Category Archives: News

Report: GLO Public Lecture on 51 years of Bangladesh’s Development Achievements delivered by Niaz Asadullah.

Dr. Niaz Asadullah (PhD, Oxford), the Global Labor Organization (GLO) Lead of South Asia and Professor of Development Economics, Monash University Malaysia, delivered a public lecture titled “Bangladesh at 51: Achievements, Contradictions, and Challenges”, at North South University (NSU) in Dhaka on April 19, 2022.


The event was jointly organized by the Department of EconomicsSchool of Business & Economics (SBE), NSU, and GLO Southeast Asia Cluster. NSU Young Economists’ Forum (YEF), a student club of NSU affiliated with the Department of Economics, was the youth engagement partner of the event.

In his intriguing and thought-provoking lecture, Professor Niaz demystified Bangladesh’s development achievements since 1970s revisiting trends in a range of indicators across different sectors. He explained that Bangladesh’s social achievements in female schooling, fertility reduction, immunization coverage, contraception usage, and weakening of son preference in fertility are truly exceptional when compared with Pakistan, India and other countries at the same stage of economic development. These cases of ‘positive deviance’ point to a ‘development miracle’ i.e. systematic social progress achieved before Bangladesh’s recent surge in GDP growth.


Professor Niaz however cautioned that the public spendings on education and health as ratios of GDP are among the lowest in the world. If Bangladesh is to emulate the East Asian model of economic growth (e.g. South Korea, Singapore and Malaysia), then a drastic increase in education and health spending is necessary – mega infrastructure projects must be complemented with human capital development for sustainable development. Among other issues, Professor Niaz commented on the sustainability of our current economic progress, highlighting some worrying trends in data on FDI, exports, inequality, military expenditure and state capacity as well as the rise of plutocracy.

The public lecture was followed by a lively Q&A session where participants actively engaged with the speaker asking questions about the future of Bangladesh economy. The event was attended by over 200 students. NSU faculty members, the Chair of the Department of Economics Dr. Asad Karim Khan Priyo, the Dean of NSU SBE Dr. Abdul Hannan Chowdhury, and the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of NSU Dr. M Ismail Hossain were all present in the lecture.

Pro-VC-Sir-Dean-Sir-Eco-Department-Chair-Director-of-Student-Affairs-and Faculty-Members


The event received extensive press coverage in the Bangladeshi media in outlets such as The News Time, The Daily Swadesh PratidinThe Daily Jugantorthe Daily JanakanthaThe Daily Bonik BartaThe Daily Bhorer Kagoj and The Daily Bporikroma.

Ends;

The Impact of Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers Laws on Abortions and Births. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Grace Arnold.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for the USA that regulations have reduced abortions and increased fertility.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1093, 2022

The Impact of Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers Laws on Abortions and Births  Download PDF
by Arnold, Grace E.

GLO Fellow Grace Arnold

Meet the author and read related work in the Journal of Population Economics: More details

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions on aggregate abortion and birth rates in the United States. Specifically, I exploit state and time variation in the implementation of the first targeted regulation of abortion provider (TRAP) law in a state to identify the effects of the laws. I find that TRAP laws are associated with a reduction in the abortion rate of approximately 5% the year the first law is implemented, and an average reduction of 11-14% in subsequent years. There is also evidence that TRAP laws increased birth rates by 2-3%, which accounts for approximately 80-100% of the observed decline in abortion rates.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Income and Differential Fertility: Evidence from Oil Price Shocks. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Abebe Hailemariam.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for a panel of 122 countries spanning the period 1965-2020 that national per capita income has generally a negative and significant effect on the total fertility rate.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1089, 2022

Income and Differential Fertility: Evidence from Oil Price Shocks  Download PDF
by Hailemariam, Abebe

GLO Fellow Abebe Hailemariam

Author Abstract: This paper examines the effect of national income on the total fertility rate (children born per woman). We estimate the effects on fertility of shocks to national per capita income using plausibly exogenous variations in oil price shock as an instrument for income and using instrumental variable generalized quantile regressions (IV-GQR). Using data for a panel of 122 countries spanning the period 1965-2020, our results show that national per capita income has generally a negative and significant effect on the total fertility rate. Looking at the entire spectrum of the fertility distribution, the IVGQR estimates exhibit considerable heterogeneity in the impact of income on fertility. The income elasticity of fertility is relatively low at the upper tail of the distribution (for countries with high fertility) compared to the value at the median.

Source: GLO DP 1089

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Do Gender, Child, and Parent Characteristics Contribute to Intergenerational Subjective Well-being Mobility? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang & Kseniya Abanokova.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that intergenerational mobility exists with daughters having higher transmissions from their mothers than sons. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1088, 2022

Do Gender, Child, and Parent Characteristics Contribute to Intergenerational Subjective Well-being Mobility? Evidence from Russia during 1994-2019 Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Abanokova, Kseniya

GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang

Hai-Anh Dang

Author Abstract: Measuring the intergenerational mobility of welfare provides key inputs for policies, but very few studies examine intergenerational mobility of subjective well-being (SWB), particularly in a poorer, transitional country context. We make new contributions by analyzing rich panel SWB data from Russia over the past quarter century, which address various shortcomings with traditional income data. We find that intergenerational SWB mobility-as measured by subjective wealth and life satisfaction-exists, with daughters having higher transmission of SWB from their mothers than sons. Adding other child and parent characteristics to the multivariate regression models can reduce the estimated impacts of mothers’ SWB by up to 40% but does not change the gender gaps in the intergenerational transmission. Our results are robust to different model specifications and sample restrictions.

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The new industrial revolution: The optimal choice for flexible work companies. A new GLO Discussion paper by GLO Fellows Leonardo Becchetti & Francesco Salustri and Nazaria Solferino.

A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that COVID-19 made employers and employees more aware of the productivity gains arising from the digital revolution. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1087, 2022

The new industrial revolution: The optimal choice for flexible work companies  Download PDF
by Becchetti, Leonardo & Salustri, Francesco & Solferino, Nazaria

GLO Fellows Leonardo Becchetti & Francesco Salustri

Author Abstract: The forced remote working relationships experienced during the COVID-19 pandemics made employers and employees more aware of the productivity gains arising from the digital revolution. To investigate the characteristics of such gains, we model firms’ production allowing companies to choose among three types of (face-to-face in presence, remote synchronous, and remote asynchronous) employees relationships. The introduction of remote interactions allows us to outline five features affecting workers productivity such as i) mobility reduction, ii) frequency of interactions, iii) optimal time/place, iv) work-life balance, and v) relationship decay effects. We calculate the optimal share of the three types of relationships that maximise corporate profits conditional to reasonable parametric assumptions on the five effects under perfect and asymmetric information. We as well assess the potential productivity growth of companies that use only faceto- face interactions when allowing also remote interactions. We finally discuss existing private business contracts that introduced hybrid combinations of in-person and remote work activities for their employees, that are aligned with our theoretical findings and call for new industrial and environmental policies at national and supranational level.

Featured image: kelly-sikkema-S47XBGwRZkc-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Talk to the authors: Research for the Abortion Debate in the Journal of Population Economics. Register for online workshops on May 31 & June 1.

Abortion issues are again on the agenda in may societies around the globe. Academic research can inform the public debate. The Journal of Population Economics ((JOPE) is a scientific outlet for studying important issues. It has published a larger number of relevant papers recently, which are discussed in the workshops announced below. The events are open to the general public. Use this chance to discuss research findings with the authors. Prior registration to both parts separately is required. JOPE Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) will open the events, and Managing Editors Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) and Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida) will chair the sessions.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues I
Tuesday May 31; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University)

  • Anisha Sharma (Ashoka University, India)
    Unwanted daughters: the unintended consequences of a ban on sex-selective abortions on the educational attainment of women
  • Federico H. Gutierrez (Vanderbilt University, USA)
    The inter-generational fertility effect of an abortion ban

Prior registration required:

  • You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
    When: May 31, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
  • After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Free access to the papers see below.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues II
Wednesday June 1; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida)

  • Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)
    Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020
  • Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)
    The Impact of Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers Laws on Abortions and Births

Prior registration required:

  • You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
    When: Jun 1, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
  • After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Free access to the papers see below.

Forthcoming articles

In print in the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE):

GLO Fellow Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions on aggregate abortion and birth rates in the United States. Specifically, I exploit state and time variation in the implementation of the first targeted regulation of abortion provider (TRAP) law in a state to identify the effects of the laws. I find that TRAP laws are associated with a reduction in the abortion rate of approximately 5% the year the first law is implemented, and an average reduction of 11-14% in subsequent years. There is also evidence that TRAP laws increased birth rates by 2-3%, which accounts for approximately 80-100% of the observed decline in abortion rates.

GLO Fellow Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

Access to more published JOPE research on abortion issues:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Health shocks and spousal labor supply: An international perspective. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Nicholas Jolly and GLO Fellow Nikolaos Theodoropoulos.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds minimal changes on the probability of work and the intensity of work for both husbands and wives of disabled spouses.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1086, 2022

Health shocks and spousal labor supply: An international perspective  Download PDF
by Jolly, Nicholas A. & Theodoropoulos, Nikolaos

GLO Fellow Nikolaos Theodoropoulos

Nikolaos Theodoropoulos

 


 

Author Abstract: This paper uses data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to analyze the effect of spousal health shocks on own labor supply decisions. Results from the analysis suggest minimal changes to the probability of work and the intensity of work for both husbands and wives of disabled spouses. Wives, however, do experience an increase in the probability of retirement after their husbands experience a work-limiting health shock. Results suggest that this increased probability is due to the desire to consume joint leisure. Finally, the analysis finds substantial cross-regional heterogeneity in the effect spousal health shocks have on the various labor market outcomes examined here, which suggests an important role for country-specific factors in the estimates provided in the earlier literature.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Don’t Cross the Line: Bounding the Causal Effect of Hypergamy Violation on Domestic Violence in India. A new GLO Discussion paper by GLO Fellow Punarjit Roychowdhury & Gaurav Dhamija.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds strong evidence that violation of hypergamy leads to a significant increase in domestic violence.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1085, 2022

Don’t Cross the Line: Bounding the Causal Effect of Hypergamy Violation on Domestic Violence in India  Download PDF
by Roychowdhury, Punarjit & Dhamija, Gaurav

GLO Fellow Punarjit Roychowdhury

Punarjit Roychowdhury

 

Author Abstract:We empirically examine whether violation of hypergamy – which occurs when the wife’s economic status equals or exceeds that of her husband’s – causally affects domestic violence using microdata from India. Identifying the causal effect of hypergamy violation on domestic violence, however, is challenging due to unmeasured confounding and reverse causality. To overcome these difficulties, we utilize a nonparametric bounds approach. Relying on fairly weak assumptions, we find strong evidence that violation of hypergamy leads to a significant increase in domestic violence. Further, we provide suggestive evidence that this result arises because violation of hypergamy is likely to undermine patriarchal beliefs and norms about gender roles, and also because it is likely to increase men’s likelihood of using domestic violence as an instrument. Our findings suggest that policies that seek to empower women and promote gender equality might paradoxically increase women’s exposure to domestic violence.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country. Public Speech of Shyamal Chowdhury in Dhaka/Bangladesh on May 12, 2022.

Using data from large-scale experiments with entire families for Bangladesh, the research finds that both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences. Results differ from evidence for rich countries.

Shyamal Chowdhury (University of Sydney) presents the paper in a public speech in the University of Dhaka on May 12, 2022.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 592, 2020 now forthcoming as

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country
by
Chowdhury, Shyamal & Sutter, Matthias & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

in: Journal of Political Economy

Free Pre-publication version

GLO Fellows Shyamal Chowdhury and Matthias Sutter & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann

Author Abstract: Our large-scale experiment with 542 families from rural Bangladesh finds substantial intergenerational persistence of economic preferences. Both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly (and largely to the same degree) positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences, even when controlling for personality traits and socio-economic background. We discuss possible transmission channels and are the first to classify all families into one of two clusters, with either relatively patient, risk-tolerant and pro-social members or relatively impatient, risk averse and spiteful members. Classifications correlate with socio-economic background variables. We find that our results differ from evidence for rich countries.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is favicon_glabor.png

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Interview with Ambassador Alfredo Toro Hardy on his new book on “America’s Two Cold Wars”.

New book published. It investigates the global challenges for the United States and the upcoming competition with China.

  • Alfredo Toro Hardy: America’s Two Cold Wars: From Hegemony to Decline? Palgrave Macmillan, 2022. More information: SpringerAmazon

Below: GLO interview with the author!

  • Without a single shot being fired, the United States had won the Cold War. This led to the homogenization of the world under America’s liberal order. Its global hegemony, though, proved to be brief. A country that arrived from the blue, China, is now contesting the U.S. primacy.
  • China has been the driving force of a whole array of multilateral cooperative initiatives that have kept a lid on its nationalistic excesses and enhanced its global convergence appeal.
  • China’s GDP is in the process of surpassing that of the United States. It has already developed the capability to technologically offset America’s superior forces through disruptive asymmetric weapons.
  • During its first Cold War the U.S. had the wind on its back. All the right configuration of elements supported it. In this emerging Cold War with China the opposite happens as the U.S. confronts the wrong configuration of factors. With such inauspicious outlook Washington should explore other alternatives to Cold War.

ALFREDO TORO HARDY is a Venezuelan retired diplomat, scholar and author.

  • He has a PhD on International Relations by the Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Affairs, two master degrees on international law and international economics by the University of Pennsylvania and the Central University of Venezuela, a post-graduate diploma in diplomatic studies by the Ecole Nationale D’Administration (ENA) and a Bachelor of Law degree by the Central University of Venezuela.
  • Before resigning from the Venezuelan Foreign Service in protest for events taking place in his country, he was one of its most senior career diplomats. As such, he served as Ambassador to the United States, the United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, Singapore, Chile and Ireland. He directed the Diplomatic Academy of the Venezuelan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as other Venezuelan academic institutions in the field of international affairs.
  • He is an Honorary Research Fellow of the Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Relations and has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Princeton and Brasilia and an on-line Professor at the University of Barcelona. He has also been a Fulbright Scholar, a two-time Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Resident Scholar and an academic advisor on diplomatic studies to the University of Westminster.
  • He has authored twenty-one books and co-authored fifteen more on international affairs and history, while publishing thirty peer reviewed papers on the same subjects. His latest book America’s Two Cold Wars: From Hegemony to Decline? was published by Palgrave Macmillan in March 2022.

INTERVIEW

GLO: In your book you argue that the United States won the Cold War with the Soviet Union, and is now at the outset of a new Cold War with China. Is this not an illusion in the face of the invasion of Ukraine, where we are confronted again in a radical way with a split of the world between democratic and autocratic regimes with Russia as a particularly aggressive opponent? This new war seems to be hot, not cold.

Alfredo Toro Hardy: The idea of an ideological split of the world between democratic and autocratic regimes, with the U.S. towering again a “free world” notion, is controversial. Notwithstanding that Russia’s invasion to Ukraine has provided a temporary support to Biden’s democracy versus autocracy proposal, the fact remains that America’s liberal order has been invaded by the cancer of populism and its functioning and basic norms are under threat. In three years’ time Washington could be inaugurating a fresh Trump administration.

Conversely, at least in the case of China there is no interest whatsoever in promoting or weighing an ideological contest on behalf of authoritarianism. First, since Deng Xiaoping days’ results are all that matter. A straightforward social contract exists between the Chinese Communist Party and the people: We’ll make you better off and you will follow our orders. Efficacy becomes the magic word. Second, the authoritarian nature of the Chinese regime is not tantamount to ideology but to culture. A political culture that dates back to 221 BC with the establishing of the Qin dynasty and that presents the CCP regime as part of a continuum within China’s long dynastic history. This duality efficacy-culture is not prone to ideological disquisitions.

As for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine other elements are also in line: Its historical obsession with borders, imperial nostalgia, Ivan Ilyn’s fashionable ideas on Russia’s exceptionalism and the need of spiritual renewal. And so on.

In sum, the ideologically oriented dichotomy democracy versus autocracy fails to capture the complexities involved within the great powers competition.

GLO: While Russia may live on its natural resources and the military, China badly depends on trade and technology. China seeks world domination beyond military strength and needs the collaboration of the Western World. Will globalization return or will we see a bipolar world again?

Alfredo Toro Hardy:  China has indeed become the main promoter and defender of globalization. However, trends are moving in the opposite direction. This requires some explanation. Globalization emerged as a result of political intention and technological feasibility. Now, it finds itself seriously challenged for the same reasons. In both cases, political intention and technological feasibility are clearly identified with Western economies.

Globalization, as its promoters assumed, would mainly benefit the Western world as fast moving nations appeared to be the better prepared to take advantage from a rapidly moving global economy. Based on this assumption, Western nations and the economic multilateral institutions under their control, gave the necessary steps to make globalization a reality. Political intention was reinforced by technological feasibility. One centered in the so called supply chains and global chains of value, which allowed for the offshoring of countless manufacturing and service jobs within an integrated world economy.

However, political intention has been reversing course. The massive contraction of traditional employments and the dramatic shrinking of middle classes within Western economies, ignited this change. A wave of protectionism and economic nationalism has kept globalization under siege. On its side, a technological feasibility centered in the Fourth Industrial Revolution makes possible the onshoring of economic activities to the Western world. Why, indeed, go manufacturing or looking for service providers afar, when technology allows for cheap options at home?

Onshoring which identifies with producing home or near shoring which identifies with regionalism, have been gathering strength. Covid 19 has provided an important push in the same direction, as the disruption of supply chains that it unleashed generated inflation. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is providing an even more significant push. Not only by disrupting the energy and food supply chains, which in themselves are immensely important, but because it implies a return to the age of geopolitical uncertainty. Henceforward, economic security would advise producing home or close to home.

China would be certainly affected by the crisis of globalization.

GLO: Many observers think that the core of the US-Chinese competition will be the race to achieve the most advanced technological breakthroughs. Will the United States be able to keep its leading position?

Alfredo Toro Hardy: Until not long ago China’s technological advances depended on its “picking from the low-hanging trees”. Nowadays, China is an extremely efficient indigenous innovator in direct competition with the United States in several key technological areas. Although not yet prepared to displace America’s technological superiority overall, the technologies in which they are forcefully competing have a tremendous multiplier effect.

Their competition is contingent on the efficiency of two very different development models – the State guided and funded one, and the market oriented one. Curiously enough, the Chinese have become the best pupils in following the textbook of America’s innovation success story in the decades that followed World War II, when the Federal Government played a pivotal role. Nowadays, however, the former teachers completely adhere to the market forces. The Chinese route map in science, technology and innovation looks more coherent and holistic than the one currently been followed by the United States.

GLO: How should the Western world deal with the forthcoming Chinese conflict with Taiwan? What lessons do we lean from the current war in Europe?

Alfredo Toro Hardy: To begin with, the newfound strength of the European Alliance, which under Trump seemed to have been brain dead according to Macron’s definition, has yet to prove itself. Would it survive a long conflict in Ukraine? Would it survive beyond the European continent? Would it survive a plausible Trump return to the White House? Hence, better circumscribe ourselves to the United States when referring to a Western approach in the “forthcoming” Chinese conflict with Taiwan.

The case of Taiwan is particularly forbidding in relation to an American containment policy of the Popular Republic of China. This, for three reasons. First, the distances involved. Distance from California to Taiwan is 7,000 miles and from Hawaii close to 5,300 miles. Conversely, distance between mainland China and Taiwan is only 90 miles. John Mearsheimer’s notion of the stopping power of water fully applies here. Second, the asymmetric interests involved. For Beijing reuniting Taiwan with the mainland represents a historical restitution not a territorial expansion. Meaning, it sees Taiwan as an integral part of the country’s territory and has immanent incentives in seeking reunification. For the U.S., on the contrary, only reputational interests are involved. What it’s at stake for both lies at completely different levels. Third, the principles involved. Since the 1972 joint communique between Washington and Beijing, the former has never contested the One China policy. A good example of this was Clinton’s “three no’s” policy – the U.S. doesn’t support independence for Taiwan, nor does it support “two Chinas”, nor does believe that Taiwan should have membership in any organization for which statehood is required. Under those bases how to go to war with Beijing in support of Taipei?

******

Alfredo Toro Hardy was interviewed by  Klaus F. ZimmermannGLO President.

Ends;

On the social desirability of centralized wage setting when fims are run by biased managers. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Nicola Meccheri.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that in such a framework, the common tenet that consumer surplus and overall welfare are always higher under decentralized wage setting is completely overturned. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1084, 2022

On the social desirability of centralized wage setting when fims are run by biased managers  Download PDF
by Meccheri, Nicola

GLO Fellow Nicola Meccheri

Author Abstract: This paper compares the welfare outcomes obtained under alternative unionization regimes (decentralized vs. centralized wage setting) in a duopoly market, in which shareholders delegate strategic decisions to biased (overconfident or underconfident) managers. In such a framework, the common tenet that consumer surplus and overall welfare are always higher under decentralized wage setting is completely overturned. Indeed, since in the presence of centralized unionization (industry-wide union) firms’ shareholders always prefer to hire more aggressive or less conservative managers, output (consumer surplus) and overall welfare are larger in a centralized wage setting structure. This result holds true independently of the degree of product differentiation and the weight attached by unions to wages with respect to employment. Moreover, it also proves to be largely robust relative to the competition regime (quantity or price) in the product market.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Independent Research Informing the Abortion Debate from the Journal of Population Economics.

In print in the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE):

GLO Fellow Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions on aggregate abortion and birth rates in the United States. Specifically, I exploit state and time variation in the implementation of the first targeted regulation of abortion provider (TRAP) law in a state to identify the effects of the laws. I find that TRAP laws are associated with a reduction in the abortion rate of approximately 5% the year the first law is implemented, and an average reduction of 11-14% in subsequent years. There is also evidence that TRAP laws increased birth rates by 2-3%, which accounts for approximately 80-100% of the observed decline in abortion rates.

GLO Fellow Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

Access to more published JOPE research on abortion issues:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Diving in the minds of recruiters: What triggers gender stereotypes in hiring? A new GLO Discussion Paper by Hannah Van Borm and GLO Fellow Stijn Baert.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that employers in the United States perceive women in gender stereotypical terms when making hiring decisions. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1083, 2022

Diving in the minds of recruiters: What triggers gender stereotypes in hiring?  Download PDF
by Van Borm, Hannah & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: We investigate the drivers of gender differentials in hiring chances. More concretely, we test (i) whether recruiters perceive job applicants in gender stereotypical terms when making hiring decisions and (ii) whether the activation of these gender stereotypes in recruiters’ minds varies by the salience of gender in a particular hiring context and the gender prototypicality of a job applicant, as hypothesised in Ridgeway and Kricheli-Katz (2013). To this end, we conduct an innovative vignette experiment in the United States with 290 genuine recruiters who evaluate fictitious job applicants regarding their hireability and 21 statements related to specific gender stereotypes. Moreover, we experimentally manipulate both the gender prototypicality of a job applicant and the salience of gender in the hiring context. We find that employers perceive women in gender stereotypical terms when making hiring decisions. In particular, women are perceived to be more social and supportive than men, but also as less assertive and physically strong. Furthermore, our results indicate that the gender prototypicality of job applicants moderates these perceptions: the less prototypical group of African American women, who are assumed to be less prototypical, are perceived in less stereotypical terms than white women, while some stereotypes are more outspoken when female résumés reveal family responsibilities.

Featured image: tim-gouw-bwki71ap-y8-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020. Article by GLO Fellow Caitlin Myers forthcoming in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years.

Accepted for publication in the Journal of Population Economics.

Has the US Supreme Court voted to overturn abortion rights? The paper by Caitlin Myers provides important background information about the US policy environment over decades.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1073, 2022

Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020 Download PDF
by Myers, Caitlin Knowles

GLO Fellow Caitlin Myers

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

NOTE on the latest situation in Florida: “Florida is the latest state to pass legislation that further restricts access to abortion.”

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Monetary compensation schemes during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for household incomes, liquidity constraints and consumption across the EU. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Michael Christl & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies the diverse impacts of Covid-19 on the private households and labor markets of EU member states making use of the EU microsimulation model EUROMOD and nowcasting techniques.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1082, 2022

Monetary compensation schemes during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for household incomes, liquidity constraints and consumption across the EU Download PDF
by Christl, Michael & De Poli, Silvia & Figari, Francesco & Hufkens, Tine & Leventi, Chrysa & Papini, Andrea & Tumino, Alberto

GLO Fellow Michael Christl

Michael Christl

Author Abstract: This paper analyses the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on household disposable income and household demand in the European Union (EU), making use of the EU microsimulation model EUROMOD and nowcasting techniques. We show evidence of heterogeneity in the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the labour markets in EU Member States, with some countries hit substantially harder than others. Most EU Member States experience a large drop in market incomes in 2020, with poorer households hit the hardest. Tax-benefit systems cushioned significantly the transmission of the shock to the disposable income and the household demand, with monetary compensation schemes playing a major role. Additionally, we show that monetary compensation schemes prevent a significant share of households from becoming liquidity constrained during the pandemic.

Featured image: Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

VIDEO & REPORT: Spring Event of the Journal of Population Economics, 25 April 2022.

Meet the author! The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) Spring Event took place online on 25 April 2022, 4-6 pm CEST (Maastricht, Dutch time). Authors presented the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:1 and 35:2 of 2022. Sessions were chaired by 4 journal editors. Various members of the JOPE Board present. Intensive discussions with a large audience. High number of participants registered.

Missed the event? Want to study details? Here is the Video of the event. Explore also the links to the papers provided below in the program outline!

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Maastricht-Netherlands

16:00-18:00/4-6 pm: Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann

16:00-16:30/4:00-4.30 pm — Elderly & YouthChair: Kompal Sinha

Havari: Unemployed Youth in Latvia

16:30-17.00/4:30-5.00 pm — Children Chair: Terra McKinnish

Strom: Children & Labor Outcome

17:00-17.30/5:00-5.30 pm — Covid-19Chair: Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

Skoda: Elections & Covid-19

17:30-18.00/5:30-6.00 pm — US ImmigrantsChair: Michaella Vanore

Regets: Immigrant Earnings I
Regets: Immigrant Earnings II

***

Explore the full set of JOPE papers (23 papers): January 2022, issue 1 & April 2022, issue 2

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Causal impact of physical activity on child health and development. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Ha Nguyen & Luke Connelly and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that physical activity leads to widespread benefits in child development in Australia.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1081, 2022

Causal impact of physical activity on child health and development Download PDF
by Nguyen, Ha Trong & Christian, Hayley & Le, Huong Thu & Connelly, Luke & Zubrick, Stephen R. & Mitrou, Francis

GLO Fellows Ha Nguyen & Luke Connelly

Author Abstract: The relationship between physical activity and child health and development is well-documented, yet the extant literature provides limited causal insight into the amount of physical activity considered optimal for improving any given health or developmental outcome. This paper exploits exogenous variations in local weather conditions observed across random time use diary dates for the same individuals over time to investigate the causal impact of physical activity on a comprehensive set of health, non-cognitive development, and academic outcomes of children and adolescents. Applying an individual fixed-effects instrumental variables model to a nationally representative panel dataset from Australia, we find that physical activity leads to widespread benefits in child development. These include improved health, social and emotional development, and lower health expenditure. The results further indicate that physical activity offers greater developmental benefits for females. However, we find no evidence that physical activity improves academic performance. Our study highlights that the “optimal” amount of time that children and adolescents should spend physically active each day varies by the health or non-cognitive development outcome of interest. The results are robust to a series of specification and sensitivity tests, including an over-identification test and controlling for weather conditions recorded on the day when development outcomes were assessed.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Intermediate activities while commuting. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal, José Alberto Molina & Jorge Velilla.

A new GLO Discussion Paper analyzes what activities workers do while commuting using the American Time Use Survey.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1080, 2022

Intermediate activities while commuting Download PDF
by Giménez-Nadal, José Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge

GLO Fellows José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal, José Alberto Molina & Jorge Velilla

José Alberto Molina

Author Abstract: Recent analyses have shown that commutes to and from work are not symmetric, suggesting that intermediate activities are at the root of these asymmetries. However, how intermediate activities interact with trips to and from work is an unexplored issue. Using data from the American Time Use Survey 2003-2019, we analyze what activities workers do while commuting, and compare measures of commuting when intermediate activities are included or excluded as part of the commuting trip. We show that commuting is underestimated if measured with the Time Use Survey lexicon. Such differences are especially significant in commuting from work. Furthermore, gender comparisons of commuting are affected by the inclusion of intermediate while commuting, with gender differences narrowing when intermediate activities are considered. Our results contribute to the analysis of commuting behavior, by proposing new identification strategies based on intermediate non-trip episodes, and by showing how commuting interacts with other non-commuting activities.

Featured image: Manuel-Lardizabal-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

TODAY: Meet the author! Spring Event of the Journal of Population Economics, 4-6 pm CEST.

The Journal of Population Economics Spring Event will take place online on 25 April 2022, 4-6 pm CEST (Maastricht, Dutch time). Register in time to meet the authors to get informed about new research and to ask questions. Authors will present the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:1 and 35:2 of 2022.

Meet the author! You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: Apr 25, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUpf-6qpjwsGdEESSI7NncAhQHdcMqT-hf6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing the personal event link.

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Maastricht-Netherlands

16:00-18:00/4-6 pm: Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann

16:00-16:30/4:00-4.30 pm Chair: Kompal Sinha

16:30-17.00/4:30-5.00 pm Chair: Terra McKinnish

17:00-17.30/5:00-5.30 pm Chair: Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

17:30-18.00/5:30-6.00 pm Chair: Michaella Vanore

Explore the full set of JOPE papers (23 papers): January 2022, issue 1 & April 2022, issue 2

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

The Benefits of Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services on Health. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Yinan Liu & GLO Affiliate Xianhua Zai.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that the Medicaid Home and Community- Based Services program in the United States is beneficial to improve general health outcomes of older individuals.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1079, 2022

The Benefits of Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services on Health Download PDF
by Liu, Yinan & Zai, Xianhua

GLO Affiliate Xianhua Zai

Xianhua Zai

Author Abstract: The Medicaid Home and Community- Based Services (HCBS) program in the United States subsidizes the long-term care provided at home or in community-based settings for older adults. Little is known about how HCBS affects the well-being of the aging population. Using detailed information about health from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) linked with state-level HCBS policy expenditures, we show that HCBS is beneficial to improve general health outcomes of older individuals. Our results find that HCBS generosity is positively associated with the probability of older individuals self-reporting better health status, mitigating functional mobility limitations, showing better emotional feelings, and increasing cognitive skills. In addition, these health benefits of HCBS differ across groups by resources and demographic characteristics.

Featured image: mark-timberlake-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Call for contributions: 40th EBES Conference, Istanbul/Turkey, 6-8 July 2022. Submission deadline for abstracts is May 27!

Interested researchers are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration. The 40th EBES Conference in Istanbul will take place on July 6-8, 2022 in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). The event is supported by the Istanbul Economic Research Association. GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES.

Invited Speakers

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues Iftekhar Hasan, Narjess Boubakri, Douglas Cumming, Jonathan A. Batten, Marco Vivarelli and Klaus F. Zimmermann will participate as keynote speakers and/or invited editors.

Jonathan Batten is professor of finance and CIMB-UUM Chair in Banking and Finance at the School of Economics, Finance and Banking at the University Utara Malaysia (Malaysia). Prior to this position, he worked at the Monash University (Australia), Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong), and Seoul National University (Korea). He is a well-known academician who has published articles in many of the leading economics and finance journals and currently serves as the Editor of Emerging Markets Review (SSCI), Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions & Money (SSCI), and Finance Research Letters (SSCI). He was also the President of EBES from July 2014 till December 2018. His current research interests include: financial market development and risk management; spread modelling arbitrage and market integration; and the investigation of the non-linear dynamics of financial prices.

Narjess Boubakri is professor of Finance at American University of Sharjah (AUS) (United Arab Emirates) where she joined in 2007. She is currently the Dean of the School of Business Administration at AUS as well. She has taught at Laval University and HEC Montreal School of Business (Canada). She has also several editorial roles at leading journals such as Editor (Finance Research Letters), Co-Editor (Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance), Associate Editor (Journal of Corporate Finance), and Subject Editor (Emerging Markets Review; Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions, and Money; and Journal of International Business Policy). Her papers were published in well-known journals such as Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Corporate Finance, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of Accounting Research. Her research has been widely cited (Google Scholar=6,000+). Her research areas are Corporate Governance, Privatization, Corporate Finance, International Finance, Mergers and Acquisitions, Legal and Political Institutions, Lobbying, and Earnings Management.

Douglas Cumming, J.D., Ph.D., CFA, is the DeSantis Distinguished Professor of Finance and Entrepreneurship at the College of Business, Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. Douglas has published over 195 articles in leading refereed academic journals in finance, management, and law and economics, such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Financial Economics, Review of Financial Studies, and Journal of International Business Studies. His work has been cited over 19,000 times according to Google Scholar. He is the Managing Editor-in-Chief of the Review of Corporate Finance (2021-current) and British Journal of Management (2020-current). Douglas has published 21 academic books, including Crowdfunding: Fundamental Cases, Facts, and Insights (Elsevier Academic Press, 2019). Douglas’ work has been reviewed in numerous media outlets, including The Economist, The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker.

Iftekhar Hasan holds the title of university professor at Fordham University, where he also serves as the E. Gerald Corrigan Chair in Finance at the Gabelli School of Business, co-director of the Center for Research in Contemporary Finance, and director of the Ph.D. program. He further serves as a scientific advisor at the Bank of Finland; as a fractional faculty member at the University of Sydney; as a research fellow at the Financial Institution Center at the Wharton School as well as at the IWH Institute in Halle, Germany. He is the managing editor of the Journal of Financial Stability and has served as an associate editor with several other reputed academic journals. Professor Hasan’s research interests are in the areas of financial institutions, corporate finance, capital markets, and emerging economies. He has been involved in numerous academic research grants from different governmental, national, and international science foundations and organizations in the U.S. and abroad. Hasan has more than 375 publications in print, including 16 books and edited volumes, and more than 280 peer-reviewed articles in distinguished academic outlets in finance, economics, international business, management, accounting, operation research, and information systems, including JFE, JFQA, JB, JME, RF, JFI, JMCB, JCF, FM, JBF, JIMF, SMJ, JIBS, HRM, JoM, BJM, JBE, RP, JAR, CAR, RAST, JAPP, JAAF, ABR, MSc, EJOR, and JMIS. Professor Hasan has held visiting faculty positions at several research universities around the world, including the University of Rome, Italy; the University of Strasbourg, France; the University of Carlos III, Madrid; EPFL at Lausanne, Switzerland; the University of Limoges, France; National Taiwan University at Taipei; the University of Romania at Bucharest; Xi’an Jiaotong University, China, the University of Sydney, Australia; and NYU’s Stern School of Business. Professor Hasan has also been a consultant or a visiting scholar for numerous international organizations, including the World Bank, the IMF, the United Nations, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, the Office of the Comptroller of Currency of the U.S. Treasury, the Banque de France, Development Bank of Japan, and the Italian Deposit Insurance Corporation. A Fulbright scholar and a Fulbright selector, Professor Hasan is also a recipient of a “Doctor Honoris Causa” degree from the Romanian-American University in Bucharest.

Marco Vivarelli is a full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics EJournal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as a referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics, Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization, Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, and World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment, and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of EBES; President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (ret.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin, Renmin University of China and Lixin University; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea. Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia; EBES Fellow Award 2018. He has published in many top journals including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. His research fields are population, labor, development, and migration.

Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than May 27, 2022.

For submission, please visit our website at https: //ebesweb.org/40th-ebes-conference-istanbul/40th-ebes-istanbul-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: July 6-8, 2022
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 27, 2022
Reply-by: June 8, 2022*
Registration Deadline: June 13, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: June 13, 2022
Announcement of the Program: June 16, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): June 13, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: October 15, 2022

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before May 27, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by June 13, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference Link

Improving Entrepreneurs’ Digital Skills and Firms’ Digital Competencies through Business Apps Training: A Study of Small Firms. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that business apps training in Athens/Greece was positively associated with migrant entrepreneurs’ attitudes toward technology, willingness to change, and internet/digital skills, increased use of business apps and with firms’ digital competencies in general.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1078, 2022

Improving Entrepreneurs’ Digital Skills and Firms’ Digital Competencies through Business Apps Training: A Study of Small Firms Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis

Author Abstract: The lack of awareness of digital services and outcomes is a concern in business environments since small firms need to improve their digital competencies. The present exploratory study investigated whether business apps training was associated with entrepreneurs’ and firms’ digital advancements. The business apps training was offered to migrant entrepreneurs running small firms in Athens (Greece) over three months, with data collected before and after the training. The analysis revealed that business apps training was positively associated with entrepreneurs’ attitudes toward technology, willingness to change (relating to technology/skills/operations), and internet/digital skills, as well as increased use of business apps. Moreover, the training was positively associated with firms’ digital competencies related to communication, networking, social media, customer relationship management, payments, accounting and finance, and project management operations. Furthermore, the business apps training was positively associated with migrant entrepreneurs’ integration into Greek society. Given the increased number of migrants in Europe, factors that positively impact their entrepreneurship and integration merit consideration. The study provides researchers with a systematic method for evaluating the association between business app training and entrepreneurs’ and firms’ digital advancements.

Featured image: Alex-Knight-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The effects of natural resource extraction on household expenditure patterns: Evidence from Mongolia. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Odmaa Narantungalag.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows how mining activities benefited local residents in Mongolia.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1077, 2022

The effects of natural resource extraction on household expenditure patterns: Evidence from Mongolia Download PDF
by Narantungalag, Odmaa

GLO Fellow Odmaa Narantungalag

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the economic impacts of the mining sector on household expenditures. Employing the difference-in-differences model and the Mongolia Household Socio-Economic Survey data from 2008 to 2016, I find that the mining activities benefited local residents. Specifically, mining activities increase household expenditures on food, health, and electricity, respectively, while households reduce their expenditures on education and other non-food items. Interestingly, illness did not increase in the resource-producing region, while educational attainment improved. The findings highlight that the positive impacts of the mining sector are likely to be higher than what is determined by traditional welfare measurements of income and consumption. I provide some anecdotal evidence that the changes in household expenditure patterns can be due to increased availability of health care services and educational facilities in the mining region.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

2022-23 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS). Deadline for Applications: June 20, 2022.

Global Labor Organization (GLO) invites interested young scholars to apply for participation in the 2022-23 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS). This is the fourth cohort of the successful GLO venture to support career developments of young researchers. It also provides a unique opportunity to interact with the large and very active GLO global research network.

2022-23 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS)

About GLO: The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is a global, independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that has no institutional position. The GLO functions as an international network and virtual platform for researchers, policy makers, practitioners and the general public interested in scientific research and its policy and societal implications on global labor markets, demographic challenges and human resources. These topics are defined broadly in line with its Mission to embrace the global diversity of labor markets, institutions, and policy challenges, covering advanced economies as well as transition and less developed countries.

Program’s Goal: In the spirit of the GLO Mission, the GLO VirtYS program’s goal is to contribute to the development of the future generation of researchers, who are committed to the creation of policy-relevant research, are well equipped to work in collaboration with policy makers and other stakeholders, and adhere to the highest standards of academic integrity. This goal is achieved through the process of working on a specific research paper within the duration of the program, which is 10 months starting from September 2022.

Program’s Advisory Board:

  • Jan van Ours, Professor of Applied Economics, Erasmus School of Economics Rotterdam, Netherlands, & Professorial Fellow, University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Marie Claire Villeval, Research Professor, CNRS GATE, France
  • Marco Vivarelli, Professor at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milano and Director of the Department of Economic Policy
  • Le Wang, Chong K. Liew Chair and Professor & President’s Associates Presidential Professor, University of Oklahoma, USA
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann, Professor Emeritus, Bonn University, UNU-MERIT & President of GLO

Program’s Activities:

  • Virtual kick-off meeting of all the participants and Thematic Cluster advisors, who will be appointed by the participating Cluster leads to match closely participants’ research interests.
  • One-to-one activities with the Thematic Cluster Advisor will be agreed upon at the beginning of the scholarship period in an Individual Research Plan. These activities at a minimum shall include 2-3 virtual consultations, 1 review round of the completed research work and a discussion of the amendments (if needed) to follow up.
  • Provide a virtual platform for the GLO VirtYS program participants to present their findings and receive feedback from their peers and the GLO wider community.
  • The scholarship will conclude in June 2023 followed by the presentations by the scholars within the GLO-wide seminar series in September 2023, after which the GLO Management Board will make a decision on whether to extend an invitation to the graduate of the GLO Virtual Scholar Program to join the organization as a GLO Fellow, based on the recommendation from their Thematic Cluster Advisors and evaluation of the GLO VirtYS Advisory Board.

Research proposals are invited within one of the following GLO thematic clusters:

  1. Coronavirus
  2. Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior
  3. Economics of Happiness
  4. EU Mobility
  5. Gender
  6. Labor and Wealth
  7. School-to-Work Transition
  8. South-East Asia
  9. Technological Change

Benefits to the GLO VYSP Scholars:

  • No fees: Participation is free for the scholars.
  • All GLO VirtYS program participants will become GLO Affiliates, if they are not already, and receive a GLO Bio page.
  • GLO VirtYS program participants will be listed with pictures on the www.glabor.org website of the program.
  • Feedback on their research from leading researchers in the area of their interest.
  • Networking opportunities with researchers from other countries within the same area and beyond
  • (Priority) access to GLO activities.
  • Interactions with the scholars of the cohort, program’s alumni, and the future cohorts.
  • Opportunity to promote own research via GLO channels.
  • Completed research paper ready for submission to the GLO Discussion Paper series.
  • Possibility of promotion to GLO Fellow after exceptional performance.

Eligibility criteria:

  • Applicant must be either currently enrolled in a doctoral program or be within 2 years after graduation as evidenced by the letter from the degree awarding institution or a degree certificate.
  • Applicant must be at an advanced stage of the analysis of a specific research question within the corresponding GLO Thematic Cluster to which he/she is applying as evidenced by the submitted draft.
  • Applicant must be supported by a letter of endorsement from either one of the GLO Fellows or from the administration of one of the GLO supporting institutions.

How to apply: all application materials have to be submitted online. If there are any questions, please write to virtys@glabor.org.

Selection procedure:

The GLO Virtual Young Scholars will be selected by a Scientific Selection Committee consisting of the GLO VirtYS Program Director, GLO thematic cluster leads participating in the current year, and a member of the GLO Management Board.

The results of the selection will be posted on the GLO site www.glabor.org by July 18, 2022. Scholars will be notified via email. In the 2022-23 academic year we expect to select 5-7 scholars.

The final research paper should be submitted by June 30th, 2023, by 5 pm GMT.

Upon completion of the program and based on the quality of the produced research paper, some of the GLO VirtYS programme graduates may be invited to become GLO Fellows and their paper accepted as a GLO Discussion Paper.

Evaluation criteria for applications:

  1. Research excellence (50 points)
  2. Policy relevance of the research question in a local and/or global context (25 points)
  3. Potential for capacity development (25 points) (preference will be given to the applicants for which the GLO Young Scholars Program can bring the highest capacity development, compared to what the applicant would have achieved without being a GLO Young Scholar)

Application procedure:

Many applicants apply in the last days before the submission deadline. To avoid last minute problems, we ask applicants to apply in advance. Applications received after the deadline or applications that do not meet the requirements set out below will not be accepted.

To apply please complete the online application form with three attachments:

1. Research proposal (maximum 2 pages including references, single-spaced, font size 12) should include the following information:

• Formulation of the problem/ research question.
• Research methodology (data and empirical approach).
• (Potential) Practical/Policy implications.
• Reference list.

2. 2-page CV

3. Transcript from the doctoral program or doctoral degree certificate

4. Letter of endorsement for the candidate and the research proposal from either one of the GLO fellows or from the administration of one of the GLO supporting institutions reflecting on the potential of the candidate to benefit from the Program and the merits of the research proposal.

Featured image: The-Coherent-Team-on-Unsplash

Ends;

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021 (many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact) & two additional Associate Editors appointed.

The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) welcomes Raphael Franck (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel) and Rigissa Megalokonomou (University of Queensland, Australia) among its team of Associate Editors.

Congratulations. We all are looking forward to working with you!

Note: Meet authors of JOPE Issue 1 & 2 in the Spring Event presentation on April 25 of the Journal of Population Economics. More information and registration.

Report of the Editor-in-Chief for 2021

The Journal of Population of Economics is an international quarterly that publishes original theoretical and applied research in all areas of population economics, household economics, and human resources. This report contains information about the Journal and its editorial process in the past year and some earlier years.

The number of submissions has substantially increased over recent years (Figure 1). Between 2011 and 2013, the Journal received about 400 submissions per year; by 2016 the number of submissions neared 500. In 2020, 871 manuscripts were received, marking an annual increase of submissions of 41%. In 2021 the total number of submissions declined to 793. Over the decade 2010-2020, the manuscript inflow rose from 337 to a level 2.6 times higher. The additional workload was managed through an efficient desk rejection policy for initial screening.

In line with past years, the largest single share of submissions made in 2021 were from corresponding authors based in Europe (Figure 2). Over 40% of all submissions originated from Europe, and over one-third (32%) of submissions came from authors based in Asia and the Middle East. Under one-fifth (14.7%) of submissions came from authors based in North America. The remaining submissions came from contributors from Africa (3.6%), Oceania (Australia and New Zealand; 4.2%), and South and Central America (2.6%). Figure 3 contains the internet visits to the Journal on the Springer website from the world regions. With over a third of visits coming from North America and 29% from Europe, followed by the Asia-pacific region (22%), the Journal is globally accessed and read.

Figure 4 shows that the average number of days between submission and first decision has generally declined over time. Despite a slight uptick in the turnaround time for first decisions between 2015 and 2016, which may be partially attributed to the increased volume of submissions, there was a substantial reduction in turnaround time in following years. In 2021, the average time for first decisions was 23 days. The Journal is committed to keeping the time between submission and decisions low, including eventual publication. Since 2013 the Journal has executed a desk rejection policy to provide authors with an early signal for better targeting of their work. The large number of submissions combined with an annual quota of 40 manuscripts keeps the acceptance rates of the Journal  very low.

Table 1 shows three acceptance rate measures: 1) the number of manuscripts accepted in a given year as a share of all final decisions made in that year; 2) the number of published articles in a given year as a share of all submissions in that year; and; 3) the number of articles published in a given year divided by the number of the previous year’s submissions.

The number of accepted papers (submitted at any point in time) in a given year as a share of all decisions made in that year has shifted over time. The acceptance rate has slightly increased in the past years, from 4.9% in 2019 to 5.4% in 2020 and 7% in 2021. If acceptance rate is measured as the number of published manuscripts as a share of total submissions received in that year, the acceptance rate was lower, at 5% in 2021 (at 40 manuscripts from among 793 submissions), falling from 6.5% in 2019 but slightly increasing from 4.6% in 2020. Measuring the acceptance rate as the number of publications as a share of the number of submissions received in the previous year (2020) would yield a 2021 rate of 4.6%, which is lower than the previous years (7.1% in 2019 and 6.5% in 2020).

Table 2 reports  the status of papers submitted in the given year for years 2019 – 2021. The Journal’s Impact Factor has increased substantially over time (Figure 5). In the 2020 published simple Impact Factor was 2.813, and the 5-year Impact Factor was 3.318. The Journal ranked 104/377 in economics and 10/29 in demography in 2020. As of March 2022, the Journal’s IDEAS/RePEc ranking was 79/2,740 (based on the Simple Impact Factor 17.646, for Journals and all years).

The Journal is ranked in: Social Science Citation Index, Journal Citation Reports/Social Sciences, SCOPUS, EconLit, Google Scholar, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest, CAB International, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, Academic OneFile, Academic Search, Bibliography of Asian Studies, CAB Abstracts, CSA Environmental Sciences, Current Contents/Social & Behavioral Sciences, ECONIS, ERIH PLUS, Gale, Global Health, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), JSTOR, OCLC, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Review of Population Reviews, SCImago, and Summon by ProQuest.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Population Economics

Ends;

Reflecting Research on Covid-19. GLO Handbook Session at EBES 39: Video & Report.

The 39th EBES Conference in Rome took place on April 6-8, 2022 including a session on Covid-19 research on April 8. Organizer and Session Chair Sergio Scicchitano, National Institute for Public Policies Analysis (INAPP), was GLO Cluster Lead COVID-19 and Section Editor COVID-19 of the Handbook “Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics”. The presentations in this session refer to the review chapters in the Handbook, which is in production.

Day 3: Friday, April 8 (16:20-18:20 CEST, Rome time): VIDEO of the session

Featured image: fusion-medical-animation-rnr8D3FNUNY-unsplash

Ends;

GLO SE Asia to Celebrate 51st Birthday of Bangladesh jointly with North South University

GLO is co-sponsoring a public lecture in Dhaka in collaboration with the country’s leading private higher educational institution — North South University (NSU) — to celebrate the 51st anniversary of Bangladesh. GLO Southeast Asia Lead, Niaz Asadullah, will deliver the lecture entitled “Bangladesh at 51: Achievements, Contradictions, and Challenges”. The main organizer is Department of Economics, School of Business & Economics (SBE) of NSU. The event is also supported by North South University Young Economists’ Forum (YEF) club.

Venue: Auditorium 801, NSU, Bashundhara City, Bangladesh

Date: 19 April 2022

Time: 11:30 am (Dhaka)

Contact of the local organizer: For media and event related queries, please contact HoD (Economics), Professor Asad Priyo (asad.priyo@northsouth.edu) .

Ends;

Register: Meet the author! Spring Event on April 25 of the Journal of Population Economics.

The Journal of Population Economics Spring Event will take place online on 25 April 2022, 4-6 pm CEST (Maastricht, Dutch time). Register in time to meet the authors to get informed about new research and to ask questions. Authors will present the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:1 and 35:2 of 2022.

Meet the author! You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: Apr 25, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUpf-6qpjwsGdEESSI7NncAhQHdcMqT-hf6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing the personal event link. You will be reminded about this link on April 25 in time.

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Maastricht-Netherlands

16:00-18:00/4-6 pm: Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann

16:00-16:30/4:00-4.30 pm Chair: Kompal Sinha

16:30-17.00/4:30-5.00 pm Chair: Terra McKinnish

17:00-17.30/5:00-5.30 pm Chair: Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

17:30-18.00/5:30-6.00 pm Chair: Michaella Vanore

Explore the full set of JOPE papers (23 papers): January 2022, issue 1 & April 2022, issue 2

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

Ends;

China’s Labor Market Demand in the Shadow of COVID-19: Evidence from an Online Job Board. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Xiangquan Zeng, GLO Affiliate Shuai Chu and Xuan Chen.

A new GLO Discussion Paper quantifies the dynamic impacts of China’s stringent control measures on the country’s labor demand during the pandemic.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1074, 2022

China’s Labor Market Demand in the Shadow of COVID-19: Evidence from an Online Job Board Download PDF
by Zeng, Xiangquan & Chu, Shuai & Chen, Xuan

GLO Fellow Xiangquan Zeng & GLO Affiliate Shuai Chu

Shuai Chu

Author Abstract: Using data of the largest online job board in China, Zhaopin.com, we examine the impacts of the lockdown policy on the Chinese labor market demand during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The analyses reveal that the lockdown policy, which was implemented in Wuhan on January 23, 2020, reduced the labor market demand drastically. Specifically, the “Number of Companies” that posted weekly job vacancies, “Number of Positions,” and “Number of Employees” to be recruited reduced rapidly by 18.5%, 21.9%, and 30.0%, respectively. Furthermore, this impact of the lockdown policy began to reduce, thus allowing the labor demand to rebound four weeks after the outbreak. The heterogeneity analyses reveal that the industries with high physical proximity and those manufacturing non-essential products/services, as well as small-size firms, were greatly impacted by the policy. No statistical difference was observed between the impacts on the cities that implemented specific control measures and those that did not. This study quantifies the dynamic impacts of China’s stringent control measures on the country’s labor demand during the pandemic. These findings indicate that the effective management of public health crises in conjunction with economic policies is critical to revitalizing labor markets.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Caitlin Myers.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years.

Accepted for publication in the Journal of Population Economics.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1073, 2022

Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020 Download PDF
by Myers, Caitlin Knowles

GLO Fellow Caitlin Myers

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Disentangling the attractiveness of telework to employees: a factorial survey experiment. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Stijn Baert & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the attractiveness of telework is particularly explained by expectations of an improved work-life balance, more work scheduling autonomy, a higher job satisfaction, and more work methods autonomy in jobs with a greater possibility to telework.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1076, 2022

Disentangling the attractiveness of telework to employees: a factorial survey experiment Download PDF
by Moens, Eline & Verhofstadt, Elsy & Van Ootegem, Luc & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: This research adds to the literature on the attractiveness of telework to employees. To this end, we set up an innovative factorial survey experiment in which a high-quality sample of employees evaluates job offers with diverging characteristics, among which a wide variation in telework possibilities. We find that the relationship between the possibility to telework and job attractiveness is approximately linear: 10 percentage points more telework hours yield a rise of 2.2 percentage points in job attractiveness and, therefore, the willingness to give up an increase of 2.3 percentage points in wage in the new job. Our experimental design also allows us to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relationship as well as its moderators. We find that the attractiveness of telework is particularly explained by expectations of an improved work-life balance, more work scheduling autonomy, a higher job satisfaction, and more work methods autonomy in jobs with a greater possibility to telework. In addition, our analyses show that less conscientious employees are on average more attracted to jobs with greater telework possibilities, so that it is important that self-selection in jobs with more telework is well-monitored.

Featured image: The-Coherent-Team-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Are you Puffing your Children’s Future Away? Energy Poverty and Childhood Exposure to Passive Smoking. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Kushneel Prakash and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that passive smoking in childhood creates energy poverty later in life.

Kushneel Prakash

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1075, 2022

Are you Puffing your Children’s Future Away? Energy Poverty and Childhood Exposure to Passive Smoking Download PDF
by Prakash, Kushneel & Churchill, Sefa Awaworyi & Smyth, Russell

GLO Fellow Kushneel Prakash

Author Abstract: We examine whether having a parent who smoked during one’s childhood or adolescence increases the probability of being in energy poverty in adulthood. We find that people who had a parent who smoked when they were young are 0.8 to 1.4 percentage points more likely to be in energy poverty later in life. Various checks suggest that this relationship can be regarded as being plausibly causal. We identify health, human capital, labour market outcomes and non-cognitive traits as channels through which early life exposure to passive smoking increases the likelihood of being in energy poverty. Our results have important implications for early life interventions to address the deficits caused by exposure to passive smoking.

Featured image: pawel-czerwinski-on-unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Inequality and Public Policy in Asia. CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A SPECIAL ISSUE OF JURNAL EKONOMI MALAYSIA. Submission deadline June 30, 2022.

The Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia will publish a special issue on “Inequality and Public Policy in Asia” in collaboration with GLO Southeast Asia under the direction of its GLO Cluster Lead M Niaz Asadullah. Submission deadline is June 30, 2022.

JURNAL EKONOMI MALAYSIA
CALL FOR PAPERS FOR A SPECIAL ISSUE ON: Inequality and Public Policy in Asia

Guest Editor: Professor M Niaz Asadullah
(Universiti Malaya & Global Labor Organization (GLO) Southeast Asia)

Niaz Asadullah

Overview of the Special Issue: While income inequality globally has declined significantly in many socio-economic indicators in the past decades, within country inequality is once again on the rise. Rapid economic growth and market reforms have helped reduce extreme poverty within Asian region, but this also coincided with a worsening distribution of earnings, wages and wealth. These contrasting patterns have raised questions about the progressivity of public policy and its efficacy in achieving growth with equity. To what extent have fiscal policies succeeded in reducing inequality in Asia? How important was the role of social expenditures on health and education? And what about the design of social safety nets, labor market reforms, and financial sector inclusion?

To answer some of the above questions, the editorial board of Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia is seeking scholarly manuscripts for a special issue on inequality and public policy, which is also the first in collaboration with Global Labor Organization (GLO). The unique partnership with GLO will ensure worldwide circulation of the accepted papers.

The SI focus is on contemporary issues involving all aspects of inequality (social and economic). Social science research including a range of disciplinary perspectives and quantitative methods is welcome. Manuscripts in the following issues, but not limited to, are welcome:

  • Within and cross-country analysis of trends in and drivers of inequality in Asia
  • Policy drivers of rising or declining inequality in Asia
  • Political economy analysis of fiscal and tax policy
  • Inequality of pre-market opportunities (e.g. health, education)
  • Financial shock, economic crisis and redistributive policy measures


More Information about the Journal

Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia is an internationally refereed SCOPUS-indexed journal that publishes original articles, research notes, book reviews on economics three times a year published by Penerbit UKM, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. It is also one of the oldest SCOPUS-indexed economics journals published from Southeast Asia.

Submission Information

Word limit: 6,000-8,000
Total number of papers to be Accepted Paper: 8-10
Registration and Submission: https://www.ukm.my/jem/
Select article type “Special issue” in the submission process.
Author guidelines: https://www.ukm.my/jem/author-guidelines/
Enquiries on Submission: jem@ukm.edu.my
Informal enquiries on proposed topics and potential fit with special Issue objective: m.niaz@um.edu.my

Key Deadlines

Opening Submission Date: 1 May 2022
Closing Submission Date: 30 June 2022
Possible publication date: October 2022

Ends;

Expanding the Measurement of Culture with a Sample of Two Billion Humans. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Ömer Özak and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper uses Facebook data to expand the measurement of culture to establish new and rich insights.

Ömer Özak

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1070, 2022

Expanding the Measurement of Culture with a Sample of Two Billion Humans Download PDF
by Obradovich, Nick & Özak, Ömer & Martín, Ignacio & Ortuño-Ortín, Ignacio & Awad, Edmond & Cebrián, Manuel & Cuevas, Rubén & Desmet, Klaus & Rahwan, Iyad & Cuevas, Ángel

GLO Fellow Ömer Özak

Author Abstract: Culture has played a pivotal role in human evolution. Yet, the ability of social scientists to study culture is limited by the currently available measurement instruments. Scholars of culture must regularly choose between scalable but sparse survey-based methods or restricted but rich ethnographic methods. Here, we demonstrate that massive online social networks can advance the study of human culture by providing quantitative, scalable, and high-resolution measurement of behaviorally revealed cultural values and preferences. We employ publicly available data across nearly 60,000 topic dimensions drawn from two billion Facebook users across 225 countries and territories. We first validate that cultural distances calculated from this measurement instrument correspond to traditional survey-based and objective measures of cross-national cultural differences. We then demonstrate that this expanded measure enables rich insight into the cultural landscape globally at previously impossible resolution. We analyze the importance of national borders in shaping culture and compare subnational divisiveness to gender divisiveness across countries. The global collection of massive data on human behavior provides a high-dimensional complement to traditional cultural metrics. Further, the granularity of the measure presents enormous promise to advance scholars’ understanding of additional fundamental questions in the social sciences. The measure enables detailed investigation into the geopolitical stability of countries, social cleavages within both small and large-scale human groups, the integration of migrant populations, and the disaffection of certain population groups from the political process, among myriad other potential future applications.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Shadow of the Neolithic Revolution on Life Expectancy: A Double-Edged Sword. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Raphael Franck, Oded Galor and Ömer Özak.

A new GLO Discussion Paper establishes the presence of conflicting forces – the beneficial effects on life expectancy before the second epidemiological transition and their adverse effects thereafter.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1071, 2022

The Shadow of the Neolithic Revolution on Life Expectancy: A Double-Edged Sword  Download PDF
by Franck, Raphaël & Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer & Özak, Ömer

GLO Fellows Raphael Franck, Oded Galor and Ömer Özak

Author Abstract: This research explores the persistent effect of the Neolithic Revolution on the evolution of life expectancy in the course of human history. It advances the hypothesis and establishes empirically that the onset of the Neolithic Revolution and the associated rise in infectious diseases triggered a process of adaptation reducing mortality from infectious diseases while increasing the propensity for autoimmune and in ammatory diseases. Exploiting an exogenous source of variation in the timing of the Neolithic Revolution across French regions, the analysis establishes the presence of these conflicting forces – the beneficial effects on life expectancy before the second epidemiological transition and their adverse effects thereafter.

See also: Oded Galor, The Journey of Humanity

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Life satisfaction and job insecurity: Evidence from Albania. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Elvisa Drishti and Fiona Carmichael.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds a negative effect of perceived job insecurity on life satisfaction. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1072, 2022

Life satisfaction and job insecurity: Evidence from Albania  Download PDF
by Drishti, Elvisa & Carmichael, Fiona

GLO Affiliate Elvisa Drishti

Elvisa Drishti

Author Abstract: Fear of the threat of job loss is likely to elicit negative thoughts that have adverse consequences for not only job satisfaction, but also, all-round happiness and satisfaction with life. Using nationally representative cross-sectional data, this study provides evidence of the negative effect of perceived job insecurity on life satisfaction in post-communist Albania, an under-research context. This adverse effect is found to be more pronounced for women and for blue-collar workers: being in a blue-collar job is associated with lower overall life satisfaction, but if this job is perceived as insecure, the negative effect on life satisfaction is magnified. In contrast, workers in well-paying jobs are more satisfied with their lives and, relatedly, higher education also has a positive impact, more so for males. Evidence of the quality of life effects of job insecurity can be used to inform workplace policy initiatives and practices, particularly as measures of life satisfaction, well-being and happiness are increasingly considered appropriate indicators of social progress and the ultimate goal of public policy.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

39th EBES Conference, Rome/Italy, 6-8 April 2022. Conference Program.

The 39th EBES Conference in Rome takes place on April 6-8, 2022 in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). The event is supported by the Istanbul Economic Research Association and hosted by the Faculty of Economics Sapienza, University of Rome. GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES.

The full program and participation details are available here.

Some program details:

Day 1: Wednesday, April 6 (CEST, Rome time):

Day 2: Thursday, April 7 (CEST, Rome time):

This event is joint with the monthly GLO Virtual Seminar for April. Invited Speaker is Sarah Pearlman; Chair is GLO Director Matloob Piracha.

Day 3: Friday, April 8 (16:20-18:20 CEST, Rome time):

Session Chair Sergio Scicchitano, National Institute for Public Policies Analysis (INAPP), is GLO Cluster Lead COVID-19 and Section Editor COVID-19 of the Handbook “Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics” (Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor). The presentations in this session refer to chapters in the Handbook.

Room access:
Z-Room 1: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89732175370
Z-Room 4: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84116971137

Featured image: david-kohler-VFRTXGw1VjU-unsplash

Ends;

The heterogeneity of Okun’s law: A metaregression analysis. A new GLO Discussion Paper by M. Sylvina Porras-Arena & GLO Fellow Ángel L. Martín-Román.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds considerable heterogeneity. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1069, 2022

The heterogeneity of Okun’s law: A metaregression analysis  Download PDF
by Porras-Arena, M. Sylvina & Martín-Román, Ángel L.

GLO Fellow Ángel L. Martín-Román

Ángel L. Martín-Román

Author Abstract: Okun’s law is an extremely influential parameter in empirical research and policy analysis, based on the sizable number of estimates from this perspective. Nevertheless, it is also subject to considerable heterogeneity. We first show graphical and statistical evidence on the existence of a high level of heterogeneity among Okun’s law estimates in existing research, then analyze potential sources of heterogeneity. Using 1,213 estimates of Okun’s law for various countries, regions, and time periods, separate metaregressions are estimated; one using estimates with the unemployment rate as the dependent variable, and the other with output as the dependent variable. Our findings indicate that the specification of the underlying model of the relationship has an effect on the magnitude of Okun’s parameter. Differential labor market characteristics may also explain part of the observed heterogeneity. Finally, the results are also found to be influenced by methodological issues, such as the type of data (time series or panel data), the frequency of the data (annual or quarterly), the spatial coverage of the estimates (country, region, or group of countries), whether more variables are included in estimations, and whether a dynamic or static, symmetric or asymmetric model is estimated. This paper contributes to highlight the heterogeneity affecting the estimates of Okun’s law and that needs to be taken into account. In order to know the “true” relationship between unemployment and economic growth, researchers should bear in mind that there are a number of methodological choices that have consequences for the results.

angellm

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Citizens’ Opinions of and Experiences with Government Responses to COVID-19 Pandemic in Viet Nam. A new GLO Discussion paper by GLO Fellow Cuong Nguyen and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the pandemic had a more severe impact in 2021 than in 2020, and there are great concerns about health issues. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1068, 2022

Citizens’ Opinions of and Experiences with Government Responses to COVID-19 Pandemic in Viet Nam  Download PDF
by Do, Huyen Thanh & Nguyen, Cuong Viet & Nguyen, Long Thanh & Nguyen, Phuong Minh & Ngo, Quyen Ha & Phung, Tung Duc

GLO Fellow Cuong Nguyen

Cuong Nguyen

Author Abstract: This study explores the impact of COVID-19 and how Vietnamese citizens perceived and experienced measures adopted by central and local governments to contain the CVODI-19 pandemic in 2021. In general, the COVID-19 pandemic had a more severe impact in 2021 than in 2020. Citizens showed great concern about their children’s education (76 percent) and their personal health (68 percent). COVID-19 negatively impacted employment and income, with 77 percent of the respondents reporting income reduction due to the pandemic. The poor, ethnic minorities, unskilled, non-farm workers, and those working in the service sector or living in provinces with longer lockdowns were the most likely to suffer. Compared with 2020, in 2021, respondents showed a high but declining positive assessment of government performance in dealing with the pandemic, with 84 percent of the respondents rating the responses from the Central Government as good or very good (97 percent in 2020), 89 percent rating the response from their provincial governments’ responses as good or very good (94 percent in 2020). Only 13 percent of the respondents received support from the Government’s package. However, ethnic minorities, female, poorer and rural respondents were less likely to receive the support. For the support recipients, delivery was regarded as timely and transparent, but administrative procedures to get access to the package were not simple. Meanwhile, support from non-governmental organizations (NGOs), social organizations, charity foundations, and individuals was distributed more efficiently, with 25 percent of the respondents receiving support from these sources.

Featured image: Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Trends and Drivers of Inequality: Recent Evidence from Vietnam. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Cuong Nguyen and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that inequality has been stable and tends to be higher in provinces with higher initial income and poverty.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1067, 2022

 Trends and Drivers of Inequality: Recent Evidence from Vietnam  Download PDF
by Dang, Trang Huyen & Nguyen, Cuong Viet & Phung, Tung Duc

GLO Fellow Cuong Nguyen

Cuong Nguyen

Author Abstract: This study provides evidence on the trends and drivers of inequality in Vietnam using Vietnam Household Living Standard Surveys. We find that inequality, regardless of the choice of welfare indicators and inequality measurements, has been stable in Vietnam. Inequality in income or expenditure is remarkably lower than inequality in assets. In 2016, the Gini coefficient of per capita expenditure and per capita income was 0.35 and 0.39, respectively, while the Gini coefficient in electricity consumption and housing value was 0.42 and 0.62, respectively. Using the decomposition analysis, we find that inequality between provinces accounts for 22% of the total inequality, while inequality between ethnic groups accounts for 15% of the total inequality. The regression analysis shows that inequality tends to be higher in provinces with higher initial income and poverty. This implies that high-income people are more likely to benefit from economic growth, especially in better-off provinces.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

A New Claims-Based Unemployment Dataset: Application to Postwar Recoveries Across U.S. States. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow David Munro and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides a historical monthly unemployment series for U.S. states going back to January 1947.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1066, 2022

A New Claims-Based Unemployment Dataset: Application to Postwar Recoveries Across U.S. States  Download PDF
by Fieldhouse, Andrew & Howard, Sean & Koch, Christoffer & Munro, David

GLO Fellow David Munro

Author Abstract: Using newly digitized unemployment insurance claims data we construct a historical monthly unemployment series for U.S. states going back to January 1947. The constructed series are highly correlated with the Bureau of Labor Statics’ state-level unemployment data, which are only available from January 1976 onwards, and capture consistent patterns in the business cycle. We use our claims-based unemployment series to examine the evolving pace of post-war unemployment recoveries at the state level. We find that faster recoveries are associated with greater heterogeneity in the recovery rate of unemployment and slower recoveries tend to be more uniformly paced across states. In addition, we find that the pace of unemployment recoveries is strongly correlated with a states’ manufacturing share of output.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Rally Post-Terrorism. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Shuai Chen.

A new GLO Discussion Paper analyzes the driver of the rally effect of terrorism by disentangling voluntary solidarity from economically or politically elicited solidarity.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1065, 2022

Rally Post-Terrorism  Download PDF
by Chen, Shua

GLO Fellow Shuai Chen

Shuai Chen

Author Abstract: This study examines whether the rally ’round the flag phenomenon is present in the context of terrorist attacks, and investigates the explanations for the related increase of confidence in political institutions and political approval of the incumbent’s job performance. I exploit variations in terrorist occurrences and results across sub-national regions among EU countries from 2008 to 2016. I restrict the sample to only regions where at least one attack took place during the data period, in order to mitigate concerns over selectivity of terrorism in particular areas. I empirically show that both terrorism occurrence and its results (successful or failed attacks) are plausibly exogenous to the prior political and economic climate. Conducting a difference-in-differences analysis, I compare changes in political confidence and approval among individuals who were exposed to an attack in their region to those who were not. With another more sophisticated identification, I also compare such political changes after successful attacks to those after failed attacks of the same type. I find that post-terrorism, individual political confidence and support significantly increased by more than 10 percentage points, and that this political increment was 5 percentage points after successful attacks relative to failed ones. Furthermore, I explore various potential channels suggesting patriotism and civic engagement as mechanisms while rejecting perceived economic capture and political acquisition as alternative explanations. This paper first empirically analyzes the driver of the rally effect of terrorism by disentangling voluntary solidarity from economically or politically elicited solidarity.

Featured image: Fabien Maurin on Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country. Now forthcoming in the Journal of Political Economy. By Shyamal Chowdhury, Matthias Sutter & Klaus F. Zimmermann.

Using data from large-scale experiments with entire families for Bangladesh, the research finds that both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences. Results differ from evidence for rich countries.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 592, 2020 now forthcoming as

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country
by
Chowdhury, Shyamal & Sutter, Matthias & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

in: Journal of Political Economy

Free Pre-publication version

GLO Fellows Shyamal Chowdhury and Matthias Sutter & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann

Author Abstract: Our large-scale experiment with 542 families from rural Bangladesh finds substantial intergenerational persistence of economic preferences. Both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly (and largely to the same degree) positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences, even when controlling for personality traits and socio-economic background. We discuss possible transmission channels and are the first to classify all families into one of two clusters, with either relatively patient, risk-tolerant and pro-social members or relatively impatient, risk averse and spiteful members. Classifications correlate with socio-economic background variables. We find that our results differ from evidence for rich countries.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is favicon_glabor.png

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Immigrant Employment and the Contract Enforcement Costs of Offshoring. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Magnus Lodefalk and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper supports for Sweden the hypothesis that immigrant employees increase offshoring intensity by lowering contract enforcement costs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1064, 2022

Immigrant Employment and the Contract Enforcement Costs of Offshoring  Download PDF
by Hatzigeorgiou, Andreas & Karpaty, Patrik & Kneller, Richard & Lodefalk, Magnus

GLO Fellow Magnus Lodefalk

Magnus Lodefalk

Author Abstract: Offshoring continues to be an important dimension of firms’ internationalization choices. However, offshoring also increases contract enforcement costs by inhibiting the coordination and monitoring of performance. Immigrant employees may reduce such costs through their specific knowledge of the employer, their country of birth and access to foreign networks. We develop a heterogeneous firm framework with immigrants and offshoring costs, including technology leakage. In the model, immigrant employees augment the supervisory services of headquarters and limit technology leakage, thereby reducing contract enforcement costs. Then, we bring our conjectures to rich administrative Swedish microlevel data that include specific information about the characteristics of employees, manufacturing firms and their bilateral offshoring. Our results support the hypothesis that immigrant employees increase offshoring intensity by lowering contract enforcement costs. Hiring one additional immigrant employee can increase offshoring by up to three percent on average, with the strongest effects found for skilled immigrant employees.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Event Report: The Inaugural GLO, Lee Kuan Yew School (NUS) and University Malaya Youth Policy Dialogue.

On 25 March 2022, GLO Southeast Asia Lead Niaz Asadullah successfully organized the inaugural Youth Policy Dialogue on COVID-19 pandemic in the ASEAN region. The event was jointly hosted by the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and the University of Malaya. It is the first of its kind and coincided with the second anniversary of the pandemic. 

Niaz Asadullah, who is also a Professor at the University Malaya, delivered the keynote lecture on the political economy of COVID-19 policy response, offering a global overview of some of the key challenges for policymakers in tackling the “new inequality” through progressive public policy. This was followed by a lively youth panel debate where 8 speakers from 7 countries deliberated on the proposition (debate motion) that “This house believes that ASEAN’s uncoordinated response to obtaining vaccines has increased regional inequality”. 

The proposition team was Lee Kuan Yew School represented by Lavanyaa Saxena (India), Celso Lastica Crisostomo Jr. (Philippines), Ryosuke Watanabe (Japan) and Gabriel Chen (Malaysia).

The opposition team members were Christopher Pike (UK), Zhongyan Tang (China), Syed Farhan Akbari (Bangladesh) and Ronald Phuan (Malaysia) —  all students of the University of Malaya.

The Lee Kuan Yew School youth delegates (proposition team) argued that ASEAN’s uncoordinated response to COVID-19 led to very high cases of infections and deaths, which combined with economic lockdowns, stunted economic growth. This in turn has increased income inequality. Therefore they concluded that a coordinated response by state authorities in member countries in obtaining vaccines early and administering the vaccination campaign effectively would have helped avoid the spike in inequality.

Youth delegates from the University of Malaya (opposition team) contested the motion pointing out that the lack of coordination in the vaccine campaign and the rise in inequality is just a coincidence and does not imply that the former is driven by the latter. Besides, inequality is multifaceted in nature as is exemplified by the rise in education inequality during the pandemic — coordinated vaccine response would not have helped much in avoiding the learning loss as it had more to do with issues of digital infrastructure provisions and quality of state-run online programs. The opposition speakers also noted ASEAN’s limited organizational capacity to coordinate a response due to its doctrine of  non-interference and the geo-politics of vaccine production and supply.

Among other highlights, youth members of the audience also took part by voting on the motion before and after the youth panel session. The pre-debate audience poll produced 85% votes in favour of the proposition. After the debate, follow up votes increased support for the opposition from 15% to 36%.

Overall, the event was a huge success attracting nearly 100 youth participants from all over Southeast Asia.  It ended with an hour long lively Q&A session. It was extensively advertised in social media by prominent Asian youth networks such as Higher Education Malaysia Association (HEYA) and the Asian University Alliance (AUA). Here are some links – HEYA twitter post || AUA announcement || HEYA Facebook ||  HEYA Instagram || LinkedIn

At the end of the event, youth speakers received a certificate signed by GLO Southeast Asia Lead, Niaz Asadullah, and the Vice Dean of Student Affairs of LKY School, Dr Tan-Soo Jie-Sheng.  

Ends;

A measure of well-being efficiency based on the World Happiness Report. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Francesco Sarracino & Kelsey J. O’Connor.

A new GLO Discussion Paper does not support the conjecture that economic efficiency promotes well-being.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1061, 2022

A measure of well-being efficiency based on the World Happiness Report  Download PDF
by Sarracino, Francesco & O’Connor, Kelsey J.

GLO Fellows Francesco Sarracino & Kelsey J. O’Connor

Author Abstract: We propose a measure of well-being efficiency to assess countries’ ability to transform inputs into subjective well-being (Cantril ladder). We use the six inputs (real GDP per capita, healthy life expectancy, social support, freedom of choice, absence of corruption, and generosity) identified in the World Happiness Reports and apply Data Envelopment Analysis to a sample of 126 countries. Efficiency scores reveal that high ranking subjective well-being countries, such as the Nordics, are not strictly the most efficient ones. Also, the scores are uncorrelated with economic efficiency. This means that the implicit assumption that economic efficiency promotes well-being is not supported. Well-being efficiency can be improved by changing the amount (scale) or composition of inputs and their use (technical efficiency). For instance countries with lower unemployment, and greater healthy life expectancy and optimism are more efficient.

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Religiosity, Smoking and Other Risky Behaviors. GLO Discussion Paper by Monica Roman, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Aurelian-Petruș now published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Economics, Management and Religion.

Using data for young Romanians, a GLO Discussion Paper found that it is external religiosity that interacts with weaker addictive behaviors like smoking, drinking and using drugs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 859, 2021

Religiosity, Smoking and Other Addictive Behaviors
by
Roman, Monica & Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Plopeanu, Aurelian-Petruș

Now forthcoming OPEN ACCESSJournal of Economics, Management and Religion (JEMAR), Vol. 2 (2022), 2250001.

Free Pre-publication version

Author Abstract: While under communism the identity-providing religion was suppressed, religiosity is strong today even among the youth in post-communist countries. This provides an appropriate background to investigate how external and internal religiosity relates to risky behaviors like smoking, drinking, and drugs among the young. This study shows that not religion as such or internal religiosity, but largely observable (external) religiosity prevents them from wallowing in those vices. While this is found strongly for both males and females, those females doubting or reflecting religion show a somewhat smaller risky activity. 

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

A Tale of Parallel Processes of Gender (In-)Equality: How Big is the Glass Ceiling for Mena Women? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Ömer Tuğsal Doruk & Francesco Pastore.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds sizeable glass ceiling effects in all countries considered, and persistent across all industrial sectors and years considered. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1062, 2022

A Tale of Parallel Processes of Gender (In-)Equality: How Big is the Glass Ceiling for Mena Women?  Download PDF
by Doruk, Ömer Tuğsal & Pastore, Francesco

GLO Fellows Ömer Tuğsal Doruk & Francesco Pastore

Author Abstract: In all the MENA countries considered in this study, namely Jordan Egypt and Tunisia, there has been a significant decrease in the female labor force participation rate over the last two decades. Moreover, existing analysis and the anecdotal evidence suggest that it may be problematic for women to reach a white collar high skill job, also in the more protected public sector, though there is very little empirical evidence on this. By using repeated cross sections of individuals covering periods of up to 20 years (for Egypt), we examine the evolution of the glass ceiling problem for women resorting to the matching approach, which, to our knowledge, has never been used in this field. Instead of looking at the gender gap along the wage distribution, we assess the probability to reach the top professions of manager, professional and technician or associate professional. We find a sizeable glass ceiling effect in all the countries considered. It is a persistent phenomenon across all the industrial sectors and the years considered. The present study sheds new light on the glass ceiling effect for woman in the MENA countries, which is relevant also for other countries.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Occupations of Free Women and Substitution with Enslaved Workers in the Antebellum United States. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Barry Chiswick & RaeAnn H. Robinson.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that foreign-born and illiterate women were more likely to report having an occupation compared to their native-born and literate counterparts.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1063, 2022

The Occupations of Free Women and Substitution with Enslaved Workers in the Antebellum United States  Download PDF
by Chiswick, Barry R. & Robinson, RaeAnn H.

GLO Fellow Barry Chiswick

Barry Chiswick

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the occupational status and distribution of free women in the antebellum United States. It considers both their reported and unreported (imputed) occupations, using the 1/100 IPUMS files from the 1860 Census of Population. After developing and testing the model based on economic and demographic variables used to explain whether a free woman has an occupation, analyses are conducted comparing their occupational distribution to free men, along with analyses among women by nativity, urbanization, and region of the country. While foreign-born and illiterate women were more likely to report having an occupation compared to their native-born and literate counterparts, they were equally likely to be working when unreported family workers are included. In the analysis limited to the slave-holding states, it is shown that the greater the slave-intensity of the county, the less likely were free women to report having an occupation, particularly as private household workers, suggesting substitution in the labor market between free women and enslaved labor.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

VIDEO of the online event on 21 March 2022: Oded Galor on his new book: “The Journey of Humanity: The Origins of Wealth and Inequality”. Book released on March 22 in the USA, on April 7 in the UK and on April 13 in Germany.

Oded Galor (Brown University) spoke on March 21, 2022 (4.00 pm to 5.30 pm CET Berlin time) in a public world-wide online event on

The Journey of Humanity:
The Origins of Wealth and Inequality

VIDEO OF THE EVENT

The event was jointly organized by Global Labor Organization (GLO), the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) and POP @ UNU-MERIT and chaired by Klaus F. Zimmermann (President of GLO, Editor-in-Chief of JOPE, and Co-Director of POP). About 200 people had registered to attend.

What Twitter says!  

The Journey of Humanity by Oded Galor

Oded Galor spoke about his new book just published with Penguin Random House in thirty languages worldwide. It is released on March 22 in the USA and on April 7 in the UK and on April 13 in Germany.

Further details on the book (see also below) and how it can be purchased: USA-LINK —– UK-LINK …… Germany-LINK

He is Herbert H. Goldberger Professor of Economics at Brown University and the founding thinker behind Unified Growth Theory, which seeks to uncover the fundamental causes of development, prosperity and inequality over the entire span of human history. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Economic Growth and an Editor of the Journal of Population Economics.

About the book

In a captivating journey from the dawn of human existence to the present, world-renowned economist and thinker Oded Galor offers an intriguing solution to two of humanity’s great mysteries.

Why are humans the only species to have escaped – only very recently – the subsistence trap, allowing us to enjoy a standard of living that vastly exceeds all others? And why have we progressed so unequally around the world, resulting in the great disparities between nations that exist today? Immense in scope and packed with astounding connections, Galor’s gripping narrative explains how technology, population size, and adaptation led to a stunning “phase change” in the human story a mere two hundred years ago. But by tracing that same journey back in time and peeling away the layers of influence – colonialism, political institutions, societal structure, culture – he arrives also at an explanation of inequality’s ultimate causes: those ancestral populations that enjoyed fruitful geographical characteristics and rich diversity were set on the path to prosperity, while those that lacked it were disadvantaged in ways still echoed today.

As we face ecological crisis across the globe, The Journey of Humanity is a book of urgent truths and enduring relevance, with lessons that are both hopeful and profound: gender equality, investment in education, and balancing diversity with social cohesion are the keys not only to our species’ thriving, but to its survival.

From the event

From the opening remarks of Klaus F. Zimmermann

Oded is the Herbert Goldberger Professor of Economics at Brown University and one of the profoundest economic thinkers of the world. He has published his research in the best academic outlets of the profession. His contributions focus for long around the fundamental causes of development, prosperity and inequality over the entire span of human history. As the driving force behind what he calls “Unified Growth Theory” and the role of genetic diversity for development he seeks to uncover the fundamental causes of the path of human wellbeing across time and space.

Oded Galor was awarded Doctorates Honoris Causa from UCLouvain and from Poznań University of Economics & Business. He is an elected Foreign Member of Academia Europaea and an Elected Fellow of the Econometric Society. He is affiliated with many distinguished academic networks like NBER, CEPR, GLO, IZA, among others. Furthermore, he is the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Economic Growth, Editor of the Journal of Population Economics, and Co-Editor of Macroeconomic Dynamics. He has served the profession in many unique ways.

His new book “The Journey of Humanity: The Origins of Wealth and Inequality” comes at the time of a dramatic setback in economic history, as for a few weeks now the aggressive war against the Ukraine reveals. Europe experiences some of the darkest days on the continent since WWII with unpredictable ending.

The book could not foresee this development. But it nevertheless feeds the hope for a long-term rise in humanity, of increased wealth, understanding and collaboration.

  • As Oded Galor writes at the beginning of his global review of history (p. 9): “…. the outlook derived from this exploration can be described as fundamentally hopeful, in terms of the overarching trajectory of societies across the globe. …. education, tolerance and greater gender equality hold the keys to our species’ flourishing in the decades and centuries to come. ”
  • And after discussing major global catastrophes over the last century, he writes towards the end (p. 242f): “But history shows that, shattering and dreadful as they are, these events have had limited long-term impact on the grand arc of human development. The relentless march of humanity has so far been unstoppable.”

The book helps us to see the mechanisms and common institutions we need to invest and struggle for to foster human development and to overpower disaster.

Ends;