds itself seriously challenged for the very same reasons. In both cases, political intention and technological feasibility are clearly identified with developed economies. 

What kind of route map can Latin America follow amid this confusing situation? To begin with, it is necessary to analyze the forces that push for and against globalization, trying to measure their respective strength, convergence capacity, and potential impact. This requires, at the same time, looking into the flaws, weaknesses and contradictions of such forces. With these elements in hand, it might be easier to envisage where the trends are leading to and, by extension, where Latin America might end up standing.

However, there seems to be no alternative to playing in both directions, with the aim of minimizing costs and maximizing opportunities. Within this highly fluid situation, pragmatism, resilience, creativeness, imagination, and the joining together of Latin American forces, will have to guide the region’s actions in the foreseeable future.

GLO: What are the challenges for globalization to become profitable for Latin America?

Alfredo Toro Hardy: The curious equation formed by protectionism, populism, political rage, algorithms, deep learning, robots, 3D printing, nanotechnology, indoor and vertical farming, an emerging post animal food industry, and renewable energy, among other elements, may end up suctioning the oxygen of globalization. It is not only that trade barriers emerge, but that it will make no sense to look for cheaper manufactures, products or services afar, when it would become possible to generate them locally at competitive prices.

A decoupling world economy, like the one that may emerge under such equation, presents no benefit for Latin America. Finding a path under such scenario would become extremely stressful and challenging. However, globalization has not been a rose garden for the region. Much to the contrary, it has imposed upon it the need to reconvert into labor-intensive manufacturing or to go back in time to commodities producing. Both of those options have being far from satisfactory.

A globalization that becomes profitable for Latin America would entail the possibility of overcoming such limitations, while opening a path towards a much more international service oriented economy and a more value added manufacturing. Unfortunately, at this point in time options are narrowing not widening.

The book

Ends;

Centre for Workforce Futures, Macquarie University, has joined GLO Network


The Centre for Workforce Futures at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, has joined the network of institutions of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) following intensified research collaborations. Prestigious ARC Discovery Research Grant of the Australian Research Council (ARC) won.

The Centre for Workforce Futures is a collaborative hub connecting researchers from a wide range of disciplines and universities with government, industry, not-for-profit organizations and the broader community to undertake problem-focused research and thought leadership that addresses current and future economic and social challenges relating to work, working people, work organization and employment. Directors are Lucy Taksa and Daryll Hull of Macquarie University.

In November 2017, Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT & President of the Global Labor Organization, GLO) had been a Visiting Professor at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and he has recently affiliated with Macquarie University further by accepting to join the Centre for Workforce Futures as an Associate Member. The Co-Director of the Centre, Lucy Taksa is also a Professor of Management and Associate Dean for Research of the Faculty of Business & Economics at Macquarie University, and a GLO Fellow.

A team of GLO Fellows affiliated with the Centre for Workforce Futures consisting of Chief Investigators Fei Guo, Lucy Taksa, Zhiming Cheng, Massimiliano Tani and Partner Investigators Lihua Liu (University of Southern California) and Klaus F. Zimmermann have recently won a very prestigious ARC Discovery Research Grant of the Australian Research Council (ARC) on “Demographic and Social Dimensions of Migrant Ageing and Wellbeing in Australia”.

Ends;

GLO Fellow Alfredo Toro Hardy Explains ‘The Crossroads of Globalization’ from a Latin American Perspective.

In his new book just published in December 2018, Alfredo Toro Hardy, Venezuelan Scholar and Diplomat as well as a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), explains his views about the perspectives of Latin America at the crossroads of globalization. Currently, globalization seems to be in decline all over the globe. However, if the future would see a revival, it seems plausible that Latin America should continue its current pace of following it. However, if globalization would continue to decline, the region would need to find other options. The book evaluates the risks and outlines the options. MORE DETAILS.

Ambassador Alfredo Toro Hardy
Venezuelan Scholar and GLO Fellow

The Preface to the book has been provided by Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is the President of the GLO. He writes in the book:

“As so often in the history of mankind, the fate of globalization is currently at stake. It looks that, again, the world is at a crossroad between development or contraction. The economic and political polarizations within or between countries, the rise of populism and in the number of instable democracies, the tensions resulting from migration, inequality, robotization and the demands of emerging economies like China, India and (perhaps) Brazil require attention. Protectionism, EU-skepticism, nationalism, racism, and rejections of economic multilateralism and multicultural approaches are more and more important again. Only few critical observers of the world are not concerned about the current strength and the unclear directions of the driving forces behind which are only slowly understood.

            Globalization is much more than the persistent global integration of the flow of goods, capital and labor. It also merges cultures and enforces permanent and immediate exchange of knowledge and sentiments. Latin America was once forced into globalization and moved in unprepared, stumbling. It survived by adapting. It is an export-based economy. Moving out is likely to be very costly in economic terms. Is this unavoidable or are there alternatives?

            Globalization, as is widely perceived, mainly benefits liberal democracies. But is this really true? The Chinese pro-globalization strategy certainly questions this position. And if globalization collapses in parts of the world, does it make sense to follow like lemmings. Or is it not better to go on as much as possible, making use of the potentials of globalization? In other words, if the United Kingdom wants Brexit, why should the remaining European Union give up its ambitions?

            Globalization will not end, since economic advantages and constraints will enforce its rise, as it materialized over the entire history of mankind. The rise of homo sapiens over thousands of years has taken place due to a superior brain, excellent language abilities and a tremendous talent to collaborate. But, of course, mistakes of humans as of political and social organizations can cause a break of further globalization for some time. In many ways, the current world is not much more open than it was before World War I. In any case: Those nations and continents ignoring historical lessons will eventually fall behind.

            Alfredo Toro Hardy offers us some advanced training. The author of this book deserves significant attention: After a long and successful career as top diplomat, ambassador and global scholar, he is exploiting his deep knowledge and experience acquired over a worklife to tackle some of the most pressing issues of our time.

            I have had the privilege to learn him and his lovely wife during a joint tenure as a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Resident Scholar in 2017. During this period, we have had many inspiring and fruitful exchanges about the future of our worlds and the challenges of life. I have always been impressed by his deep insights in complex issues and his balanced views on controversial or even explosive topics.

            In his unique way, Alfredo Toro Hardy, develops the perspectives of his continent in this world at the crossroads as the Voice of Latin America. Chapter by chapter, he sharpens our views for the challenges to come and the strengths, Latin America is able to mobilize. What is the right path for the continent? As the author states (p. 388): “Fast moving nations, indeed, appeared to be the better prepared to take advantage from a rapidly moving global market-place.” It is ‘flexibility, stupid’, making the difference. Investing in the technological advances in the fields of knowledge transfer, communications and transportations still make sense. And the continent needs to embrace, not to fight the upcoming digital economy.

            Hence, Alfredo Toro Hardy suggests that (p. 393) “pragmatism, resilience, creativeness, imagination, and the joining together of Latin American forces, will have to guide the region’s actions in the foreseeable future.” This implies to develop the integration of the Latin American markets even further through free trade agreements while keeping open to the global economy, in particular to the European Union. Certainly, institutions like the Inter-American Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Latin America can be instruments to foster the process.

Klaus F. Zimmermann , President of the Global Labor Organization, Professor Emeritus, Bonn University, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University, Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017″

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers December 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month examines the potentials multiple language skills have for employment and wages in a globalized world. The research finds in the context of an open and multilingual economy that language training improves employability, but the skills are not sufficiently rewarded by higher wages.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: December

Discussion Paper No. 289 Evaluation of Language Training Programs in Luxembourg using Principal StratificationDownload PDF
by Bia, Michela & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Mercatanti, Andrea

GLO Fellow Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

Abstract: In a world increasingly globalized, multiple language skills can create more employment opportunities. Several countries include language training programs in active labor market programs for the unemployed. We analyze the effects of a language training program on the re-employment probability and hourly wages of the unemployed simultaneously, using high quality administrative data from Luxembourg. We address selection into training by exploiting the rich administrative information available, and account for the complication that wages are “truncated” by unemployment by adopting a principal stratification framework. Estimation is undertaken with a mixture model likelihood-based approach. To improve inference, we use the individual’s hours worked as a secondary outcome and a stochastic dominance assumption. These two features considerably ameliorate the multimodality problem commonly encountered in mixture models. We also conduct sensitivity analysis to assess the unconfoundedness assumption employed. Our results strongly suggest a positive effect (of up to 12.7 percent) of the language training programs on the re-employment probability, but no effects on wages for those who are observed employed regardless of training participation. It appears that, in the context of an open and multilingual economy, language training improve employability but the language skills acquired are not sufficiently rewarded to be reflected in higher wages.

GLO Discussion Papers of December 2018

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

289 Evaluation of Language Training Programs in Luxembourg using Principal StratificationDownload PDF
by Bia, Michela & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Mercatanti, Andrea

288 Bounds on Average and Quantile Treatment Effects on Duration Outcomes under Censoring, Selection, and NoncomplianceDownload PDF
by Blanco, German & Chen, Xuan & Flores, Carlos A. & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso

287 Anti-Migration as a Threat to Internationalization? A Review of the Migration-Internationalization LiteratureDownload PDF
by Hatzigeorgiou, Andreas & Lodefalk, Magnus

286 Some unpleasant consequences of testing at lengthDownload PDF
by Brunello, Giorgio & Crema, Angela & Rocco, Lorenzo

285 Does Money Relieve Depression? Evidence from Social Pension Expansions in ChinaDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi & Wang, Tianyu & Busch, Susan H.

284 Media Attention and Choice of Major: Evidence from Anti-Doctor Violence in ChinaDownload PDF
by Bo, Shiyu & Chen, Y. Joy & Song, Yan & Zhou, Sen

283 Elite School Designation and House Prices – Quasi-experimental Evidence from Beijing, ChinaDownload PDF
by Huang, Bin & He, Xiaoyan & Xu, Lei & Zhu, Yu

282 Commuting Patterns, the Spatial Distribution of Jobs and the Gender Pay Gap in the U.S.Download PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

281 The Effect of Self-Employment on Income InequalityDownload PDF
by Schneck, Stefan

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Happy Holidays and MORE from the GLO!

Happy holidays and a great start into an exciting New Year 2019 to all members and friends of GLO! Thanks to a large number of activists, we have made substantial progress in 2018.

I am now writing from the plane on my way to Florida. Earlier next year, I will be at the ASSA meeting in Atlanta. Please try to meet me, if you are there and have issues to discuss. You may wish to send me an email to arrange a meeting there or to just meet me at the Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), Jinan University, on Friday January 4, 2019, from 6pm to 8pm, at Hilton Atlanta 217.

Over the last few weeks, I had the chance to meet and interact with many of you. From November 28 to December 22, I have been in Luxembourg, Darmstadt, Brussels, Kigali, Xiamen, Seoul, and Mumbai for events and conferences. See below some own quick pictures from the tour.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President

Brussels Airport
Real  & Fake Christmas Trees

Ends;

Join the Kuznets Prize Ceremony at ASSA 2019 in Atlanta

Those friends of the Journal of Population Economics and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) participating at the ASSA 2019 Atlanta conference are invited to the prominent Kuznets Prize ceremony. It takes part at the Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), Jinan University, on Friday January 4, 2019, from 6pm to 8pm, at Hilton Atlanta 217. The ceremony will start at about 6.30 pm and will take about 15 minutes. The Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics will announce some journal news including the 2019 prize winner(s). Then the award plate is given to the (still confidential) author(s). The 2018 Prize winner Le Wang will be also present; see an interview with him about the last prize paper.

Those planning to attend the reception are invited to register with Jiayu Lin via email: iesr_job@126.com.

The Kuznets Prize ceremony takes place on the invitation of Dean Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), who is also a GLO Fellow. He will introduce the ceremony. The Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO): Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University). IESR has been an early institutional supporter of GLO.

Feng (right) and Zimmermann at IESR
Kuznets Prize Winner 2018 Chunbei Wang & Le Wang, University of Oklahoma

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers November 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) deals with the sources of inequality in East Africa. It concludes that promoting equity in education requires policies that go beyond raising average school quality and should attend to the distribution of school quality as well as assortative matching between households and schools.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: November

Anand, Paul & Behrman, Jere R. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Jones, Sam: 2018. “Inequality of Opportunity in Education: Accounting for the Contributions of Sibs, Schools and Sorting across East Africa,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 270, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE – Download PDF

Abstract: Inequalities in the opportunity to obtain a good education in low-income countries are widely understood to be related to household resources and schooling quality. Yet, to date, most researchers have investigated the contributions of these two factors separately. This paper considers them jointly, paying special attention to their covariation, which indicates whether schools exacerbate or compensate for existing household-based inequalities. The paper develops a new variance decomposition framework and applies it to data on more than one million children in three low-income East African countries. The empirical results show that although household factors account for a significant share of total test score variation, variation in school quality and positive sorting between households and schools are, together, no less important. The analysis also finds evidence of substantial geographical heterogeneity in schooling quality. The paper concludes that promoting equity in education in East Africa requires policies that go beyond raising average school quality and should attend to the distribution of school quality as well as assortative matching between households and schools.

GLO Discussion Papers of November 2018

280 The Financial Decisions of Immigrant and Native Households: Evidence from ItalyDownload PDF
by Bertocchi, Graziella & Brunetti, Marianna & Zaiceva, Anzelika

279 War and Social AttitudesDownload PDF
by Child, Travers Barclay & Nikolova, Elena

278 Younger and Dissatisfied? Relative Age and Life-satisfaction in AdolescenceDownload PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Baert, Stijn

277 Relative Age Effect on European Adolescents’ Social NetworkDownload PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Baert, Stijn

276 Work Hard or Play Hard? Degree Class, Student Leadership and Employment OpportunitiesDownload PDF
by Baert, Stijn & Verhaest, Diete

275 Industrial relations reform, firm-level bargaining and nominal wage floorsDownload PDF
by Giannakopoulosa, Nicholas & Laliotis, Ioannis

274 Labor supply and the business cycle: The “Bandwagon Worker Effect”Download PDF
by Martín Román, Ángel L. & Cuéllar-Martín, Jaime & Moral de Blas, Alfonso

273 Reaching the Top or Falling Behind? The Role of Occupational Segregation in Women’s Chances of Finding a High-Paying Job Over the Life-CycleDownload PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

272 Arrival of Young Talents: The Send-down Movement and Rural Education in ChinaDownload PDF
by Chen, Yi & Fan, Ziying & Gu, Xiaomin & Zhou, Li-An

271 Family Unification, Siblings, and SkillsDownload PDF
by Duleep, Harriet Orcutt & Regets, Mark

270 Inequality of Opportunity in Education: Accounting for the Contributions of Sibs, Schools and Sorting across East AfricaDownload PDF
by Anand, Paul & Behrman, Jere R. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Jones, Sam

269 Trade and capital flows: Substitutes or complements? An empirical investigationDownload PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Domnick, Clemens

268 Son Preference and Human Capital Investment Among China’s Rural-Urban Migrant HouseholdsDownload PDF
by Lin, Carl & Sun, Yan & Xing, Chunbing

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers October 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) presents a remarkable review of the growing economic and epidemiologic evidence linking air pollution, cognition performance and real-world decision making. All by a leading expert of the field, GLO Fellow & GLO Cluster Lead Xi Chen. Further, the paper relates to an outstanding GLO workshop in Hong Kong on climate change and human resources consequences.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: October

Chen, Xi: 2018. “Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision Making,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 266, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE – Download PDF

Abstract: Cognitive functioning is critical as in our daily life a host of real-world complex decisions in high-stakes markets have to be made. The decision-making process can be vulnerable to environmental stressors. Summarizing the growing economic and epidemiologic evidence linking air pollution, cognition performance and real-world decision making, we first illustrate key physiological and psychological pathways between air pollution and cognition. We then document the main patterns of air pollution affecting cognitive test performance by type of cognitive tests, gender, window of exposure, age profile, and educational attainment. We further extend to a review of real-world decision making that has been found to be affected by air pollution and the resulting cognitive impairments. Finally, rich implications on environmental health policies are drawn based on existing evaluations of social costs of air pollution.

GLO Discussion Papers of October 2018

267 New Education Models for the Future of Work ForceDownload PDF
by Pastore, Francesco

266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi

265 Drivers of Labor Force Participation in Advanced Economies: Macro and Micro EvidenceDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

264 A Cohort-Based Analysis of Labor Force Participation for Advanced EconomiesDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

263 Low, High and Super Congestion of an Open-Access Resource: Impact under Autarky and Trade, with Aquaculture as IllustrationDownload PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

262 Brain Drain-Induced Brain Gain and the Bhagwati Tax: Are Early and Recent Paradigms Compatible?Download PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

261 Labor Market and Institutional Drivers of Youth Irregular Migration: Evidence from the MENA RegionDownload PDF
by Dibeh, Ghassan & Fakih, Ali & Marrouch, Walid

260 Public versus Private Sector Wage Gap in Egypt: Evidence from Quantile Regression on Panel DataDownload PDF
by Tansel, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin

259 Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?Download PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

258 Marriage Market Signals and Homeownership for the Never MarriedDownload PDF
by Mundra, Kusum & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth

257 Economic impact of STEM immigrant workersDownload PDF
by Baum, Christopher F. & Lööf, Hans & Stephan, Andreas

256 Does Regulation Trade-Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction EngineersDownload PDF
by Rostam-Afschar, Davud & Strohmaier, Kristina

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

GLO President Zimmermann visited Örebro University in Sweden

On the invitation of GLO Fellow Daniela Andren and Magnus Lodefalk, Klaus F. Zimmermann, (UNU-MERIT and President of the Global Labor Organization, GLO) was visiting Örebro University/Sweden on 19-20 November 2018 to attend a workshop on publishing in scientific journals. In his function as keynote speaker to the event, he was also reporting about his experience as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics and his role with many other journals in the profession. (MORE INFORMATION about the Journal of Population Economics.) The workshop discussed publication strategies and studied them on a selection of papers presented by the authors together with invited external reviewers, among them GLO Fellow Björn Gustafsson of Gothenburg University and Daniel Halvarsson of the Ratio Institute, Stockholm. Zimmermann and department members further discussed ways to intensify contacts with the GLO. He also enjoyed parts of Örebro, this wonderful Swedish city, which is very much worth visiting.

Workshop Co-Organizer and GLO Fellow Daniela Andren of Örebro University (left).


Dinner time for workshop participants

Also of potential interest for fans of the Journal: Brown, Alessio J.G. & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Three Decades of Publishing Research in Population Economics: Journal of Population Economics, 30 (2017), 11-27.

Ends;

GLO intensifies collaborations with Baku: Collaboration contract (MoU) signed and GLO President joins the Advisory Board of IGEP

During his recent visit to Baku/Azerbaijan on 10-13 November 2018, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann, has met Chairman Natig Shirinzade of the Institute of Global Economic Problems (IGEP) and collaborated intensively with him. MORE DETAILS. Shirinzade, who is also a GLO Fellow and the GLO Country Lead Azerbaijan, had organized the meetings of Zimmermann with key representatives from government, academia and business to discuss the global challenges and approaches of the country. MORE DETAILS.

In the light of the great success of the visit and the large potentials, Chairman Shirinzade and President Zimmermann agreed to intensify the relationships between both organizations even further. For this purpose, both signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The MoU expresses that the planned collaborations should advance academic knowledge in both organizations through the encouragement of academic research, the communication among scholars through meetings, the promotion of publication opportunities and by providing networking opportunities for scholars through conferences and other joint activities.

For this purpose, Zimmermann has also accepted to join the IGEP Advisory Board headed by the Honorary Academician Ziyad Samedzade, the Chairman of the Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Committee of the National Assembly (Milli Mejlis). In a festive ceremony, Natig Shirinzade presented Zimmermann the certificate for this appointment, which is signed by him and Ziyad Samedzade.

Over dinner on the previous night, Samedzade, Shirinzade and Zimmermann had discussed further details of the global challenges and found that they largely agree how one needs to approach them.

Shirinzade and Zimmermann after the presentation of the Certificate of the membership in the IGEP Advisory Board.

Relaxation after the hour.

The Honorary Academician Ziyad Samedzade, the Chairman of the Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Committee of the National Assembly (Milli Mejlis) and Chairman of the IGEP Advisory Board with Zimmermann.

Klaus F. Zimmermann: “The exchange with Ziyad Samedzade was a big honor and great pleasure, we have debated and agreed on important issues of the globalized world, the perspectives of our countries, and what we have to do. A truly great man; I am deeply impressed. He found time on the eve of an important budget debate in the parliament to receive me in his office in the National Assembly and to join us for dinner. About his significant intervention in the parliamentary debate in the following morning I read in the media:”

“The activities of the country’s banks once again caused a barrage of criticism. This time, criticism was voiced by the parliamentarians during the discussion of the draft state budget for 2019 at the plenary session of the Milli Majlis (National Assembly). The statement of Chairman of the Parliamentary Committee on Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Ziyad Samadzadeh was especially noteworthy. He stated bluntly: ‘We cannot be satisfied with the activities of banks in Azerbaijan, because their assistance to the real sector is insignificant.’” (MPs attacked banks. Elnur Mammadov in the AZERI DAILY)

Ends;

GLO President visits government officials, business and the research community in Azerbaijan

On the invitation of Natig Shirinzade, Chairman of the Institute of Global Economic Problems, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann, has visited Baku, Azerbaijan, on 10-13 November 2018 to discuss research and policy issues and to intensify contacts. Chairman Natig Shirinzade is also a GLO Fellow and the GLO Country Lead Azerbaijan representing GLO. MORE DETAILS.

Organized by Natig Shirinzade (right side of the picture), Zimmermann met with researchers and scientists, representatives from business and government including members from the office of the First Vice President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, the Executive Director of the State Oil Fund and his staff, the Minister of Labor and the Minister of Education with their staff, the Chairman of the Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Committee of the National Assembly, and the Deputy Foreign Minister and Founding Rector of the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy (ADA University) with various administrators and professors from ADA University and the Azerbaijan State University of Economics.

The full program on November 12-13, 2018 included the following major program points in this sequence:

The joint initiative of Natig Shirinzade and Klaus F. Zimmermann was broadly covered by the Azerbaijani media:

Left picture: In the middle, Sahil Babayev, Minister of Labor and Social Protection. Right: Natig Shirinzade and Klaus F. Zimmermann

 

Excellent and deep discussions with key staff members of the office of the First Vice President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, First Lady Mehriban Aliyeva: Emin Huseynov (left) and Khalid Ahadov (right). Broad and common understanding about the global human challenges and the large potentials for deeper collaborations between Azerbaijan and Europe.

 

With Shahmar Movsumov as the Executive Director of the State Oil Fund of the Republic of Azerbaijan, the Fund prepares for the future of the country investing resources around the world and supporting the change of the country including activities strengthening infrastructure and human resources. Both Natig Shirinzade and Klaus F. Zimmermann were visiting Shahmar Movsumov and his staff in his headquarter to introduce the respective institutions and to discuss the research needs to deal with the major challenges of the country. Bellow: In the headquarter of the Fund.

 

 

In both ministries, labor and education, the exchange was about the political strategies to deal with the demand for effective government using the instruments of the digital age, establishing the physical and administrative infrastructure needed for the post oil age, the need to strengthen entrepreneurship and the development of skills and education. A particular need was identified in vocational training, where large efforts of both ministries are under way. Zimmermann agreed with ministers Sahil Babayev (labor) and Ceyhun Bayamon (education) that vocational training could be key for the development if combined with proper entrepreneurship and small business. He advertised for the German dual system, knowing the difficulties with an adaption of the model that requires long traditions and the strong support of the business community.

Shirinzade and Zimmermann further met with Ambassador Hafiz Pashayev, Deputy Foreign Minister and Founding Rector of the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy (ADA University). At the ADA University, they met with him and Fariz Ismailzade (Vice Rector for External, Government and Student Affairs), Elkin Nurmammadov (Dean of the School of Business), Rahman Shahhuseynli (Director of the Office of International Affairs), Kavus Abushov (Assistant Professor, Political Sciences), all ADA University, and Anar Rzayev, Vice-Rector International Relations and Programs of UNEC, the Azerbaijan State University of Economics. Topics discussed included the mission of GLO, the natural role of the country as a geographic, economic and political meeting point between Europe and Asia, and potentials for academic exchange of the universities with Europe. The visit at ADA University ended with a lecture of Zimmermann for ADA students.

Zimmermann speaking at the ADA University Global Perspectives Lecture Series in front of a large audience of interested students.

 

REFERENCES:
Klaus F. Zimmermann et al. (2013). Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training. Foundations and Trends in Microeconomics, Vol. 9, 1-157. now publishers.

Luca Barbone, Martin Kahanec, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Lucia Kureková (2013), Migration from the Eastern Partnership Countries to the European Union — Options for a Better Future, IZA Research Report, No. 55, Bonn. (50 pages)

Martin Kahanec, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Lucia Kureková and Costanza Biavaschi (2013), Labour Migration from EaP Countries to the EU – Assessment of Costs and Benefits and Proposals for Better Labour Market Matching, IZA Research Report, No. 56, Bonn. (164 pages)

On the more touristic side, Zimmermann explored on November 11 and 12 the city of Baku and the environment directed by a strongly motivated team of tourist guide, interpreter and driver. These experiences provided him with deep insides into history, modern developments, challenges and potentials of the country. On November 10, he was visiting modern Baku and enjoyed some of the local culture. On November 10 in the afternoon, he has been in the old city of Baku, and on November 11, among others, in the Gobustan National Park, saw the Petroglyphs and investigated the Zoroastrian temple of Ateshgah (Part III). At the end, he inspected Yanardag, the burning mountain. (The links lead to the four individual reports on Zimmermann’s private website for those interested.)

Ends;

Climate Change and Human Responses: More impressions from the KAS-FOM-GLO conference in Hong Kong

The joint FOM-GLO-KAS Conference about “Climate Change and Human Responses” co-organized by the Global Labor Organization (GLO), FOM University of Applied Sciences and Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS) took place on October 31 – November 2 in Hong Kong. (See for detailed reports: DAY ONE, DAY TWO, DAY THREE ) Here are some further impressions (courtesy of KAS):

Conference participants at Day 2 after lunch.


Conference organizers (from the left): GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, Peter Hefele, Director of the Hong Kong branch of the German Konrad-Adenauer Foundation and Andreas Oberheitmann (FOM, RWI and GLO).

RECENT GLO Discussion Papers on the issue of the conference (freely downloadable):

DP 266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi
DP 221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar
DP 86 Do Environmental Regulations Effect FDI decisions? The Pollution Haven Hypothesis Revisited – Download PDF
by Yoon, Haeyeon & Heshmati, Almas
DP 78 Managing the Impact of Climate Change on Migration: Evidence from Mexico – Download PDF
by Chort, Isabelle & de la Rupelle, Maëlys
DP 56 Happiness in the Air: How Does a Dirty Sky Affect Mental Health and Subjective Well-being? – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xiaobo & Chen, Xi
DP 32 Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance  – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin

Ends;

Conference Announcement: 28th EBES Conference in Coventry (UK) in 2019

28th EBES Conference. May 29-31, 2019 in Coventry, United Kingdom
Hosted by the Centre for Financial and Corporate Integrity (CFCI), Coventry University

Interested researchers are cordially invited to submit abstracts or papers for presentation consideration at the 28th EBES Conference in Coventry. It will take place on May 29th, 30th, and 31st, 2019 at Coventry University in Coventry, United Kingdom. The conference will be organized with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and will be hosted by the Centre for Financial and Corporate Integrity (CFCI) in collaboration with the Coventry Business School Trading Floor. To support the event, GLO will organize three invited paper sessions.

Invited Speakers are David B. Audretsch, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Marco Vivarelli.

David B. Audretsch is a Distinguished Professor at Indiana University, where he also serves as Director of the Institute for Development Strategies. He is an Honorary Professor of Industrial Economics and Entrepreneurship at the WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany and a Research Fellow of the CEPR in London. He has also worked as a consultant to the UN, World Bank, OECD, EU Commission, and U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Prof. Audretsch’s research has focused on the links between entrepreneurship, government policy, innovation, economic development, and global competitiveness. He is co-author of The Seven Secrets of Germany (Oxford University Press) along with several other books. He is co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal and many other journals. He was awarded the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research by the Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum (Entreprenörskapsforum). He has received honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Augsburg in Germany and Jonköping University in Sweden. Prof. Audretsch was also awarded the Schumpeter Prize from the University of Wuppertal in Germany. He has served as an advisory board member to a number of international research and policy institutes, including Chair of the Deutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Berlin(German Institute for Economic Analysis Berlin), Chair of the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft (Foundation for the Promotion of German Science) in Berlin, Germany, and the Center for European Economic Research (Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung) in Mannheim, Germany etc. He has authored numerous papers which were published in prestigious journals such as American Economic Review, European Economic Review, Review of Economics and Statistics, and Journal of Management and his researches have been cited more than 77,000 (Google Scholar). He holds a PhD in economics from University of Wisconsin, Madison in U.S.A.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (em.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin and Renmin University of China; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea (Chair of its Section for Economics, Business and Management Sciences). Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia;  EBES Fellow Award 2018 of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society. His research has been published in the top journals of the profession, including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. He has published 53 books, 168 papers in refereed research journals, 152 chapters in collected volumes, 11 contributions to handbooks and encyclopaedias, 113 contributions to policy journals and reports and 517 media pieces. His research fields are population, labor, development and migration.

Marco Vivarelli, Ph.D. in Economics and Ph.D. in Science and Technology Policy, is full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA, Bonn; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES, Istanbul); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics E-Journal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics,  Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization,  Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

EBES Board: Prof. Jonathan Batten, Monash University, Australia; Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.; Prof. Peter Rangazas, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, U.S.A.; Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.; Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy; Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University, The Netherlands:

Abstract/Paper Submission: Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 28, 2018. For submission, please visit the EBES website at https://www.ebesweb.org/Conferences/28th-EBES-Conference-Coventry/Abstract-Submission.aspx. No submission fee is required. General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org.

Publication Opportunities: Qualified papers can be published (after refereeing) in the EBES journals (no submission and publication fees). EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) are published by Springer Nature and indexed by SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABI/INFORM, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, EBSCO TOC Premier, Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Summon by ProQuest, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory.

Furthermore, qualified papers after review will be recommended to be considered for publication in regular issues of the Journal of Corporate Finance after a review process. However, presentation at the EBES Conference does not guarantee publication in the Journal of Corporate Finance.

Also all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in the USB. After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees).

This will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th and 19th EBES Conference Proceedings were accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). 18th, 20th and subsequent conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates
Abstract Submission Start Date: November 5, 2018
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019
Decision Communicated by: March 8, 2019*
Registration Deadline: April 19, 2019
Announcement of the Program: April 30, 2019
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): April 19, 2019**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 31, 2019
* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.
** Full paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before February 28, 2018, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by April 19, 2019.

Contact: Ugur Can (ebes@ebesweb.org); Dr. Ender Demir (demir@ebesweb.org)

Ends;

EBES & GLO intensify collaboration: GLO President will also become EBES President

Breaking news: GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann has accepted to serve as the President of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES). He will take office in this role on January 1, 2019. Zimmermann will remain in his position as the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

On July 15, 2018, representatives of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) had signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) about establishing a long-term collaboration on educational and research activities between both organizations. Among other issues, the cooperation includes the exchange of academic documents, the organization of events, joint publications and other means to foster research.

Zimmermann had received the EBES Fellow Award 2018, is already a member of the Executive Board of EBES and a member of the Editorial Board of one of the EBES Journals, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER, since 2017).

GLO intends to organize a session at the Bali EBES 27 conference on January 9-11, 2019: Extended deadline is November 9, 2018.

GLO will also organize three sessions at the May 29-31, 2019 EBES conference in Coventry, UK, following the very successful experiences of the first joint event organized in May 2018 in Berlin (EBES 25).

 

 

 

 

 

Ends;

Hong Kong based German business meets GLO experts to debate the role of the city and business at the time of climate change

After two days of scientific discussions (see details linked: DAY ONE, DAY TWO), the joint FOM-GLO-KAS Conference about “Climate Change and Human Responses” co-organized by the Global Labor Organization (GLO), FOM University of Applied Sciences and Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS) met on 2 November 2018 German business at and with the German Chamber of Commerce, Hong Kong for a Breakfast Discussion. Peter Hefele, Director of the Hong Kong branch of the German Konrad-Adenauer Foundation was organizing this event for the team of organizers.

Business agreed with academics that climate change can no longer be stopped, and one needs a strong focus on adaptation, in particular in large cities such as Hong Kong.

The event was chaired by Andreas Oberheitmann (FOM, RWI and GLO) and welcomed by Wolfgang Ehmann, Head of the German Chamber of Commerce, Hong Kong, and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann for all participating organizations. Oberheitmann speaking:

The keynote speeches were provided by Manfred Fischedick, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment, and Eric Chung, President and CEO of Siemens Ltd. Hong Kong and Member of the Board of Directors of the Business Environment Council (BEC), Hong Kong.

From the left: Wolfgang Ehmann (Welcome), Keynote Speaker Manfred Fischedick, Andreas Oberheitmann, Klaus F. Zimmermann (Welcome), and Keynote Speaker Eric Chung.

GLO Fellows Almas Heshmati, Venkatachalam Anbumozhi, Xi Chen under the observation of Peter Hefele, Director of the Hong Kong branch of the German Konrad-Adenauer Foundation.

GLO experts debating in Hong Kong with representatives of German business about the consequences of climate change for business and humanity. From the left:
Xi Cheng, Professor at Yale University and GLO Cluster Lead “Environment and Human Resources”.
Klaus F. Zimmermann, Professor at Bonn University (em.),  Honorary Professor at the Renmin University of China, UNU-MERIT, and President of GLO.
Andreas Oberheitmann, Professor at FOM, RWI and GLO.
Almas Heshmati, Jönköping International Business School, Sogang University
and GLO, Sweden/South Korea, and GLO Cluster Lead “Green Employment Creation”.
Venkatachalam Anbumozhi, Senior Economist, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA) and GLO.

PROGRAM; FRIDAY, 2ND NOVEMBER 2018
8:30 Breakfast Discussion (in cooperation with the German Chamber of Commerce)
Climate Change and Human Responses: How to prepare for Change?
Venue: German Chamber of Commerce, 3601, Tower One, Lippo Centre,
89 Queensway, Admiralty, Hong Kong
Chair: Andreas OBERHEITMANN, FOM, RWI and GLO
Welcoming Remarks
– Wolfgang EHMANN, German Chamber of Commerce
Klaus F. ZIMMERMANN, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO
Keynote Speeches (10 min each)
– Manfred FISCHEDICK, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment
– Eric CHONG, President and CEO of Siemens Ltd. Hong Kong; Member of the
Board of Directors of Business Environment Council (BEC), Hong Kong
Q&A
10:00 End of Event

RECENT GLO Discussion Papers on the issue (freely downloadable):

DP 266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi
DP 221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar
DP 86 Do Environmental Regulations Effect FDI decisions? The Pollution Haven Hypothesis Revisited – Download PDF
by Yoon, Haeyeon & Heshmati, Almas
DP 78 Managing the Impact of Climate Change on Migration: Evidence from Mexico – Download PDF
by Chort, Isabelle & de la Rupelle, Maëlys
DP 56 Happiness in the Air: How Does a Dirty Sky Affect Mental Health and Subjective Well-being? – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xiaobo & Chen, Xi
DP 32 Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance  – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin

Ends;

Climate Change and Human Responses: Impressions from a scientific debate in Hong Kong

The joint FOM-GLO-KAS Conference about “Climate Change and Human Responses” co-organized by the Global Labor Organization (GLO), FOM University of Applied Sciences and Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS) at the Hotel Harbour Grand Kowloon, Hung Hom, Hong Kong (see FIRST DAY, for the full program of all three days, literature references and some pictures of the first day; details of THIRD DAY) continued on 1 November 2018 with a dense scientific program.

Here are some photos of the academic event of the SECOND DAY (November 1, 2018):

9:00 Session 1: Impact of Climate Change on Regions and Industry Sectors
Chair: ZHANG Yifan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO

 

Session chair ZHANG Yifan (The Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO) next to Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and President GLO)

 

 

 

Manfred FISCHEDICK, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment
Climate Change and (Basic) Industry: Options and Related Chances and Challenges for a Green Transformation


Andreas OBERHEITMANN, FOM, RWI and GLO
Challenges of Climate Change for Coastal Regions and Cities: the Case of China

 

11:00 Session 2: Impacts of Climate Change on Global Labor Force and Labor Markets. Chair: GUO Chaoran, Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO

 

Session Chair Chaoran Guo (Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO) with Jean-Marc Champagne  (World Wide Fund for Nature) and Walton Li (Greenpeace)

 

 

 

FENG Shuaizhang, Jinan University and GLO, video
presentation
(with CUI Xiaomeng, Jinan University,
per skype in the discussion below)

Climate Variability, Agricultural Productivity and Migration


CHEN Xi, Yale University and GLO
Climate and Environmental Challenges to Health Capital

DEBATE: Astghik Mavisakalyan (Curtin University and GLO), discussing; with from the left Chris Parsons (University of Western Australia and GLO), Peter Hefele (Director, Konrad Adenauer- Foundation, Hong Kong SAR, PR China), Eric Chun Sum Lee (Konrad Adenauer- Foundation), Nicolas de Loisy (SCMO, Hong Kong), and session chair GUO Chaoran (Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO)

Christopher PARSONS, The University of Western Australia and GLO
Climate Change and Migration, Exit, Voice and Loyalty: A Solution to the Immobility Paradox

 

14.00 Session 3: Climate Change: Historical Lessons
Chair: Manfred FISCHEDICK, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment

Almas HESHMATI, Jönköping International Business School, Sogang University
and GLO, Sweden/South Korea
What Can We Learn from Environmental Disasters for the Climate Change Challenges?

PEI Qing, Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Mandate of Heaven – Climate change, migration and geopolitical cycles in imperial China

 

15:45 Session 4: Climate Change: How to React?
Chair: Anbumozhi VENKATACHALAM, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA)

 

Session Chair Anbumozhi VENKATACHALAM (Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia, ERIA) with Almas HESHMATI (Jönköping International Business School, Sogang University, Sweden/South Korea and GLO), and speaker Astghik MAVISAKALYAN (Curtin University and GLO)

 

Astghik MAVISAKALYAN, Curtin University and GLO
Gender and Climate Change: Do Female Parliamentarians Make a Difference?

Background Paper GLO DP 221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar

Eileen GALLAGHER, BSR, Business for Social Responsibility, Hong Kong
How Business Can Manage Climate Risk in Southeast Asia

THE WORKDAY ENDED WITH STUDENT PRESENTATIONS ON THE TOPIC
17:20 KAS–CUHK Students Forum
(in cooperation with the Faculty of Law/Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK)
“Climate Change and Human Responses”
Chair: Peter HEFELE, KAS RECAP, Hong Kong
Welcoming Remarks:
– Anatole BOUTE, Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK)
– LL.M-Master Course Student, CUHK
Discussion
18:00 Wrap-up and Concluding Remarks
– Andreas OBERHEITMANN

RECENT GLO Discussion Papers on the issue (freely downloadable):

DP 266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi
DP 221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar
DP 86 Do Environmental Regulations Effect FDI decisions? The Pollution Haven Hypothesis Revisited – Download PDF
by Yoon, Haeyeon & Heshmati, Almas
DP 78 Managing the Impact of Climate Change on Migration: Evidence from Mexico – Download PDF
by Chort, Isabelle & de la Rupelle, Maëlys
DP 56 Happiness in the Air: How Does a Dirty Sky Affect Mental Health and Subjective Well-being? – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xiaobo & Chen, Xi
DP 32 Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance  – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin

Ends;

 

“Climate Change and Human Responses”: GLO conference in Hong Kong with FOM & KAS has started on Wednesday, 31 October 2018

The joint FOM-GLO-KAS Conference about “Climate Change and Human Responses”  scheduled  for 31 October – 2 November 2018 in Hong Kong has begun on Wednesday, 31 October 2018. The event is co-organized by the Global Labor Organization (GLO), FOM University of Applied Sciences and Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS).

See details on the following days, linked: DAY TWO, DAY THREE

Climate change is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st Century. It does not only have severe consequences for eco-systems, but also directly and indirectly affects societies and economies. The consequences for global production chains, output, labor markets and well-being will be massive. Rising sea levels, floods and droughts, changing agricultural patterns – tremendous economic losses and migration of labor force will lead to unforeseeable consequences on human well-being, public health, labor performance and productivity. The innovative conference deals with the under-researched human consequences of climate change and brings together researchers, business, the policy community and civil society in a city which will be heavily affected by climate change, Hong Kong.

GLO has recently provided a number of Discussion Papers on the topic, see below.

Organizers are Peter Hefele (KAS RECAP, Hongkong), Andreas Oberheitmann (FOM, RWI and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO). Participants are renowned researchers, politicians and entrepreneurs from Hong Kong, Asia, Europe and the US.

THE PROGRAM: “Climate Change and Human Responses” 

WEDNESDAY, 31ST OCTOBER 2018
Venue: Meeting Room Whampoa 1&2, 1/F, Hotel Harbour Grand Kowloon, Hung Hom,
Hong Kong

16:00 Registration
16:15 Welcoming Remarks
Peter HEFELE, KAS RECAP, Hong Kong
Andreas OBERHEITMANN, FOM Hochschule, RWI and GLO
16:45 Keynote Speech
Klaus F. ZIMMERMANN, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO
Climate Change: The Global Labor Challenge
17:15 Q&A
18:00 End of Discussion
19:00 Dinner
Keynote Speech: Ir Albert LAI, CEO of Carbon Care Asia, Hong Kong
Climate Change: Challenges and Opportunities for Hong Kong´s Innovation System
Venue: Grand Salon, Hotel Harbour Grand Kowloon

THURSDAY, 1ST NOVEMBER 2018

9:00 Session 1: Impact of Climate Change on Regions and Industry Sectors
Chair: ZHANG Yifan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO
– Manfred FISCHEDICK, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment
Climate Change and (Basic) Industry: Options and Related Chances and Challenges
for a Green Transformation
– Andreas OBERHEITMANN, FOM, RWI and GLO
Challenges of Climate Change for Coastal Regions and Cities: the Case of China
10:30 Coffee break
11:00 Session 2: Impacts of Climate Change on Global Labor Force and Labour
Markets
Chair: GUO Chaoran, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and GLO
FENG Shuaizhang, Jinan University and GLO (with CUI Xiaomeng, Jinan University)
Climate Variability, Agricultural Productivity and Migration
(video presentation)
– CHEN Xi, Yale University and GLO
Climate and Environmental Challenges to Health Capital
– Christopher PARSONS, The University of Western Australia and GLO
Climate Change and Migration, Exit, Voice and Loyalty: A Solution to the Immobility Paradox
13:00 Lunch
Venue: Restaurant Waterfront Bar & Terrace, G/F, Harbour Grand Kowloon

14.00 Session 3: Climate Change: Historical Lessons
Chair: Manfred FISCHEDICK, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment
– Almas HESHMATI, Jönköping International Business School, Sogang University
and GLO, Sweden/South Korea
What Can We Learn from Environmental Disasters for the Climate Change Challenges?
– PEI Qing, Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Mandate of Heaven – Climate change, migration and geopolitical cycles in imperial
China
15:30 Coffee Break
15:45 Session 4: Climate Change: How to React?
Chair: Anbumozhi VENKATACHALAM, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East
Asia (ERIA)
– Astghik MAVISAKALYAN, Curtin University and GLO
Gender and Climate Change: Do Female Parliamentarians Make a Difference?
Eileen GALLAGHER, BSR (Business for Social Responsibility), Hong Kong
How Business Can Manage Climate Risk in Southeast Asia
17:00 Coffee Break

17:20 KAS–CUHK Students Forum
(in cooperation with the Faculty of Law/Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK)
“Climate Change and Human Responses”
Chair: Peter HEFELE, KAS RECAP, Hong Kong / Anjle GUPTA, CUHK, Hong Kong
Welcoming Remarks:
– Anatole BOUTE, Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK)
Statements (each 5–10 mins)
– LL.M-Master Course Student, CUHK
Discussion
18:00 Wrap-up and Concluding Remarks
– Andreas OBERHEITMANN
– Peter HEFELE
18:30 Meet at Lobby and Transfer to Restaurant
19:00 Dinner

FRIDAY, 2ND NOVEMBER 2018
8:30 Breakfast Discussion (in cooperation with the German Chamber of Commerce)
Climate Change and Human Responses: How to prepare for Change?
Venue: German Chamber of Commerce, 3601, Tower One, Lippo Centre,
89 Queensway, Admiralty, Hong Kong
Chair: Andreas OBERHEITMANN, FOM, RWI and GLO
Welcoming Remarks
– Wolfgang EHMANN, German Chamber of Commerce
Klaus F. ZIMMERMANN, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO
Keynote Speeches (10 min each)
– Manfred FISCHEDICK, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment
– Eric CHONG, President and CEO of Siemens Ltd. Hong Kong; Member of the
Board of Directors of Business Environment Council (BEC), Hong Kong
Q&A
10:00 End of Event

 
From the left: GLO Fellows Andreas OBERHEITMANN, Christopher PARSONS &  Astghik MAVISAKALYAN
Andreas OBERHEITMANN &
Klaus F. ZIMMERMANN
From the left: Almas HESHMATI, GLO Fellow and GLO Cluster Lead Africa, listening to Peter HEFELE who is introducing the Keynote Dinner Speaker: Ir Albert LAI Keynote Dinner Speaker
  Ir Albert LAI
CEO of Carbon Care Asia
Hong Kong

RECENT GLO Discussion Papers on the issue (freely downloadable):

DP 266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi
DP 221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar
DP 86 Do Environmental Regulations Effect FDI decisions? The Pollution Haven Hypothesis Revisited – Download PDF
by Yoon, Haeyeon & Heshmati, Almas
DP 78 Managing the Impact of Climate Change on Migration: Evidence from Mexico – Download PDF
by Chort, Isabelle & de la Rupelle, Maëlys
DP 56 Happiness in the Air: How Does a Dirty Sky Affect Mental Health and Subjective Well-being? – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xiaobo & Chen, Xi
DP 32 Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance  – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin

Ends;

 

Is female breadwinning unhealthy for partnerships? Not broadly, says new evidence for the US and Australia

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month (see below) from all GLO DP’s of October (see below) presents new evidence on the association between female breadwinning and the quality of US and Australian partnerships and their stability. The good news is that it is not widely negatively related.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: October 2018

Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S., 2018. “Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 259, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Using Bertrand, Kamenica and Pan’s (2015) original data, we find that female breadwinning is significantly associated with partnership problems only for older women in cross sections, but for younger ones in fixed-effects specifications. In more recent US and Australian data, female breadwinning is associated with a modestly higher dissolution risk and a fall in some measures of reported relationship quality, but mainly for young people in cohabiting partnerships and men in less educated partnerships. We suggest our results reflect changing norms plus market dynamics arising from the ease of access to superior partnership alternatives for women who out-earn their partners.

GLO Discussion Papers of October 2018

267 New Education Models for the Future of Work ForceDownload PDF
by Pastore, Francesco

266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi

265 Drivers of Labor Force Participation in Advanced Economies: Macro and Micro EvidenceDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

264 A Cohort-Based Analysis of Labor Force Participation for Advanced EconomiesDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

263 Low, High and Super Congestion of an Open-Access Resource: Impact under Autarky and Trade, with Aquaculture as IllustrationDownload PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

262 Brain Drain-Induced Brain Gain and the Bhagwati Tax: Are Early and Recent Paradigms Compatible?Download PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

261 Labor Market and Institutional Drivers of Youth Irregular Migration: Evidence from the MENA RegionDownload PDF
by Dibeh, Ghassan & Fakih, Ali & Marrouch, Walid

260 Public versus Private Sector Wage Gap in Egypt: Evidence from Quantile Regression on Panel DataDownload PDF
by Tansel, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin

259 Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?Download PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

258 Marriage Market Signals and Homeownership for the Never MarriedDownload PDF
by Mundra, Kusum & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth

257 Economic impact of STEM immigrant workersDownload PDF
by Baum, Christopher F. & Lööf, Hans & Stephan, Andreas

256 Does Regulation Trade-Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction EngineersDownload PDF
by Rostam-Afschar, Davud & Strohmaier, Kristina

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

Zimmermann gave a research seminar at Beijing Normal University last Friday on arsenic drinking water

In October 2018, Klaus F. Zimmermann, President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, had taken his office at Renmin University of China. On Friday October 26, he visited Beijing Normal University to provide a research seminar on “Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water and Mental Health”.

The seminar was invited and chaired by GLO Fellow & Professor Li Shi of Beijing Normal University, who also introduced Zimmermann to the very large audience. The presentation was based on a revised version of his recent Princeton University Discussion Paper (Working Paper #607, Princeton University, Industrial Relations Section). The discussion was lively and Zimmermann has received a number of useful comments.

Zimmermann during his lecture.
LAI Desheng (right), Professor & Dean of the Business School of Beijing Normal University.
AFTER THE HOUR. Zimmermann, left, with GLO Fellow Professor LI Shi of Beijing Normal University, one of the leading labor scholars of the country.

 

Ends;

China Research promoted by the GLO Discussion Papers series: On the Chinese transition to permanent work contracts

New research in the Discussion Paper Series of the Global Labor Organization (GLO): In its Labor Contract Law introduced in 2008, China strengthened the labor protection for workers. As a consequence, temporary work contracts have to be permanent after 10 years of work duration. Randall Akee (University of California, Los Angeles) with GLO Fellows Ligiu Zhao and Zhong Zhao (both Renmin University of China) have presented evidence that Chinese companies have often dismissed workers to avoid such permanent contracts resulting in large welfare losses among those workers.

GLO Fellow Zhong Zhao, Renmin University of China, Beijing, and Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics

GLO Discussion Paper No. 242

Unintended Consequences of China’s New Labor Contract Law on Unemployment and Welfare Loss of the WorkersDownload PDF
by Akee, Randall & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

Abstract

China’s new Labor Contract Law, which intended to strengthen the labor protection for workers, went into effect on January 1, 2008. The law stipulated that the maximum cumulative duration of successive fixed-term (temporary) labor contracts is 10 years, and employees working for the same employer for more than 10 consecutive years are able to secure an open-ended (permanent) labor contract under the new law, which is highly desirable to employees. However, in order to circumvent the new Labor Contract Law, some employers may have dismissed workers, after the passage of the new law, who had worked in the same firm for more than 10 years. Using data from the 2008 China General Social Survey, we find strong evidence that firms did in fact dismiss their formal-contract employees who have been employed for more than 10 years. Additionally, using a regression discontinuity design based on this exogenous change in unemployment status for this particular group of workers, we show that the dismissed workers suffered significant welfare loss in terms of happiness. Our results are robust to various specifications and placebo tests.

Interested in other GLO Discussion Papers?  The GLO DP series for free.

Interested in other research on China? Recent Papers on the Chinese Labor Market.

Ends;

Another GLO & University of Malaya Research Seminar took place in Kuala Lumpur on 19 October 2018

19 October 2018 at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Faculty of Economics and Administration of the University of Malaya (UM) has organized again an event in this seminar series: The GLO-UM Joint Labor Economics Seminar. It is headed by GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah in his function as the GLO Lead for South-East Asia (GLO activities in South-East Asia). He is also the GLO Country Lead Malaysia.

The speaker has been Dr Rasyad  Parinduri, who is an Associate Professor at the Nottingham University Business School (NUBS), the University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus. He spoke about:

“The Effects of Mediums of Instruction on Educational and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Malaysia ”

Abstract of the lecture:
We examine the effects of having English as a medium of instruction on labor market outcomes later in life. We exploit an exogenous variation in mediums of instruction induced by the government of Malaysia’s decision to discontinue English-medium public schools and phase them out with Malay-medium public schools in 1970, which fits a fuzzy regression discontinuity design. We find some evidence that having English as a medium of instruction improves labor market outcomes. We explore some mechanisms through which mediums of instruction matter: We find having English as a medium of instruction improves English proficiency, especially reading and writing skills, and increases educational attainment, which in turn increase earnings and improve employability.

PDF Flyer of the event: GLO-Seminar-19-Oct-2018
Paper for the event.
Further details of the event schedule.

GLO Fellow Niaz Asadullah (left) & Rasyad  Parinduri
Associate Professor Yong Chen Chen commenting on the talk

Speaker bio:
Rasyad A. Parinduri
is an Associate Professor of Economics at the Nottingham University Business School (NUBS), the University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus. Rasyad teaches industrial organization at the NUBS. He does research on the intersection of development economics and industrial organization using applied microeconometrics, analyzing the effects of policies and market changes on development, competition, labor outcomes, and trade. He has published in, among others, the Journal of Development Studies, Economics of Transition, Economics of Education Review, and World Development.

Seminar Speaker Rasyad A. Parinduri GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah
Ends;

 

 

 

Update: More on the 10th CIER Anniversary on 18 October 2018 in Beijing

On October 18, 2018, the China Institute for Employment Research (CIER) at Renmin University of China had celebrated its 10th Anniversary during a regular seasonal meeting to analyze the employment situation at the Chinese labor market. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann gave one of the invited keynotes. More details. More pictures of the event:

First row from the left: GLO Fellows and Professors Shi Li (Beijing Normal University) & Xiangquan Zeng (Renmin University, Director CIER), former Chinese Minister of Labor Xiaojian Zhang, and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann

 

Conference Hall During the debate Conference participants

Several further GLO Fellows participated at the event, including Renmin University Professors Liqin Zhao and Fei Wang.

Ends;

Expert Michele Bruni says: African mass emigration is not an option, but unavoidable.

In an interview with GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann in Beijing, Michele Bruni, Team Leader and Resident Expert of the EU-China Social Protection Reform Project, outlines that the world will see large, unstoppable demographic imbalances causing substantial challenges. It will in particular involve China, Europe and Africa. Only managed migration and educational efforts can help to deal with this.

GLO Fellow Michele Bruni, Team Leader and Resident Expert of the EU-China Social Protection Reform Project, Beijing.

Michele Bruni holds a Laurea in Political Sciences from the University of Florence and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. He has taught at the Universities of Calabria, Bologna, and Modena. He is a Fellow of  the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and member of the Center for the Analysis of Public Policies of the Faculty of Economics “M. Biagi”, University of Modena (CAPP). At present, Bruni lives in Beijing where he is Team Leader and Resident Expert of the EU-China Social Protection Reform Project. For more than twenty five years he has participated as labor market expert in numerous EU, ADB and WB funded projects in Eastern Europe, Africa and South East Asia countries. In his research, Bruni has focused on the development of stock and flow models and their application to the analysis of labor market and migration.

QUESTION: Your research seems to suggest that the world will soon experience the largest demographic imbalances that mankind has ever seen. What do you mean by this?

During this century, the growth of working age population will level off as a consequence of the unstoppable demographic transition. But this will result from two opposite tendencies:  the working age population of (i) an increasing number of countries will sharply decline, and (ii) of an decreasing number of countries, the poorest ones, it will explode. This is an unprecedented demographic polarization due to the very different stages countries are currently in the demographic transition.

Over the next 40 years, the world’s working age population will increase from 4.85 billion to 6.21 billion, this is a rise of 1.36 billion people and 28%. This results from positive balances of 1.9 billion and negative balances of 524 million people. The shrinking areas are lead by China with a share of 48.1%, followed by Europe (25.6%), Asia excluding China (18.2%), Latin America (4.1%), and the new world countries (USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) with only 3.8%. The positive balances will be concentrated in Africa (56.8%) and in Asia (37.6 %).

QUESTION: Although both shrinking and aging, China and Europe plan to play the “fortress game”. Will this be sustainable?

In absence of migration the working age population of Europe will decline by 134 million and that of China by 252 million over the next 4 decades. Can Europe and China really continue on their path of economic growth and social development without migrants? Is technological change capable to increase productivity as then needed?

The idea that AI and robots will produce a dramatic decline of labor needs has been put forward by gurus of the new technologies, economists, and obviously politicians. However, this is not supported by empirical evidence, it is static and ignores second order effects. Computer-based technologies may destroy jobs, but may also create new ones. Furthermore, the human mind has what appears to be a limitless capacity and fantasy to “invent” new needs and a limitless capacity to invent and produce new goods to satisfy them. It seems therefore evident that for Europe, China – and other numerous countries like Japan and Korea that will experience an even more dramatic decline of working age population – mass immigration is not an option, but a necessity.

To play the “fortress game” by exploiting irrational fears and ignore how the labor market works and how strong the demographic trends are would be totally irrational. Moreover, this game would be undermined by the market itself that will find a way to satisfy its labor needs. At the same time it is difficult to believe that Africa, a continent plagued by war, endemic problems of corruption, and a low educational level will be able to outperform the Chinese economic miracle and create over a 40 year period the more than 700 million jobs necessary to satisfy its increase of labor supply. Therefore, African mass emigration is not an option, but unavoidable.

QUESTION:  Would global collaboration help, and could educational investments be part of a solution?

The demographic polarization contains the potential solution to the problems it generates: The structural need of labor of the countries in the last phase of the demographic transition will correspond a structural excess of labor in the countries in the first phase. However, it is unrealistic that in the present political context immigration countries will open their countries sufficiently allowing the market to do the matching. In my work, I have suggested a cooperative management of migration flows recognizing that arrival countries will almost only need migrants with a medium or high level of education. Hence, the necessary education and vocational training should be financed by the immigration countries and organized by a specialized international organization in the origin countries.

QUESTION: How can China and Europe cooperate, and could they absorb African excess supply of labor?

Europe and China cannot absorb the huge rise in the job-seeking African population, but significantly reduce the burden of job-creation there to less than 400 million. Still a large number, but together with the Chinese infrastructure initiatives the proposed educational activities could help to give the African continent a push. This analysis also suggest that Europe, China and other Asian countries could join forces to maximize the potential of demand-driven migrations, while given its location and rich experience in this field, Europe could take the role of the “training center” of the project.

QUESTION: So the face of migration in the future is “African”?

Human history has already recorded two “out of Africa” migrations. It is a matter of speculation whether those early migrations were due to economic reasons or, as I suspect, to one of the basic characteristic of primates, curiosity. This century will record the third out of Africa migration, but this time migrants will be pulled by the labor needs of Europe and Asia.

GLO Experts Bruni & Zimmermann debating the facts and the policy options in a Beijing coffee shop

References

Bruni, Michele (2017), Egypt Labour market report. Demographic trends, labour market evolution and scenarios for the period 2015-30, International Organization for Migration, Cairo.

Bruni, Michele (2017), Promoting a Common Understanding of Migration Trends. Analysis and Policies, International Organization for Migration, Cairo.

Bruni, Michele (2018), Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF, GLO Discussion Paper No. 222.

Cervellati, Matteo, Uwe Sunde & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Demographic Dynamics and Long-Run Development: Insights for the Secular Stagnation Debate, Working Paper #604, Princeton University, Industrial Relations Section, UNU – MERIT Working Paper # 2016-049, ZEF Discussion Papers on Development Policy #226 & CEPR Discussion Paper DP 11569. Published:  Journal of Population Economics , Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 401–432; DOI: 10.1007/s00148-016-0626-8.

Zimmermann, Klaus F. et al. (2013), Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training, Foundations and Trends® in Microeconomics 9, 1-157.

Ends;

GLO President Zimmermann delivered keynote speech at Beijing Capital University

Beijing, 21 October 2018. Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing/China. During the Third Annual Conference of Labor Economics in ChinaGLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann provided a keynote speech on “Migration and Wellbeing”.

Zimmermann also provided information about GLO, the Journal of Population Economics, where he serves as Editor-in-Chief and made references to the recent research work in these outlets on China. See for the material.

At the gate of Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing. Before the keynote in the lecture room. Announcement of the keynote.
Welcome by Prof. Xiliang Feng, Chairman of the School of Labor Economics (left). Comments and summary by Prof. Yufen Tong of the School of Labor Economics


Ends;

GLO Fellow Michele Bruni, Beijing, studies the long-term implications of demographic change for China

China is much younger than Europe, but ages much faster reaching and passing Europe in due course. Michele Bruni, EU Expert resident in Beijing and Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) analyzes the consequences of the significant demographic changes for the Chinese labor market and welfare.

GLO Fellow Michele Bruni, EU Expert, and  Resident in Beijing

GLO Discussion Paper No. 222 Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF
by Bruni, Michele

Abstract

China still lags behind Europe along the path of the demographic transition and therefore is still much younger. However, due to the speed with which the fertility rate dropped and life expectancy increased, China ageing process will proceed at a very fast space and around the middle of the century the population of China is projected to be as old as that of France and the UK and older than that of the USA. The paper evaluates the labor market and welfare implications of this process, also by an economic indicator of dependency and socioeconomic burden.

Interested in other GLO Discussion Papers?  The GLO DP series for free.

Interested in other research on China? Recent Papers on the Chinese Labor Market

Ends;

Employment in China: CIER Forecasting Workshop debates future while celebrating CIER’s 10th anniversary

CIER at Renmin University celebrates its 10th anniversary and debates the challenging employment prospective in the face of global trade tensions. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, while visiting Renmin University in October, congratulates to the success of CIER and contributes to the exchange on the future of labor.

The China Institute for Employment Research (CIER) at Renmin University of China, now a globally well known and respected research institution, organizes regular influential meetings by academics, government experts and practitioners from business to judge the state of the Chinese labor market. CIER is directed by Professor Xiangquan Zeng, a former long-term Dean of the School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University and Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

Due to the large changes of China and in the world, traditional data sources have often become meaningless and new indicators and their permanent evaluation have to be organized. It was an innovative initiative, when CIER presented in 2011 for the first time what is now called the CIER-Index, an indicator that measures the tightness of the Chinese labor market by relating the size of jobseekers to the demands of the hiring authorities using survey data from business. The index has established its value and is well used inside and outside China.

On 18 October 2018, the regular seasonal forecasting meeting at Renmin University has dealt with the employment consequences of the global tensions in international economic relations. Concerns have been expressed about the predicted moderation of economic growth and an expected decline in employment, which were detailed and confirmed by CIER analysis and all the experts present.

All invited speakers including Renmin Vice-President Liu Yuanchun, former Labor Minister of China Xiaojian Zhang and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann expressed in their keynote speeches strongly the importance  and significance CIER and its leader, Professor Xiangquan Zeng, had over the entire decade. Zimmermann has called Director Zeng a “man of vision and practice” during challenging times. All wished Zeng and CIER much success for the important work in the time to come.

Former Chinese Minister of Labor Xiaojian Zhang (middle) with GLO Fellow Xiangquan Zeng (left) & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann after a joint dinner.

During the celebration & analysis meeting:

GLO Fellows Xiangquan Zeng (right) and Shi Li of Beijing Normal University CIER Director Xiangquan Zeng of Rinmin University during his talk presenting his analysis of the Chinese labor market. In front: Liu Yuanchun, Vice President of Renmin University During the debate:  Liu Yuanchun, Xiangquan Zeng & Klaus F. Zimmermann

 


Ends;

Recent Research Papers on the Chinese Labor Market

The School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China (Beijing) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) currently organize a joint conference on the Chinese Labor Market. The place on 20 and 21 October 2018 at Renmin University of China, Beijing. On Sunday October 21, Klaus F. Zimmermann, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and Honorary Professor at Renmin University will give a keynote speech on “Recent Labor Market Research on China”. In his presentation, he will draw on three sources: (i) His own published recent research work in the area, (ii) papers made available in 2017 & 2018 through the prominent GLO Discussion Paper series and (iii) the papers on China published in 2017-2018 and online 2019 In the Journal of Population Economics. Zimmermann is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics, the leading global academic journal of this field.

Klaus F. Zimmermann

A. RESEARCH PAPERS BY KLAUS F. ZIMMERMANN

Relative Concerns of Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 81 (2012), 421-441. (With A. Akay and O. Bargain.)

Self-Employment of Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, International Journal of Manpower, 33 (2012), 96-117.  (With C. Giulietti and G. Ning.)

China’s Latent Human Capital Investment: Achieving Milestones and Competing for the Top, Journal of Contemporary China, 22 (2013), 109-130. (With A. Constant, B. Tien and J. Meng.)

The RUMiC Longitudinal Survey: Fostering Research on Labor Markets in China, IZA Journal of Labor and Development, 3 (2014) (With M. Akgüc and C. Giulietti.)

Remittances and Well-Being among Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, Review of Economics of the Household, 12 (2014), 517-546. (With A. Akay, C. Giulietti and J.D. Robalino.)

Sibling Influence on the Human Capital of the Left Behind, Journal of Human Capital, 9 (2015), 403-438. (With C. Biavaschi and C. Giulietti.)

Remittances and Relative Concerns in Rural China, China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 191-207. (With A. Akay, O. Bargain, C. Guilietti and J. D. Robalino.)

Risk Attitudes and Migration, China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 166-176. (With M. Akgüc, X. Liu and M. Tani.)

B. RESEARCH PAPERS IN THE GLO DISCUSSION PAPER SERIES (DP numbers and links for free access): 2017 & 2018

Chi Chen, Yale University Zhong Zhao, Renmin University Michele Bruni, EU Expert

242 Unintended Consequences of China’s New Labor Contract Law on Unemployment and Welfare Loss of the WorkersDownload PDF
by Akee, Randall & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

238 Returns to higher education subjects and tiers in China – Evidence from the China Family Panel StudiesDownload PDF
by Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei & Zhu, Yu

222 Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF
by Bruni, Michele

204 The Power of the Government: China’s Family Planning Leading. Group and the Fertility Decline since 1970 – Download PDF
by Chen, Yi & Huang, Yingfei

177 Technological catching-up, sales dynamics and employment growth: evidence from China’s manufacturing firms – Download PDF
by Dosi, Giovanni & Yu, Xiaodan

159 Do Skewed Sex Ratios Among Children Promote Parental Smoking? Longitudinal Evidence from Rural China – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi

130 Do Migrant Students Affect Local Students’ Academic Achievements in Urban China? – Download PDF
by Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell

127 What Drives Spatial Clusters of Entrepreneurship in China? Evidence from Economic Census Data – Download PDF
by Zheng, Liang & Zhao, Zhong

120 Where Are Migrants from? Inter- vs. Intra-Provincial Rural-Urban Migration in China – Download PDF
by Su, Yaqin & Tesfazion, Petros & Zhao, Zhong

80 The Heterogeneous Impact of Pension Income on Elderly Living Arrangements: Evidence from China’s New Rural Pension Scheme – Download PDF
by Cheng, Lingguo & Liu, Hong & Zhang, Ye & Zhao, Zhong

56 Happiness in the Air: How Does a Dirty Sky Affect Mental Health and Subjective Well-being? – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xiaobo & Chen, Xi

53 The Impact of Social Pensions on Intergenerational Relationships: Comparative Evidence from China Download the PDF
by Chen, Xi & Eggleston, Karen & Ang, Sun

37 On the exposure of the BRIC countries to global economic shocks  – Download PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Dreger, Christian & Dubova, Irina

32 Smog in Our Brains: Gender Differences in the Impact of Exposure to Air Pollution on Cognitive Performance  – Download PDF
by Chen, Xi & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhang, Xin

C. PAPERS PUBLISHED IN THE JOURNAL OF POPULATION ECONOMICS: 2017-2019

Journal of Population Economics

Three decades of publishing research in population economics by Alessio J. G. Brown & Klaus F. Zimmermann; Journal of Population Economics (2017) 30: 1, 11–27

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Report of the Editor-in-Chief, 2018

ONLINE forthcoming

How does internal migration affect the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind? By Juliane Scheffel, Yiwei Zhang

The dragon cohort of Hong Kong: traditional beliefs, demographics, and education by Yan Lau

PUBLISHED 2018

Informal search, bad search?: The effects of job search method on wages among rural migrants in urban China by Yuanyuan Chen, Le Wang, Min Zhang; Vol. 31:3, 837-876

The intergenerational education spillovers of pension reform in China by Cheng Yuan, Chengjian Li, Lauren A. Johnston; Vol. 31:3, 671-701

Run away? Air pollution and emigration interests in China by Yu Qin, Hongjia Zhu; Vol. 31: 1, 235-266

The heterogeneous impact of pension income on elderly living arrangements: evidence from China’s new rural pension scheme by Lingguo Cheng, Hong Liu, Ye Zhang, Zhong Zhao; Vol. 31: 1, 155-192

PUBLISHED 2017

Quality of migrant schools in China: evidence from a longitudinal study in Shanghai by Yuanyuan Chen, Shuaizhang Feng; Vol. 30:3, 1007-1034

Sibling gender composition’s effect on education: evidence from China by Xiaoyan Lei, Yan Shen, James P. Smith, Guangsu Zhou; Vol. 30:2, 569-590

China’s family planning policies and their labor market consequences by Fei Wang, Liqiu Zhao, Zhong Zhao; Vol 30:1, 31-68

Ends;

Renmin University of China & GLO Conference on the Chinese Labor Market on October 20-21: Program is out!

The School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China (Beijing) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have published the program of their forthcoming  conference on the Chinese labor market. The event will take place on 20 and 21 October 2018 at Renmin University of China, Beijing, in Conference Room 2, Yifu Conference Hall, Renmin University. Program Announcement (Chinese link). Program Flyer

The Renmin University / GLO Conference provides a platform for researchers working on topics related to the Chinese labor market, including migration, discrimination, health and well-being, education, environment, labor market policies. The event is part of the Chinese Labor Market Cluster of GLO headed by GLO Cluster Lead Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton).
————————
Keynote speakers are
Xin Meng (Australian National University & GLO)
Junsen Zhang (Chinese University of Hong Kong & GLO )
Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University & GLO )
————————
Program Committee
Sylvie Démurger (French National Centre for Scientific Research& GLO ), Shuaizhang
Feng (Jinan University & GLO ), Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton & GLO ), Jun
Han (Renmin University of China& GLO)
————————
Organizers:
Corrado Giulietti
(University of Southampton & GLO)
Jun Han (Renmin University of China & GLO)
————————

Entrance to Renmin University

From above: GLO activists Feng, Meng, Zhang, Zimmermann, Giulietti & Han

Ends;

 

 

 

 

GLO President visits Beijing & Renmin University of China in October

During the entire October 2018, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is visiting the School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China in Beijing on a research and communication mission. He has taken an office at the school, participates at conferences and workshops, and meets with individual researchers. In particular, he will provide a keynote speech to a joint GLO-Renmin University conference on 20 and 21 October 2018. Since 2006, Zimmermann is Honorary Professor of this university and has visited the institution a larger number of times (see for more details). Renmin University of China is one of the most prominent and influential of the country.

Selected program:

  • 10; 24: Beijing/China. School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University; Research Seminar on “Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water and Mental Health”
  • 10; 21: Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing/China. Third Annual Conference of Labor Economics in China. Keynote speech on “Migration and Wellbeing”.
  • 10; 20-21: Renmin University of China, Beijing/China. Conference on “The Chinese Labor Market”.  Keynote speech on “Recent Labor Market Research on China”.
  • 10; 12: Beijing/China. “EU-China Social Protection Reform Project.” 2018 Workshop. Event participation.


Zimmermann at the entrance of the School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University of China.

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers September 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) presents a new method to estimate non-pecuniary returns to adult education.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: September

Ruhose, Jens & Thomsen, Stephan L. & Weilage, Insa, 2018. “The Wider Benefits of Adult Learning: Work-Related Training and Social Capital,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 250, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: We propose a regression-adjusted matched difference-in-differences framework to estimate non-pecuniary returns to adult education. This approach combines kernel matching with entropy balancing to account for selection bias and sorting on gains. Using data from the German SOEP, we evaluate the effect of work-related training, which represents the largest portion of adult education in OECD countries, on individual social capital. Training increases participation in civic, political, and cultural activities while not crowding out social participation. Results are robust against a variety of potentially confounding explanations. These findings imply positive externalities from work-related training over and above the well-documented labor market effects.

GLO Discussion Papers of September 2018

255 Natural hazards and internal migration: The role of transient versus permanent shocksDownload PDF
by Pavel, Tanvir & Hasan, Syed & Halim, Nafisa & Mozumder, Pallab

254 Globalization, Structural Change and Innovation in Emerging Economies : The Impact on Employment and SkillsDownload PDF
by Vivarelli, Marco

253 The Impact of Compulsory Schooling on Earnings. Evidence from the 1999 Education Reform in PolandDownload PDF
by Liwiński, Jacek

252 Transitioning towards more equality? Wealth gender differences and the changing role of explanatory factors over timeDownload PDF
by Sierminska, Eva & Piazzalunga, Daniela & Grabka, Markus M.

251 The Wage Premium from Foreign Language SkillsDownload PDF
by Liwiński, Jacek

250 The Wider Benefits of Adult Learning: Work-Related Training and Social CapitalDownload PDF
by Ruhose, Jens & Thomsen, Stephan L. & Weilage, Insa

249 Social Cohesion and Labor MobilityDownload PDF
by Zimmermann, Klaus F.

248 Fertility Transitions in Developing Countries: Convergence, Timing, and CausesDownload PDF
by Papagni, Erasmo

247 Country of Origin, Earnings Convergence, and Human Capital Investment: A New Method for the Analysis of U.S. Immigrant Economic AssimilationDownload PDF
by Duleep, Harriet & Liu, Xingfei & Regets, Mark

246 Who Benefits from Local Oil and Gas Employment? Labor Market Composition in the Oil and Gas Industry in TexasDownload PDF
by Cai, Zhengyu & Maguire, Karen & Winters, John V.

245 The effect of self-employment on health: Instrumental variables analysis of longitudinal social security dataDownload PDF
by Gonçalves, Judite & Martins, Pedro S.

244 The effect of culture on home-ownershipDownload PDF
by Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

243 Is Unemployment on Steroids in Advanced Economies?Download PDF
by Di Bella, Gabriel & Grigoli, Francesco & Ramírez, Francisco

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

Kuala Lumpur 19 October: GLO & University of Malaya Research Seminar on Mediums of Instruction

19 October 2018 at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.The Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Faculty of Economics and Administration of the University of Malaya (UM) invite again to the new joint seminar series:

The GLO-UM Joint Labor Economics Seminar

It is headed by GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah in his function as the GLO Lead for South-East Asia (GLO activities in South-East Asia). He is also the GLO Country Lead Malaysia.

The speaker will be Dr Rasyad  Parinduri, who is an Associate Professor at the Nottingham University Business School (NUBS), the University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus. He will speak about:

“The Effects of Mediums of Instruction on Educational and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Malaysia ”.  

PDF Flyer of the event: GLO-Seminar-19-Oct-2018

19 October 2018, Friday
10.00 am to 12:00 pm DK4,
Faculty of Economics & Administration,
University of Malaya
Program
10.00-10:10 am Registration
10.10-10:15 am Introductory remarks by Professor Niaz Asadullah, GLO Lead for South-East Asia 
10:15 – 11:15 am Lecture by Dr Rasyad Parinduri
11:15 – 11.45 am Q & A session
11.45 – 12.30 pm Lunch (only by invitation)
Abstract: We examine the effects of having English as a medium of instruction on labor market outcomes later in life. We exploit an exogenous variation in mediums of instruction induced by the government of Malaysia’s decision to discontinue English-medium public schools and phase them out with Malay-medium public schools in 1970, which fits a fuzzy regression discontinuity design. We find some evidence that having English as a medium of instruction improves labor market outcomes. We explore some mechanisms through which mediums of instruction matter: We find having English as a medium of instruction improves English proficiency, especially reading and writing skills, and increases educational attainment, which in turn increase earnings and improve employability.
Speaker bio: Rasyad A. Parinduri is an Associate Professor of Economics at the Nottingham University Business School (NUBS), the University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus. Rasyad teaches industrial organization at the NUBS. He does research on the intersection of development economics and industrial organization using applied microeconometrics, analyzing the effects of policies and market changes on development, competition, labor outcomes, and trade. He has published in, among others, the Journal of Development Studies, Economics of Transition, Economics of Education Review, and World Development.

Seminar Speaker Rasyad A. Parinduri

GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah in his function as the GLO Lead for South-East Asia heading the new GLO-UM Joint Labor Economics Seminar in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Ends;

 

 

 

How gender and family types shape wealth and homeownership: New book from Palgrave Macmillan

Two Fellows of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have just published a new study on “Wealth and Homeownership: Women, Men and Families” with the prominent publisher Palgrave Macmillan. In this timely book, Mariacristina Rossi and Eva Sierminska analyze the complex relationship between gender, wealth and homeownership. By providing a conceptual framework to insert homeownership and housing decisions within an economic rationale, the authors explore how gender and family types have shaped wealth accumulation and homeownership.​

MORE DETAILS – Content and Order

GLO Fellow Mariacristina Rossi is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Turin, Italy. Her research interests include intertemporal saving and consumption choices, household finance, development and gender economics.


GLO Fellow Mariacristina Rossi

GLO Fellow Eva M. Sierminska is Senior Researcher at the Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Luxembourg. She is a labor economist and has extensive research experience in the area of labor markets, inequality, household finance and population economics.


GLO Fellow Eva M. Sierminska


Ends;

GLO – supported scientific conferences and events 2018

REMINDER –  forthcoming events 2018:
(Note that the submission deadline for the Bali EBES 27 conference on January 9-11, 2019 is October 31, 2018!)

 

Past events 2018

 

Ends;

Migration and well-being among those left behind: New research from the Journal of Population Economics

New research forthcoming in the Journal of Population Economics finds: Having family members abroad internationally may be associated with greater well-being of those staying behind as one study shows Nikolova, Graham and Ivlevs)! However, it does not hold for the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind in China as other research in the Journal shows (Scheffel and Zhang).

Milena Nikolova, Carol Graham, and Artjoms Ivlevs:

Emigration, remittances, and the subjective well-being of those staying behind

The authors are: Artjoms Ivlevs ( University of the West of England), Milena Nikolova (University of Groningen) & Carol Graham (The Brookings Institution). Milena Nikolova & Carol Graham are also Fellows of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

The paper is open access/freely downloadable and already pre-published online. It is forthcoming 2019 in the Journal of Population Economics.

A Brookings blog has just introduced and detailed the analysis and contribution of the paper: International migration: What happens to those left behind?

Full Abstract:
We offer the first global perspective on the well-being consequences of emigration for those staying behind using several subjective well-being measures (evaluations of best possible life, positive affect, stress, and depression). Using the Gallup World Poll data for 114 countries during 2009–2011, we find that having family members abroad is associated with greater evaluative well-being and positive affect, and receiving remittances is linked with further increases in evaluative well-being, especially in poorer contexts—both across and within countries. We also document that having household members abroad is linked with increased stress and depression, which are not offset by remittances. The out-migration of family members appears less traumatic in countries where migration is more common, indicating that people in such contexts might be able to cope better with separation. Overall, subjective well-being measures, which reflect both material and non-material aspects of life, furnish additional insights and a well-rounded picture of the consequences of emigration on migrant family members staying behind relative to standard outcomes employed in the literature, such as the left-behind’s consumption, income, or labor market outcomes.

Journal of Population Economics

This adds to the literature on the positive impacts of emigrants on families and friends left behind.  See for instance:

Nikolova, Milena, Monica Roman & Klaus F. Zimmermann. Left Behind but Doing Good? Civic Engagement in Two Post-Socialist Countries. Journal of Comparative Economics, 45 (2017) 658–684.

The authors document for two post-socialist states (Bulgaria & Romania) that migration can affect the values and norms of those left behind in the home country and promote more social behavior. See on this paper a recent Gallup Blog. And a related Linkedin blog.

OTHER FRESH MIGRATION RESEARCH FORTHCOMING IN THE JOURNAL OF POPULATION ECONOMICS HAS A DIFFERENT PICTURE:

Juliane Scheffel (Leeds University, Business School, UK)  and Yiwei Zhang (Beijing, China) find that internal Chinese migration has caused reduced happiness and a higher probability of loneliness among elderly parents.

How does internal migration affect the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind?

The paper is open access/freely downloadable and already pre-published online. It is forthcoming 2019 in the Journal of Population Economics.

Full Abstract:
The ageing population resulting from the one-child policy and massive flows of internal migration in China pose major challenges to elderly care in rural areas where elderly support is based on a traditional inter-generational family support mechanism. We use data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study to examine how migration of an adult child affects the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind. We identify the effects using fixed effects and IV approaches which rely on different sources of variation. We find that migration reduces happiness by 6.6 percentage points and leads to a 3.3 percentage points higher probability of loneliness. CES-D scores of elderly parents are severely increased pushing average scores close to the cut-off indicating clinical levels of depressive symptoms. As emotional health is a key determinant of the overall health status, our findings have significant impacts on economic development in China.

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers August 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: August

Drydakis, Nick, 2018. “School-age bullying, workplace bullying and job satisfaction: Experiences of LGB people in Britain,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 237, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Using a data set that contains information on retrospective school-age bullying, as well as on workplace bullying in the respondents’ present job, the outcomes of this study suggest that bullying, when it is experienced by sexual orientation minorities tends to persist over time. According to the estimations, it seems that school-age bullying of LGB people is associated with victims’ lower educational level and occupational sorting into non-white-collar jobs, especially for gay/bisexual men. In addition, the outputs suggest that for both gay/bisexual men and lesbian/bisexual women, school-age bullying is positively associated with workplace bullying and negatively associated with job satisfaction. Additional results suggest a negative association between workplace bullying and job satisfaction. However, the outcomes show a positive association between the existence of an LGBT group in the workplace and job satisfaction.

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge & GLO) is the Lead of the GLO ClusterGender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes“.

With GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, Nick Drydakis is editing a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market“. For Details. Submissions will be accepted until March 30, 2019.

GLO Discussion Papers of August 2018

242 Unintended Consequences of China’s New Labor Contract Law on Unemployment and Welfare Loss of the WorkersDownload PDF
by Akee, Randall & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

241 The labour-augmented K+S model: a laboratory for the analysis of institutional and policy regimesDownload PDF
by Dosi, G. & Pereira, M. C. & Roventini, A. & Virgillito, M. E.

240 Workers’ awareness context in Italian 4.0 factoriesDownload PDF
by Cirillo, Valeria & Rinaldini, Matteo & Staccioli, Jacopo & Virgillito, Maria Enrica

239 From Engineer to Taxi Driver? Language Proficiency and the Occupational Skills of ImmigrantsDownload PDF
by Imai, Susumu & Stacey, Derek & Warman, Casey

238 Returns to higher education subjects and tiers in China – Evidence from the China Family Panel StudiesDownload PDF
by Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei & Zhu, Yu

237 School-age bullying, workplace bullying and job satisfaction: Experiences of LGB people in BritainDownload PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

236 When the market drives you crazy: Stock market returns and fatal car accidentsDownload PDF
by Giulietti, Corrado & Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

 

Joint GLO University of Malaya Seminar Series in Labor Economics Took Place in Kuala Lumpur.

On 21 August 2018 at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Faculty of Economics and Administration of the University of Malaya (UM) started an new joint seminar series:

The GLO-UM Joint Labor Economics Seminar

It is chaired by GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah in his function as the GLO Lead for South-East Asia. He is also the GLO Country Lead Malaysia. More information on the GLO South-East Asia Cluster.

The first speaker was GLO Fellow Dr Chandravadan Shah, who is an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for International Research on Education Systems (CIRES), Victoria University and Affiliate of Monash University in Australia.

GLO Fellow Shah spoke about

“Forecasting Labor Demand: International Best Practices”. 

FURTHER DETAILS.


From the left: Dr Kian-Ping Lim (Deputy Dean Research of the Faculty of Economics), the speaker of the day GLO Fellow Dr. Chandravadan Shah, and Niaz Asadullah (GLO Lead for South-East Asia and  GLO Country Lead Malaysia).

A well-attended event! On the microphone: University of  Malaya economist Dr VGR Chandran.


In the lively debate during the Q&A discussion session: picture features University of  Malaya economist Dr Evelyn Devadason, left.

Ends;

GLO research initiatives on “Sexual Orientation and Work” & “Gender-based Violence”

The GLO Cluster Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes headed by GLO Cluster Lead Nick Drydakis focuses on the state of being man or woman (gender), which is typically used with reference to masculinity vs femininity rather than sex, the internal and personal conception of oneself as man or woman (gender identity), and sexual preferences (sexual orientation) and their effects on wages, employment levels, occupational sorting, and workplace evaluations. What is seen as gender-appropriate can change over time, and gender assumptions are interpolated by cultural, historical and regional location.

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

GLO Cluster Lead Nick Drydakis

Among a number of activities (MORE), the GLO Cluster has prepared:

  • A Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market“. For Details.
  • A number of GLO Discussion Papers on “Gender-Based Violence“.

Gender – based violence is a very serious but under-researched issue.

Researchers affiliated with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have now provided a number of scientific papers to respond to this challenge. Read the following abstracts of those contributions. Download and read the affiliated work.

GLO DP 171: A fuzzy approach to measuring violence against women and its severity – Download PDF
by Bettio, Francesca & Ticci, Elisa & Betti, Gianni

  • We develop a scale of severity of violence against women based on fuzzy set theory. The scale can be used to derive fuzzy indexes of violence which account for the prevalence, frequency and severity of violence. Using the results of the survey conducted by the European Agency for Human Rights (FRA) we find strong congruence of ranking between the proposed scale and three widely used alternatives – the Conflict Tactic Scale, The Severity of Violence Against Women Scale and the Index of Spouse Abuse. Unlike existing alternatives, however, the scale that we propose is based on objective information rather than subjective assessment; it is parsimonious in terms of the amount of information that it requires; and it is less vulnerable to risks of cultural bias. As an example of the uses to which fuzzy measurement of violence can be put, we compute fuzzy indexes of intimate partner violence for European countries and find a clear, inverse correlation across countries with the degree of gender equality.

GLO DP 109: Male Education and Domestic Violence in Turkey: Evidence from a Natural Experiment – Download PDF
by Özer, Mustafa & Fidrmuc, Jan

  • We utilize a natural experiment, an education reform increasing compulsory schooling from five to eight years in Turkey, to obtain endogeneity-robust estimates of the effect of male education on the incidence of abusive and violent behaviour against women. We find that husband`s education lowers the probability of suffering physical, emotional and economic violence. The only aspect of violence not affected by spouse`s education is sexual violence. Schooling also lowers the likelihood that the marriage was arranged against the woman`s will, and makes men less inclined to engage in socially unacceptable behaviours such as drinking, gambling, and drug abuse. We also find that women whose mothers or whose husbands’ mothers experienced domestic violence are more likely to suffer violence themselves.

GLO DP 107: Attitudes towards intimate partner violence against women in Latin America – Download PDF
by Bucheli, Marisa & Rossi, Máximo

  • In this paper we analyze the factors that explain attitudes towards intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW) in 23 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Analyses of IPVAW in LAC are relatively scarce although there is growing concern about this problem in the region. We aim to assess the effect of individual and country characteristics using data from common sources for all countries. This work contributes to the sparse literature dealing with methods that attempt to assess the effect of macro variables. We perform a two-step procedure. We first estimate a logit model at the individual level, we calculate a measure of relative approval of IPVAW at country level and we use this measure as a dependent variable to estimate the effect of macro variables. Our study finds that most LAC patterns at individual level are similar to the international ones: approval of IPVAW is higher among women, people in rural areas, people in a disadvantaged socio-economic situation and individuals with some particular cultural characteristics. Unlikely international evidence, attitudes do not differ between ages. Our findings at country level show that approval of IPVAW increases with poverty, fertility rate and equal gender outcomes. It decreases with internet access and, with a lesser degree of robustness, with the time elapsed since the enactment of women’s suffrage. The most novel contribution of our work is the study of the variables at country level.

GLO DP 96 Stigma of Sexual Violence and Womens Decision to Work – Download PDF
by Chakraborty, Tanika & Mukherjee, Anirban & Rachapalli,Swapnika Reddy &Saha, Sarani

  • Our study is motivated by two disturbing evidences concerning women in India. On one hand, crime against women is on the rise while on the other, women’s labor force participation rate (WLFPR) has been declining over the last three decades. We estimate the extent to which the decline in WLFPR can be assigned to increasing instances of crime against women. We argue that an increase in crime against women, increases the non-pecuniary costs of traveling to work, particularly in a traditional society marked by stigma against victims of sexual crimes. Our findings suggest that women are less likely to work away from home in regions where the perceived threat of sexual harassment against girls is higher. The estimate is robust to various sensitivity checks. Moreover, the deterrence effect of crime responds to the opportunity cost of work on one hand and the stigma cost of sexual crimes on the other.

GLO Discussion Papers
GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers).

Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

Ends;

Azita Berar Awad (previously ILO) joins GLO as Policy Director

Azita Berar Awad has been appointed GLO Policy Director of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). She had been previously the Director of the Employment Policy Department of the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Azita Berar Awad has been the Director of the Employment Policy Department of the ILO in the period 2006 – 2017, working for the institution since 1983. In this position, she was responsible for the development of ILO’s approach to promoting full, productive, decent and freely chosen employment. Since employment is one of the four strategic pillars of  ILO‘s decent work agenda, her task was crucial. She was also facilitating broad-based social dialogue processes and extensive capacity-building for employment policy, engaging governments and social partners (employers and workers organizations) in all regions of the world.

See MORE on the Featured Alumna of The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva.

As the GLO Policy Director, Azita Berar Awad will continue her mission to strengthen employment creation around the world by directing policy initiatives of the GLO network. Her rich experience and large network will help GLO to develop further and connect to the relevant international organizations.

Azita BERAR AWAD

GLO Policy Director Azita Berar Awad

Ends;

Asian Productivity Organization (APO) workshop on The Impact of Education Policies on National Productivity Growth Completed in Manila/Philippines

Global Labor Organization (GLO) Fellows led the recently completed Asian Productivity Organization (APO) Workshop on the impact of education policies on national productivity growth as experts on labor productivity.

The event took place at the Development Planning Academy (DAP) in Manila (Philippines) on 14 – 17 August 2018. The GLO Lead for South-East Asia, Professor Niaz Asadullah (Malaya University), was joined by three other fellows as resource persons. They were: Dr Chandra Shah (Monash University, Australia), Dr Franceso Pastore (Seconda Università di Napoli, Italy) and Dr Gyuhee Hwang (Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training, South Korea).

The GLO Fellows discussed issues such as dual-track technical and vocational training programs, school to work transition, on the job training programs, modelling future labor demand, the race between man and machine and so on.

Below: GLO Lead for South-East Asia Niaz Asadullah (Malaya University)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: GLO Fellow Franceso Pastore (Seconda Università di Napoli, Italy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: GLO Fellow Chandra Shah (Monash University, Australia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: GLO speakers in debate from the left GLO Fellow Gyuhee Hwang (Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training, South Korea; #2), Pastore (#4), Asadullah (#5) and Shah (#6) .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: All forum participants. GLO Fellows from the left sitting in the first row: Pastore (#1), Hwang (#2), Shah (#4) and Asadullah (#5).

 

Ends;

GLO – recommended Kent University Workshop: Employment and Wage Determination in European Labour Markets

On the suggestion of the organizers, the Global Labor Organization GLO is pleased to announce the Kent Workshop in Labour Economics organized at the University of Kent, Keynes College, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP, United Kingdom.

Employment and Wage Determination in European Labour Markets

Organizers: Amanda Gosling (University of Kent) & Andrey Launov (University of Kent & GLO)
Date: November 22, 2018
Location: University of Kent, Canterbury, UK

Call for Papers

The School of Economics at the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK, invites submissions for a one-day Kent Workshop in Labour Economics which will take place on November 22, 2018. The focus of the workshop will be on the changes in European labour markets over the last two decades. Topics of particular interest include, yet not limited to, the stagnation of real wages, the role of policies such as minimum wages and social security, employment and firm dynamics as well as changes to wage structure and inequality. Submission of descriptive papers and empirical papers on policy evaluations (reduced form or structural) is equally encouraged. Keynote speech of the workshop will be delivered by

Prof. Stephen Machin (London School of Economics).

The deadline for submissions is September 15, 2018. Authors of submitted papers will be notified of decision shortly thereafter. For submission, please send your paper as an email attachment to GLO Fellow Andrey Launov (a.launov@kent.ac.uk).

The University of Kent will provide accommodation and reimburse economy class travel expenses to all authors whose contributions were accepted for presentation at the workshop.

For more information please contact Amanda Gosling (a.gosling@kent.ac.uk) or Andrey Launov (a.launov@kent.ac.uk). Further details regarding the workshop are available.

The workshop is public and open to all.  GLO wishes this workshop the best success.

Ends;

GLO directed special issue of the International Journal of Manpower on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market”

REMINDER: Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market

Submissions will be accepted from now on until March 30, 2019. See also Call for Papers of the Journal.

Edited by

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA, and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), this project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis.

Despite the enactment, in English speaking countries and the EU, of labor legislation against discrimination in the labor market based on sexual orientation, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) people continue to experience occupational access constraints, lower job satisfaction, wage discrimination (especially gay men), and more bullying and harassment than their heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014; Valfort, 2017).

Studies for the period 1989–2014 suggest that gay men receive lower wages than heterosexual men of comparable education, skills, and experience. For instance, studies find that gay men earn from 4–5% less than heterosexual men in the Netherlands, France, Greece, and the UK and up to 12–16% less in Canada, Sweden, and the US (Drydakis, 2014). Whether wage discrimination against gay men exists in other regions is of great interest and ascertaining this is of importance for policy interventions. In addition, whether wage discrimination lessens over time in response to policy interventions and legislation is hard to determine in the absence of relevant studies. It is not yet clear whether prejudice-based and/or statistical discrimination is the more appropriate framework for the study of labor discrimination against LGBTI people.

The available studies on sexual orientation and job satisfaction highlight that in Australia, Canada, and Greece, both gay men and lesbians experience lower job satisfaction than do their otherwise similar heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014). Because gay and lesbian employees face severe workplace harassment and bullying, these conditions may affect their workplace experience evaluations (Drydakis, 2014). Whether factors other than workplace harassment cause gay and lesbian employees’ dissatisfaction requires examination. Also, for instituting appropriate policy actions, it is important to determine whether these job satisfaction differences suffered by sexual orientation minorities exist in other countries.

In general, the dearth of studies makes it difficult to examine how education, occupation, industrial relations, region, core socio-economic characteristics, personality and mental health traits moderate the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes (Drydakis, 2014). Indeed, although studies suggest that lesbians face prejudice in the labor market, some studies estimate that lesbians earn more than comparable heterosexual women. Lesbians have been found to earn 3% more in the Netherlands, 8% more in the UK, 11% more in Germany, 15% more in Canada, and 20% more in the US. Whether personality characteristics, coping strategies, occupational choices, family structures and/or region positively affect lesbians’ wages is still an open question.

In addition, quantitative research on employment outcomes is scarce for trans people (Drydakis, 2017). A representative study suggests that trans people tend to suffer higher unemployment rates than those reported, in other studies, for the general U.S. population (Leppel, 2016). In addition, the interaction between trans identity, and sexual orientation, and the effects of this on employment outcomes is under-examined (Drydakis, 2017). Whether explicit, legislative employment protection against discrimination on the ground of a trans identity has an effect on employment outcomes has also received little attention (Drydakis, 2017).

Given the aforementioned lack of sufficient literature, the editors welcome empirical papers on labor economics which have a clear and highlighted added value, and solid policy implications, on the following general areas:

  • Testing, in under-examined geographical regions, for wage discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • Empirically testing and disentangling the forms of employment discrimination (i.e. prejudice-based, and/or statistical discrimination) against LGBTI people.
  • Examining the relationship between sexual orientation, personality characteristics, mental health and employment outcomes.
  • Assessing how moderators (i.e. human capital, educational choices, occupations, family structure, industrial relations etc.) affect the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.
  • Testing the relationship between sexual orientation, past/present victimization and labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying the relationship between sexual orientation and job satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the impact of the legal recognition of same-sex couples on labor market outcomes.
  • Evaluating the impact of employment legislation against sexual orientation and trans identity discrimination on labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying employment bias against trans people.
  • Examining the interaction between trans identities, sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.

Submissions will be accepted from now on until the 30th of March 2019. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the forthcoming call on the journal website.

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA and GLO)

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

References:

Drydakis N. (2014). Sexual orientation and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 111. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.111

Drydakis N. (2017). Trans people, well-being, and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 386. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.386

Leppel, K. (2016). The labor force status of transgender men and women. International Journal of Transgenderism,  Vol. 17, No. (3−4), pp. 155−164.

Patacchini, E.; Ragusa, G.; Zenou, Y. (2015)
Unexplored dimensions of discrimination in Europe: homosexuality and physical appearance, Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 28, pp. 1045-1073.

Valfort, M. (2017). LGBTI in OECD countries: A review. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 198, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: 10.1787/d5d49711-en

Ends;

Submission Deadline is August 15! Conference on the Chinese labor market in Beijing on 20-21 October 2018

The School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China (Beijing) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) announce the creation of a new conference series on issues related to the Chinese labor market. The first event will take place on 20 and 21 October 2018 at Renmin University of China, Beijing. Papers or long abstracts should be submitted by 15 August 2018 to renmin-glo@ruc.edu.cn. CONFERENCE FLYER

FOR FURTHER DETAILS SEE ALSO THE GLO WEBSITE.

Ends;

Climate Change and Human Responses: Joint FOM-GLO-KAS Conference in Hong Kong

A joint FOM-GLO-KAS Conference about “Climate Change and Human Responses” takes place on 31 October – 2 November 2018 in Hong Kong. The event is co-organized by the Global Labor Organization (GLO), FOM University of Applied Sciences and Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS).

Climate change is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st Century. It does not only have severe consequences for eco-systems, but also directly and indirectly affects societies and economies. The consequences for global production chains, output, labor markets and well-being will be massive. Rising sea levels, floods and droughts, changing agricultural patterns – tremendous economic losses and migration of labor force will lead to unforeseeable consequences on human well-being, public health, labor performance and productivity.

Mitigation and adaptation measures might have positive impacts on local and regional economies and labor markets – but with huge sector differences. Shifting from carbon-based economies to renewable ones create new sources of value and increase demand for skilled labor globally.

Against this background, the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and FOM University of Applied Sciences organize an international conference in cooperation with Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS) | Regional Project Energy Security and Climate Change Asia-Pacific to discuss these issues. The event will take place on October 31 – November 2 in Hongkong.

Organizers are Peter Hefele (KAS RECAP, Hongkong), Andreas Oberheitmann (FOM, RWI and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO)

Participants are renowned researchers, politicians and entrepreneurs from Hongkong, Asia, Europe and the US. Speakers include:

  • Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO: Climate Change: The Global Labor Challenge
  • Manfred Fischedick, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Energy and Environment, Climate Change and (Basic) Industry: Options and related Chances and Challenges for a Green Transformation
  • Andreas Oberheitmann, FOM, RWI and GLO, Challenges of Climate Change for Coastal Regions and Cities: the Case of China
  • Almas Heshmati, Jönköping International Business School, Sogang University and GLO, What Can We Learn from Environmental Disasters for the Climate Change Challenges
  • Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University and GLO, Climate Variability, Agricultural Productivity and Migration
  • Xi Chen, Yale University and GLO, Climate and Environmental Challenges to Health Capital
  • Christopher Parsons, The University of Western Australia and GLO, Climate Change and Migration, Exit, Voice and Loyalty: A Solution to the Immobility Paradox

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers July 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: July

Goel, Deepti & Deshpande, Ashwini, 2018. “Social Identity and Perceived Income Adequacy,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 232, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Economists are increasingly interested in subjective well-being, but the economic literature on perceptions of income adequacy, which is one of the factors that shapes subjective well-being, is small. Our paper fills this lacuna in the literature. We utilize nationally representative data on perceptions of amounts considered as remunerative earnings from self-employment in India, and examine how these are shaped by social identity, namely, caste. We also investigate if institutional change such as the introduction of an employment guarantee scheme alters these perceptions. Finally, we examine the relationship between caste identity and actual earnings. We find that caste identity does shape both perceptions of income adequacy as well as actual earnings: lower-ranked groups perceive lower amounts as being remunerative, and also earn lower amounts. Further, the employment guarantee scheme alters self-perceptions differentially for different caste groups, but in more nuanced ways than our ex-ante beliefs.

GLO Discussion Papers of July 2018

235 Selling hope? A review of current youth unemployment initiatives in CairoDownload PDF
by Pettit, Harry

234 Defining and Measuring Workforce Development in the United States in a Post-Bipartisan EraDownload PDF
by Holland, Brian

233 Flexible Work Organization and Employer Provided Training: Evidence from German Linked Employer-Employee DataDownload PDF
by Campaner, Annika & Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe

232 Social Identity and Perceived Income AdequacyDownload PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Deshpande, Ashwini

231 Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in DelhiDownload PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Barooah, Bidisha

230 Reflections on wage-settingDownload PDF
by Zimmermann, Klaus F.

229 Will you marry me? It depends (on the business cycle)Download PDF
by Bellido, Héctor & Marcén, Miriam

228 Immigration and the Health of Older Natives in Western EuropeDownload PDF
by Escarce, José J. & Rocco, Lorenzo

227 The Effects of Political Reservations on Credit Access and Borrowing Composition: New Evidence from IndiaDownload PDF
by Ao, Chon-Kit & Chatterjee, Somdeep

226 Self-Employment Can Be Good for Your HealthDownload PDF
by Nikolova, Milena

225 What Women Want (their men to do): Housework and satisfaction in Australian householdsDownload PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

224 My Choice: Female Contraceptive Use Autonomy in BangladeshDownload PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo

223 The Long-Run and Gender-Equalizing Impacts of School Access: Evidence from the First Indochina WarDownload PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Hoang, Trung X. & Nguyen, Ha

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

 

Submission deadline extended to October 1, 2018: 60th ISLE Annual Conference, 19-21 December 2018, Mumbai, India

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) supports the annual conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) and the associated Indian Journal of Labour Economics. Both are partner institutions of the GLO.

CALL FOR PAPERS

60th ISLE Annual Conference, 19-21 December 2018, Mumbai, India
Conference Flyer ISLE 2018

The 60th Annual Conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) will be held during 19-21 December 2018 in Mumbai, India, organized by the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research (IGIDR). The conference commemorates with the Diamond Jubilee year of the formation of ISLE.  Congratulations from GLO!

Conference Themes
– Emerging Labor Markets and Employment Challenges
– Inequality in Labor Markets and Wellbeing
– World of Work and Women

Submission of Papers:
– Submission deadline:  31 August 2018: EXTENDED TO OCTOBER 1, 2018.
– Submission details: Call for papers

GLO  intends to organize a special GLO session at this conference. Those GLO members interested to contribute to such a session are invited to contact GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com) with ideas or preliminary paper titles.

INDIAN SOCIETY OF LABOUR ECONOMICS (ISLE)   

Ends;

GLO – UM Joint Seminar at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on August 21, 2018

21 August 2018 at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.The Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Faculty of Economics and Administration of the University of Malaya (UM) start an new joint seminar series:

The GLO-UM Joint Labor Economics Seminar

It is headed by GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah in his function as the GLO Lead for South-East Asia. He is also the GLO Country Lead Malaysia.

The first speaker will be GLO Fellow Dr Chandravadan Shah, who is an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for International Research on Education Systems (CIRES), Victoria University and Affiliate of Monash University in Australia. He will speak about “Forecasting Labor Demand: International Best Practices”.  For further details see below.

PDF of this agenda: GLO-UM Program

PDF of this flyer: GLO-UM Joint Seminar

GLO Fellow Professor Niaz Asadullah in his function as the GLO Lead for South-East Asia heading the new GLO-UM Joint Labor Economics Seminar in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Ends;

GLO Fellows Wim Naudé & Alessio J. G. Brown with GLO President Zimmermann at UNU-MERIT annual internal research conference

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Co-Directors of POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), participated on June 26 – 28, 2018 at the UNU-MERIT Internal Conference 2018 and discussed with colleagues recent research activities. Zimmermann presented two papers:

  • Migration Policy as Development and Innovation Policy (with GLO Fellows Alessio J. G. Brown and Marco Vivarelli)
  • Evaluating Intergenerational Persistence of Economic Preferences: A Large Scale Experiment with Families in Bangladesh (with GLO Fellows Shyamal Chowdhury and Matthias Sutter)

and acted as a discussant of

  • Racky Balde (UNU-MERIT): The Eff ects of a Tougher Regulation of the Informal Sector: Evidence from South Africa

Zimmermann presenting paper on economic preference formation.
(Picture courtesy of GLO Fellow Franziska Gassmann, UNU-MERIT.)

At this important event, GLO – Fellow Wim Naudé, Maastricht University, and GLO Cluster Lead “Occupations and Development” presented his paper “Start-Up Accelerators as Tool to Facilitate Adaptation to Climate Change in Developing Countries: A Critical Assessment”:

Wim Naudé speaking.

Naudé and Zimmermann after a discussion of research & GLO issues in front of UNU-MERIT.

Klaus F. Zimmermann also met and spoke with GLO Fellow Alessio J. G. Brown, Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University about long-term GLO strategies and their joint research paper with GLO Fellow Marco Vivarelli.

Ends;

EBES and GLO confirm long-term collaborations between both organizations

On July 15, 2018, representatives of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) about establishing a long-term collaboration on educational and research activities between both organizations. Among other issues, the cooperation will include the exchange of academic documents, the organization of events, joint publications and other means to foster research. For instance, GLO intends to organize sessions at the May 29-31, 2019 EBES conference in Coventry, UK following the very successful experiences of a first joint event organized in May 2018 in Berlin. The MOU has been signed by EBES Vice President Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann.

 

 

 

 

 

Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin (right) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (left) with FOM Head Berlin Manuela Zipperling at the May 2018 joint EBES-FOM-GLO conference in Berlin.

Ends;

New GLO Discussion Paper investigates how life satisfaction of couples relates to the allocation of housework between them.

Does a fairer allocation of housework make her feel better? A new research paper by Gigi Foster (University of New South Wales) and Leslie S. Stratton (Virginia Commonwealth University) on housework is just freely available as a Global Labor Organization (GLO) Discussion Paper. A core finding of the study is that “when he exceeds housework norms, she is happier with housework allocations, but is less happy in broader dimensions.”

Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S. (2018) : What Women Want (their men to do): Housework and satisfaction in Australian households, GLO Discussion Paper, No. 225. PDF Free Download.

Abstract: The time allocated to household chores is substantial, with the burden falling disproportionately upon women. Further, social norms about how much housework men and women should contribute are likely to influence couples’ housework allocation decisions and satisfaction. Using Australian data spanning the years 2001-2014, we employ a two-stage estimation procedure to examine how deviations from housework norms relate to couples’ satisfaction. We find that satisfaction is negatively affected by predicted housework time, and that women’s satisfaction, but not men’s, is robustly affected by their partners’ residual housework time. When he exceeds housework norms, she is happier with housework allocations, but less happy in broader dimensions. We suggest several reasons for our results, including that housework is more salient in women’s lives than in men’s, that housework in general is not a preferred activity, and that some degree of gender-norm conformity in regard to housework can positively affect women’s life satisfaction.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

Ends;