Category Archives: Special Issue Journal

GLO directed special issue of the International Journal of Manpower on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market”

REMINDER: Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market

Submissions will be accepted from now on until March 30, 2019. See also Call for Papers of the Journal.

Edited by

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA, and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), this project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis.

Despite the enactment, in English speaking countries and the EU, of labor legislation against discrimination in the labor market based on sexual orientation, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) people continue to experience occupational access constraints, lower job satisfaction, wage discrimination (especially gay men), and more bullying and harassment than their heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014; Valfort, 2017).

Studies for the period 1989–2014 suggest that gay men receive lower wages than heterosexual men of comparable education, skills, and experience. For instance, studies find that gay men earn from 4–5% less than heterosexual men in the Netherlands, France, Greece, and the UK and up to 12–16% less in Canada, Sweden, and the US (Drydakis, 2014). Whether wage discrimination against gay men exists in other regions is of great interest and ascertaining this is of importance for policy interventions. In addition, whether wage discrimination lessens over time in response to policy interventions and legislation is hard to determine in the absence of relevant studies. It is not yet clear whether prejudice-based and/or statistical discrimination is the more appropriate framework for the study of labor discrimination against LGBTI people.

The available studies on sexual orientation and job satisfaction highlight that in Australia, Canada, and Greece, both gay men and lesbians experience lower job satisfaction than do their otherwise similar heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014). Because gay and lesbian employees face severe workplace harassment and bullying, these conditions may affect their workplace experience evaluations (Drydakis, 2014). Whether factors other than workplace harassment cause gay and lesbian employees’ dissatisfaction requires examination. Also, for instituting appropriate policy actions, it is important to determine whether these job satisfaction differences suffered by sexual orientation minorities exist in other countries.

In general, the dearth of studies makes it difficult to examine how education, occupation, industrial relations, region, core socio-economic characteristics, personality and mental health traits moderate the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes (Drydakis, 2014). Indeed, although studies suggest that lesbians face prejudice in the labor market, some studies estimate that lesbians earn more than comparable heterosexual women. Lesbians have been found to earn 3% more in the Netherlands, 8% more in the UK, 11% more in Germany, 15% more in Canada, and 20% more in the US. Whether personality characteristics, coping strategies, occupational choices, family structures and/or region positively affect lesbians’ wages is still an open question.

In addition, quantitative research on employment outcomes is scarce for trans people (Drydakis, 2017). A representative study suggests that trans people tend to suffer higher unemployment rates than those reported, in other studies, for the general U.S. population (Leppel, 2016). In addition, the interaction between trans identity, and sexual orientation, and the effects of this on employment outcomes is under-examined (Drydakis, 2017). Whether explicit, legislative employment protection against discrimination on the ground of a trans identity has an effect on employment outcomes has also received little attention (Drydakis, 2017).

Given the aforementioned lack of sufficient literature, the editors welcome empirical papers on labor economics which have a clear and highlighted added value, and solid policy implications, on the following general areas:

  • Testing, in under-examined geographical regions, for wage discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • Empirically testing and disentangling the forms of employment discrimination (i.e. prejudice-based, and/or statistical discrimination) against LGBTI people.
  • Examining the relationship between sexual orientation, personality characteristics, mental health and employment outcomes.
  • Assessing how moderators (i.e. human capital, educational choices, occupations, family structure, industrial relations etc.) affect the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.
  • Testing the relationship between sexual orientation, past/present victimization and labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying the relationship between sexual orientation and job satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the impact of the legal recognition of same-sex couples on labor market outcomes.
  • Evaluating the impact of employment legislation against sexual orientation and trans identity discrimination on labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying employment bias against trans people.
  • Examining the interaction between trans identities, sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.

Submissions will be accepted from now on until the 30th of March 2019. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the forthcoming call on the journal website.

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA and GLO)

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

References:

Drydakis N. (2014). Sexual orientation and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 111. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.111

Drydakis N. (2017). Trans people, well-being, and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 386. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.386

Leppel, K. (2016). The labor force status of transgender men and women. International Journal of Transgenderism,  Vol. 17, No. (3−4), pp. 155−164.

Patacchini, E.; Ragusa, G.; Zenou, Y. (2015)
Unexplored dimensions of discrimination in Europe: homosexuality and physical appearance, Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 28, pp. 1045-1073.

Valfort, M. (2017). LGBTI in OECD countries: A review. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 198, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: 10.1787/d5d49711-en

Ends;

Special issue on hiring discrimination edited by GLO Fellows

A special issue of the International Journal of Manpower on “Hiring Discrimination” has just been published under the editorship of three Fellows of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

***Special Issue on Hiring Discrimination***

GLO Fellows Nick Drydakis, Stijn Baert, and Magnus Carlsson are delighted to publish a collection of papers on “Hiring Discrimination: Measures, Moderators and Mechanisms” in the International Journal of Manpower (Volume 39, Issue 4). Many of the papers are related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis as GLO Cluster Lead.

The papers offer new patterns in the study of hiring discrimination and employment bias. Innovative primary field experiments, literature reviews on field experiments, scenario experiments and wage studies are provided from a most interesting sample of countries including Belgium, China, Czech Republic, France, the GCC, Sweden and the UK.

The Special Issue examines a plethora of characteristics that might entail favorable or adverse treatments in the labor market. How transgenderism, attractiveness, masculine and feminine personality traits, ethnicity, labor market history, neighborhood signalling effects, commuting time, firm size, marital status, and parental leave length affect the hiring stage and individuals’ employment prospects are explored and evaluated through the lens of economic theory.

The papers report several statistically significant patterns which might create a fruitful discussion in the research field. For instance, the papers suggest that: (a) hiring prospects might be negatively affected by a part-time profile for men, living in a deprived neighborhood for ethnic minorities, commuting time, spells of unemployment for married women, transgenderism for women; and (b) hiring prospects might be positively affected by attractiveness, high quality profiles after a short parental leave for women, and masculine personality traits for women.

Nick DrydakisStijn BaertProfilbild

GLO Cluster Lead Nick Drydakis (left) and GLO Fellows Stijn Baert and Magnus Carlsson

RELATED LITERATURE (open access):

GLO Discussion Paper No. 176: Economic Pluralism in the Study of Wage Discrimination: A Note – Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

GLO Discussion Paper No. 175: Public Opinion and Immigration: Who Favors Employment Discrimination against Immigrants? – Download PDF
by Cooray, Arusha & Marfouk, Abdeslam & Nazir, Maliha

GLO Discussion Paper No. 173: The Signal of Applying for a Job Under a Vacancy Referral Scheme – Download PDF
by Van Belle, Eva & Caers, Ralf & De Couck, Marijke & Di Stasio, Valentina & Baert, Stijn

GLO Discussion Paper No. 115: Why Is Unemployment Duration a Sorting Criterion in Hiring? – Download PDF
by Van Belle, Eva & Caers, Ralf & De Couck, Marijke & Di Stasio, Valentina & Baert, Stijn

GLO Discussion Paper No. 103: Inclusive recruitment? Hiring discrimination against older workers – Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick & MacDonald, Peter & Bozani, Vasiliki & Chiotis, Vangelis

GLO Discussion Paper No. 61: Hiring Discrimination: An Overview of (Almost) All Correspondence Experiments Since 2005 – Download PDF
by Baert, Stijn

GLO Discussion Paper No. 2: Hiring a Homosexual, Taking a Risk? A Lab Experiment on Employment Discrimination and Risk AversionDownload PDF
by Baert, Stijn

Annabelle Krause
Ulf Rinne
Klaus F. Zimmermann
Anonymous Job Applications in Europe
IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, 1:5 (2012)
Annabelle Krause
Ulf Rinne
Klaus F. Zimmermann
Anonymous Job Applications of Fresh Ph.D. Economists
Economics Letters, 117 (2012), pp. 441-444

Ends;

 

European Development Research Network publish special issue on Migration & Development: Research & Policy

A high-profile workshop organized by the European Development Research Network focused on how migration and migration policies can affect economic development and studied the policies that strengthen the benefits of migration for both sending and receiving countries. The event took place at Bonn University on December 5, 2016 under the leadership of Stephan Klasen (University of Goettingen), the President of the European Development Research Network.

The keynote speaker of the event had been Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and ZEF, Bonn University), who is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

GLO Discussion Paper No. 70 Migration for Development: From Challenges to Opportunities – Download PDF

by Klaus F. Zimmermann

Background paper to the keynote presentations to the European Development Conference 2016 on “Migration and Development” at Bonn University, December 5, 2016, and to the 22. Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) Conference, May 24-26, 2017 at Sapienza University of Rome.

The papers of this event have now been published in French and English in the Revue D’Économie Du Développement collecting also articles of GLO Fellows Hillel Rapoport (Paris School of Economics), Dean Yang (University of Michigan) and Tommaso Frattini (Milan University) and were discussed, among others, by GLO Fellows Toman Barsbai (Kiel Institute for the World Economy) and Melissa Siegel (Maastricht Graduate School of Governance and UNU-Merit). (See for more details below.)

 

 

Ends;

REMINDER: Call for Papers on “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market”. Deadline for Research Journal is 31 August 2018

REMINDER: Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market

Submissions will be accepted until August 31, 2018.

Edited by

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA, and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), this project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis.

Despite the enactment, in English speaking countries and the EU, of labor legislation against discrimination in the labor market based on sexual orientation, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) people continue to experience occupational access constraints, lower job satisfaction, wage discrimination (especially gay men), and more bullying and harassment than their heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014; Valfort, 2017).

Studies for the period 1989–2014 suggest that gay men receive lower wages than heterosexual men of comparable education, skills, and experience. For instance, studies find that gay men earn from 4–5% less than heterosexual men in the Netherlands, France, Greece, and the UK and up to 12–16% less in Canada, Sweden, and the US (Drydakis, 2014). Whether wage discrimination against gay men exists in other regions is of great interest and ascertaining this is of importance for policy interventions. In addition, whether wage discrimination lessens over time in response to policy interventions and legislation is hard to determine in the absence of relevant studies. It is not yet clear whether prejudice-based and/or statistical discrimination is the more appropriate framework for the study of labor discrimination against LGBTI people.

The available studies on sexual orientation and job satisfaction highlight that in Australia, Canada, and Greece, both gay men and lesbians experience lower job satisfaction than do their otherwise similar heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014). Because gay and lesbian employees face severe workplace harassment and bullying, these conditions may affect their workplace experience evaluations (Drydakis, 2014). Whether factors other than workplace harassment cause gay and lesbian employees’ dissatisfaction requires examination. Also, for instituting appropriate policy actions, it is important to determine whether these job satisfaction differences suffered by sexual orientation minorities exist in other countries.

In general, the dearth of studies makes it difficult to examine how education, occupation, industrial relations, region, core socio-economic characteristics, personality and mental health traits moderate the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes (Drydakis, 2014). Indeed, although studies suggest that lesbians face prejudice in the labor market, some studies estimate that lesbians earn more than comparable heterosexual women. Lesbians have been found to earn 3% more in the Netherlands, 8% more in the UK, 11% more in Germany, 15% more in Canada, and 20% more in the US. Whether personality characteristics, coping strategies, occupational choices, family structures and/or region positively affect lesbians’ wages is still an open question.

In addition, quantitative research on employment outcomes is scarce for trans people (Drydakis, 2017). A representative study suggests that trans people tend to suffer higher unemployment rates than those reported, in other studies, for the general U.S. population (Leppel, 2016). In addition, the interaction between trans identity, and sexual orientation, and the effects of this on employment outcomes is under-examined (Drydakis, 2017). Whether explicit, legislative employment protection against discrimination on the ground of a trans identity has an effect on employment outcomes has also received little attention (Drydakis, 2017).

Given the aforementioned lack of sufficient literature, the editors welcome empirical papers on labor economics which have a clear and highlighted added value, and solid policy implications, on the following general areas:

  • Testing, in under-examined geographical regions, for wage discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • Empirically testing and disentangling the forms of employment discrimination (i.e. prejudice-based, and/or statistical discrimination) against LGBTI people.
  • Examining the relationship between sexual orientation, personality characteristics, mental health and employment outcomes.
  • Assessing how moderators (i.e. human capital, educational choices, occupations, family structure, industrial relations etc.) affect the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.
  • Testing the relationship between sexual orientation, past/present victimization and labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying the relationship between sexual orientation and job satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the impact of the legal recognition of same-sex couples on labor market outcomes.
  • Evaluating the impact of employment legislation against sexual orientation and trans identity discrimination on labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying employment bias against trans people.
  • Examining the interaction between trans identities, sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.

Submissions will be accepted until the 31th of August 2018. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the forthcoming call on the journal website.

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA and GLO)

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

References:

Drydakis N. (2014). Sexual orientation and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 111. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.111

Drydakis N. (2017). Trans people, well-being, and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 386. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.386

Leppel, K. (2016). The labor force status of transgender men and women. International Journal of Transgenderism,  Vol. 17, No. (3−4), pp. 155−164.

Valfort, M. (2017). LGBTI in OECD countries: A review. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 198, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: 10.1787/d5d49711-en

Ends;

REMINDER: Call for Papers on “School to Work Transitions”. Deadline for Research Journal is February 15, 2018

Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower on:

“The School to work transition: Cross-country differences, evolution and reforms“

Edited by Francesco Pastore (University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli” and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO)

PLEASE NOTE: Submissions are invited until February 15, 2018.

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). This project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “School-to-Work Transitions” headed by Francesco Pastore. Interested network members are invited to contribute to both ventures, but the Special Issue is open to submissions from all authors of qualified articles dealing with relevant aspects of the broadly defined topic.

A school-to-work transition (SWT) regime denotes the set of institutions and rules that govern and supervise the passage of young people from school to adulthood. They include the degree of regulation and flexibility of the labour market, but also of the educational and training systems and the provision of employment services (placement and training) to help young people finding a job more easily. The household is also part of the regime, by providing, for instance, financial support during the entire transition and a cushion against the risk of unemployment. The role assigned to each institution within a regime is different from one country to another, so that different SWT regimes can be identified in the world.

A rising interest for the issue of the optimal design and organization of a SWT regime is emerging together with soaring unemployment, especially in Europe and in many developing countries. In some countries, the slowness of the transition is a factor of concern because it persists also during periods of economic boom constraining the ability of the economic system to create all the possible jobs for young people.

A SWT has as its main aim that of filling the gap of work experience of young people with respect to adults. This can be done by resorting to the labor market and by making it more flexible, with the risk that young people fall in the so-called work experience trap (they have education and also general work experience, but firms want job-specific work experience and competences). Alternatively, the education system can give an important contributions by following the dual principle and namely providing at the same time education and training already at school or by developing closer links to the labor market through establishing direct links to the labor market like in the Japanese Jisseki Kankei or by providing efficient and dynamic job placement services and information on vacancies like in Anglo-Saxon systems.

After posing a strong and long-lasting emphasis on labor market flexibility since the mid-1980s, reforms of the SWT regime are focusing on the education system. In Italy, the Buona Scuola reform has changed the mission of an education system which still remains sequential, but providing high secondary school students with compulsory work related learning, based on the Scandinavian model. However, there is still widespread concern that a deeper integration of the education system with the labor market is necessary to increase the chances of young people to find suitable jobs. The European Youth Guarantee is a programme of active labor market policy that the EU Parliament has exported to all of Europe with ups and downs. Recent reforms have regarded also public and private employment services, foreseeing the introduction of a quasi-market organization to make them more efficient.

This special issue aims to inspire the debate on these issues by stimulating the submission of high quality papers on different aspects of the SWT, also not considered in this short abstract. Preference will be given to papers implementing advanced econometric methods and addressing causality issues. We wish for theoretical or empirical papers that include, but are meant not to be restricted in any possible way to such issues as, among others:

  • Cross-country differences in the performance of different SWT regimes;
  • Experience of developing countries;
  • Effectiveness of the German dual system;
  • Effectiveness of the Japanese Jisseki Kankei;
  • Regional differences in the SWT and youth unemployment rate;
  • Impact of the economic and financial crisis on youth labor markets;
  • Definition of new regimes of SWT to accumulate job specific skills;
  • Impact evaluation of recent policy programs for promoting the employment opportunities of young people, such as:
    • recent labor market reforms, e.g. the Jobs Act;
    • apprenticeship legislation;
    • the European Youth Guarantee;
    • the programs of work-related learning;
    • “3+2 reform” of the university system;
    • Implementation of New Public Management principles to universities;
  • Role of public and private employment services;
  • Role of job placement services at high secondary schools and universities;
  • Technical and vocational education and training;
  • Experiences of study and work;
  • Role of the household as a shock absorber and as a disincentive to more active job search.

Submissions will be accepted up until the 15th of February 2018. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the Call on the journal website.

http://www.klausfzimmermann.de/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/20171020_182321-4.jpg

Pastore (left) and Zimmermann discussing the Special Issue project during a joint GLO mission 2017 in Brasov/Romania.

Ends;

Call for papers: Conference on “Globalisation and Labour Markets”, London June 14-15, 2018.

On the suggestion of GLO Fellow Cevat Giray Aksoy (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development), we post the following Call for Papers for a Conference on “Globalisation and Labour Markets”:

CEPR, EBRD and The Economics of Transition

Conference Call for Papers
Submission deadline – 30th January 20182nd CEPR/EBRD/Economics of Transition Symposium: Globalisation and Labour Markets;  London, June 14-15, 2018

You are invited to submit a paper to the 2nd CEPR/EBRD/Economics of Transition Economics Symposium on globalisation and labour markets in advanced and emerging markets. The symposium will provide a platform for researchers and policy makers to discuss new research findings and to identify areas where further academic and policy-oriented work is needed. Papers are invited on the following – non-exhaustive – list of topics:

  • International trade and labour market outcomes
  • The political, economic and social consequences of globalisation
  • Migration and social mobility within and across countries
  • Educational attainment and skill development in a globalised world
  • The changing nature of work in the digital economy
  • Inequality, inclusion and gender in the global economy
  • Institutional quality and governance in a comparative perspective
  • Globalisation and its impact on the environment
  • The role of automation and robots in shaping labour markets
  • Globalisation and labour regulation

The symposium features keynote talks by Paola Conconi (Université Libre de Bruxelles and CEPR) and David Dorn (University of Zurich and CEPR).

Authors of accepted papers will be invited (without obligation) to submit their papers for a special issue of the Economics of Transition. Accommodation expenses will be covered for speakers and discussants. Travel expenses will be reimbursed in accordance with CEPR’s expense guidelines.

To submit a paper (full papers accepted only), please send an email to Lucie Newman at NewmanL@ebrd.com. In the subject header please add “Submission: Globalisation and Labour Markets Symposium” and nothing else. In the case of multiple-authored papers, indicate who will present and whether or not the presenter would also be willing to act as a discussant. The submission deadline is 30 January 2018 and authors will be notified about the acceptance of papers by 16 March 2018.

The conference will be held at the EBRD, One Exchange Square, London. The conference programme starts on Thursday morning (June 14) and ends on Friday afternoon (June 15). An invitation-only conference dinner will be held on Thursday evening. Details about the sponsors: www.ebrd.com,  www.cepr.org and http://services.bepress.com/eot/.

ORGANISING AND PROGRAMME COMMITTEE

Cevat Giray Aksoy (EBRD, LSE and WEF)
Cagatay Bircan (EBRD)
Michelle J. Brock (EBRD and CEPR)
Ralph De Haas (EBRD and Tilburg University)
Guido Friebel (Goethe University Frankfurt and CEPR)
Sergei Guriev (EBRD, Sciences Po and CEPR)
Guy Michaels (LSE, CEP and CEPR)
Barbara Petrongolo (Queen Mary University of London, LSE and CEPR)

GLO Fellow Cevat Giray Aksoy (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development)

Giray

 

Ends;

 

Tirana/Albania: Forthcoming International Conference on 1-2 December 2017

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON “SOCIO–ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES IN THE AGE OF XXI CENTURY GLOBALIZATION”, TIRANA – ALBANIA, DECEMBER 2017
Organized by University of Tirana, Department of Economics
Venue: Faculty of Economics, Rruga e Elbasanit, Tirana
Dates: 01st -02nd December 2017

The event is supported by GLO Country Lead of Albania Besa Shanini.

The Department of Economics, Faculty of Economy, Tirana is honored to invite academia, scholars, researchers, economists and policy makers with broad and diverse research interests from around the world to share knowledge, ideas, experiences and establish academic relationships in the 1st International Conference on “Socio –Economic Perspectives in the Age of XXI Century Globalization”. The Economics Department comes to this conference after several years’ experience in organizing the European Doctoral Seminar (EDS) in collaboration with the University of Bamberg, Budapest University of Technology, University of Sarajevo and the South East European University (SEEU) in Tetovo, Macedonia.

CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION
In today’s context the world is experiencing a wide variety of issues, of which some have been long lasting and are considered a global phenomenon. In the current era of globalization fuelled by the rapid growth of new technology, it is widely acknowledged that the ability to innovate is a significant driver of competitiveness for entrepreneurs, teams, organizations, industries, countries, and economies of all sizes. Competition is increasingly forged not just to achieve financial performance, but also to deliver social and environmental outcomes for the present and future. Within this context of global competition, innovative models, strategies, policies, processes, and practices become ever more important in creating value for sustainable growth and development at various levels within firms, industries, countries, and economies, and also across borders in company networks, industrial clusters, and economic and regional blocs.
The last decades have acknowledged a growing integration of economies and societies worldwide. There has been an increase of interdependence among countries in trade, finance, people and ideas. The development of information technology and advancement of telecommunication have facilitated both resources and output mobility, improving further efficiency at which economies operate. However, the international trade arena and competitiveness lead to increased pressure for the policy makers and the independent economic agents in both developed and developing countries. On one side, there is the importance of the public policies and institutions to creating a sustainable and dynamic environment in a time when trade liberalization policies and moderate capital control have changed the role of state in the
global economy. On the other side, there is the response of consumers and producers in making efficient choices under the perspective of widen possibilities and reshaped constraints.
The changing conjecture of the last two decades around the world has led to a restructuring of the growth potentials and international market roles of countries, and economic actors and economic decision processes have evolved considerably. Our conference is focusing on evaluation of the last two decades from a multidimensional point of view. Thus generating a platform in which the economic, social and policy transformations of the last twenty years are debated will be vision enhancing for both policy formulation for tomorrow and understanding the current state of affairs.
The conference aims at bringing together in one venue academics, researchers and all the interested parties in the field, with the purpose of elaborating at a theoretical, empirical and policy-making perspective the above. We invite you to submit papers dealing with the challenges associating the economic perspectives in the age of the 21st century globalization.

The conference will be focused, but not limited, on the following areas:
 Monetary Policy before, during and after the global financial crises
 Trade Openness, Competitiveness and Growth Globalization and labor markets
 Public Policies to Sustain Competitiveness
 Globalization, Financial Markets, and Fiscal Policy
 Financial Inclusion and Financial Regulation
 Integration and Economic Globalization: Challenges for Development
 Corporate Governance and Business Regulation
 Inequality, Poverty & Social Inclusion
 Gender Equality and Sustainable Development
 Real and Potential Usage of Resources: Identifying Gaps
 Value and Importance of Sustainable Agriculture and the Environment  Urban – Rural Disparity, Migration and Remittances  Economic Modeling of Tourism  Socio-Cultural Environment and Innovation
 The Digital Economy
 Economic Structure Performance and Structural Adjustments

Submission of abstracts and papers Submission of abstracts and papers are invited from academia, policy makers, business people, public and private sector organizations, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations. Poster presentations are also encouraged. While multiple submissions by individuals or groups of authors are welcome, the abstract selection process will seek to ensure
as broad participation as possible: each author may present only one paper or one poster in the conference. No author should submit more than one abstract as its single author. Structure of abstracts and papers Submissions should be of high standard, unpublished, and suitable for scientific or professional publications. They can be theoretical or field research based papers as well as practical/experiential papers based on individual, institutional or community experience. All submitted papers will be refereed to blind reviewers to uphold the high standards of the conference. Papers demonstrating high rigor, high theoretical and/or practical implications will be considered for publication. The abstracts should not exceed 300 words and should be organized as: title, context and objectives, methodology, findings, conclusion, contribution, key words. Key words: from 3 up to 5 words (12 pt. font size). Avoid abbreviations unless they are firmly established. Key words should efficiently represent the paper content.
Authors’ autobiographical details should appear as the first footnote of each contribution, and include the name, academic and professional qualifications, institutional affiliation, current title, position and e-mail of each author.
Authors are also advised to proofread their abstracts because they will be reproduced from the online submission. Any error in spelling, grammar or data will appear online or in print. Papers are expected to have a uniform structure/format, times new roman (font 12), 1.5 line spacing, maximum of 12 pages including references, appendices, figures etc. Thus, the contents are expected to rhyme with background that includes a theoretical context and objectives; methodology covering the way the study was designed and carried out; findings, discussion and conclusions.
All accepted abstracts will be published in the conference abstract book. Best papers will be published at the Journal of the Faculty of Economics, University of Tirana “Albanian Journal of Economics and Business” (AJEB).

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING DEADLINES:
 Deadline for abstract submissions : September 30, 2017
 Notification of abstract acceptances: October 15, 2017
 Deadline for full paper submissions : November 15, 2017
 Deadline for participants registration : November 25, 2017
THE CONFERENCE FEE:
 Participant (attending / paper presenting author): 50 EUR
 Accompanying co-author: 30 EUR
 Attending (without paper): 20 EUR
DISCOUNTED FEE:
 PhD students: 30 EUR
 MSc students: 20 EUR
 2nd paper registration (publishing only): 20 EUR
Registration fee includes admission to all sessions, conference kit (including the Scientific Book of Proceedings on CD and Book of Abstracts in hard copy) and admission to the lunch or dinner with all coffee brakes according to the program.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
1. Prof. Dr. Abdylmenaf Bexheti, Southeast University of Tetovo, Republic of Macedonia
2. Prof. Dr. Ahmet Mançellari, University of Tirana
3. Prof. Dr. Albana Hashorva, University of Tirana
4. Prof. Dr. Dhori Kule, University of Tirana
5. Prof. Dr. Dietmar Meyer, Andrassy University, Budapest, Hungary
6. Prof. As. Dr. Elida Liko, University of Tirana 7. Prof. Dr. Enrico Saltari, Sapienza, Università di Roma, Italy 8. Prof. As. Dr. Ervin Demo, University of Tirana
9. Mr. Gent Sejko, Governer, Bank of Albania
10. Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Heinz. Dieter Wenzel, University of Bamberg, Germany
11. Prof. As. Dr. Holger Kaechelein, University of Bamberg
12. Prof. Dr. Iraj Hashi, Staffordshire University
13. Prof. Dr. Nick Adnett, Staffordshire University
14. Prof. Dr. Raimonda Duka, University of Tirana
15. Prof. Dr. Sulo Haderi, University of Tirana
16. Prof. Dr. Tonin Kola, University of Tirana
ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
1. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Adela Shera, University of Tirana
2. Dr. Arjan Tushaj, University of Tirana
3. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Arjeta Vokshi, University of Tirana
4. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Arsena Gjipali, University of Tirana
5. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bernard Dosti, University of Tirana
6. Dr. Ditjona Kule, University of Tirana
7. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Doriana Dervishi, University of Tirana
8. Dr. Enton Duro, University of Tirana
9. Dr. Ergita Kokaveshi, University of Tirana 10. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Esmeralda Shehaj, University of Tirana
11. Dr. Etis Jorgji, University of Tirana
12. Dr. Ledjon Shahini, University of Tirana
13. Dr. Matilda Veliu, University of Tirana
14. Dr. Olta Milova, University of Tirana
15. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Soana Teka, University of Tirana
16. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Suela Thimo, University of Tirana
17. Dr. Valbona Karapici, University of Tirana
18. Dr. Visar Malaj, University of Tirana
19. Dr. Zenel Shalari, University of Tirana
For any questions or additional information please contact Prof. Dr. Albana HASHORVA
Email: economics@feut.edu.al

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GLO Call for papers for special issue on “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market”

Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market

Edited by

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA, and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), this project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis.

Despite the enactment, in English speaking countries and the EU, of labor legislation against discrimination in the labor market based on sexual orientation, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) people continue to experience occupational access constraints, lower job satisfaction, wage discrimination (especially gay men), and more bullying and harassment than their heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014; Valfort, 2017).

Studies for the period 1989–2014 suggest that gay men receive lower wages than heterosexual men of comparable education, skills, and experience. For instance, studies find that gay men earn from 4–5% less than heterosexual men in the Netherlands, France, Greece, and the UK and up to 12–16% less in Canada, Sweden, and the US (Drydakis, 2014). Whether wage discrimination against gay men exists in other regions is of great interest and ascertaining this is of importance for policy interventions. In addition, whether wage discrimination lessens over time in response to policy interventions and legislation is hard to determine in the absence of relevant studies. It is not yet clear whether prejudice-based and/or statistical discrimination is the more appropriate framework for the study of labor discrimination against LGBTI people.

The available studies on sexual orientation and job satisfaction highlight that in Australia, Canada, and Greece, both gay men and lesbians experience lower job satisfaction than do their otherwise similar heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014). Because gay and lesbian employees face severe workplace harassment and bullying, these conditions may affect their workplace experience evaluations (Drydakis, 2014). Whether factors other than workplace harassment cause gay and lesbian employees’ dissatisfaction requires examination. Also, for instituting appropriate policy actions, it is important to determine whether these job satisfaction differences suffered by sexual orientation minorities exist in other countries.

In general, the dearth of studies makes it difficult to examine how education, occupation, industrial relations, region, core socio-economic characteristics, personality and mental health traits moderate the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes (Drydakis, 2014). Indeed, although studies suggest that lesbians face prejudice in the labor market, some studies estimate that lesbians earn more than comparable heterosexual women. Lesbians have been found to earn 3% more in the Netherlands, 8% more in the UK, 11% more in Germany, 15% more in Canada, and 20% more in the US. Whether personality characteristics, coping strategies, occupational choices, family structures and/or region positively affect lesbians’ wages is still an open question.

In addition, quantitative research on employment outcomes is scarce for trans people (Drydakis, 2017). A representative study suggests that trans people tend to suffer higher unemployment rates than those reported, in other studies, for the general U.S. population (Leppel, 2016). In addition, the interaction between trans identity, and sexual orientation, and the effects of this on employment outcomes is under-examined (Drydakis, 2017). Whether explicit, legislative employment protection against discrimination on the ground of a trans identity has an effect on employment outcomes has also received little attention (Drydakis, 2017).

Given the aforementioned lack of sufficient literature, the editors welcome empirical papers on labor economics which have a clear and highlighted added value, and solid policy implications, on the following general areas:

  • Testing, in under-examined geographical regions, for wage discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • Empirically testing and disentangling the forms of employment discrimination (i.e. prejudice-based, and/or statistical discrimination) against LGBTI people.
  • Examining the relationship between sexual orientation, personality characteristics, mental health and employment outcomes.
  • Assessing how moderators (i.e. human capital, educational choices, occupations, family structure, industrial relations etc.) affect the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.
  • Testing the relationship between sexual orientation, past/present victimization and labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying the relationship between sexual orientation and job satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the impact of the legal recognition of same-sex couples on labor market outcomes.
  • Evaluating the impact of employment legislation against sexual orientation and trans identity discrimination on labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying employment bias against trans people.
  • Examining the interaction between trans identities, sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.

Submissions will be accepted up until the 31th of August 2018. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the forthcoming call on the journal website.

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA and GLO)

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

References:

Drydakis N. (2014). Sexual orientation and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 111. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.111

Drydakis N. (2017). Trans people, well-being, and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 386. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.386

Leppel, K. (2016). The labor force status of transgender men and women. International Journal of Transgenderism,  Vol. 17, No. (3−4), pp. 155−164.

Valfort, M. (2017). LGBTI in OECD countries: A review. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 198, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: 10.1787/d5d49711-en

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GLO supports 59th ISLE Labour Conference in Kerela/India

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) supports the annual conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) and the associated Indian Journal of Labour Economics. Both are partner institutions of the GLO.

CALL FOR PAPERS

59th ISLE Annual Conference, 16-18 December 2017, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

The 59th Annual Conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) will be held during 16-18 December 2017 in the premises of Gulati Institute of Finance and Taxation (GIFT), Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala. The conference is organized for ISLE by  GIFT in collaboration with the Department of Economics, Kerala University, and the Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram.

Submission of Papers:  Papers along with a summary of about 500 to 750 words should be submitted online at www.isleijle.org/59isleconference or emailed to conference.isle@gmail.com. Selected papers are considered for publication in the Indian Journal of Labour Economics after peer reviewing.

The GLO will organize a special GLO session at this conference. Those GLO members interested to contribute to such a session are invited to contact GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com).

INDIAN SOCIETY OF LABOUR ECONOMICS (ISLE)   

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Call for Papers on Comparative Wealth and Income Research

Comparative Wealth and Income Research

Call for papers: Special Issue of the Journal of Income Distribution

LIS has been providing data on income and wealth for comparative research since 1983. Over the years, Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) or Luxembourg Wealth Study (LWS) databases have made possible hundreds of publications, including many articles in top journals. In this special of the Journal of Income Distribution scholars are offered the opportunity to publish their LIS/LWS research in one volume in a swift manner in order to broaden the discussion and enhance our knowledge from inequality and poverty to labor market participation, from saving patterns to class composition. Papers with cross-comparative perspective or an overview over time are particularly welcomed. All submissions will undergo the standard -refereeing procedure. Priority will be given to papers presented at the 2017 LIS/LWS Users Conference.

Submissions on the following and related topics will be considered:

A. The distributions of living standards, inequality, poverty, and mobility
B. Micro and macro models on the (causal) relationships between inequality and economic development / crisis and empirical tests of such models
C. Policy lessons: the role of public policies for economic growth and inequality
D. Cross-country comparisons, e.g. between rich and poor countries, and comparisons across different societal groups

Submission Deadline: July 31, 2017

Please submit your paper online with the subject line “LIS” to http://www.jid-online.org/

Guest editors of the Special Issue:
Daniele Checchi
Janet Gornick

Managing Editors:
Christos Koulovatianos
Carsten Schroeder
Eva Sierminska

Proposed by GLO Fellow Eva Sierminska. She is also the GLO Cluster Lead on Labor and Wealth.

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