Category Archives: Article

Does gender of firm ownership matter? Female entrepreneurs and the gender pay gap. New paper open access in the Journal of Population Economics.

Newly published in the Journal of Population Economics. Video of paper presentation now available.

Kritikos, A.S., Maliranta, M., Nippala, V. , Nurmi, S.  
Does gender of firm ownership matter? Female entrepreneurs and the gender pay gap. 
Journal of Population Economics 37, 52 (2024).
OPEN ACCESS. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-01030-x

Video of paper presentation by Alexander Kritikos in the GLO Virtual Seminar on June 6, 2024.

WATCH THE VIDEO
Video of the event

ABSTRACT

We examine how the gender of business owners is related to the wages paid to female relative to male employees working in their firms. Using Finnish register data and employing firm fixed effects, we find that the gender pay gap is—starting from a gender pay gap of 11 to 12%—two to three percentage points lower for hourly wages in female-owned firms than in male-owned firms. Results are robust to how the wage is measured, as well as to various further robustness checks. More importantly, we find substantial differences between industries. While, for instance, in the manufacturing sector, the gender of the owner plays no role in the gender pay gap, in several service sector industries, like ICT or business services, no or a negligible gender pay gap can be found, but only when firms are led by female business owners. Businesses with male ownership maintain a gender pay gap of around 10% also in the latter industries. With increasing firm size, the influence of the gender of the owner, however, fades. In large firms, it seems that others—firm managers—determine wages and no differences in the pay gap are observed between male- and female-owned firms.

Program GLO-JOPE Online Workshop February 26-27 2024

Since January 2024, the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) follows Continuous Article Publishing: accepted articles are published immediately and included in the current issue of the journal. The journal is committed to speed and high quality. JOPE continuously organizes workshops presenting fresh publications in online workshops. This is a unique opportunity to follow exciting new research and come into contact with the authors.

The GLO-JOPE Online Workshop on February 26-27, 2024 will follow this tradition. Please find below the papers to be presented and the links to register for the meeting. The papers are all in production and you will find links to access them freely (Open Access) or to read them online as soon as they are published.

Please register in advance as soon as possible. You will receive a confirmation afterwards; and a reminder with the link close to the meeting again. The entire workshop has three parts, and you will need to register for all 3 parts separately (links below next to the parts).

Time allocation is 15 min per paper, 10 min presentation, 5 min Q&A. So use your chances to interact with the authors.

All sessions will be recorded and the videos will be made available on the GLO website here.
All articles of Vol. 37, Issue 1, 2024 are here asa online published: Issue 1, 2024.

For abstracts of all papers currently in production see: LINK

Follow the evolution & ranking of JOPE papers within the JOPE Google Scholar Citations Ranking.

JOPE Editors present next to Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann:

PART I: Feb 26; 3-5 pm CET. Chair: Milena Nikolova (JOPE Editor)
Time Zone Converter

VIDEO OF PART I

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR PART I: CLOSED

Happiness & Wellbeing

3:00-3:15 pm CET. David G Blanchflower, Alex Bryson
The Female Happiness Paradox
OPEN ACCESS: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-00981-5

3:15-3:30 pm CET. Enghin Atalay
A Twenty-First Century of Solitude? Time Alone and Together in the United States
https://rdcu.be/dxVs6

3:30-3:45 pm CET. Claudia Senik, Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D’Ambrosio, Anthony Lepinteur, Carsten Schröder
Teleworking and Life Satisfaction in Germany during COVID-19: The Importance of Family Structure
https://rdcu.be/dxMle

3:45-4:00 pm CET. Jeehoon Han, Caspar Kaiser
Time use and happiness: US evidence across three decades
https://rdcu.be/dyoiv

4:00-4:15 pm CET. Philippe Sterkens, Stijn Baert, Eline Moens, Joey Wuyts, Eva Derous
I Won’t Make the Same Mistake Again: Burnout History and Job Preferences
https://rdcu.be/dw5Kg

Labor & Family

4:00-4:15 pm CET. Jiyoon Kim     
The Effects of Paid Family Leave – Does It Help Fathers’ Health, Too?

OPEN ACCESS: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-00994-0

4:14-4:30 pm CET. Joanna Lahey, Roberto Mosquera
Age and Hiring for High School Graduate Hispanics in the United States
https://rdcu.be/dyMpO

4:14-4:30 pm CET. Stanislao Maldonado
Empowering women through multifaceted interventions: Long-term evidence from a double matching design

https://rdcu.be/dxMkH

PART II: Feb 27; 9:00-10:30 am CET. Chair: Kompal Sinha (JOPE Editor)
Time Zone Converter

VIDEO OF PART II

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR PART II: CLOSED

Migration (9:00-10:00 am CET)

9:00-9:15 am CET. Guanchun Liu, Yuanyuan Liu,Jinyu Yang, Yanren Zhang
Labor Contract Law and Inventor Mobility: Evidence from China

https://rdcu.be/dxMlp

9:15-9:30 am CET. Olivier Charlot, Claire Naiditch, Radu Vranceanu
Smuggling of Forced Migrants to Europe: A Matching Model
https://rdcu.be/dyMok

9:30-9:45 am CET. Federico Maggio, Carlo Caporali
The Impact of Police Violence on Migration: Evidence from Venezuela
https://rdcu.be/dzlzD

9:45 BREAK

Historical Demography (10:00-10:30 am CET)

10:00-10:15 am CET. Xuechao Qian 
Revolutionized Life: Long-term Effects of Childhood Exposure to Persecution on Human Capital and Marital Sorting

10:15-10:30 am CET. Nikos Benos, Stelios Karagiannis, Sofia Tsitou
Geography, Landownership Inequality and Literacy: Historical Evidence from Greek Regions
OPEN ACCESS.
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-024-01002-1

PART III: Feb 27; 3-5 pm CET  Chair: Terra McKinnish (JOPE Editor)
Time Zone Converter

VIDEO OF PART III

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR PART III: CLOSED

Elderly Care

3:00-3:15 pm CET. Julien Bergeot
Care for Elderly Parents: Do Children Cooperate?

https://rdcu.be/dxMls

Violence

3:15-3:30 pm CET. Veronica Grembi, Anna Rosso, Emilia Barili
Domestic Violence Perception and Gender Stereotypes
OPEN ACCESS: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-024-00986-0

3:30-3:45 pm CET. Riccardo Ciacci
Banning the purchase of sex increases cases of rape: evidence from Sweden

Health

3:45-4:00 pm CET. Li Zhou; Zongzhi Liu; Xi Tian 
Threat Beyond the Border: Kim Jong-un’s Nuclear Tests and China’s Rural Migration
https://rdcu.be/dw5J6

4:00-4:15 pm CET. Fabian Duarte, Valentina Paredes, Cristobal Bennett, Isabel Poblete
Impact of an extension of maternity leave on infant health
https://rdcu.be/dxVts

4:15-4:30 pm CET. Davide Furceri, Pietro Pizzuto, Khatereh Yarveisi
The Effect of Pandemic Crises on Fertility

https://rdcu.be/dw5Kf

4:30-4:45 pm CET. Jose Ignacio García-Pérez, Manuel Serrano-Alarcon, Judit Vall-Castello
Long-term unemployment subsidies and middle-aged disadvantaged workers’ health
OPEN ACCESS: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-01000-3

Ends;

Forthcoming Articles in Issue 1- 2024 of the Journal of Population Economics.

The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) has recently accepted 26 articles for publication in its upcoming Volume 37, Issue 1 (2024). These articles are currently in production and are scheduled to be published soon. A comprehensive overview of their key findings will be presented by the authors during an online GLO – JOPE workshop scheduled for February 26-27, 2024. Specific details regarding the workshop will be communicated in due time. The paper abstracts, titles and author names are listed below.

Effective since January 1, 2024, JOPE has transitioned to a Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) model. Under this new approach, all accepted articles will be directly published in the ongoing issue, bringing an end to the previous backlog policy. To facilitate this shift, JOPE published all available articles last year, successfully clearing the backlog. Notably, of the 90 articles included in JOPE issues in 2023, only 45 were accepted in the past year, and the other 45 were from previous years.

This policy change addresses the confusion surrounding the publication status of online articles, now widely recognized as published. When included in a journal issue with delay because of a backlog, this created two publication dates in the past practice.

Additionally, the policy change reflects JOPE’s commitment to expeditious publishing. The decision to organize the online GLO – JOPE workshops aligns with JOPE’s effective communication strategy, aimed at disseminating significant research findings in time to a broader audience within academia and society.

Articles accepted for publication in the Journal of Population Economics.

1. David G Blanchflower, Alex Bryson: The Female Happiness Paradox

Using data across countries and over time we show that women have worse mental health than men in negative affect equations, irrespective of the measure used – anxiety, depression, fearfulness, sadness, loneliness, anger – and they have more days with bad mental health and more restless sleep. Women are also less satisfied with many aspects of their lives, such as democracy, the economy, the state of education and health services. They are also less satisfied in the moment in terms of peace and calm, cheerfulness, feeling active, vigorous, fresh and rested. However, prior evidence on gender differences in happiness and life satisfaction is less clear cut. Differences vary over time, location, and with model specification and the inclusion of controls, especially marital status. We now find strong evidence that males have higher levels of both happiness and life satisfaction in recent years even before the onset of pandemic. As in the past women continue to have worse mental health. A detailed analysis of several data files, with various metrics, for the UK confirms that men now are happier than women and the size of the effect is not trivial.          

2. Jeehoon Han, Caspar Kaiser: Time Use and Happiness: US Evidence Across three Decades

We use diary data from representative samples from the United States to examine determinants and historical trends in time-weighted happiness. To do so, we combine fine-grained information on self-reported happiness at the activity level with data on individuals’ time use. We conceptually distinguish time-weighted happiness from evaluative measures of wellbeing and provide evidence of the validity and distinctiveness of this measure. Although timeweighted happiness is largely uncorrelated with economic variables like unemployment and income, it is predictive of several health outcomes, and shares many other determinants with evaluative wellbeing. We illustrate the potential use of time-weighted happiness by assessing historical trends in the gender wellbeing gap. For the largest part of the period between 1985 and 2021, women’s time-weighted happiness improved significantly relative to men’s. This is in stark contrast to prominent findings from previous work. However, our recent data from 2021 indicates that about half of women’s gains since the 1980s were lost during the Covid-19 pandemic. Hence, as previously shown for several other outcomes, women appear to have been disproportionally affected by the pandemic. Our results are replicable in UK data, and robust to alternative assumptions about respondents’ scale use.

3. Enghin Atalay: A Twenty-First Century of Solitude? Time Alone and Together in the United States

This paper explores trends in time alone and with others in the United States. Since 2003, Americans have increasingly spent their free time alone on leisure at home and have decreasingly spent their free time with individuals from other households. These trends are more pronounced for non-White individuals, for males, for the less educated, and for individuals from lower-income households. Survey respondents who spend a large fraction of their free time alone report lower subjective well-being. As a result, differential trends in time alone suggest that between-group subjective wellbeing inequality may be increasing more quickly than previous research has reported.

4. Philippe Sterkens, Stijn Baert, Eline Moens, Joey Wuyts, Eva Derous: I Won’t Make the Same Mistake Again: Burnout History and Job Preferences

The burnout literature has focused on the determinants of burnout, whereas its careers consequences remain understudied. Therefore, we investigate whether recently burned-out individuals differ in job preferences from non-burned-out workers. We link these differences in preferences with (1) perceptions of job demands and resources, as well as (2) the weighting of such perceptions. To this end, a sample of 582 employees varying in their history of burnout judged job offers with manipulated characteristics in terms of their willingness to apply as well as perceived job demands and resources. We find that recently burned-out employees appreciate possibilities to telework and fixed feedback relatively more, while being relatively less attracted to learning opportunities. These findings can be partially explained by differences in the jobs’ perceived resources.

5. Claudia Senik, Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D’Ambrosio, Anthony Lepinteur, Carsten Schröder: Teleworking and Life Satisfaction in Germany during COVID-19: The Importance of Family Structure

We carry out a difference-in-differences analysis of a real-time survey conducted as part of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) survey and show that teleworking had a negative average effect on life satisfaction over the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. This average effect hides considerable heterogeneity, reflecting gender-role asymmetries: lower life satisfaction is found only for unmarried men and for women with school-age children. The negative effect for women with school-age children disappears in 2021, suggesting adaptation to new constraints and/or the adoption of coping strategies.

6. Davide Furceri, Pietro Pizzuto, Khatereh Yarveisi: The Effect of Pandemic Crises on Fertility

This paper examines the dynamic effects of pandemic crises on fertility rates for a large, unbalanced sample of 182 developed and developing countries during the period 1996-2019. We find that major pandemics are associated with significant and persistent declines in fertility rates of about 2 percent, on average. These effects are significantly larger for pandemics characterized by a very large number of confirmed cases relative to the population (up to 6½ percent) and by deep recessions (up to 5 percent). In addition, the effects are larger in advanced economies (up to 5 percent) and for younger women, on average.

7. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, Cristina Borra, Chunbei Wang: Asian Entrepreneurship in the Coronavirus Era

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a deleterious impact on the world economy. Studies have documented the disproportional impact of the pandemic on minorities, immigrants, and business owners in the United States. In this study, we use Current Population Survey monthly data spanning from January 2014 through December 2021 to examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected Asian entrepreneurship. We show that the pandemic disproportionally hurt Asian entrepreneurship, particularly among immigrants, up until the end of 2020. A detailed analysis of Asian business dynamics reveals a substantial increase in self-employment exits during the first year of the pandemic. We fail to find convincing evidence of differential industry/job-type concentration, individual preferences, majority-minority disparities, narrower clientele, or differential access to government support as primary drivers for such patterns. Instead, we find suggestive evidence of discrimination playing a non-negligible role that subsided in 2021, coinciding with the rollout of vaccines.

8. Riccardo Ciacci: Banning the Purchase of Sex Increases Cases of Rape: Evidence from Sweden

This paper leverages the timing of a ban on the purchase of sex to assess its impact on rape offenses. Relying on Swedish high-frequency data from 1997 to 2014, I find that the ban increases the number of rapes by around 44%–62%. The results are robust to several econometric specifications that exploit different identification assumptions. The increase reflects a boost in completed rapes both in the short- and long run. However, it is not accompanied by a decrease in the number of pimps. Taken together, the empirical evidence hints at the notion that the rise in rapes is not connected to the supply of prostitution but rather to changes in the demand for prostitution due to the ban. The results here have the opposite sign but larger magnitudes in absolute value than results in the literature on the decriminalization of prostitution.

9. Veronica Grembi, Anna Rosso, Emilia Barili: Domestic Violence Perception and Gender Stereotypes

Using a survey of more than 4,500 Italian women, we address the link between gender stereotypes and perceptions of domestic violence. We define a new measure of stereotypes at the individual level and show that women with stronger stereotypes are less likely to state that violence is common in their area of residence and are more likely to classify physical violence as less severe than privacy breaches. This ranking is associated with a victim-blaming mindset among respondents with stronger stereotypes, who are also more li(e.g., economic distress) than to personal characteristics of abusers (e.g., psychological issues) and to advise a hypothetical victim not to react to violence.

10. Stanislao Maldonado: Empowering Women through Multifaceted Interventions: Long-term Evidence from a Double Matching Design

Empowering women is a policy goal that has received a lot of interest from policy-makers in the developing world in recent years, yet little is known about effective ways to promote it sustainably. Most existing interventions fail to address the multidimensional nature of empowerment. Using a double matching design to construct the sampling frame and to estimate causal effects, I evaluate the long-term impact of a multifaceted policy intervention designed to improve women’s empowerment in the Atlantic region in Colombia. This intervention provided information about women’s rights, soft skills and vocational training, seed capital, and mentoring simultaneously. I find that this intervention has mixed results: there are improvements in incomes and other economic dimensions along with large political and social capital effects, but limited or null impacts on women’s rights knowledge and control over one’s body. Using a list experiment, I even find an increase in the likelihood of intra-household violence. The results highlight the importance of addressing the multidimensional nature of women’s empowerment in policy innovations designed to foster it and incorporating men in these efforts.

11. Jinglin Wen: Female Chief Officers and Crime: Evidence from England and Wales

I study the impact of the appointment of female chief police officers on crimes typically committed against females: sexual and rape offenses. Evidence suggests that adding more female chief officers leads to a statistically significant increase in documented sexual crimes in England and Wales. Yet, this rise is good news because it is due not to a rise in actual crimes committed or improved police recording practices but, rather, to more reporting of sexual crimes. I also find that appointing a female chief officer is associated with a reduction of around 1.1 homicides against women, which is equivalent to 21 percent of the mean value. Exploration of mechanisms suggests that the reduction may reflect an increase in policing resources devoted to women’s protection.

12. Li Zhou; Zongzhi Liu; Xi Tian: Threat Beyond the Border: Kim Jong-un’s Nuclear Tests and China’s Rural Migration

Between 2006 and 2017, North Korea conducted six nuclear weapons tests near its border with China, which clearly posed an existential threat to China. Utilizing data from a representative sample of rural households and adopting a quasi-experimental framework, this study analyzes the effects of human-made nuclear threats on the coping strategies of China’s rural households living on the border with North Korea. Our results show that nuclear tests have sizable causal effects on different aspects of non-farm employment and land rented out by rural residents in the border area of China. It is particularly noteworthy to emphasize that the results of this study demonstrate that, due to the human-made radiation risk resulting from North Korean nuclear tests, households in the border regions of China bordering North Korea increase labor out migration and land lease out. Multiple robustness tests consistently support this conclusion. Next, the paper attempts to identify various mechanisms behind these effects, such as the nuclear risk’s effect on the village’s economic viability, ultimately leading households to move out. We also find that the impact of moving away from rural areas due to nuclear tests is more pronounced for households with higher human capital, higher income, and a lower proportion of elderly family members. In conclusion, as rural households respond to nuclear threats by migrating out, North Korea’s nuclear tests exacerbate the phenomenon of rural hollowing in China’s border regions.

13. Xuechao Qian: Revolutionized Life: Long-term Effects of Childhood Exposure to Persecution on Human Capital and Marital Sorting

This paper investigates the effects of early-life exposure to persecution risk on human capital formation and marital sorting, while also analyzing how these effects are influenced by the timing of the exposure during early life. Utilizing the context of China’s “class struggle” period, which targeted various classes including landlords, capitalists, and intellectuals, this study demonstrates that individuals who experienced persecution risk during their childhood exhibit lower formal education attainment, reduced cognitive skills, and lower earnings. They are more likely to form marriages with individuals from classes that were previously favored by the regime but have comparatively lower human capital outcomes. Moreover, the study highlights that the most substantial and enduring impacts occur when the exposure to class struggle persecution risk takes place during early childhood.

14. Olivier Charlot, Claire Naiditch, Radu Vranceanu: Smuggling of Forced Migrants to Europe: A Matching Model

This paper develops a matching model to analyze the smuggling market for forced migrants, building on the empirical evidence related to the smuggling of migrants from the Horn of Africa and the Middle East to Europe in the last decade. Comparative statics for the equilibrium solution reveal that coercion-based measures targeting the smugglers reduce the number of irregular migrants and smugglers at the expense of migrants’ overall welfare. Slightly increasing legal migration opportunities has the interesting feature of reducing irregular flows, without deteriorating migrants’ welfare or increasing the total number of migrants. An extremely restrictive asylum policy has similar effects in terms of the flows of irregular migrants as a quite loose one, with the largest flows of irregular migrants occurring under a “middle-range” policy.

15. Federico Maggio, Carlo Caporali: The Impact of Police Violence on Migration: Evidence from Venezuela

This study unveils the causal effect of authoritative violence on individuals’ likelihood to migrate. Specifically, we examine the migration patterns of Venezuelans during the 2017-2018 political and economic crisis. We draw insights from regional-level data on civilian casualties caused by security forces, along with information extracted from the ENCOVI-2018 survey data that captures migration flows. The estimates rely on travel time from the capital city as an instrumental variable and are robust to the inclusion of several household and socio-economic regional-level characteristics. The findings strongly suggest that authoritative violence is a significant non-economic push factor for international migration. Moreover, additional evidence indicates that this type of violence influences the skill composition of migrants, especially in the context of South-to-South migration flows.

16. Guanchun Liu, Yuanyuan Liu,Jinyu Yang, Yanren Zhang: Labor Contract Law and Inventor Mobility: Evidence from China

This paper investigates the causal effect of employment protection on inventor mobility. Taking the enactment of China’s Labor Contract Law in 2008 as a quasi-natural experiment, our difference-in-differences estimate utilizes two-dimensional variations: firm ownership (i.e., SOEs vs. non-SOEs) and year (i.e., before and after 2008). Using combined data on patent applications filed at the State Intellectual Property Office of China and listed manufacturing companies over 2004–2012, we find that the law plays a sizeable positive role in reducing the likelihood of inventor mobility. This effect is more pronounced for firms with higher labor intensity, stricter law enforcement, higher innovation dependence, lower R&D team stability, and inventors that work outside the core of R&D networks. Further, we provide consistent evidence for two plausible mechanisms for the positive effect: limiting the ability of employers to unfairly dismiss inventors, and substituting low-skilled workers with inventors. In addition, the law causes firms to obtain more high-quality patents and reduces bankruptcy risk. Overall, our findings shed new light on the economic effects of labor protection in a typical emerging market.

17. Jiyoon Kim: The Effects of Paid Family Leave – Does It Help Fathers’ Health, Too?

I investigate the effects of California’s paid family leave (CA-PFL) program, the first statemandated paid leave available to both mothers and fathers in the U.S. I examine the effects on the overall health of mothers and fathers during two distinct periods: health immediately around childbirth, and health following childbirth. To do so, I leverage the variation in the timing of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) health care topical module relative to the exact year and month of childbirth. I find that CA-PFL has improved mothers’ health during pregnancy and immediately after childbirth. This improvement in health is accompanied by a reduced likelihood of mothers not working or taking unpaid work absence. Some improvements manifest in fathers’ health too during the same period. However, I observe that fathers report more instances of feeling sick, starting around five months after childbirth. Further analysis reveals that the share of fathers not working or taking unpaid work absence rises temporarily when the leave period ends. Understanding the effects on fathers’ health and leave utilization is pivotal to evaluating the program’s overall benefits and potential unintended consequences given the growing focus on enhancing equal access to paid leave for both mothers and fathers.

18. Fabian Duarte, Valentina Paredes, Cristobal Bennett, Isabel Poblete: Impact of an Extension of Maternity Leave on Infant Health

We study the effect of a 12-week maternity leave extension in Chile on the health of infants between 6 and 12 months old. Using unique administrative sick leave data for working women enrolled in the private health insurance system who gave birth between 2011 and 2013, we estimate the effect of this extension on the number of paid sick days taken by the mother due to her child being ill. We find that extending maternity leave improved infant health and decreased the number of sick days by 6.43 (0.18sd) days on average. Additionally, we show that mothers with extended maternity leave take their infant to the pediatrician less often than mothers without the extended leave. Our results are consistent with a decrease in daycare attendance, which decreases exposure to communicable diseases.

19. Julien Bergeot: Care for Elderly Parents: Do Children Cooperate?

Do children cooperate when they decide to provide informal care to their elderly parent? This paper assesses whether a cooperative or non-cooperative model drives the caregiving decisions of children. Focusing on families with two children and one single parent, I use use data from a survey of older adults in France to compare the predictive power of the two models. Results suggest that children are more likely to behave according to a non-cooperative model, and that a cooperative model overestimates the level of care received by the parents. I construct an indicator of the degree of non-cooperativeness between two children and explore the determinants of non-cooperation. Finally, I show that this indicator is positively correlated with the number of unmet needs the parent has. This latter result suggests that the current level of informal care provided to a parent appears to suffer from a public good problem and the lack of cooperativeness between children has detrimental consequences for the parent.

20. Trine Engh Vattø, Kjersti Misje Østbakken: Do Means-tested Childcare Subsidies Discourage Work?

We examine how means-tested childcare subsidies affect parental labor supply. Using the introduction of reduced childcare prices for low-income families in Norway in 2015, we show that these subsidies may have the unintended effect of discouraging work rather than promoting employment. First, structural labor supply simulations suggest that a negative parental labor supply effect dominates, ex ante. Ex post, we find a small and insignificant effect of means-tested childcare subsidies on parental labor supply in the reform year. We find no statistically significant bunching around the income limits in subsequent years, but we do find negative labor supply effects in subsequent expansions of the reform. Our results suggest that in a context where both parental employment and participation in formal childcare are high, means-tested childcare subsidies may have unintended parental labor supply effects.

21. Caroline Hall, Inés Hardoy, Kristine von Simson: Policies for Young Adults with Reduced Work Capacity: Labour Market Impact in Sweden and Norway

The rising numbers of young people with disability pension concerns many advanced economies. We present results from a comparative analysis of the neighbouring countries Sweden and Norway on the impacts of differing policy mixes aimed at enhancing the employability of the work disabled. Using rich longitudinal data, we follow unemployed young adults (ages 2529) with work-impairment up to four years after they became unemployed to investigate the effect of different types of labour market policies. Our results indicate that, despite differences in programme composition and strategies, there are surprisingly small country differences in treatment effect patterns and signs of estimated impacts. In line with previous studies, we find strong lock-in effects of both workplace-related programmes and training/educational programmes. After participation, workplace-related programmes about double the likelihood of entering regular employment or education. Participating in training courses also increases this likelihood, but effect sizes are smaller.

22. Jose Ignacio García-Pérez, Manuel Serrano Alarcon, Judit Vall-Castello: Long-term Unemployment Subsidies and Middle-aged Disadvantaged Workers’ Health

This paper examines the labour market and health effects of a non-contributory long-term unemployment (LTU) benefit targeted at middle-aged disadvantaged workers. To do so, we exploit a Spanish reform introduced in July 2012 that increased the age eligibility threshold to receive the benefit from 52 to 55. Our results show that men who were eligible for the benefit experience a reduction in injury hospitalizations by 12.9% as well as a 2 percentage points drop in the probability of a mental health diagnosis. None of the results are significant for women. We document two factors that explain the gender differences: the labour market impact of the reform is stronger for men, and eligible men are concentrated in more physically demanding sectors, like construction. Importantly, we also find evidence of a program substitution effect between LTU and partial disability benefits. Our results highlight the role of long-term unemployment benefits as a protecting device for the (physical and mental) health of middle-aged, low-educated workers who are in a disadvantaged position in the labour market.

23. Jindong Pang, Shulin Shen: Do Subways Improve Labor Market Outcomes for Low-Skilled Workers?

This paper evaluates the labor market effects of subway systems on low-skilled workers. A simple model of labor supply predicts that access to subway services can decrease transportation costs and improve labor force participation, but have ambiguous effects on the intensive margin of labor market outcomes. Empirical estimates from US cities show that a ten percent expansion in subway miles increases the labor force participation of low-skilled individuals without a car by eight percentage points. However, subway expansions, have no significant effect on the labor force participation of low-skilled individuals who own automobiles or on high-skilled workers. In contrast, expansions of light rails and buses have no significant effect on the labor market outcomes of low-skilled individuals. Improved subway services do not affect wages, hours worked, and commuting times, suggesting the labor market benefits of subways mainly lie in the extensive margin of labor supply.

24. Joanna Lahey, Roberto Mosquera: Age and Hiring for High School Graduate Hispanics in the United States

The intersection of age with ethnicity is understudied, particularly for labor force outcomes. We explore the labor market for Hispanic high school graduates in the United States by age using information from the US Census, American Community Survey, Current Population Survey, and three laboratory experiments with different populations. We find that the differences in outcomes for Hispanic and non-Hispanic high school graduates do not change across the lifecycle. Moving to a laboratory setting, we provided participants with randomized resumes for a clerical position that are, on average, equivalent except for name and age. In all experiments, participants treated applicants with Hispanic and non-Hispanic names the same across the lifecycle. These findings are in stark contrast to the differences and patterns across the lifecycle for corresponding Black workers and job applicants. We argue that these null results may explain the much smaller literature on labor market discrimination against less-educated Hispanic workers.

25. Nikos Benos, Stelios Karagiannis, Sofia Tsitou: Geography, Landownership Inequality and Literacy: Historical Evidence from Greek Regions

Our work sheds light on the joint role of human capital and geography during the early stages of the transition from stagnation to growth in early 20th century Greece. We uncover a robust association between geography and literacy. We also show that geography is correlated with land inequality and thus establish that land distribution is a channel through which geography influences literacy. Finally, the impact of geography on human capital formation weakens with industrialization. Our work contributes to the literature on geography and human capital in the transition from stagnation to growth since Greece was at the early stages of the industrial era during the study period.

26. Evelyn Skoy: Household Impacts of Child Health Shocks

Women bear a disproportionate share of the unpaid labor within a household, which contributes to gender gaps in life and relationship satisfaction. This paper examines how an exogenous shock that increases the workload within the household impacts the burden of unpaid labor. By exploiting a rich longitudinal dataset from Australia, I estimate the gendered impacts to parental workload and stress, life and relationship satisfaction, and household division of labor when parents have a child with a significant health shock. I find evidence that women experience a decrease in their satisfaction with parenting and life satisfaction. These results are most pronounced for households where the mother is less active in the labor market or less educated. Point estimates indicate that men do not experience the same negative effects.

Ends;

2024 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Yinjunjie Zhang & Robert Breunig of the Australian National University for their research on female breadwinning and domestic abuse in Australia.

Yinjunjie Jacquelyn Zhang and Robert Breunig of the Australian National University receive the 2024 Kuznets Prize for their OPEN ACCESS article Female breadwinning and domestic abuse: evidence from Australia, which was published in the Journal of Population Economics (2023), 36, pp. 2925–2965. The annual prize honors the best article published in the Journal of Population Economics in the previous year. 

The prize will be awarded in a public online event during the 2023 GLO – JOPE Global Conference on December 4, 2023 on 10:00 pm – 12.00 am CET Berlin = December 4, 2023 on 16:00 pm – 18.00 pm EST Philadelphia = December 5, 2023 on 8:00 am – 10:00 am AEDT Sydney. For the program and to register for the event see LINK.

December 6, 2023: Missed the event? Here is the video of the session.
VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Sessions A6-A7 (Kuznets Prize Session)


Biographical Abstracts

Yinjunjie Zhang (Jacquelyn) is a research fellow affiliated at Arndt-Corden Department of Economics and Tax and Transfer Policy Institute in Crawford School of Public Policy at Australian National University. Dr Zhang obtained her PhD at Texas A&M University in 2018. She has her research interest spanning the areas of labor economics, public economics, and experimental economics. A common thread is in understanding the impact of public policy on people’s behavior, choice, and welfare. She has published research articles in peer-reviewed economic journals and worked on a range of research projects aimed at providing insights on social policies and labor market outcomes.

Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at the Crawford School of Public Policy. He is one of Australia’s leading Public Policy Economists. He has published in over 50 international academic journals in economics and public policy. Professor Breunig has made significant policy impact through a number of his research projects: the relationship between child care and women’s labor supply; the effect of immigration to Australia on the labor market prospects of Australians; the effect of switching to cash from food stamps in the U.S. food stamp program and the inter-generational transmission of disadvantage. Professor Breunig’s research is motivated by important social policy issues and debates. His work is characterized by careful empirical study and appropriate use of statistical technique.

Paper Abstract

We explore the relationship between heterosexual partners’ relative income and the incidence of both domestic violence and emotional abuse. Using Australian data drawn from society-wide surveys, we find women who earn more than their male partners are subject to a 33% increase in partner violence and a 20% increase in emotional abuse compared to mean levels. We show the relationship between relative spouse income and female partner abuse is best modelled by a binary variable that captures “female breadwinning.” This finding differs from those of some earlier studies that considered only serious abuse and found a continuous negative relationship between female partners’ relative income and abuse. Instead, our findings suggest a mechanism related to gender norms generating domestic violence. We find no link between relative income and abuse of male partners.

More about the Kuznets Prize & previous prize winners.

Further research & video presentations on domestic violence in the Journal of Population Economics:

JOPE Collections and calls for papers: One focus (collection) is Sexual and Domestic Violence. JOPE Associate Editors Astghik Mavisakalyan and Dave Ribar are important advisors in the JOPE Editorial Board for this focus.

Recommended reading:
Prettyman, A., Ribar, D.C. (2022). Child Abuse and Neglect. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_234-1
Hsu, L., Henke, A. (2022). Intimate Partner Violence. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_309-2

*****

The Sixth IESR-GLO Joint Workshop at Jinan University, October 26-27, 2023, had covered papers on “Gender Issues and Domestic Violence”: REPORT

Ends;

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples: Findings for the USA about chronic distress by Blanchflower & Feir in the Journal of Population Economics.

August 9 is International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. A recently published paper in the Journal of Population Economics demonstrates that levels of consistently poor mental health were higher among Native American peoples than among White or Black Americans in every year between 1993 and 2020, and these levels have been rising.

Blanchflower, D.G., Feir, D.L.: Native Americans’ experience of chronic distress in the USA.  Journal of Population Economics  36, 885–909 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00910-4  — Free Readlink: https://rdcu.be/c3NqP

The Journal of Population Economics has CiteScore 9.2 (MORE Info) & Impact Factor 6.1.

Reference: statista

Ends;

Marriage and divorce: the role of unemployment insurance. Open Access to a new article published in the Journal of Population Economics.

A recent German unemployment insurance reform that tightened means-testing based on the partner’s income led to a decrease in intermarriage.

Schulz, B., Siuda, F. Marriage and divorce: the role of unemployment insuranceJ Popul Econ (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00961-1 OPEN ACCESS

The Journal of Population Economics has CiteScore 9.2 (MORE Info) & Impact Factor 6.1.

Ends;

The US COVID-19 baby bust and rebound. A new article by Melissa Kearney and Phillip Levine published in the Journal of Population Economics.

Findings document the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on births in the USA, which resulted in a “baby bust” period, from August 2020 through February 2021, and a birth rebound between March and September 2021. The bust was larger with more COVID cases and the rebound was smaller in places that had mask mandates.

Kearney, M.S., Levine, P.B. The US COVID-19 baby bust and reboundJ Popul Econ (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00965-x Free to read: https://rdcu.be/dg1uw

The Journal of Population Economics has CiteScore 9.2 (MORE Info) & Impact Factor 6.1.

Ends;

Troubled in school: does maternal involvement matter for adolescents? A new paper published in the Journal of Population Economics.

The paper finds that an increase in maternal involvement leads to a significant decrease in adolescents’ trouble in school.

Norris, J., van Hasselt, M. Troubled in school: does maternal involvement matter for adolescents? Journal of Population Economics (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00950-4 OPEN ACCESS

JOPE has CiteScore 9.2 (2022 MORE Info) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)


Vol. 36, Issue 3, July 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 26 articles on:

Aspirations and preferences; Environment, Weather, Climate; Family; Fertility; Historical demography; Ageing, pensions, social security; Migration

https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-3

Just published online:

Hu, S. Survival of the literati: Social status and reproduction in Ming–Qing China. Journal of Population Economics (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00960-2 Free read: https://rdcu.be/demM7

Abeliansky, A.L., Strulik, H. Health and aging before and after retirement. Journal of Population Economics (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00951-3 OPEN ACCESS

Attar, M.A. Technology and survival in preindustrial England: a Malthusian view. Journal of Population Economics (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00952-2. Free read: https://rdcu.be/ddUDe

Zhang, B. The long-term effect of wartime social networks: evidence from African American Civil War veterans, 1870–1900. Journal of Population Economics (2023)
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00940-6 Free to read: https://rdcu.be/ddUCh

Bernhardt, R., Wunnava, P.V. Does asking about citizenship increase labor survey non-response? Journal of Population Economics (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00945-1 Free read: https://rdcu.be/ddUB0

Ends;

Twenty-six articles in the July issue 2023 of the Journal of Population Economics

JUST PUBLISHED: 26 articles on

  • Aspirations and preferences
  • Environment, Weather, Climate
  • Family
  • Fertility
  • Historical demography
  • Ageing, pensions, social security
  • Migration

Vol. 36, Issue 3, July 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 26 articles.
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-3

JOPE has CiteScore6.5 (2021LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021LINK)

Ends;

Delay in childbearing and the evolution of fertility rates. Published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

The paper provides a framework to study the direct, preference-related factors that reinforce the delay in the timing of childbearing.

Dioikitopoulos, E., Varvarigos, D.: Delay in childbearing and the evolution of fertility rates. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00931-z

Authors: Evangelos Dioikitopoulos & Dimitrios Varvarigos
Handling JOPE Editor: Gregory Ponthiere

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Natural selection and Neanderthal extinction in a Malthusian economy by Angus C. Chu. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

The paper studies: Why are Homo sapiens the only human species living on this planet? 

Chu, A.C. Natural selection and Neanderthal extinction in a Malthusian economy. J Popul Econ (2023).


https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00939-z
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c48dk

Author: Angus C. Chu. Department of Economics, University of Macau, Macau, China
Handling JOPE Editor: Oded Galor. Author of the bestselling book Journey of Humanity.

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Analyzing household cost functions using direct wellbeing measures.

The study of GLO Fellow Arie Kapteyn (University of Southern California) published in 1994 in the Journal of Population Economics demonstrated that subjective wellbeing measures fully identify household cost functions.

Happy birthday and 77 thanks to a role model in the field of population economics.

Kapteyn, A. The measurement of household cost functions. Journal of Population Economics 7:4, 333–350 (1994).

https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00161471 
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c4SAL

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Quantity-quality trade-off in Northeast China during the Qing dynasty. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

The study provides supportive evidence for the unified growth theory, showing that the decreased fertility rates in pre-transition China could be a result of rational behaviors perpetuated by households in response to higher educational returns and accessibility.

Bai, Y., Li, Y. & Lam, P.H. Quantity-quality trade-off in Northeast China during the Qing dynasty. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00933-x
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c3X9x

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Social security, economic growth, and social welfare in an overlapping generation model with idiosyncratic TFP shock and heterogeneous workers. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

In terms of social welfare within the Rawlsian welfare function, if people are highly risk-averse and therefore strongly inequality-averse, a pay-as-you-go system with no savings credit outperforms a fully funded system. 

Tamai, T. Social security, economic growth, and social welfare in an overlapping generation model with idiosyncratic TFP shock and heterogeneous workers. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00934-w
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c3X6q

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Persistent effects of Communist regime affiliations on well-being and preferences. Published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new study shows that those connections still matter much for wellbeing and mark differences concerning preferences for democracy and market economy, for levels of optimism, and risk tolerance.

Otrachshenko, V., Nikolova, M. & Popova, O. Double-edged sword: persistent effects of Communist regime affiliations on well-being and preferences. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00930-0 OPEN ACCESS

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Economic geography of contagion: a study of COVID-19 outbreak in India. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new study provides direct evidence that the positive relationship between regional inequality and COVID-19 infection is driven by mobility. 

Chakraborty, T., Mukherjee, A. Economic geography of contagion: a study of COVID-19 outbreak in India. J Popul Econ (2023).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00935-9



Free to READ: https://rdcu.be/c3XPS

GLO Fellow Tanika Chakraborty

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

The effects of temperature on mental health: evidence from China. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

Temperatures over 30°C significantly increase the likelihood of depression!

Hua, Y., Qiu, Y. & Tan, X. The effects of temperature on mental health: evidence from China. J Popul Econ (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00932-y

Free to READ: https://rdcu.be/c2zRN

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Health shocks and spousal labor supply. Access to new article in the Journal of Population Economics by GLO Fellows Nicholas A. Jolly & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos.

Jolly, N.A., Theodoropoulos, N. Health shocks and spousal labor supply: an international perspective. J Popul Econ (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00929-7

To READ: https://rdcu.be/c10zG

NikosTheodoropoulos

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Scholz visit to strengthen mutual trust. Opinion Piece in “China Daily” of November 4, 2022.

The pros and cons of the one-day trip of German Chancellor Olaf Scholz are heavily debated at home and globally. Is this a good move after the “Zeitenwende” caused by the Russian aggression in the Ukraine? In an opinion piece for the China Daily I argue today that the visit is important at this time to explore the potentials for the world and strengthen mutual trust.

China Daily, Hong Kong Edition, November 4, 2022, p. 10.

Ends;

Daylight Saving ends. Recent research about daylight effects in the Journal of Population Economics.

Daylight saving is under debate. What are the health and crime implications?

Journal of Population Economics, Issue 3/2022

Follow the paper presentations of the authors during the Summer Event 2022 of the Journal of Population Economics:

July 15, 2022. Journal of Population Economics Summer 2022 Event. Program & Event Video.

Ends;

Independent Research Informing the Abortion Debate from the Journal of Population Economics.

In print in the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE):

GLO Fellow Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions on aggregate abortion and birth rates in the United States. Specifically, I exploit state and time variation in the implementation of the first targeted regulation of abortion provider (TRAP) law in a state to identify the effects of the laws. I find that TRAP laws are associated with a reduction in the abortion rate of approximately 5% the year the first law is implemented, and an average reduction of 11-14% in subsequent years. There is also evidence that TRAP laws increased birth rates by 2-3%, which accounts for approximately 80-100% of the observed decline in abortion rates.

GLO Fellow Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

Access to more published JOPE research on abortion issues:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020. Article by GLO Fellow Caitlin Myers forthcoming in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years.

Accepted for publication in the Journal of Population Economics.

Has the US Supreme Court voted to overturn abortion rights? The paper by Caitlin Myers provides important background information about the US policy environment over decades.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1073, 2022

Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020 Download PDF
by Myers, Caitlin Knowles

GLO Fellow Caitlin Myers

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

NOTE on the latest situation in Florida: “Florida is the latest state to pass legislation that further restricts access to abortion.”

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country. Now forthcoming in the Journal of Political Economy. By Shyamal Chowdhury, Matthias Sutter & Klaus F. Zimmermann.

Using data from large-scale experiments with entire families for Bangladesh, the research finds that both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences. Results differ from evidence for rich countries.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 592, 2020 now forthcoming as

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country
by
Chowdhury, Shyamal & Sutter, Matthias & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

in: Journal of Political Economy

Free Pre-publication version

GLO Fellows Shyamal Chowdhury and Matthias Sutter & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann

Author Abstract: Our large-scale experiment with 542 families from rural Bangladesh finds substantial intergenerational persistence of economic preferences. Both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly (and largely to the same degree) positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences, even when controlling for personality traits and socio-economic background. We discuss possible transmission channels and are the first to classify all families into one of two clusters, with either relatively patient, risk-tolerant and pro-social members or relatively impatient, risk averse and spiteful members. Classifications correlate with socio-economic background variables. We find that our results differ from evidence for rich countries.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is favicon_glabor.png

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Religiosity, Smoking and Other Risky Behaviors. GLO Discussion Paper by Monica Roman, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Aurelian-Petruș now published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Economics, Management and Religion.

Using data for young Romanians, a GLO Discussion Paper found that it is external religiosity that interacts with weaker addictive behaviors like smoking, drinking and using drugs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 859, 2021

Religiosity, Smoking and Other Addictive Behaviors
by
Roman, Monica & Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Plopeanu, Aurelian-Petruș

Now forthcoming OPEN ACCESSJournal of Economics, Management and Religion (JEMAR), Vol. 2 (2022), 2250001.

Free Pre-publication version

Author Abstract: While under communism the identity-providing religion was suppressed, religiosity is strong today even among the youth in post-communist countries. This provides an appropriate background to investigate how external and internal religiosity relates to risky behaviors like smoking, drinking, and drugs among the young. This study shows that not religion as such or internal religiosity, but largely observable (external) religiosity prevents them from wallowing in those vices. While this is found strongly for both males and females, those females doubting or reflecting religion show a somewhat smaller risky activity. 

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Feminisation U, cultural norms, and the plough. A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Luca J. Uberti and Elodie Douarin.

The new paper finds that an U-shaped relationship between female labour force participation and economic development is only significant in countries whose ancestors employed a plough-based agricultural technology.

Luca J. Uberti & Elodie Douarin

The Feminisation U, cultural norms, and the plough

Journal of Population Economics (2022). Open Access
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-022-00890-5

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: The Feminisation U describes the tendency of female labour force participation (FLFP) to first decline and then rise in the process of economic development. While the Feminisation U is often presented as a ‘stylised fact’ of development, empirical support for it is mixed. Here, we show that cultural norms inherited from ancestral plough use exert a moderating influence on the shape of the Feminisation U. Specifically, we find a significantly U-shaped path of FLFP only in countries whose ancestors employed a plough-based agricultural technology. The shape of the U-curve becomes progressively more muted as the share of a country’s ancestors that practiced plough agriculture decreases. In countries with little or no legacy of historical plough use, the time path of FLFP is effectively flat. This pattern of results is robust to correcting for dynamic panel bias, instrumenting for per-capita income, and controlling for other potential effect modifiers. Our findings are compatible with a nuanced reading of the main theoretical models proposed in the literature to explain the Feminisation U.

Fig. 1

Journal of Population Economics

  • 33 more ONLINE FIRST articles: LINK
  • 13 new articles in issue 2/April 2022: LINK

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Social assimilation and immigrants’ labour market outcomes. Newly published article OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Matloob Piracha, Massimiliano Tani, Zhiming Cheng & Ben Zhe Wang.

The new paper finds that assimilation in Australia is strongly associated with employment and wages as well as a number of job satisfaction measures.

Matloob Piracha, Massimiliano Tani, Zhiming Cheng & Ben Zhe Wang

Social assimilation and immigrants’ labour market outcomes

J Popul Econ (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-021-00883-w
Open Access

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: We analyse how immigrants’ level of social assimilation is related to their labour market outcomes. More precisely, we estimate the association between assimilation and employment, wages, underemployment, three measures of job satisfaction, overeducation and wages. Using Australian longitudinal data, we find that assimilation is strongly associated with employment and wages as well as a number of job satisfaction measures. We then split our data and repeat the analysis for before and after the financial crisis of 2008–2009. We find important differences in the way assimilation is associated with different measures of labour market outcomes under different economic conditions. Finally, we explore mechanisms that may underlie the results.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)

Journal of Population Economics
Access to Volume 34, Issue 4, 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

Journal of Population Economics Workshop Kuznets Prize & Issue 4/2021 Highlights
Program VIDEO OF EVENT

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Understanding the setup and speed of global COVID-19 vaccination campaigns: VoxEU column published.

Because vaccinations are crucial to containing the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to identify the key factors behind successful immunisation campaigns. This column shows that pandemic pressures, economic strength, educational advancement, and political regimes can affect vaccination uptake, given vaccine availability. While democratic regimes initially show faster vaccination uptake, this advantage fades out as countries try to get more people vaccinated. Countries with strong economies and education systems are likely to have faster uptake of vaccination campaigns.

Read the column:

Vu M. Ngo, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Phuc V. Nguyen, Toan Luu Duc Huynh and Huan H. Nguyen (2021).
Understanding the setup and speed of global COVID-19 vaccination campaigns

VoxEU on 25 January 2022.

Featured image: Markus-Spiske-DnBtFBnqlRc-unsplash

Ends;

Born or bred? The roles of nature and nurture for intergenerational persistence in labour market outcomes. Newly published article in the Journal of Population Economics by Ulvestad, M.E.S. & Markussen, S., Online First.

A new paper published Online First in the Journal of Population Economics finds heritability for Norway to account for about 50–100% of intergenerational transmissions.

Ulvestad, M.E.S., Markussen, S.

Born or bred? The roles of nature and nurture for intergenerational persistence in labour market outcomes.

J Popul Econ (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-021-00880-z
READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/cFDy0

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: Using a Norwegian sample of adoptees from South Korea, matched to a sample of Norwegian-born children, we study the intergenerational transmission of labour market outcomes, including earnings, disability insurance participation and sickness absence, as well as education. We find the nurture effect to be substantial for education, labour earnings, and sickness absence, but fairly small and insignificant for disability insurance participation. By carefully comparing adoptees to children living with their biological parents, we also estimate the shares of intergenerational transmission stemming from heritability and environmental factors. Across outcomes we find heritability to account for about 50–100% of intergenerational transmission.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

International Migrants Day: December 18. Free Access to Migration Research.

On the occasion of the International Migrants Day December 18, 2021 Springer Nature provides free access throughout December to a fine collection of articles of recent migration research. Publication outlets supported by GLO have published seven of the chosen contributions (see below). These include the Journal of Population Economics and the Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics.

Explore the latest Springer Nature collection of research on migration and migration studies.

The Economic Geography of Cross-Border Migration

Featured chapter: Free access throughout December

Featured papers: Free access throughout December

Journal website

Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics

Featured chapters: Free access throughout December

Handbook website

Ends;

Cohort at risk: long-term consequences of conflict for child school achievement. A new paper published freely accessible in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics shows that an increase in family experience of conflict has large negative long-term effects on the educational attainment of children.

Cohort at risk: long-term consequences of conflict for child school achievement

by Hendrik Jürges, Luca Stella, Sameh Hallaq and Alexandra Schwarz

Published OPEN ACCESS:
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 35 (2022), pp. 1-43. PDF

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: We investigate the long-term effects of households’ exposure to violent conflict on children’s educational attainment in primary school, studying cognitive and non-cognitive skills as possible causal channels. Our identification strategy exploits the locality-level variation in the intensity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the West Bank during the Second Intifada (2000–2005). We show that an increase in family experience of conflict has large negative long-term effects on the educational attainment of children as measured by grade point averages. We find that non-cognitive rather than cognitive skills are the channels through which exposure affects children’s educational achievement.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Return migrants and the wage premium: does the legal status of migrants matter? New open access online first publication by GLO Fellows Nelly Elmallakh and Jackline Wahba.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST finds that, upon return, undocumented migrants experience a wage penalty compared with documented migrants, as well as relative to non-migrants.

Return migrants and the wage premium: does the legal status of migrants matter?

by GLO Fellows Nelly Elmallakh and Jackline Wahba

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS PDF

Jackline Wahba
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper examines the impact of the legal status of overseas migrants on their wages upon return to the home country. Using unique data from Egypt, which allows us to distinguish between return migrants according to whether their international migration was documented or undocumented, we examine the impact of illegal status on wages upon return. Relying on a Conditional Mixed Process model, which takes into account the selection into emigration, into return, and into the legal status of temporary migration, we find that, upon return, undocumented migrants experience a wage penalty compared with documented migrants, as well as relative to non-migrants. Our results are the first to show the impact of undocumented migration on the migrant upon return to the country of origin.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Something in the pipe: the Flint water crisis and health at birth. A new paper published freely available in the Journal of Population Economics by Rui Wang, Xi Chen and Xun Li.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST with free readlink in the Journal of Population Economics finds that severe water contamination in the US modestly increased the rate of low birth weight, but had little effect on the length of gestation or rate of prematurity.

Something in the pipe: the Flint water crisis and health at birth

by Rui Wang, Xi Chen and Xun Li

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
Free READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cytgm

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In 2014, the city of Flint, MI, in the USA changed its public water source, resulting in severe water contamination and a public health crisis. Using the Flint water crisis as a natural experiment, we estimate the effect of in utero exposure to polluted water on health at birth. Matching vital statistics birth records with various sources of data, we use the synthetic control method to identify the causal impact of water pollution on key birth outcomes. Our results suggest that the crisis modestly increased the rate of low birth weight (LBW) by 1.8 percentage points (or 15.5%) but had little effect on the length of gestation or rate of prematurity. However, these effects are larger among children born to black mothers, as indicated by an increase in the rate of LBW by 2.5 percentage points (or 19%). Children born to white mothers exhibit, on average, a 30.1-g decrease in birth weight. We find little evidence that the male-to-female sex ratio declines in the overall population, suggesting that the in utero scarring effect of the Flint water crisis may dominate the channel of mortality selection. However, we observe a slight decline in the sex ratio among children born to black mothers. Finally, we find no notable change in the fertility rates of either black women or white women in Flint. These results are robust to a rich set of placebo and falsification tests.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Changes in children’s time use during periods of financial hardship. A new paper published freely available in the Journal of Population Economics by Jessica L. Arnup, Nicole Black & David W. Johnston.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST with free readlink in the Journal of Population Economics finds that financial hardship is associated with significantly more screen time, particularly passive screen time, and screen time at excessive levels.

Changes in children’s time use during periods of financial hardship

by Jessica L. Arnup, Nicole Black & David W. Johnston

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
Free READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cyeE8

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper examines the impact of children’s migration on the well-being of left-behind parents using panel data on experienced utility measured by the Day Reconstruction Method. Exploiting exogenous variation in exposure to employment shocks at migration destinations for identification, we find that left-behind parents experience lower utility when their adult children migrate. This is partly due to increased working time and less time spent in social activities, and partly due to reduced utility within activity type. The latter effect is consistent with the finding of less physical care and psychological support from children who have migrated. These negative effects dominate the possible benefits of greater income associated with children’s migration.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The unintended effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders on abortions. A new paper published in the Journal of Population Economics by Fernanda Marquez-Padilla & Biani Saavedra.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST with free readlink in the Journal of Population Economics finds that abortions in Mexico City reduced substantially during the period of stay-at-home orders.

The unintended effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders on abortions

by Fernanda Marquez-Padilla & Biani Saavedra

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
Free READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cyeBt

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: We study the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and of government mandated mitigation policies on the number of abortions performed by Mexico City’s public abortion program. We find that the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders (SAHO) implemented in Mexico led to unintended consequences for women’s sexual and reproductive health. Using difference-in-differences and event study analyses, we show that SAHO and the pandemic led to a fall in abortions of around 25% and find no evidence that unsafe abortions increased. We find a decrease in the share of single and teenage women getting abortions, arguably due to fewer unwanted pregnancies from decreased sexual activity, and estimate that at most 9.8% of the total fall in abortions can be attributed to this. We complement our analysis using call data from a government helpline and show that the SAHO time period led to fewer abortion- and contraception-related calls but to an increase in pregnancy-related calls.

Featured image: Fusion-medical-animation-on-unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF


The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Do elections accelerate the COVID-19 pandemic? A new Paper published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Ján Palguta, René Levínský & Samuel Škoda says “yes”.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST with free OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics finds that elections indeed matter. It has implications for postal voting reforms or postponing of large-scale, in-person (electoral) events during viral outbreaks.

Do elections accelerate the COVID-19 pandemic?

by Ján Palguta, René Levínský & Samuel Škoda

Published OPEN ACCESS ONLINE FIRST PDF 2021: Journal of Population Economics

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: Elections define representative democracies but also produce spikes in physical mobility if voters need to travel to polling places. In this paper, we examine whether large-scale, in-person elections propagate the spread of COVID-19. We exploit a natural experiment from the Czech Republic, which biannually renews mandates in one-third of Senate constituencies that rotate according to the 1995 election law. We show that in the second and third weeks after the 2020 elections (held on October 9–10), new COVID-19 infections grew significantly faster in voting compared to non-voting constituencies. A temporarily related peak in hospital admissions and essentially no changes in test positivity rates suggest that the acceleration was not merely due to increased testing. The acceleration did not occur in the population above 65, consistently with strategic risk-avoidance by older voters. Our results have implications for postal voting reforms or postponing of large-scale, in-person (electoral) events during viral outbreaks.

Featured image: Fusion-medical-animation-on-unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF


The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Migration and experienced utility of left-behind parents: evidence from rural China. A new paper published in the Journal of Population Economics by Shu Cai, Albert Park & Winnie Yip.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST with free readlink in the Journal of Population Economics finds that left-behind parents experience lower utility when their adult children migrate.

Migration and experienced utility of left-behind parents: evidence from rural China

by Shu Cai, Albert Park & Winnie Yip

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cxiiq

Shu Cai
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper examines the impact of children’s migration on the well-being of left-behind parents using panel data on experienced utility measured by the Day Reconstruction Method. Exploiting exogenous variation in exposure to employment shocks at migration destinations for identification, we find that left-behind parents experience lower utility when their adult children migrate. This is partly due to increased working time and less time spent in social activities, and partly due to reduced utility within activity type. The latter effect is consistent with the finding of less physical care and psychological support from children who have migrated. These negative effects dominate the possible benefits of greater income associated with children’s migration.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 4, July 2021. 10 articles on Covid-19 all freely accessible.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 4, 2021:
The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease
by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF



The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap. A new paper published freely accessible in the Journal of Population Economics by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that the minimum working age raised from 14 to 16 in Spain, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%.

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap

by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cq2lY

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In 1980, a few years after its democratization process, Spain raised the minimum working age from 14 to 16, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. This reform changed the within-cohort incentives to remain in the educational system. We use a difference-in-differences approach, where our treated and control individuals only differ in their month of birth, to analyze the gender asymmetries in mortality generated by this change. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%. This is driven by increases in HIV mortality, as well as by diseases related to the nervous and circulatory systems. We show that women’s health habits deteriorated as a consequence of the reform, while this was not the case for men. The gender differences in the impact of the reform on smoking and drinking should be understood in the context of the gender equalization process that affected women were experiencing when the reform took place. All in all, these patterns help explain the narrowing age gap in life expectancy between women and men in many developed countries while, at the same time, they provide important policy implications for middle-income countries that are undergoing those gender equalization processes right now.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Coronagraben in Switzerland: culture and social distancing in times of COVID-19. New paper by Neha Deopa & Piergiuseppe Fortunato published ONLINE FIRST & WITH OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS finds that within the Swiss context, high trusting areas exhibited a smaller decline in mobility.

Coronagraben in Switzerland: culture and social distancing in times of COVID-19

by Neha Deopa & Piergiuseppe Fortunato

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics

OPEN ACCESS. And PDF. GLO Discussion Paper No. 857.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: Social distancing measures help contain the spread of COVID-19, but actual compliance has varied substantially across space and time. We ask whether cultural differences underlie this heterogeneity using mobility data across Switzerland between February and December 2020. We find that German-speaking cantons decreased their mobility for non-essential activities significantly less than French-speaking cantons. However, we find no such significant differences for bilingual cantons. Contrary to the evidence in the literature, we find that within the Swiss context, high trusting areas exhibited a smaller decline in mobility. Additionally, cantons supporting a limited role of the state in matters of welfare also experienced a smaller reduction in mobility.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap. A new paper published freely accessible in the Journal of Population Economics by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that the minimum working age raised from 14 to 16 in Spain, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%.

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap

by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cq2lY

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In 1980, a few years after its democratization process, Spain raised the minimum working age from 14 to 16, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. This reform changed the within-cohort incentives to remain in the educational system. We use a difference-in-differences approach, where our treated and control individuals only differ in their month of birth, to analyze the gender asymmetries in mortality generated by this change. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%. This is driven by increases in HIV mortality, as well as by diseases related to the nervous and circulatory systems. We show that women’s health habits deteriorated as a consequence of the reform, while this was not the case for men. The gender differences in the impact of the reform on smoking and drinking should be understood in the context of the gender equalization process that affected women were experiencing when the reform took place. All in all, these patterns help explain the narrowing age gap in life expectancy between women and men in many developed countries while, at the same time, they provide important policy implications for middle-income countries that are undergoing those gender equalization processes right now.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Immigration and economic mobility. New paper by Maria F. Hoen, Simen Markussen and Knut Røed published ONLINE FIRST & WITH OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that immigration from low-income countries reduces intergenerational mobility and thus steepens the social gradient
in natives’ labor market outcomes, whereas immigration from high-income countries levels it.

Immigration and economic mobility

by Maria F. Hoen, Simen Markussen and Knut Røed

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics

OPEN ACCESS. PDF.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: We examine how immigration affects natives’ relative prime-age labor market outcomes by economic class background, with class background established on the basis of parents’ earnings rank. Exploiting alternative sources of variation in immigration patterns across time and space, we find that immigration from low-income countries reduces intergenerational mobility and thus steepens the social gradient in natives’ labor market outcomes, whereas immigration from high-income countries levels it. These findings are robust with respect to a wide range of identifying assumptions. The analysis is based on high-quality population-wide administrative data from Norway, which is one of the rich-world countries with the most rapid rise in the immigrant population share over the past two decades. Our findings suggest that immigration can explain a considerable part of the observed relative decline in economic performance among natives with a lower-class background.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Optimal lockdown and social welfare. New paper by GLO Fellows Pierre Pestieau and Grégory Ponthière published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible examines the robustness of the optimal lockdown strategy to the postulated social welfare criterion.

Optimal lockdown and social welfare

by Pierre Pestieau and Grégory Ponthière

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cpRlF

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper examines the robustness of the optimal lockdown strategy to the postulated social welfare criterion. We show that utilitarianism can, under some conditions, imply a COVID-19 variant of Parfit’s (1984) Repugnant Conclusion: for any (interior) lockdown with life periods of low quality, there must be a stricter lockdown that is regarded as better, even though this reduces the quality of life periods even more. On the contrary, the ex post egalitarian criterion (giving priority to the worst-off ex post) implies zero lockdown. Varying between its minimal and its maximal levels, the optimal lockdown is not robust to the postulated ethical criterion. We also identify a general ethical dilemma between the goal of saving lives (modeled by the Survivors Number Count axiom) and the goal of giving priority to the worst-off (Hammond Equity).

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Sexual Orientation and Earnings. A Meta-Analysis 2012-2020. New paper by GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

The meta-analysis provided in a new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that gay men earned less than heterosexual men; lesbian women earned more than heterosexual women, while bisexual men earned less than heterosexual men.

Sexual Orientation and Earnings. A Meta-Analysis 2012-2020.

by Drydakis, Nick

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cpeNT

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg
Nick Drydakis

Author Abstract: This meta-analysis utilizes 24 papers published between 2012-2020 that focus on earnings differences by sexual orientation. The papers cover the period between 1991 and 2018, and countries in Europe, North America and Australia. The meta-analysis indicates that gay men earned less than heterosexual men. Lesbian women earned more than heterosexual women, while bisexual men earned less than heterosexual men. Bisexual women earned less than heterosexual women. According to the meta-analysis, in data sets after 2010, gay men and bisexual men and women continue to experience earnings penalties, while lesbian women continue to experience earnings premiums. Τhe meta-regression estimates indicate relationships between study characteristics and the estimated earnings effects for sexual minorities. For instance, regions, sexual minority data set sizes, and earnings classifications influence the outcomes. The persistence of earnings penalties for gay men and bisexual men and women in the face of anti-discrimination policies represents a cause for concern and indicates the need for comprehensive legislation and workplace guidelines to guarantee that people receive fair pay and not experience any form of workplace inequality simply because of their sexual orientation.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 862, 2021 (Download PDF)

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Skipping the doctor: evidence from a case with extended self-certification of paid sick leave. New paper by Bruno Ferman, Gaute Torsvik & Kjell Vaage published ONLINE FIRST & OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

Norway extended to workers the right to self-certify sickness absence from work. A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics rules out large absence increases after the reform but provides evidence that the policy change caused a reduction in absence for female workers.

Skipping the doctor: evidence from a case with extended self-certification of paid sick leave

by Bruno Ferman, Gaute Torsvik & Kjell Vaage

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS: PDF

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper examines the impact of a policy reform in a municipality in Norway that extended to workers the right to self-certify sickness absence from work. After the reform, workers were no longer obliged to obtain a certificate from a physician to receive sickness benefits. They could call in sick directly to their line leader and had to engage in a counselling program organized by the employer. To estimate the effect of this reform, we contrast the change in sickness absence among employees who were granted the extended right to self-certify absence with absence among employees who had to obtain a physician’s certificate to be entitled to sickness benefits. We use both a standard difference-in-differences method and the synthetic control method to estimate the effect of the reform. We can rule out large positive effects on absence after the reform, with strong evidence that the policy change actually resulted in a reduction in absence for female workers.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

I am a survivor, keep on surviving: early-life exposure to conflict and subjective survival probabilities in adult life. New paper by Bruno Arpino, Pierluigi Conzo & Francesco Salustri published ONLINE FIRST & OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics presents evidence to support the hypothesis that personal growth and life appreciation emerge after traumatic events, thereby leading to optimistic perceptions of longevity.

I am a survivor, keep on surviving: early-life exposure to conflict and subjective survival probabilities in adult life

by Bruno Arpino, Pierluigi Conzo & Francesco Salustri

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS: PDF

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: Life-course studies have shown that early-life conditions predict health and socio-economic status in adult life. This study analyzes whether experiencing a traumatic event in childhood, i.e., the Second World War (WW2), affects subjective survival probabilities (SSPs). We rely on a representative sample of European adults who were differentially exposed to WW2 during childhood as a result of their date and place of birth. Results show that exposure to WW2 increases SSPs, with socio-economic and health characteristics not playing a mediating role. War exposure also counterbalances the adverse effects of health impairments on SSPs, but it does not affect health outcomes per se. This fact, jointly with low mortality rates of the cohort under investigation, suggests that selective mortality and post-traumatic stress are not the main channels. Instead, the results support the hypothesis that personal growth and life appreciation emerge after traumatic events, thereby leading to optimistic perceptions of longevity.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease. New paper by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter published ONLINE FIRST & WITH OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

As the first country in the world, Slovakia implemented and repeated mass rapid antigen testing. A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics has shown that this had reduced infections substantially.

The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease

by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS: PDF

Martin Kahanec
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In the absence of effective vaccination, mass testing and quarantining of positive cases and their contacts could help to mitigate pandemics and allow economies to stay open. We investigate the effects of repeated mass testing on the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, using data from the first ever nationwide rapid antigen testing implemented in Slovakia in autumn 2020. After the first round of testing, only districts above an ex ante unknown threshold of test positivity were re-tested. Comparing districts above and below the threshold, we provide evidence that repeated mass antigen testing can temporarily reduce the number of new infections. Our results suggest that mass testing coupled with the quarantining of positive cases and their contacts could be an effective tool in mitigating pandemics. For lasting effects, re-testing at regular intervals would likely be necessary.

Featured image: Mufid-Majnun-on-Unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Aging and automation in economies with search frictions. New paper by Xiaomeng Zhang, Theodore Palivos & Xiangbo Liu published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible shows that an increase in life expectancy raises the level as well as the inequality of income.

Aging and automation in economies with search frictions

by Xiaomeng Zhang, Theodore Palivos & Xiangbo Liu

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/coNTX

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of an increase in life expectancy on the level and the distribution of income in the presence of skill heterogeneity and automation. It shows analytically that an increase in life expectancy induces the replacement of low-skilled workers by automation capital and high-skilled workers. Moreover, it raises the skill premium and has an ambiguous effect on total income. A simulation exercise, based on US data, shows that an increase in life expectancy raises the level as well as the inequality of income. We consider redistributive policies that can mitigate some of the adverse effects of an increase in life expectancy for low-skilled workers.

Featured image: Andy-Kelly-on-Unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The effect of compulsory schooling laws and child labor restrictions on fertility: evidence from the early twentieth century: New paper by Yannay Shanan published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that changes in legislation across time and between US states during the early twentieth century make parents chose to have fewer children in response to the constraints imposed.

The effect of compulsory schooling laws and child labor restrictions on fertility: evidence from the early twentieth century

by Yannay Shanan

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cn2UZ

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper uses census data to examine the impact of child labor restrictions imposed by compulsory schooling laws and child labor regulation on fertility. By exploiting variation induced by changes in legislation across time and between US states during the early twentieth century, I show that parents chose to have fewer children in response to the constraints imposed on the labor supply of their potential children and the increase in their expected quality. My findings suggest that compulsory schooling laws and child labor regulation contributed to the demographic transition in the US and provide additional empirical support for the notion that financial incentives play a role in determining household fertility decisions.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Baby commodity booms? The impact of commodity shocks on fertility decisions and outcomes. New paper published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by GLO Fellow Francisco Gallego & Jeanne Lafortune.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that commodity shocks lead to an increase in the number of births and the birth rate in Chile.

Baby commodity booms? The impact of commodity shocks on fertility decisions and outcomes

by Francisco Gallego & Jeanne Lafortune

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cnd2y

GLO Fellow Francisco Gallego

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper uses international commodity prices and local natural resource endowments as a source of plausibly exogenous variation in local Chilean economic conditions to study how these shocks impact fertility behavior of families in a small, emerging open economy where non-marital fertility is common but parental obligations are not well enforced. We find that these commodity shocks lead to an increase in the number of births and the birth rate. We argue that these results are consistent with most women experiencing an income effect and a limited substitution effect from commodity booms. This is confirmed by looking at groups that would have experienced a larger income than substitution effect: higher-order births, births within marital relationships, and those by mothers who do not experience an increase in their employment probability respond more strongly to these commodity booms.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Local mortality estimates during the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. New paper published ONLINE FIRST & OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Augusto Cerqua, Roberta Di Stefano, Marco Letta & Sara Miccoli

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible demonstrate for Italy that supervised machine learning techniques outperform the official statistical method by substantially improving the prediction accuracy of local mortality.

Local mortality estimates during the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy

by Augusto Cerqua, Roberta Di Stefano, Marco Letta & Sara Miccoli

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS and PDF.

GLO Fellow Marco Letta

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: Estimates of the real death toll of the COVID-19 pandemic have proven to be problematic in many countries, Italy being no exception. Mortality estimates at the local level are even more uncertain as they require stringent conditions, such as granularity and accuracy of the data at hand, which are rarely met. The “official” approach adopted by public institutions to estimate the “excess mortality” during the pandemic draws on a comparison between observed all-cause mortality data for 2020 and averages of mortality figures in the past years for the same period. In this paper, we apply the recently developed machine learning control method to build a more realistic counterfactual scenario of mortality in the absence of COVID-19. We demonstrate that supervised machine learning techniques outperform the official method by substantially improving the prediction accuracy of the local mortality in “ordinary” years, especially in small- and medium-sized municipalities. We then apply the best-performing algorithms to derive estimates of local excess mortality for the period between February and September 2020. Such estimates allow us to provide insights about the demographic evolution of the first wave of the pandemic throughout the country. To help improve diagnostic and monitoring efforts, our dataset is freely available to the research community.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Stay-at-home orders, social distancing, and trust. New paper published ONLINE FIRST & FREE ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Abel Brodeur, Idaliya Grigoryeva & Lamis Kattan

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds for the USA that mobility decreases significantly more in high-trust counties than in low-trust counties after stay-at-home orders are implemented.

Stay-at-home orders, social distancing, and trust

by Abel Brodeur, Idaliya Grigoryeva & Lamis Kattan

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
ACCESS. FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cmSoY

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: A clear understanding of community response to government decisions is crucial for policy makers and health officials during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we document the determinants of implementation and compliance with stay-at-home orders in the USA, focusing on trust and social capital. Using cell phone data measuring changes in non-essential trips and average distance traveled, we find that mobility decreases significantly more in high-trust counties than in low-trust counties after the stay-at-home orders are implemented, with larger effects for more stringent orders. We also provide evidence that the estimated effect on post-order compliance is especially large for confidence in the press and governmental institutions, and relatively smaller for confidence in medicine and in science.

Photo-by-Charles-Deluvio-on-Unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;