Category Archives: News

A new GLO Discussion Paper analyzes social safety nets in Tunisia.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that benefits do not necessarily reach the poor and vulnerable households at the regional level.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 440, 2020

Social Safety Nets in Tunisia: Do Benefits Reach the Poor and Vulnerable Households at the Regional Level? –  Download PDF
by Nasri, Khaled

GLO Fellow Khaled Nasri

Author Abstract: Tunisian social programs provide direct transfers and free or reduced rate access to public health care for families selected by local and regional commissions. In some areas, poor and vulnerable families are excluded from these programs whose places are occupied by other households. The center is often ill-informed about the performance of different regions in reaching the poor and about the exclusion and inclusion errors sources. This lack of information can severely limit the options for designing reforms that will improve targeting performance. In a nutshell : Two components of social safety nets in Tunisia: one covers more, and the other is more generous. The regional commissions often select households headed by women widowed and elderly as beneficiaries. At the regional level, some beneficiaries are not eligible, and the eligible are not beneficiaries. The inclusion of the non-poor and the exclusion of the poor at the regional level are due to disagreement between eligibility criteria and a person’s poverty status.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Agricultural credits and agricultural productivity: A New GLO Discussion Paper.

A new GLO Discussion Paper presents cross-country evidence that agricultural credits have a positive impact on agricultural productivity.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 439, 2020

Agricultural credits and agricultural productivity: Cross-country evidence –  Download PDF
by
Seven, Unal & Tumen, Semih

GLO Fellow Semih Tumen

Author Abstract: We present cross-country evidence suggesting that agricultural credits have a positive impact on agricultural productivity. In particular, we find that doubling agricultural credits generates around 4-5 percent increase in agricultural productivity. We use two different agricultural production measures: (i) the agricultural component of GDP and (ii) agricultural labor productivity. Employing a combination of panel-data and instrumental- variable methods, we show that agricultural credits operate mostly on the agricultural component of GDP in developing countries and agricultural labor productivity in developed countries. This suggests that the nature of the relationship between agricultural finance and agricultural output changes along the development path. We conjecture that development of the agricultural finance system generates entry into the agricultural labor market, which pushes up the agricultural component of GDP and keeps down agricultural labor productivity in developing countries; while, in developed countries, it leads to labor-augmenting increase in agricultural production. We argue that replacement of the informal credit channel with formal and advanced agricultural credit markets along the development path is the main force driving the labor market response.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: A new GLO Discussion Paper

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that smartphone use reduces student success.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 438, 2019

Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: First Evidence from Longitudinal Data –  Download PDF
by
Amez, Simon & Vujić, Sunčica & De Marez, Lieven & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellows Suncica Vujic & Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: To study the causal impact of smartphone use on academic performance, we collected—for the first time worldwide—longitudinal data on students’ smartphone use and educational performance. For three consecutive years we surveyed all students attending classes in eleven different study programs at two Belgian universities on general smartphone use and other drivers of academic achievement. These survey data were merged with the exam scores of these students. We analyzed the resulting data by means of panel data random effects estimation controlling for unobserved individual characteristics. A one standard deviation increase in overall smartphone use results in a decrease of 0.349 points (out of 20) and a decrease of 2.616 percentage points in the fraction of exams passed.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper explores the associations between temporary employment, loneliness at work and job satisfaction.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that employees with a temporary contract experience more loneliness at work as opposed to employees with a permanent contract. It also reveals that loneliness at work mediates the association between working temporarily and job satisfaction.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 437, 2019

Does loneliness lurk in temp work? Exploring the associations between temporary employment, loneliness at work and job satisfaction –  Download PDF
by
Moens, Eline & Baert, Stijn & Verhofstadt, Elsy & Van Ootegem, Luc

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: This research contributes to the limited literature concerning the determinants of loneliness at work, as well as to the literature on psychological outcomes associated with temporary work. More specifically, we are adding to the literature by exploring whether there is an association between working temporarily and loneliness at work and whether loneliness at work partly explains the association between working temporarily and job satisfaction. To this end, we analyze—by means of a mediation model—a unique sample of Flemish employees in the private sector. We find that employees with a temporary contract experience more loneliness at work as opposed to employees with a permanent contract. In addition, we discover that loneliness at work mediates the association between working temporarily and job satisfaction.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: Labor Market Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the return rate to the labor market is between 50% and two thirds whereas survivors are experiencing lower work abilities and discrimination.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 436, 2019

Labour Market Outcomes for Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Reviews –  Download PDF
by
Sharipova, Adelina & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: Objectives: To synthesise the existing reviews conducted on the labour market outcomes of cancer survivors by focusing on (i) the convergences and divergences on the overall work-related outcomes, (ii) the moderating factors studied to date, and (iii) an identification of areas where more research is needed in the future. Methods: A systematic review of the existing reviews on labour market outcomes for cancer survivors was performed. Bibliographic search for eligible studies published before January 2019 involved the following three core concepts: (i) cancer survivors, (ii) work, and (iii) review. The quality of the included reviews was assessed based on the Johns Hopkins Hospital Evidence Level and Quality Guide. Following this, a narrative synthesis of the findings was completed. Results: In total, 35 articles met the inclusion criteria. The average return to work (RTW) rate varied between 54% and 66%. The self-reported work ability was consistently lower following cancer. This review also found strong converging evidence of self-reported discrimination after cancer. The effects on work performance showed several inconsistencies, possibly due to the use of different definitions of work performance. Most moderating factors for successful work outcomes showed converging evidence, except for age, marital status, cancer type, and country. We provide several possible explanations and linkages for these divergencies. Conclusions: Further investigation of causal relationships by (i) using matched control groups and by (ii) gathering longitudinal data, and the use of more standardised definitions of the outcome variables are the two main future research recommendations. Furthermore, no studies have succeeded in measuring the work outcomes objectively. We provide specific recommendations from an interdisciplinary context to solve this.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Same-sex marriage legalization and interstate migration in the United States. Insights from a new GLO Discussion Paper

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that same-sex marriage legalization permanently increased the migration flow of homosexuals moving to more tolerant states in the United States.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 435, 2019

The effect of same-sex marriage legalization on interstate migration in the United States –  Download PDF
by
Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

GLO Fellow Miriam Marcén

Author Abstract: The aim of this paper is to analyze the impact of marriage regulation on the migratory behavior of individuals using the history of the liberalization of same-sex marriage across the United States. Because the approval of same-sex marriage allows homosexuals access to legal rights and social benefits, marriage becomes more attractive relative to singlehood or other forms of partnership. The differences in the value of other forms of relationship status relative to marriage can affect the migration decisions of individuals, to the extent that those states approving same-sex marriage can be considered less discriminatory. Results show that that legal reform permanently increased the migration flow of homosexuals moving to tolerant states (i.e., those that have legalized same-sex marriage). The physical distance among states does not appear to be driving our estimates since the migration flow of homosexuals is not limited to border or close states. Supplemental analysis, developed to explore whether the migration flow is translated to a significant effect to the stock of homosexuals by state, suggests that that stock increased after the approval of same-sex marriage but that it was transitory, pointing to a ‘no effect’ on the spatial distribution of homosexuals as times went by. The liberalization of marriage for homosexuals also has an effect on the migration behavior of those individuals originating from countries in which same-sex sexual activity is illegal, for whom we observe an outflow migration from those states with same sex marriage, pointing to dissimilarities in cultural aspects related to homosexuality as important factors in migration decisions.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Interview with GLO Fellow Dejan Kovač: After the Race for President of Croatia

In 2019, Dejan Kovač, GLO fellow and a former postdoc at Princeton University, left his position in the US and joined the presidential race in Croatia as a candidate. He did not become the president of Croatia, but in his campaign he highlighted the need for structural reforms, promoted civic and economic freedoms, and most importantly attacked corruption relying on his previous research experience.

Besides his research on corruption, Dejan Kovač is taking another promising research endeavor – rethinking the design of Croatia’s labor market to increase its global competitiveness.

In 2017, the Global Labor Organization (GLO) had supported a large international conference Dejan Kovač had organized in Umag to debate the challenges of the global world for labor markets.  The event was hosting some of the best labor economists of our time, including the former chief economist  to president Obama, the late Alan Krueger, a legendary figure and GLO Fellow (see picture below).

Interview

GLO: The scientist and politics: How has the presidential campaign changed you?

Dejan Kovač: Before the campaign I was an economist, during the campaign I remained an economist, and after the campaign I am still an economist.

GLO: Was knowledge of economics and of scientific evidence helpful for you during the race?

Dejan Kovač: Not really. Presidential races in Croatia historically have a problem. This is not a competition about the better program, but rather about to what part of the political spectrum one belongs. I was not able to push any economics topic, because we are still trapped by tales from our history and historical revisionism. It is very unfortunate that there is so little voters’ awareness about the importance of particular topics. Especially because Croatia “lost” close to 10% of its population through emigration due to several main issues: high corruption, bad economic conditions and lack of structural reforms.

GLO: Is emigration the main motivation for your newly started project “Designing Croatia’s labor market for global competitiveness” or are there other important issues at play?

Dejan Kovač: The 10% loss of population is a great shock to our economy. One does not have to have a PhD in economics to realize that this will have a detrimental  effect on  GDP. A larger problem than size is the issue of “brain drain” not only in Croatia, but in the entire region. High-skilled workers are leaving and they would otherwise contribute the most to economic growth. Another problem of our labor market is that the  entire education system is not adequate to satisfy domestic labor market needs and especially global trends.

GLO: What is wrong with Croatia’s education system?

Dejan Kovač: Quotas are such that we are “over-producing” some occupations, which we realistically do not need, while we lack for instance STEM workers, who are “under-supplied”. This is still a residue from our past, when both skills and quantities were defined through central planning. Today not only domestic, but also global market forces are at play. Nevertheless, we have a rigid set of quotas for higher education which has not changed in a reasonable manner in decades. That is the first step to take. It is not an easy task, because redesigning the entire education system implies evaluating labor demand and supply in the future. For this we need the entire Croatia, not just a government which represents one part of the political spectrum only. Either policy makers will realize that and do the urgent structural reforms, or with the next wave of emigrations, our problems will intensify significantly.

GLO: What are decisive elements of the needed university reform and how does this relate to the vitalization of the labor market?

Dejan Kovač: Beyond quotas, we need to raise the skill levels of our workers in such a way that knowledge learned at our universities is up to date with the frontier of innovations at the labor market. We lack “intermediaries” such as incubators who can “translate” knowledge from pure theory to applied science which can be used at the labor market. Also we need to revise the entire curriculum at most universities.

***
With Dejan Kovač spoke Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President.

From the left: GLO Fellows Joshua Angrist (MIT), Hank Farber (Princeton University) and Alan Krueger (Princeton University and former Chief Economist of President Obama); 2017 in Umea/Croatia.

Dejan Kovač during the election campaign 2019.

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Age discrimination: What recruiters have in mind when hiring. New GLO Discussion Paper.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that older age signals to recruiters that applicants have lower technological skill, flexibility, and trainability levels. The relevance of these factors decline with higher levels of older workers in the company.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 434, 2019

What Does a Job Candidate’s Age Signal to Employers? –  Download PDF
by
Van Borm, Hannah & Burn, Ian & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: Research has shown that hiring discrimination is a barrier for older job candidates in many OECD countries. However, little research has delved into why older job candidates are discriminated against. Therefore, we have conducted an online scenario experiment involving recruiters to empirically investigate 15 potential stigma related to older age drawn from a systematic review of the literature. We found that older age particularly signals to recruiters that the applicant has lower technological skill, flexibility, and trainability levels. Together, these perceptions explain about 41% of the effect of age on the probability of being invited to a job interview. In addition, we found that the negative association between age and invitation probability is smaller when recruiters work for firms with a higher percentage of older employees.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Have corrupt societies deleterious effects on health? New GLO Discussion Paper.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that bribing for public services worsens self-assessed health using individual-level data from 28 post-communist countries.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 432, 2019

Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries –  Download PDF
by
Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga

GLO Fellows Astghik Mavisakalyan & Olga Popova

Author Abstract: Corruption is pervasive, but we know little about its effects on individual lives. This paper examines whether living in a corrupt society has deleterious effects on health. Using individual-level data from 28 post-communist countries, we demonstrate that bribing for public services worsens self-assessed health. Unlike other studies, we account for endogeneity of bribery and show that bribing for any type of public service, not just for health services, has an adverse impact. We also find that bribery lowers the quality of services received. Moreover, there are potentially high indirect costs of bribery since, as we show, it comes at the expense of cutting food consumption. These findings suggest that corruption is a potentially important source behind the poor health outcomes in many developing countries.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Female Entrepreneurs in Africa: New GLO Discussion Paper studies the sources of success of startups

A new GLO Discussion Paper analyzes the role of networks in the access of female entrepreneurs to start-up capital and firm performance in Eswatini, a country with one of the highest female unemployment rates in Africa. Women who receive support from professional networks have higher initial capital.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 431, 2019

Networks, Start-up Capital and Women’s Entrepreneurial Performance in Africa: Evidence from Eswatini –  Download PDF
by
Brixiová, Zuzana & Kangoye, Thierry

GLO Fellow Zuzana Brixiová

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the role of networks in the access of female entrepreneurs to start-up capital and firm performance in Eswatini, a country with one of the highest female unemployment rates in Africa. The paper first shows that higher initial capital is associated with better sales performance for both men and women entrepreneurs. Women entrepreneurs start their firms with smaller start-up capital than men and are more likely to fund it from their own sources, which reduces the size of their firm and sales level. However, women with higher education start their firms with more capital than their less educated counterparts. Moreover, women who receive support from professional networks have higher initial capital, while those trained in financial literacy more often access external funding sources, including through their networks.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Reminder: International Economic Association World Congress, Bali – July 3-7, 2020. Extended submission deadline is January 15.

In 2019 (Report), the Global Labor Organization (GLO) has joined the International Economic Association (IEA). The two organizations support each other in their common missions. Therefore, GLO will contribute to the Bali, Indonesia, International Economic Association World Congress, July 3-7, 2020.

Note that due to the numerous requests received to extend the call for papers, the deadline had been changed to 15 January 2020. Notification to authors is 15 February 2020. Those who still want to submit papers should consult the IEA conference website: www.ieawc2020.org

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Future Education 2020: Conference Call for Kuala Lumpur, June 22-23, out.

GLO is an Strategic Partner for The 3rd International Conference on Future Education 2020 to be held in 22nd – 23rd June 2020 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Niaz Asadullah of the University of Malaya and the GLO Lead for South-East Asia is a keynote speaker at the conference.

As the strategic partner, members of GLO receive special discount rates and partial scholarship opportunities. They also have the possibility to (i) publish in SCOPUS indexed journals, (ii) serve as a Scientific Committee Member for the conference, and (iii) serve as a Session Chair or Evaluation Panel Member of the conference.

For any inquires or questions regarding the conference please contact Austin Joseph (austin@tiikm.com).

Conference Website

Call for Papers. The deadline for submitting an abstract is February 19, 2020.

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GLO Discussion Paper of the Month December 2019: Smartphone Use and Academic Performance

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month of December uses longitudinal data to investigate the relationship between smartphone use and academic performance in universities. It suggests that smartphone use has a causal negative effect on academic performance. The paper makes a significant contribution to current policy debates around the world, on whether smartphones should be banned from schools. 

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: December

GLO Discussion Paper No.  438, 2019

Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: First Evidence from Longitudinal Data –  Download PDF
by Amez, Simon & Vujić, Sunčica & De Marez, Lieven & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellows Stijn Baert & Sunčica Vujić

Author Abstract:  To study the causal impact of smartphone use on academic performance, we collected—for the first time worldwide—longitudinal data on students’ smartphone use and educational performance. For three consecutive years we surveyed all students attending classes in eleven different study programs at two Belgian universities on general smartphone use and other drivers of academic achievement. These survey data were merged with the exam scores of these students. We analyzed the resulting data by means of panel data random effects estimation controlling for unobserved individual characteristics. A one standard deviation increase in overall smartphone use results in a decrease of 0.349 points (out of 20) and a decrease of 2.616 percentage points in the fraction of exams passed.

GLO Discussion Papers of December 2019

438 Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: First Evidence from Longitudinal Data –  Download PDF
by 
Amez, Simon & Vujić, Sunčica & De Marez, Lieven & Baert, Stijn

437 Does loneliness lurk in temp work? Exploring the associations between temporary employment, loneliness at work and job satisfaction –  Download PDF
by 
Moens, Eline & Baert, Stijn & Verhofstadt, Elsy & Van Ootegem, Luc

436 Labour Market Outcomes for Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Reviews –  Download PDF
by 
Sharipova, Adelina & Baert, Stijn

435 The effect of same-sex marriage legalization on interstate migration in the United States –  Download PDF
by 
Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

434 What Does a Job Candidate’s Age Signal to Employers?  –  Download PDF
by 
Van Borm, Hannah & Burn, Ian & Baert, Stijn

433 AI and Robotics Innovation: a Sectoral and Geographical Mapping using Patent Data –  Download PDF
by 
Van Roy, Vincent & Vertesy, Daniel & Damioli, Giacomo

432 Can bribery buy health? Evidence from post-communist countries  –  Download PDF
by 
Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga

431 Networks, Start-up Capital and Women’s Entrepreneurial Performance in Africa: Evidence from Eswatini –  Download PDF
by 
Brixiová, Zuzana & Kangoye, Thierry

430 An exploratory study of populism: the municipality-level predictors of electoral outcomes in Italy  –  Download PDF
by 
Levi, Eugenio & Patriarca, Fabrizio

429 Estimating Poverty for Refugee Populations: Can Cross-Survey Imputation Methods Substitute for Data Scarcity? –  Download PDF
by 
Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Verme, Paolo

428 The Microeconomic Impacts of Employee Representatives: Evidence from Membership Thresholds –  Download PDF
by 
Martins, Pedro S.

427 Trade in Information Technologies and Changes in the Demand for Occupations –  Download PDF
by 
Jerbashian, Vahagn

426 The Mental Health Effects of Retirement –  Download PDF
by 
Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C.

425 The Impact of Internship Experience During Secondary Education on Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes –  Download PDF
by 
Neyt, Brecht & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn

424 Training, Human Capital, and Gender Gaps in Entrepreneurial Performance –  Download PDF
by 
Brixiová, Zuzana & Kangoye, Thierry

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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GLO Discussion Paper of the Month November 2019: Former Communist Party Membership and Entrepreneurial Activities

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month of November 2019 explores the implications of post-communist party membership on the ethics and the nature of doing business in transition economies. It is found that former communist party members often become successful entrepreneurs. The Discussion Paper is the first study separating the causal effect of former communist party membership from self-selection.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: November

GLO Discussion Paper No.  423, 2019

Former Communist party membership and present-day entrepreneurship in Central and Eastern Europe –  Download PDF
by Ivlevs, Artjoms & Nikolova, Milena & Popova, Olga

GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova & Olga Popova

Author Abstract:  After the collapse of Communism in Central and Eastern Europe, former party members were particularly likely to start businesses and become entrepreneurs. However, it remains unclear whether this entrepreneurial activity was driven by the resources, information and opportunities provided by former party membership or because people with specific individual attributes were more likely to become party members (self-selection). This study is the first to separate the causal effect of former Communist party membership from self-selection. Using individual-level Life in Transition–III survey and instrumental variables analysis, we find that, in Central and Eastern European countries, membership of former Communist party has facilitated business set-up but not business longevity. Our results also suggest evidence of negative self-selection, meaning that people who joined the former ruling party tended have fewer of the traits associated with entrepreneurship such as motivation, risk tolerance, and entrepreneurial spirit. We show that former Communist party membership still matters for business practices, business ethics, and the nature of doing business in transition economies.

GLO Discussion Papers of November 2019

426 The Mental Health Effects of Retirement –  Download PDF
by 
Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C.

425 The Impact of Internship Experience During Secondary Education on Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes –  Download PDF
by 
Neyt, Brecht & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn

424 Training, Human Capital, and Gender Gaps in Entrepreneurial Performance –  Download PDF
by 
Brixiová, Zuzana & Kangoye, Thierry

423 Former Communist party membership and present-day entrepreneurship in Central and Eastern Europe –  Download PDF
by 
Ivlevs, Artjoms & Nikolova, Milena & Popova, Olga

422 Job Prestige and Mobile Dating Success: A Field Experiment  –  Download PDF
by 
Neyt, Brecht & Baert, Stijn & Vynckier, Jana

421 Greater US Gun Ownership, Lethality and Murder Rates: Analysis and Policy Proposals  –  Download PDF
by  
Schiff, Maurice

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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Successful Kuznets Prize Ceremony with Nobel Prize Winner Jim Heckman at ASSA 2020 in San Diego. Impressions from the Reception.

On January 3, the Kuznets Prize of the Journal of Population Economics was given to Gautam Hazarika, Chandan Kumar Jha, and Sudipta Sarangi at the IESR/Jinan University reception with Jim Heckman, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Shuaizhang Feng:

Award and event details.
Prize paper: Ancestral ecological endowments and missing women
(Please click title for FREE READ LINK) Published in the Journal of Population Economics (2019), 32(4), pp. 1101-1123. The annual prize honors the best article published in the Journal of Population Economics.

1. Paper examines the relationship between ecological endowments in antiquity and contemporary female to male sex ratios in the population.
2. It finds robust evidence that there are proportionately more missing women in countries whose ancestral ecological endowments were poorer.
3. Gender inequality is larger, that is, the female to male sex ratio lower, in regions whose peoples’ ancestors experienced greater resource stress captured by historical crop yields measures.
4. A conclusion is that ecological resource scarcity led to gender inequality in the intra-household allocation of resources in the past and that the associated behaviors have been culturally transmitted to the present as norms.

Shuaizhang Feng (Dean of IESR) introduced IESR and gave a warm welcome to the participants. Klaus F. Zimmermann introduced the Kuznets Prize, the award article and the authors. Jim Heckman congratulated the authors and the responsible organizations for the success and presented the award certificates. Chandan Kumar Jha and Sudipta Sarangi took the honors for all three authors and received the deserved applause of the large audience. Greetings went to author Gautam Hazarika and the responsible editor of the awarded article, Alessandro Cigno, who both could not be in San Diego.

Since 2019, Shuaizhang Feng is also an Editor of the Journal of Population Economics, Jim Heckman has been an Associate Editor for decades, while Klaus F. Zimmermann is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief. Heckman and Zimmermann supported IESR from the beginning. GLO is proud to note that all authors have joined the organization as Fellows, as Cigno, Feng and Heckman.


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ASSA 2020 started: Kuznets Prize Ceremony tonight with Nobel Prize Winner Jim Heckman

The Kuznets Prize of the Journal of Population Economics is given tonight in San Diego/USA at the IESR reception (6-8pm) at the ASSA 2020 Conference.

Details on the prize -winning article, the authors and the event. Entry is open freely for ASSA 2020 participants.

IESR Dean Shuaizhang Feng (Jinan University), also an Editor of the Journal of Population Economics will open the event as the host. Editor-in-Chief and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann will introduce the award; and Nobel Prize Winner Jim Heckman (University of Chicago), also an Associate Editor of the Journal, will present the award certificates to the three authors.

The article:
Gautam Hazarika, Chandan Kumar & Sudipta Sarangi:
(please click title for FREE READ LINK)
Ancestral ecological endowments and missing women
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 32 (2019), Issue 4 (October), pp. 1101-1123.

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Center for China and Globalization (CCG) & GLO intensify cooperation

The Center for China and Globalization (CCG) has joined the institutions supporting the Global Labor Organization (GLO). This was agreed during a recent visit of GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann at CCG with CCG President Henry Wang. Wang, who is also a GLO Fellow, and Zimmermann have collaborated in the past over a long period. GLO will support the 2020 International Conference on Global Migration and Talent Mobility, CCG is organizing in Beijing on June 12-14, 2020 together with Metropolis China and Metropolis Asia. Zimmermann was the local organizer of the 2008 International Metropolis Conference in Bonn.

The Center for China and Globalization (CCG) is a leading Chinese non-government think tank based in Beijing. It is dedicated to the study of Chinese public policy and globalization. CCG’s research agenda centers on China’s growing role in the world, drawing from issues of global governance, global trade and investment, global migration, international relations, and other topics pertaining to regional and global development. CCG is a not-for-profit and non-governmental organization registered with the civil affairs system of Chinese authorities. It is independently funded by research grants and donations from private and corporate donors. For years, CCG has been ranked by the Think Tank and Civil Society Program (TTCSP) at University of Pennsylvania as one of the world’s top 50 independent think tanks.

Zimmermann with CCG President Henry Wang on December 12, 2019

Left: CCG-GLO collaboration discussions at the CCG headquarter on December 12, 2019 Right: Zimmermann speaking at the 2008 Metropolis conference in Bonn.

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Change of Editor at the Journal of Population Economics: Interview with Junsen Zhang on journal editing.

Junsen Zhang ( Chinese University of Hong Kong) has been one of the editors of the Journal of Population Economics since 2001. After 19 years of dedicated work he moves on to work as one of the co-editors of the Journal of Human Resources. To enable a smooth transition, his position was already filled earlier this year by appointing Shuaizhang Feng (Jinan University). The whole editorial team is very grateful for the strong and very successful collaboration with Junsen Zhang for nearly two decades and wish him all the best for his future. Although he leaves his position on December 31 this year, the editorial team still looks forward to further collaborations with him. Alessandro Cigno (University of Florence) and Oded Galor (Brown University) remain in their positions as editors. Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann thanked Junsen Zhang for his inspiring and effective work which helped significantly to establish the high reputation and impact the Journal has today. Zimmermann expressed also his gratefulness for a long-term friendship and the insightful advice he received from him over the years.

On this occasion, we publish an interview with Junsen Zhang on journal editing.

Question: What motivates a productive researcher like you to act as a journal editor?
Junsen Zhang: I view it as a social responsibility with an honor.

Question: What is your current research focus and how does this relates to your editorial role?
Junsen Zhang: Family economics. I have been handling submissions related to that, especially with applications to China.

Question: Is the profession publishing too much?
Junsen Zhang: To the extent that many papers are not highly cited, perhaps the economics profession is publishing too much. But ex ante, we are not very sure which papers would be highly cited, so we need to publish more. Also, the rejection rates for most economics journals are still extremely high. Thus, overall, I do not think the publishing amount is excessive.

Question: What makes in your view a good academic journal?
Junsen Zhang: Good editors to have sound judgement on high quality, impactful research, and a fast review and publication process.

Question: What are the current trends in the journal business?
Junsen Zhang: More evidence-based research with good theoretical or conceptual underpinning, moving away from lengthy papers, and fast turnaround.

With GLO Fellow Junsen Zhang spoke Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President & Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics.

Further Journal of Population Economics News:
– All interested and participating at the ASSA conference are invited to join the Journal of Population Economics ASSA Kuznets Prize reception with IESR on January 7, 6-8 pm, in San Diego/USA.
– Those interested to read the Kuznets Prize 2020 Paper on “Ancestral ecological endowments and missing women“ by Gautam Hazarika, Chandan K. Jha, and Sudipta Sarangi, please click the title for FREE READ LINK.
– For those interested: The January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics free to read.

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Report on the December 2019 GLO-supported Colombo Conference on Poverty and Sustainable Development with GLO Southeast Asia Lead Niaz Asadullah

The 6th International Conference on Poverty and Sustainable Development 2019 (ICPSD 2019) was organized by the International Institute of Knowledge Management (TIIKM), Sri Lanka in collaboration with the Center for Sustainability, the University of Sri Jayewardenepura, as the Hosting Partner. The conference venue was the majestic Taj Samudra Hotel in Colombo. See original GLO announcement.

GLO was a strategic partner of ICPSD 2019 while Yale Global Justice Program and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University of Social Sciences (India) were the Academic Partners.

GLO Southeast Asia Lead, Professor Niaz Asadullah of the University of Malaya, Malaysia, delivered the keynote lecture on “Ending Global Poverty by 2030: Progress and challenges”.

The other keynote speaker was Dr. Peter Abrahamson, a Professor of Sociology from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Dr. Abrahamson spoke on “Leaving Nobody Behind: Poverty and Social Exclusion in the 21st Century”.

The conference provided a great platform for researchers, academics, scholars, and educators from across the world to share their research findings on issues relating to poverty, labor and sustainable development. Presentations were organized in multiple technical sessions under the following themes: (i) FOCUSING ON OUTCOMES (ii) MEASURING POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION, and (iii) GENERAL ISSUES REGARDING POVERTY AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION.

For young researchers, ICPSD hosted an intensive and interactive journal publication workshop where participants received first hand tips on writing scientific papers and scholarly publications. Workshop was led by Dr. Peter Abrahamson and Professor Niaz Asadullah. Both shared their experience as editors of different social sciences SSCI journals.

The conference ended on 6 December with a Round Table discussion on “Eliminating the Inequality Gap: Driving the World for Sustainable Development”. All participants were required to prepare a plan of action for inequality reduction in their respective region and contrast this other each other. This lively session was moderated by the conference co-chair Dr. Peter Abrahamson and Professor Niaz Asadullah.

The conference was a huge success and provided a refreshing experience for young researchers from Southeast Asia to interact with senior scholars and share their research findings on an international platform.  GLO looks forward to partnering with TIIKM and other organizers for similar events in the region in 2020.

Keynote speakers:
GLO Southeast Asia Lead Niaz Asadullah (left) and Peter Abrahamson

Professor Asadullah moderating the session on inequality reduction

Debate: From the left: Professors Abrahamson & Asadullah ; Anthropologist Professor Samia Huq of BRAC University ; and Dr J N  Mbata of UNDP, Malawi.

More pictures: ….. Day 1; …… Day 2; …… Day 3.

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Happy Holidays from GLO, Bonn!

Old Town Hall, Bonn, Germany

Dear GLO Members and Friends:

Season’s Greetings, happy holidays and a healthy & successful New Year 2020!


Many thanks for the large support GLO has experienced in 2019 from you!


We have achieved so much together!

See you all when possible at the ASSA Kuznets Prize reception with IESR.

Best regards

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President

2018 Happy Holidays and MORE from the GLO!
2017 GLO Season’s Greetings!

Between the years’ readings
The GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS) at Work.
Quo Vadis, CEU? Interview with Martin Kahanec.
January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics free to read.
Youth Policies: time to change the policy narratives. Policy Brief by Azita Berar.

Infographic: Getting Into the Holiday Spirit, One Stream at a Time | Statista

statista

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GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS): Announcement of the 2019-20 GLO VirtYS Cohort

The GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS) at Work. The GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS) 2019/2020 has started its activity. (See also original Call for Applications.)

In the spirit of the GLO Mission, the GLO VirtYS program’s goal is to contribute to the development of the future generation of researchers, who are committed to the creation of policy-relevant research, are well equipped to work in collaboration with policy makers and other stakeholders, and adhere to the highest standards of academic integrity. This goal is achieved through the process of working on a specific research paper within the duration of the program, which is 9 months, and interact with the GLO VirtYS cohort and advisors.

Under the leadership of GLO VirtYS Program Director Olena Nizalova, the participants have virtually met with GLO officials and advisors on November 15 for a warm welcome and first interactions.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Nizalova-Olena-300x300.jpg
Olena Nizalova

From a large number of excellent applications 7 participants were chosen, many more than the originally planned 3-5.

  • Ömer Tuğsal Doruk (advisor: Francesco Pastore; GLO cluster: School-to-Work Transition)
  • Yannis Galanakis (advisor: Nick Drydakis; GLO cluster: Gender)
  • Satyendra Kumar Gupta (advisor: Almas Heshmati; GLO cluster: Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior)
  • Kelly Hyde (advisor: Anurag Sharma; GLO cluster: Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior)
  • Samuel Mann (advisor: Nick Drydakis; GLO cluster: Gender)
  • Anjana Thampi (advisor: Kompal Sinha; GLO cluster: Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior)
  • Zhiling Wang (advisor: Francesco Pastore; GLO cluster: School-to-Work Transition)

Please note that the links below the virtual scholar names connect to the GLO bio pages of the cohort members.

Cohort Members

Advisors

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Quo Vadis, CEU? Interview With Former CEU School of Public Policy Dean Martin Kahanec.

Under political pressure of the Hungarian Government, the Central European University (CEU) has left this year Budapest for Vienna. Leaving behind a wonderful and perfect infrastructure, the university has found an attractive new place in Austria’s capital. The matter represents an important chapter in the global fight for academic freedom and evidence-based policy-making. The Global Labor Organization (GLO) had early on first followed and later on reflected the issue, always supporting CEU‘s case. CEU’s Martin Kahanec gave GLO’s Klaus F. Zimmermann an interview about the current state of this development.

New Home of the Central European University (CEU) in Vienna

Martin Kahanec, a prominent European economist, is currently Mercator Senior Visiting Fellow at Bruegel, Brussels, and was just selected by the Board of Trustees of Academia Europaea, the European Academy of Humanities, Letters and Sciences, as a member of its Section Committee of Economics, Business and Management Sciences. He is a Professor and former Acting Dean (2017-2019) of the School of Public Policy at the CEU. He is also Founder and Scientific Director of CELSI, Bratislava, a GLO Fellow, and a former Chairperson of the Slovak Economic Association (2016-2018).

Klaus F. Zimmermann is the GLO President, and has been the George Soros Chair at the School of Public Policy, in Spring 2019 in Budapest. Kahanec and Zimmermann have worked and published together over a longer period.

GLO: What can we learn from the CEU experience for academic freedom?

Kahanec: Let me mention three key lessons from this experience. First, never take freedom, and academic freedom in particular, for granted. Second, do not rely on politicians for its protection, it has become just one of the many tokens they are playing with. And there are many tokens they value more, such as political support in the European Parliament, or a military deal. Even worse, for some types of politicians an attack on an academic institution wins voters’ support. Third, we might lose a battle or two, but we will prevail as long as we do not give up nurturing and defending academic freedom. Free, open societies provide for innovation, critical thinking, and the pursuit of happiness and prosperity, and as such are more competitive and prevail in the long run.  

GLO: How will this affect academic capacity building in Eastern Europe?

Kahanec: As the Hungarian government is trying to convince the general public that the expulsion of CEU is not a loss for Hungary, it downplays its academic excellence and invests in domestic capacity building – but including pro-Orban institutions only. It also facilitates the opening of branches of foreign schools – from carefully selected countries – in Hungary. For example, PM Orban recently personally supported the opening of Shanghai’s Fudan University campus and an elementary and high school connected to Turkish President Erdogan in Budapest.

But many of the prominent academics are leaving Hungary and yet more will decide not to come or return to, or cooperate with, Hungary. As many prominent Hungarian academics realized early on, the attack on academic freedom was not to be confined to CEU – it has affected the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and many Hungarian universities. In the long run, this will be a huge blow to the Hungarian academe. As the attack on CEU in several ways follows the script already applied in Russia and Turkey, it is clear there are negative spillovers. How the contagion will spread to the rest of Europe will also depend on how the European political elites will respond. So far they have a worryingly poor track record.

GLO: Will there be a chance for CEU to return back?

Kahanec: We are determined not to abandon Hungary and keep the Budapest campus. We will use it for non-teaching activities. As for our degree programs, my personal opinion is ‘never say never’.

GLO: How supportive is the EU and its Commission for CEU?

Kahanec: Some attempts to save CEU have been made, but they all have been eventually utterly ineffective. The EU has very limited instruments to protect democracy and freedom, let alone academic freedom, in its member states. The EU treaties did not really foresee, let alone provide safeguards against, rogue governments in its member states.  

GLO: How well can CEU adjust in Vienna?

Kahanec: This will not be trivial, but we take this crisis as an opportunity to reinvent the university and to update its mission in order to even more strongly respond to the deep challenges societies around the globe are facing. We are opening new programs in Vienna, and I am proud to have stood, as the dean of CEU’s School of Public Policy, at the cradle of the new Masters’ program in International Public Affairs – the first graduate degree program that Central European University accredited in Austria to establish CEU in its new home in Vienna. And I must say, I am deeply impressed by, and grateful for the support from Austrian academics and institutions. There will be many challenges, but I am confidently looking forward to CEU’s future in Austria.

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Populism in Italy: New GLO Discussion Paper Explores the Role of the Left/Right Divide

A new GLO Discussion Paper is providing evidence that heterogeneity in populism does not follow a left/right divide.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 430, 2019

An exploratory study of populism: the municipality-level predictors of electoral outcomes in Italy –  Download PDF
by
Levi, Eugenio & Patriarca, Fabrizio

GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi & Fabrizio Patriarca

Author Abstract: We present an exploratory machine learning analysis of populist votes at municipality level in the 2018 Italian general elections, in which populist parties gained almost 50% of the votes. Starting from a comprehensive set of local characteristics, we use an algorithm based on BIC to obtain a reduced set of predictors for each of the two populist parties (Five-Star Movement and Lega) and the two traditional ones (Democratic Party and Forza Italia). Differences and similarities between the sets of predictors further provide evidence on 1) heterogeneity in populisms, 2) if this heterogeneity is related to the traditional left/right divide. The Five-Star Movement is stronger in larger and unsafer municipalities, where people are younger, more unemployed and work more in services. On the contrary, Lega thrives in smaller and safer municipalities, where people are less educated and employed more in manufacturing and commerce. These differences do not correspond to differences between the Democratic Party and Forza Italia, providing evidence that heterogeneity in populism does not correspond to a left/right divide. As robustness tests, we use an alternative machine learning technique (lasso) and apply our predictions to France as to confront them with candidates’ actual votes in 2017 presidential elections.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Estimating Poverty for Refugee Populations: New GLO Discussion Paper Suggests Survey Imputation Methods

A new GLO Discussion Paper firstly measures poverty among refugees.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 429, 2019

Estimating Poverty for Refugee Populations: Can Cross-Survey Imputation Methods Substitute for Data Scarcity? –  Download PDF
by
Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Verme, Paolo

GLO Fellows Hai-Anh Dang and Paolo Verme

Author Abstract: The increasing growth of forced displacement worldwide has led to the stronger interest of various stakeholders in measuring poverty among refugee populations. However, refugee data remain scarce, particularly in relation to the measurement of income, consumption, or expenditure. This paper offers a first attempt to measure poverty among refugees using cross-survey imputations and administrative and survey data collected by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Jordan. Employing a small number of predictors currently available in the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees registration system, the proposed methodology offers out-of-sample predicted poverty rates. These estimates are not statistically different from the actual poverty rates. The estimates are robust to different poverty lines, they are more accurate than those based on asset indexes or proxy means tests, and they perform well according to targeting indicators. They can also be obtained with relatively small samples. Despite these preliminary encouraging results, it is essential to replicate this experiment across countries using different data sets and welfare aggregates before validating the proposed method.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Employee Voice and Firm Performance: New GLO Discussion Paper on Evidence from Portugal

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that in Portugal employee representatives foster firm performance through increased training of workers.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 428, 2019

The Microeconomic Impacts of Employee Representatives: Evidence from Membership Thresholds –  Download PDF
by
Martins, Pedro S.

GLO Fellow Pedro S. Martins

Author Abstract: Employee representatives in firms are a potentially key but not yet studied source of the impact of unions and works councils. Their actions can shape multiple drivers of firm performance, including collective bargaining, strikes, and training. This paper examines the impact of union rep mandates by exploiting legal membership thresholds present in many countries. In the case of Portugal, which we examine here, while firms employing up to 49 union members are required to have one union rep, this increases to two (three) union reps for firms with 50 to 99 (100-199) union members. Drawing on matched employer- employee data on the unionized sector and regression discontinuity methods, we find that a one percentage point increase in the legal union rep/members ratio leads to an increase in firm performance of at least 7%. This result generally holds across multiple dimensions of firm performance and appears to be driven by increased training. However, we find no effects of union reps on firm-level wages, given the predominance of sectoral collective bargaining.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Impact of IT Trade on the Demand for Occupations: New GLO Discussion Paper about the role of China

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that the China-driven fall in IT prices has increased the demand for high wage occupations and reduced the demand for low wage occupations.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 427, 2019

Trade in Information Technologies and Changes in the Demand for Occupations –  Download PDF
by
Jerbashian, Vahagn

GLO Fellow Vahagn Jerbashian

Author Abstract: I use data from the World Input-Output Database and show that trade in information technologies (IT) has a significant contribution to the growth in foreign intermediate goods in 2001-2014 period. China has become one of the major foreign suppliers of IT and has strongly contributed to the rise in trade in IT. The growth in IT imports from China is associated with lower IT prices in sample European countries. The fall in IT prices has increased the demand for high wage occupations and reduced the demand for low wage occupations. From 20 to 95 percent of the variation in the demand for occupations stemming from the fall in IT prices can be attributed to the trade with China.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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2020 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Gautam Hazarika, Chandan Kumar Jha & Sudipta Sarangi. Award Ceremony on January 3, 2020 at the ASSA Meeting in San Diego/USA

2020 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Gautam Hazarika, Chandan Kumar Jha & Sudipta Sarangi

Gautam Hazarika (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley), Chandan Kumar Jha (Le Moyne College, Madden School of Business), and Sudipta Sarangi (Virginia Tech) will receive the 2020 Kuznets Prize for their article (please click title for FREE READ LINK)

Ancestral ecological endowments and missing women

which was published in the Journal of Population Economics (2019), 32(4), pp. 1101-1123. The annual prize honors the best article published in the Journal of Population Economics.

The award will be given to the authors during the ASSA 2020 meeting in San Diego, USA, at a reception on Friday, Jan. 3, 2020, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM, at the Marriott Marquis San Diego, Coronado Room, hosted by the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University.

Biographical Abstracts

Gautam Hazarika is presently Associate Professor of Economics at The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, the newest branch of the University of Texas system. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Delhi’s St. Stephen’s College, and his Ph.D. at the University of Rochester. His research has spanned labor and development economics. He is presently conducting research in economic anthropology. Dr. Hazarika’s research has appeared in such journals as American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Review of Income and Wealth, the Journal of Development Studies, and, recently, the Journal of Population Economics.

Chandan Kumar Jha is an Assistant Professor of Finance at the Madden School of Business, Le Moyne College. He holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. from Louisiana State University. His research interests lie in the areas of economic growth and development, political economy, and finance and development. His current research topics include corruption, gender inequality, financial risk, and economic and financial reforms. He has published several research articles in many reputed journals such as the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, the Journal of Population Economics, International Review of Finance, and Information Economics and Policy.

Sudipta Sarangi is currently Department Head and Professor of Economics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His research interests range from network theory to development economics. He studies how gender differences affect economic activity, as well as the origins of gender inequality. His work on networks focuses on the strategic formation of social and economic networks and how participation in multiple networks affects social outcomes. He is a research associate of DIW Berlin, GATE, University of Lyon-St. Etienne and the Lima School of Economics. He serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Journal of Public Economic Theory and Studies in Microeconomics.

Abstract of the Winning Paper

“This paper examines the relationship between ecological endowments in antiquity and contemporary female to male sex ratios in the population. It is found that there are proportionately more missing women in countries whose ancestral ecological endowments were poorer. This relationship is shown to be strong even after ancestral plough use, the timing of the Neolithic Transition, and many other potentially confounding factors are controlled for. Similar results are also obtained using district-level data from India.”

About the Kuznets Prize

The Journal of Population Economics awards the ‘Kuznets Prize’ for the best paper published in the Journal of Population Economics in the previous year. Starting from 2014 the Prize has been awarded annually. Papers are judged by the Editors of the Journal.

Simon Kuznets, a pioneer in population economics, Professor Emeritus at Harvard University and the 1971 Nobel Prize laureate in economics, died on July 10, 1985. Professor Kuznets was born 1901 in Pinsk, Belarus, and came to the United States in 1922. He earned his Bachelor of Science in 1923, a Master of Arts degree in 1924 and his doctorate in 1926, all from Columbia University. During World War II he was Associate Director of the Bureau of Planning and Statistics on the War Production Board, and he served on the staff of the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1927 to 1960. Mr. Kuznets was a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania for 24 years and Professor of Political Economy at Johns Hopkins University from 1954 until he joined Harvard University in 1960. He retired in 1971 and was given the title of George F. Baker Professor Emeritus of Economics. He was a former president of the American Economic Association and the American Statistical Association.

Previous Winners

The Kuznets Prize (please click titles for READ LINKS FOR FREE) has previously been awarded to:

2019: Yoo-Mi Chin (Baylor University) and Nicholas Wilson (Reed College) for their article “Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic,” Journal of Population Economics 31(2): pp. 429-451.

2018: Chunbei Wang and Le Wang (University of Oklahoma) for their article “Knot yet: Minimum marriage age law, marriage delay, and earnings,” Journal of Population Economics 30(3): pp. 771-804.

2017: Binnur Balkan (Stockholm School of Economics) and Semih Tumen (Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey) for their article “Immigration and prices: quasi-experimental evidence from Syrian refugees in Turkey,” Journal of Population Economics 29(3): pp. 657-686.

2016: Loren Brandt (University of Toronto), Aloysius Siow (University of Toronto), and Hui Wang (Peking University) for their article “Compensating for unequal parental investments in schooling,” Journal of Population Economics 28: 423-462.

2015: Haoming Liu (National University of Singapore) for his article “The quality–quantity trade-off: evidence from the relaxation of China’s one-child policy”, Journal of Population Economics 27: 565-602.

2014: Paolo Masella (University of Essex) for his article “National Identity and Ethnic Diversity“, Journal of Population Economics 26: 437-454.

Period 2010-2012: Richard W. Evans (Brigham Young University), Yingyao Hu (Johns Hopkins University) and Zhong Zhao (Renmin University) for their article “The fertility effect of catastrophe: US hurricane births“, Journal of Population Economics 23: 1-36.

Period 2007-2009: Makoto Hirazawa (Nagoya University) and Akira Yakita (Nagoya University) for their article “Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security“, Journal of Population Economics 22: 565-583.

Period 2004-2006: Jinyoung Kim (Korea University) received the Kuznets Prize for his article “Sex selection and fertility in a dynamic model of conception and abortion,” Journal of Population Economics 18: 041-067.

Period 2001–2003: Olympia Bover (Bank of Spain) and Manuel Arellano (CEMFI), for their article “Learning about migration decisions from the migrants: Using complementary datasets to model intra-regional migrations in Spain”, Journal of Population Economics 15:357–380.

Period 1998–2000: David C. Ribar (The George Washington University), for his article “The socioeconomic consequences of young women’s childbearing: Reconciling disparate evidence”, Journal of Population Economics 12: 547–565.

Period 1995–1997: James R. Walker (University of Wisconsin-Madison), for his article “The effect of public policies on recent Swedish fertility behavior”, Journal of Population Economics, 8: 223–251.

2020 Annual Congress of the Swiss Society for Economics and Statistics: CALL FOR PAPERS

The 2020 Annual Congress of the Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES/SGVS) on June 18-19 takes place at the University of Zürich organized by the Department of Economics. GLO Fellow and GLO Country Lead Switzerland Rainer Winkelmann heads the Organizing Committee that includes also GLO Fellow David Dorn.

Paper submission deadline: February 1, 2020. All fields of economics and statistics are welcome. PDF Call for Papers.

There will be keynote lectures and special sessions on the topic of Digital Transformation with speakers including: Christina Caffarra (CRA), Hal Varian (Google) and John van Reenen (MIT).

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2020 Annual Congress of the Swiss Society for Economics and Statistics, June 18-19, 2020, Zurich, Switzerland.

The Department of Economics at the University of Zürich is proud to host the Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES/SGVS) on June 18 (Thursday) and June 19 (Friday), 2020.

Topics

Submissions of papers across all fields of economics and statistics are welcome. In addition, there will be keynote lectures and special sessions on the topic of Digital Transformation. Speakers include: Christina Caffarra (CRA), Hal Varian (Google) and John van Reenen (MIT).

Paper submission

Authors are invited to submit their preliminary or complete papers electronically (PDF files only) to: https://www.sgvs.ch/conferences/sses2020
Paper submission deadline: February 1, 2020.

Papers will be selected by a Program Committee consisting of a panel of scholars from member institutions of the SSES. The submitting authors will be notified of the Program Committee’s decision by April 1, 2020, at the latest.

The registration deadline for the conference is May 1, 2020.

Contributed Sessions

In addition, there will be a possibility to propose contributed sessions (with 3-4 speakers each) on a specific topic. If you are interested, please write an email with the topic and the names of the contributors by December 31, 2019 at the latest to: rainer.winkelmann@econ.uzh.ch. These proposals will be evaluated and you will be informed about the decision by January 15, 2020.

SSES Young Economist Award

Authors who wish to be considered for the 2020 SSES Young Economist Award should indicate this when submitting their paper.

Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics

A selection of contributions related to the special theme will be published in a proceedings volume of the Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (http://www.sjes.ch).

Organizing Committee
Rainer Winkelmann (Chair), David Dorn, Marek Pycia, Florian Scheuer, Ulrich Woitek

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Second GLO-Renmin University Labor Economics Conference in Beijing: December 7-8, 2019.

The Second GLO – Renmin University of China Conference on Labor Economics in Beijing took place in the North Hall, Century Hall, RUC 7-8 December 2019. More details and full program.

Conference organizers were GLO Fellows Corrado Giulietti and Jun Han. The event is part of the GLO China Research Cluster, which is lead by Corrado Giulietti, who is also a GLO Research Director.

The conference was opened on December 7 by Corrado Giulietti, Jun Han, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, and Deputy Dean and GLO Fellow Zhong Zhao.

Keynote speakers were GLO Fellows Shi Li of Zhejiang University and Xi Chen of Yale University. The conference saw 15 further paper presentations, one of them by GLO Director Matloob Piracha on Sunday, the second day of the event.

DAY 1; December 7

DAY 2; December 8

Conference Photos

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GLO President gave a luncheon keynote on December 5 to a large international conference on ‘Vocational Education and Training Development’ in Beijing/China

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann started his December visit to Beijing on December 5 to participate in a one-day event on:

For the Future: International Conference on Vocational Education and Training Development

The event took place in the Conference Center, Beijing International Hotel, Beijing/China. It was hosted by the China Development Research Foundation (CDRF) and The Chinese Society of Technical and Vocational Education (CSTVE) and supervised by the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China and the Development Research Center of the State Council.

Next to following an intensive program with over 300 participants, Zimmermann was the Luncheon Keynote Speaker on the topic “Vocational Education & Training: Socio-Economic Sustainable Development“.

Key topics:

  • Vocational systems and youth unemployment
  • A roadmap to vocational education and training
  • General education versus vocational education
  • Challenges in the digital age

Central messages:

  • The Youth-to-Adult Unemployment Ratio of Germany With Its Dual Vocational Training System is Far Below Others in the Western World.
  • Vocational systems are a valued alternative beyond the core of general education.
  • Vocational high school graduates have better employment outcomes than general high school graduates.
  • The dual system is more effective in helping youth transition into employment than alternative academic or vocational training.
  • In the digital age, ICT skills are obviously important, but success comes with the development of non-cognitive skills.

Selective references:

  • Klaus F. Zimmermann, Costanza Biavaschi, Werner Eichhorst, Corrado Giulietti, Michael J. Kendzia, Alexander Muravyev, Janneke Pieters, Núria Rodríguez-Planas & Ricarda Schmidl (2013), Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training”, Foundations and Trends® in Microeconomics (2013), 9: 1-157.
  • Werner Eichhorst, Núria Rodríguez-Planas, Ricarda Schmidl & Klaus F. Zimmermann, A Roadmap to Vocational Education and Training in Industrialized Countries, Industrial and Labor Relations Review (2015), 68: 314-337.
  • Pierre Cahuc, Stéphane Carcillo, Ulf Rinne & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Youth Unemployment in Old Europe: The Polar Cases of France and Germany, IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, (2013), 2:18
  • Huzeyfe Torun & Semih Tumen, Do Vocational High School Graduates Have Better Employment Qutcomes Than General High School Graduates?, International Journal of Manpower (2019), 40: 1364-1388.
  • Shubha Jayaram, Tara Hill & Daniel Plaut, Training Models for Employment in the Digital Economy, Results for Development Institute (2013).

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A Second Chance for Europe. GLO Fellow Jo Ritzen, Maastricht, Presents His New Book in Spanish in a High-Profile Panel Debate. Brussels, December 3.

The new European Union Commission under the leadership of Ursula von der Leyen started working on December 1, 2019 with the aim to re-vitalize Europe.

GLO Fellow Jo Ritzen is a Professorial Fellow of UNU-MERIT and its School of Governance. UNU-MERIT is a joint institute of the United Nations University (UNU) and Maastricht University. Ritzen is a former Minister of Education, Culture, and Science of the Netherlands, served in the Dutch Cabinet at the Maastricht Treaty, is a former Vice President of the World Bank and a former President of Maastricht University.

On December 3, Jo Ritzen presented his new book at the Campus Brussels of Maastricht University on the future of Europe: Una segunda oportunidad para Europa (A Second Chance for Europe) calls upon to rethink and reboot the European Union, obviously right in time for the fresh start of Europe, Ursula von der Leyen attempts to organize.

On this occasion, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann was visiting Brussels to prepare a European strategy for this organization. Zimmermann, Professor Emeritus of Bonn University, a Honorary Professor of Maastricht University and Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT, was also participating in the book launch; he was chairing the event and was moderating the respective policy panel.

The book was first introduced in Spanish by Salvador Pérez-Moreno, Professor of Economic Policy, University of Malaga, and discussed in Spanish by Javier López, Member of the European Parliament. Then Zimmermann moderated the panel discussion in English between Jo Ritzen, Salvador Pérez-Moreno and Javier López.

MORE DETAILS on the book. The video of this event will be available in due course.

From the right: López, Ritzen, Pérez-Moreno and Zimmermann.

After a Christmas shopping tour on the Grand Place, he was visiting Bruegel, the economic think tank, to discuss research and policy projects with GLO Fellow Martin Kahanec. Kahanec, who is a Professor at the Central European University (CEU) in Vienna & Budapest and a Mercator Senior Visiting Fellow at Bruegel, acts also as the GLO Cluster Lead for EU Mobility.

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Beijing December 7-8, 2019: Second GLO-Renmin University Labor Economics Conference. Program Out.

Labor market issues will play the major role at the Second GLO – Renmin University of China Conference in Beijing on 7-8 December 2019. Keynote speakers of the event are GLO Fellows Shi Li of Zhejiang University and Xi Chen of Yale University. This continues the very successful tradition started with the first conference. See program and event pictures of the 2018 event. The 2019 program is now out (LINK), see also below. Conference organizers are GLO Fellows Corrado Giulietti and Jun Han. GLO Director Matloob Piracha will give one of the many contributed papers. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann will attend and address the conference. The event is part of the GLO China Research Cluster, which is lead by Corrado Giulietti, who is also a GLO Research Director. Place: North Hall, Century Hall, RUC.

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Mental Health Effects of Retirement Studied by a New GLO Discussion Paper

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for The Netherlands that retirement of partnered men positively affects mental health of both themselves and their partners, while single men experience a drop in mental health.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 426, 2019

The Mental Health Effects of Retirement –  Download PDF
by
Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C.

GLO Fellows Matteo Picchio & Jan van Ours

Author Abstract: We study the retirement effects on mental health using a fuzzy regression discontinuity design based on the eligibility age to the state pension in the Netherlands. We find that the mental effects are heterogeneous by gender and marital status. Retirement of partnered men positively affects mental health of both themselves and their partners. Single men retiring experience a drop in mental health. Female retirement has hardly any effect on their own mental health or the mental health of their partners. Part of the effects seem to be driven by loneliness after retirement.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Political regimes may affect time preferences within the respective societies: Evidence from Germany.

An article in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics reveals that former residents of the German Democratic Republic have a smaller present bias than former residents of the Federal Republic of Germany.

Read more in:

Time preferences and political regimes: evidence from reunified Germany
Tim Friehe & Markus Pannenberg

READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXokz

Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020), 349–387
GLO Discussion Paper No. 306, 2019.

GLO Fellow Markus Pannenberg

Author Abstract: We use the separation and later reunification of Germany after World War II to show that a political regime shapes time preferences of its residents. Using two identification strategies, we find that former residents of the German Democratic Republic exhibit a significantly less pronounced present bias when compared with former residents of the Federal Republic of Germany, whereas measures of patience are statistically indistinguishable. Interpreting the years spent under the regime as a proxy for treatment intensity yields consistent results. Moreover, we present evidence showing that present bias predicts choices in the domains of health, finance, and education, thereby illustrating lasting repercussions of a regime’s influence on time preferences.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

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To what extent can shifts in marital preferences explain inequality trends?

An article published in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics finds that assortative mating in education has become stronger in the United States, which has contributed to the observed rise in inequality.

Read more in:

The role of evolving marital preferences in growing income inequality
Edoardo Ciscato & Simon Weber

READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXokl

Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020), 307–347

Author Abstract: In this paper, we describe mating patterns in the USA from 1964 to 2017 and measure the impact of changes in marital preferences on between-household income inequality. We rely on the recent literature on the econometrics of matching models to estimate complementarity parameters of the household production function. Our structural approach allows us to measure sorting along multiple dimensions and to effectively disentangle changes in marital preferences and in demographics, addressing concerns that affect results from existing literature. We answer the following questions: Has assortativeness increased over time? Along which dimensions? To what extent can the shifts in marital preferences explain inequality trends? We find that, after controlling for other observables, assortative mating in education has become stronger. Moreover, if mating patterns had not changed since 1971, the 2017 Gini coefficient between married households would be 6% lower. We conclude that about 25% of the increase in between-household inequality is due to changes in marital preferences. Increased assortativeness in education positively contributes to the rise in inequality, but only modestly.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

Mortality inequality in France and the United States

Despite a measured strong cross-sectional relationship between income and health, a new article in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics finds no necessary connection between changes in income inequality and changes in health inequality.

Read more in:

Pauvreté, Egalité, Mortalité: mortality (in)equality in France and the United States
Janet Currie, Hannes Schwandt & Josselin Thuilliez

READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXojg

Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020), 197–231

GLO Fellow Hannes Schwandt

Author Abstract: We develop a method for comparing levels and trends in inequality in mortality in the United States and France between 1990 and 2010 in a similar framework. The comparison shows that while income inequality has increased in both the United States and France, inequality in mortality in France remained remarkably low and stable. In the United States, inequality in mortality increased for older groups (especially women) while it decreased for children and young adults. These patterns highlight the fact that despite the strong cross-sectional relationship between income and health, there is no necessary connection between changes in income inequality and changes in health inequality.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

Migrant Social Networks Mitigate Mental Health Challenges in China

A new article in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics suggests that migrant social networks in host cities mitigate adverse mental health challenges of Chinese rural-urban migrant workers.

Read more in:

Social networks and mental health outcomes: Chinese rural–urban migrant experience
Xin Meng & Sen Xue

READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXoi1

Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020), 155–195
GLO Discussion Paper No. 370, 2019.

GLO Fellows Xin Meng & Sen Xue

Author Abstract: Over the past two decades, more than 160 million Chinese rural workers have migrated to cities to work. They are separated from their familiar rural networks to work in an unfamiliar, and often hostile, environment. Many of them thus face significant mental health challenges. This paper is the first to investigate the extent to which migrant social networks in host cities can mitigate these adverse mental health effects. Using unique longitudinal survey data from Rural-to-Urban Migration in China (RUMiC), we find that network size matters significantly for migrant workers. Our preferred instrumental variable estimates suggest that a one standard deviation increase in migrant city networks, on average, reduces the measure of mental health problems by 0.47 to 0.66 of a standard deviation. Similar effects are found among the less educated, those working longer hours, and those without access to social insurance. The main channel of the network effect is through boosting migrants’ confidence and reducing their anxiety.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

December 1, 2019. World HIV/AIDS Day Promotes Awareness. Economic Research on the Consequences of the Disease.

The number of deaths from the HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to fall. This is particularly true in Africa with a striking example in South Africa, where new infections and deaths have both been reduced by 40 percent since 2010. However, the problem is still worrisome in the South of the USA and in Eastern Europe. (See the three figures below.)

The Journal of Population Economics has published a number of economic research articles on the disease and the societal consequences. The 2019 Kuznets Prize of the Journal was devoted to a recent article:

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.
The article shows that a fall in the disease risk decreases the total fertility rate in Africa, and hence contributes to the needed slowdown of population growth on the continent. Read the article for free read & share: LINK
Further articles free to read & share see below.

ECONOMIC RESEARCH ON HIV/AIDS

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Intergenerational altruism: Evidence from the African American Great Migration

A new article in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics suggests that intergenerational altruism explains between 24 and 42% of the African American northward migration.

Read more in:

Intergenerational altruism in the migration decision calculus: evidence from the African American Great Migration
John Gardner

READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXohN

Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020), 115–154

GLO Fellow John Gardner

Author Abstract: It is widely believed that many migrations are undertaken at least in part for the benefit of future generations. To provide evidence on the effect of intergenerational altruism on migration, I estimate a dynamic residential location choice model of the African American Great Migration in which individuals take the welfare of future generations into account when deciding to remain in the Southern USA or migrate to the North. I measure the influence of altruism on the migration decision as the implied difference between the migration probabilities of altruistic individuals and myopic ones who consider only current-generation utility when making their location decisions. My preferred estimates suggest that intergenerational altruism explains between 24 and 42% of the Northward migration that took place during the period that I study, depending on the generation.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

Does foreign aid reduce asylum migration?

A new article in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics suggests that foreign aid may reduce asylum inflows from poor countries in the short run, but inflows from less poor economies show a positive but weak relation with aid. Aid is not an effective instrument to avoid migration flows.

Read more in:

Foreign aid, bilateral asylum immigration and development
Marina Murat

READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXofD

Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020), 79–114
GLO Discussion Paper No. 378, 2019.

GLO Fellow Marina Murat

Author Abstract: This paper measures the links between aid from 14 rich to 113 developing economies and bilateral asylum applications during the years 1993 to 2013. Results show that asylum applications are related to aid in a U-shaped fashion with respect to the level of development of origin countries, although only the downward segment proves to be robust to all specifications. Asylum inflows from poor countries are significantly and negatively associated with aid in the short run, with mixed evidence of more lasting effects, while inflows from less poor economies show a positive but non-robust relationship to aid. Moreover, aid leads to negative cross-donor spillovers. Applications linearly decrease with humanitarian aid. Voluntary immigration is not related to aid. Overall, the reduction in asylum inflows is stronger when aid disbursements are conditional on economic, institutional and political improvements in the recipient economy.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

Brexit, UK voting and hate against migrants.

Are new immigrants causing persistent voting effects? The lead article in the January 2020 issue of the Journal of Population Economics suggests that the voting effects are short-term only.

Read more in:

Read free the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020) of the Journal of Population Economics :

Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.

FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI

GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca

Based on GLO Discussion Paper No. 364, 2019.
Background paper of GLO Research for Policy Note No. 3, 2019.

Complete issue 1, 2020 of the Journal of Population Economics, read access to all articles.

Author Abstract: In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the causal effect of immigrant presence on anti-immigrant votes is a short-run effect. For this purpose, we consider a distributed lag model and adapt the standard instrumental variable approach proposed by Altonji and Card (1991) to a dynamic framework. The evidence from our case study, votes for the UK Independent Party (Ukip) in recent European elections, supports our hypothesis. Furthermore, we find that this effect is robust to differences across areas in terms of population density and socioeconomic characteristics, and it is only partly explained by integration issues.

Ends;

31th EBES Conference – Warsaw/Poland on April 15-17, 2020. Call for contributions out.

Interested researchers are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration at the 31st EBES Conference – Warsaw, which will take place on April 15-17, 2020 hosted by the Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, Warsaw/Poland, with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association.

This is a GLO supported conference. EBES is the Eurasia Business and Economics Society, a strategic partner and institutional supporter of GLO. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES.

Invited Speaker

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished scholar Professor Brian Lucey will join the conference as keynote speaker:

Professor Brian Lucey is a well-known researcher in the finance field. He is professor of finance at the School of Business, Trinity College Dublin and editor of Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance; International Review of Financial Analysis; and Finance Research Letters. He also is an associate editor of Journal of Banking and Finance. He worked as an economist in the Department of Health and Central Bank in Ireland and has more than 150 peer-reviewed papers which were published in reputable finance journals including Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money; Journal of Banking and Finance; Journal of Financial Stability; and Journal of Multinational Financial Management.

Board
Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, & GLO.
Prof. Jonathan Batten, Monash University, Australia, & GLO
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A., & GLO
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin,Germany, and GLO
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy, & GLO

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 12, 2020.

For submission, please visit the EBES website at http://ebesweb.org/Conferences/31st-EBES-Conference-Warsaw/Abstract-Submission.aspx. No submission fee is required. General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org.

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES Proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, EBSCO TOC Premier, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Furthermore, high qualified papers will be invited to be submitted for publication in regular issues of the Review of Managerial Science (SSCI) and they will go through a review process. However, presentation at the EBES Conference does not guarantee publication in the Review of Managerial Science.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB. After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees).

This will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th (Vol. 2) EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). 20th (Vol. 1), 21st and subsequent conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Abstract Submission Start Date: November 1, 2019
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 12, 2020
Reply-by: February 14, 2020*
Registration Deadline: March 13, 2020
Announcement of the Program: March 17, 2020
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): March 13, 2020**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 15, 2020

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.
** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before February 12, 2020, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by March 13, 2020.

Contact
Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org); EBES & GLO
Dr. Ender Demir, Conferene Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org); EBES & GLO

Ends;

What drives the nativity wealth gap in Europe? OPEN ACCESS published in the Journal of Population Economics.

The paper studies the migrant-native differences in wealth among older households in Europe which is significant and to the advantage of the natives. The importance of origin country, age at migration, and citizenship status in reducing the gap is shown.

Read more in:

The nativity wealth gap in Europe: a matching approach
Irene Ferrari
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF      READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXofj
OPEN ACCESS: Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020): 33–77
GLO Discussion Paper No. 325, 2019.

GLO Fellow Irene Ferrari

Author Abstract: This study uses a matching method to provide an estimate of the nativity wealth gap among older households in Europe. This approach does not require imposing any functional form on wealth and avoids validity-out-of-the-support assumptions; furthermore, it allows estimation not only of the mean of the wealth gap but also of its distribution for the common-support sub-population. The results show that on average there is a positive and significant wealth gap between natives and migrants. However, the average gap may be misleading as the distribution of the gap reveals that immigrant households in the upper part of the wealth distribution are better off, and those in the lower part of the wealth distribution are worse off, than comparable native households. A heterogeneity analysis shows the importance of origin, age at migration, and citizenship status in reducing the gap. Indeed, households who migrated within Europe, those who moved at younger ages rather than as adults, and those who are citizens of the destination country display a wealth gap that is consistently smaller over the entire distribution.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
» Abstract» Full text HTML» Full text PDF FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

Parental responses to children’s revealed human capital’: Now published in the Journal of Population Economics.

The article finds that parents compensate disadvantaged children with greater cognitive resources using data from primary school-aged Ethiopian siblings.

Read more in:

Reinforcement or compensation? Parental responses to children’s revealed human capital levels
Wei Fan & Catherine Porter
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXojV
OPEN ACCESS: Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020): 233–270

Author Abstract: A small but increasing body of literature finds that parents invest in their children unequally. However, the evidence is contradictory, and providing convincing causal evidence of the effect of child ability on parental investment in a low-income context is challenging. This paper examines how parents respond to the differing abilities of primary school-aged Ethiopian siblings, using rainfall shocks during the critical developmental period between pregnancy and the first 3 years of a child’s life to isolate exogenous variations in child ability within the household, observed at a later stage than birth. The results show that on average parents attempt to compensate dis-advantaged children through increased cognitive investment. The effect is significant,but small in magnitude: parents provide about 3.9% of a standard deviation more in educational fees to the lower-ability child in the observed pair. We provide suggestive evidence that families with educated mothers, smaller household size and higher wealth compensate with greater cognitive resources for a lower-ability child.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
» Abstract» Full text HTML» Full text PDF FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

Ends;

Decomposing the gender pay gap in the USA: Now published in the Journal of Population Economics.

Gender pay gaps are still of much concern, in particular in the United States. A paper published in the Journal of Population Economics adds to our understanding how the gender gap is shaped by multiple different forces such as parenthood, gender segregation, part-time work and unionization.

Read more in:

The gender pay gap in the USA: a matching study
Katie Meara, Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF         READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXokf
OPEN ACCESS: Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020): 271–305

GLO Fellows Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster
The paper is also GLO Discussion Paper No. 363, 2019.

Author Abstract: This study examines the gender wage gap in the USA using two separate cross-sections from the Current Population Survey (CPS). The extensive literature on this subject includes wage decompositions that divide the gender wage gap into “explained” and “unexplained” components. One of the problems with this approach is the heterogeneity of the sample data. In order to address the difficulties of comparing like with like, this study uses a number of different matching techniques to obtain estimates of the gap. By controlling for a wide range of other influences, in effect, we estimate the direct effect of simply being female on wages. However, a number of other factors, such as parenthood, gender segregation, part-time working, and unionization, contribute to the gender wage gap. This means that it is not just the core “like for like” comparison between male and female wages that matters but also how gender wage differences interact with other influences. The literature has noted the existence of these interactions, but precise or systematic estimates of such effects remain scarce. The most innovative contribution of this study is to do that. Our findings imply that the idea of a single uniform gender pay gap is perhaps less useful than an understanding of how gender wages are shaped by multiple different forces.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 1 (2020):
Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
» Abstract» Full text HTML» Full text PDF      FREE READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 33 (2020), Issue 1 (January), pp. 1-32.
GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
Complete issue 1, read access to all articles.

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Una segunda oportunidad para Europa! GLO Fellow Jo Ritzen presents his new book now in Spanish on December 3 in Brussels at a crucial time for Europe.

“A Second Chance for Europe” calls upon us to rethink and reboot the European Union. The discontents of globalization threaten European values and call for a new economic order. EU Member States are backsliding on the rule of law and control of corruption. There is a need to rethink immigration policy. The debt overhang of some Euro countries is unsustainable.

Given the sum total of these vulnerabilities, the book argues that the EU may not survive beyond 2025 in its present form. It puts forward a number of workable solutions: a European economic model to secure full employment, a stronger European Court of Human Rights, a points-based immigration system, clear exit options from the Eurozone and an Open Education Area with a common second language. These solutions may reduce the number of EU countries in the core-EU, but would increase cohesion and overall sustainability.

“Una segunda oportunidad para Europa” nos llama a repensar y reiniciar la Unión Europea. El descontento con la globalización amenaza los valores europeos y pide un nuevo orden económico. Los Estados Miembros están retrocediendo en el mantenimiento del estado de derecho y el control de la corrupción. Existe la necesidad de repensar la política migratoria. La deuda pública de algunos países de la Eurozona es insostenible.

Teniendo en cuenta la suma de estas vulnerabilidades, el libro argumenta que la Unión Europea podría no sobrevivir más allá de 2025 en su forma actual. El libro propone una serie de soluciones: un modelo económico europeo para asegurar el pleno empleo, un Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos más fuerte, un sistema de inmigración por puntos, opciones claras de salida de la Eurozona, y un Área de Educación Abierta con un segundo idioma común. Estas soluciones podrían reducir el número de países de la UE en el núcleo de la Unión, pero incrementarían la cohesión y la sostenibilidad general.

INVITATION: The United Nations University – MERIT and Maastricht University Campus Brussels invite to the book launch of

Una segunda oportunidad para Europa edited by Jo Ritzen

on December 3, 2019, 16:00-18:00. Venue: Maastricht University Campus Brussels | Avenue de Tervueren 153, 1150, Brussels. The event will be in both Spanish and English.

Please confirm your attendance by email to: s.brodin@maastrichtuniversity.nl

Program

  • Presentation of the book in Spanish by Mr. Salvador Pérez-Moreno, Professor of Economic Policy, University of Malaga
  • Comments in Spanish by Mr. Javier López, Member of the European Parliament
  • Discussion in English between Prof. Moreno, Prof. Inmaculada Serón-Ordoñez, Lecturer of Translation and Interpretation at Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, and Mr. Javier Lopez, led by Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), UNU-MERIT and Bonn University
  • Drinks

ABOUT THE EDITOR

Jo Ritzen is a professorial fellow in the International Economics of Science, Technology and Higher Education at United Nations University-MERIT and its School of Governance. UNU-MERIT is a joint institute of the United Nations University (UNU) and Maastricht University. Prof. Ritzen is a former Minister of Education, Culture, and Science of the Netherlands, served in the Dutch Cabinet at the Maastricht Treaty, a former Vice President of the World Bank and former President of Maastricht University. Jo Ritzen is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

How to order the book:
https://www.edicionespiramide.es/libro.php?id=5928108
https://www.amazon.fr/Una-segunda-oportunidad-para-Europa/dp/8436841166

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Issue January 2020 of the Journal of Population Economics, Volume 33 Number 1, now available online!

The issue is now available online. Three articles are open access. All articles listed below have a READ LINK which allows free reading. These links can be freely used on websites and in the social media. The link enables to READ the article. For the concept behind read more: https://www.springernature.com/gp/researchers/sharedit

Journal of Population Economics, Volume 33 Number 1, January 2020

Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: the case of Ukip
Eugenio Levi, Rama Dasi Mariani & Fabrizio Patriarca
» Abstract» Full text HTML» Full text PDF      READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXnWI

The nativity wealth gap in Europe: a matching approach
Irene Ferrari
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF      READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXofj
OPEN ACCESS

Foreign aid, bilateral asylum immigration and development
Marina Murat
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXofD

Intergenerational altruism in the migration decision calculus: evidence from the African American Great Migration
John Gardner
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF       READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXohN

Social networks and mental health outcomes: Chinese rural–urban migrant experience
Xin Meng & Sen Xue
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF        READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXoi1

Pauvreté, Egalité, Mortalité: mortality (in)equality in France and the United States
Janet Currie, Hannes Schwandt & Josselin Thuilliez
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF         READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXojg

Reinforcement or compensation? Parental responses to children’s revealed human capital levels
Wei Fan & Catherine Porter
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXojV
OPEN ACCESS

The gender pay gap in the USA: a matching study
Katie Meara, Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF         READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXokf
OPEN ACCESS

The role of evolving marital preferences in growing income inequality
Edoardo Ciscato & Simon Weber
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF         READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXokl

Time preferences and political regimes: evidence from reunified Germany
Tim Friehe & Markus Pannenberg
» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF        READ LINK: https://rdcu.be/bXokz

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“Internship experience improves labor market outcomes” suggests a new GLO Discussion Paper.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds in line with the literature on vocational education programs that internship experience has a positive effect on labor market outcomes.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 425, 2019

The Impact of Internship Experience During Secondary Education on Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes –  Download PDF
by
Neyt, Brecht & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellows Dieter Verhaest & Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: The literature on workplace learning in secondary education has mainly focused on vocational education programs. In this study, we examine the impact of internship experience in secondary education on a student’s schooling and early labor market outcomes, by analyzing unique, longitudinal data from Belgium. To control for unobserved heterogeneity, we model sequential outcomes by means of a dynamic discrete choice model. In line with the literature on vocational education programs, we find that internship experience has a positive effect on labor market outcomes that diminishes over time, although within the time window of our study, we find no evidence for a null or negative effect over time.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Training, Human Capital, and Gender Gaps in Entrepreneurial Performance: New GLO Discussion Paper

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies female entrepreneurship as a possible growth driver. It finds that tertiary education makes entrepreneurial training of females effective. 

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 424, 2019

Training, Human Capital, and Gender Gaps in Entrepreneurial Performance –  Download PDF
by
Brixiová, Zuzana & Kangoye, Thierry

GLO Fellow Zuzana Brixiová

Author Abstract: In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, policymakers have been increasingly striving to support female entrepreneurship as a possible growth driver. This paper contributes to reconciling mixed findings in the literature on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial training with an analysis that links training and human capital, including tertiary education and non-cognitive skills, with gender gaps in entrepreneurial performance in Africa. We have found that while financial literacy training directly benefits men, it does not raise the sales level of women entrepreneurs. Instead, tertiary education has a direct positive link with the performance of women. Consistent with our theoretical model where different skills are complements, tertiary education can act as a channel that makes training effective. Regarding non-cognitive skills, evidence shows that women entrepreneurs who are tenacious achieve stronger sales performance. Our results underscore the importance of incorporating tertiary education and entrepreneurial training programs focused on a balanced set of skills, including non-cognitive skills, among policies for women entrepreneurs.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Report on the GLO – supported Workshop “Health, Inequality and Behavior” at Macquarie University, Sydney/Australia, November 11-13, Chaired by GLO Cluster Lead Kompal Sinha.

The Department of Economics at Macquarie University in collaboration with Macquarie University Centre for Health Economy (MUCHE) and Global Labor Organization (GLO) was organizing an international conference on the “Economics of Health, Inequality and Behaviour (WEHIB)” in Sydney/Australia over 11-13 November 2019. The multidisciplinary conference aimed to foster dialogue among social scientists on the nexus between health, behavior, and inequality across developed and developing societies.

The event was organized at the University under the leadership of GLO Fellow Kompal Sinha, a Senior Lecturer and HDR Director at the Department of Economics of Macquarie University. Sinha is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics and the GLO Research Cluster Lead for Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior. The cluster is keen to develop the event further as its trade-mark.

Keynote speakers at the conference were Lisa Cameron (University of Melbourne), Andrew Jones (University of York), and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO). The conference started on November 11 with an address by Hon Chris Bowen MP, Shadow Minister for Health, followed by the keynote speech of GLO – President Klaus F. Zimmermann on “Arsenic in drinking water: health challenges and responses”. (See also.) Lisa Cameron (University of Melbourne) spoke on November 12 about “Crime against morality: unintended consequences of criminalising sex work” and Andrew Jones (University of York) on November 13 about “Equity, opportunity and health”. Next to the 4 keynotes, the event included 18 fine contributed papers, among others by GLO Fellows Cahit Guven (Deakin University), Alfredo Paloyo (University of Wollongong), Michael Palmer (University of Western Australia) and Jaai Parasnis (Monash University).

The conference ended on November 13 with a farewell speech by the Head of the Economics Department, Professor Elisabetta Magnani, who also had welcomed the participants at the opening ceremony. Everybody was pleased with the wonderful event, with the place and service, the excellent meeting and working conditions, the very high quality of papers presented, and the lively discussions.

Full Final Program. More details: CONFERENCE WEBSITE. Other reports: GLO News, KFZ-1, KFZ-2

From the left Lisa Cameron, Kompal Sinha, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Andrew M. Jones, Hon Chris Bowen, Elisabetta Magnani and Rodrigo Moreno-Serra.

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