Category Archives: News

The wage effects of employers’ associations: A case study of the private schools sector. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Pedro Martins.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that the EA wage premium can be largely explained by the selection of high-wage firms (but not high-wage workers) into EA membership.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1163, 2022

The wage effects of employers’ associations: A case study of the private schools sector  Download PDF
by Martins, Pedro S.

GLO Fellow Pedro Martins

Author Abstract: Does employers’ association (EA) membership affect the wages paid by firms? Such effects could follow from several channels, including increased productivity, different management practices, or employer collusion promoted by EA affiliation. We test these hypotheses drawing on detailed matched employer-employee panel data, including timevarying EA affiliation and worker mobility across firms. We consider the case of private schools in Portugal, 2010-2020, and its EA, and develop a methodology to delimit the sector’s scope. We find that, even when controlling extensively for worker characteristics, including worker fixed effects, EA firms pay significantly higher wages. However, when controlling for firm fixed effects, these wage differences are significantly reduced or disappear. Our evidence indicates that the EA wage premium can be largely explained by the selection of high-wage firms (but not high-wage workers) into EA membership.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Mining and Mistrust in Government. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Astghik Mavisakalyan and Anna Minasyan.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds a negative association between mining and trust in government in 27 post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1164, 2022

Mining and Mistrust in Government  Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna

GLO Fellows Astghik Mavisakalyan and Anna Minasyan

Astghik Mavisakalyan

Author Abstract: Recent research shows that natural resources can hurt institutions by promoting corruption and diverting resources from the production of public goods. This, in turn, may have implications for the trust individuals hold for their governments. We explore this possibility by linking survey data on over 43,000 individuals with spatial data on mine locations in 27 post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. By exploiting the information on the development status of each mine site, we draw comparisons between individuals living in the vicinity of active versus inactive mines, imitating a difference-in-differences strategy applied to cross-sectional data. We show that there is a negative association between mining and trust in government – a finding that is robust to a battery of tests. Our analysis of the mechanisms confirms that corruption perception and, to a lesser extent, dissatisfaction with public good provision, are likely behind this relationship. The analysis of the consequences of such mistrust in government points towards a potentially damaging impact of mining for new democracies. The results suggest that mining activity might decrease individuals’ willingness to go on lawful demonstrations and participate in civil and political movements.

Featured image: joshua-hoehne-rIUx_Q9_axw-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Foreign Competition, Skill Premium, and Product Quality: Impact of Chinese Competition on Mexican Plants. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Thi Hang Banh and GLO Fellow Mauro Caselli.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds empirical support for a suggested theoretical model predicting that tougher competition leads plants to downgrade quality, which induces a decline in the wage difference between skilled and unskilled workers.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1162, 2022

Foreign Competition, Skill Premium, and Product Quality: Impact of Chinese Competition on Mexican Plants  Download PDF
by Banh, Thi Hang & Caselli, Mauro

GLO Fellow Mauro Caselli

Author Abstract: This paper analyses the effect of rising competition from Chinese exports on the skill premium of Mexican plants. Using detailed product-plant-level production data from Mexico and bilateral product-level trade data for 1994-2007, we provide evidence that Mexican plants reduce their skill premium in response to increasing competition from Chinese exports, and the effect is more pronounced among non-exporting plants. Thus, we develop a model linking competition and wage inequality between skilled and unskilled workers by introducing these two types of labour to a model with heterogeneous firms and quality differentiation. Our model predicts that tougher competition leads plants to downgrade quality, which induces a decline in the wage difference between skilled and unskilled workers. We investigate this hypothesis empirically by analysing the effect of Chinese competition on the product quality of Mexican plants. Consistent with the fall in the skill premium, we document a downgrading impact of China’s rise on Mexican plants’ product quality and this quality downgrading is less intense for products sold in the foreign market. These findings provide empirical support for the predictions of our model.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Returns to Education in Greece: Evidence from the 1977 Labor Market Survey using the Greek Civil War as an Instrument. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Harry Patrinos.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1161, 2022

Returns to Education in Greece: Evidence from the 1977 Labor Market Survey using the Greek Civil War as an Instrument – Download PDF
by Patrinos, Harry Anthony

GLO Fellow Harry Patrinos

Harry Patrinos

Author Abstract: Greece experienced a devastating civil war in 1946-1949. This led to many deaths, economic losses, and severe reductions in schooling expenditures and attendance. Using an instrumental variables approach, we estimate the 1977 returns to schooling, showing that for those affected by the civil war, the returns to schooling are higher than the corresponding least squares estimate.

Featured image: Stijn-Swinnen-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The effect of gender norms on gender-based sorting across occupations. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Miriam Marcén and Marina Morales.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studying immigration to the USA finds that greater gender equality in the country of origin reduces the gender gap in male-dominated occupations.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1160, 2022

The effect of gender norms on gender-based sorting across occupations  Download PDF
by Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

GLO Fellows Miriam Marcén and Marina Morales

Marina Morales

Author Abstract: Despite the notable progress that has been made in bridging the gap between women and men in the world of work, women are still underrepresented in several occupations. In this article, the effect of gender norms on whether women enter male-dominated occupations is analysed using differences in gender equality among early-arrival migrants. The variations in gender norms according to the cultural backgrounds of those migrants by country of origin are exploited to identify their impact on occupational choices. Using data from the American Community Survey, it is found that greater gender equality in the country of origin reduces the gender gap in maledominated occupations. Suggestive evidence is further shown on the roles of job flexibility and women’s relative preferences for family-friendly jobs in shaping gender-based sorting across occupations.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-lpyHSTHO7LM-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

41th EBES Conference jointly organized hybrid with GLO & FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022. Full Program with GLO contributions out.

41st EBES Conference – Berlin will take place on October 12th, 13th, 14th, 2022 in Berlin, Germany with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association. The event is jointly organized in Hybrid Mode (in-person on October 12 only) with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and in collaboration with the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

FOM, GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. GLO provides a number of invited sessions to the program as announced below.

For the full program see EBES 41 Conference Program

Note: Berlin-German time

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Call for contributions: 42nd EBES Conference – Lisbon January 12-14, 2023. Abstract deadline: November 11, 2022.

42nd EBES Conference – Lisbon will take place on January 12th, 13th, and 14th, 2023 in Lisbon, Portugal. The conference will be hosted by the ISCTE-IUL Instituto Universitário de Lisboa with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person).

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration.

Deadline for Abstract Submission is November 11, 2022.

More details!

EBES Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than November 11, 2022.

For submission, please visit https://ebesweb.org/42nd-ebes-lisbon/42nd-ebes-conference-lisbon-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: January 12-14, 2023
Abstract Submission Deadline: November 11, 2022
Reply-by: November 28, 2022*
Registration Deadline: December 19, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: December 20, 2022
Announcement of the Program: December 25, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): December 20, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: March 16, 2023

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before September 9, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by September 21, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference LINK

Ends;

The Anti-Corruption Campaign and the Inter-Generational Transmission of Working in Bureaucracy: Evidence from China. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Shuai Chen and Erqi Ge.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that the campaign decreased the economic attractiveness of bureaucratic jobs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1159, 2022

The Anti-Corruption Campaign and the Inter-Generational Transmission of Working in Bureaucracy: Evidence from China  Download PDF
by Chen, Shuai & Ge, Erqi

GLO Fellow Shuai Chen

Shuai Chen

Author Abstract: There is a clear and persistent inequality of bureaucratic employment between individuals with a bureaucrat parent and those without. Using the recent anti-corruption campaign in China as a quasi-experiment, we investigate how endeavors for counter-corruption affect inequality and potential cronyism in bureaucratic employment through inter-generational transmission. First, we conduct a difference-in-differences analysis to compare changes in the probability of working in bureaucracy after the campaign came into effect in different provincial administrative divisions of mainland China, between individuals with a bureaucrat parent and those without. We find that before the campaign, bureaucrats’ children were over 13 percentage points more likely to work in bureaucracy, and that the positive selection on human capital can explain only 12-25 percent of this advantage of bureaucrats’ children. However, after the campaign took effect, this premium significantly reduced by more than 5 percentage points. Moreover, we explore potential mechanisms through which anti-corruption efforts have diminished the inter-generational transmission of bureaucratic employment. We provide evidence that the campaign decreased the economic attractiveness of bureaucratic jobs, and that better outside options are more likely to explain the reduced inter-generational transmission. We do not find evidence supporting other two alternative channels: the insider information of bureaucrat parents on the campaign, or changes in perceptions of bureaucracy.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

GLO/EHERO Sessions on “Happiness Economics” 2022: Report & Videos.

Report on the GLO/EHERO Sessions on “Happiness Economics” during the 2022 Conference of the International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (3-6 August 2022 in Burlington, Vermont, USA)

The 20th International Society for Quality of Life Studies (ISQOLS) Conference (3-6 August 2022 in Burlington, Vermont) featured three GLO/EHERO Special Sessions in Happiness Economics. The sessions are a signature event of the GLO Cluster Economics of Happiness.

Chaired by GLO Fellow Martijn Hendriks, each of the three sessions featured three presentations, followed by comments by a dedicated discussant and questions from the audience. Two sessions were offered in a hybrid format, with participants online and in-person, and one session was exclusively in-person. The sessions were well-attended and spurred interesting discussions on- and off-line. 

In addition to presentations of research papers, the GLO/EHERO sessions also featured a presentation of the “Happiness and Migration” chapter by GLO Fellow Martijn Hendriks and Martijn Burger from the section “Welfare, Well-being, Happiness” of the forthcoming Springer Nature Handbook “Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics” that is edited by GLO Fellow and Happiness Economics Cluster Lead Milena Nikolova. The Handbook’s Editor-in-Chief is GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann.  

ISQOLS Conference program

For the program of the GLO/HERO sessions see below. The video recordings of the presentations are available here:

GLO/EHERO Happiness Economics Session I: https://youtu.be/yQAop2jXkvg
GLO/EHERO Happiness Economics Session II:  https://youtu.be/_gPfMZAYAwM
GLO/EHERO Happiness Economics Session III: https://youtu.be/Y6MbIVqyzQA

Given the success of the sessions, the co-organizers Martijn Hendriks (GLO/EHERO), Martijn Burger (EHERO), and Milena Nikolova (GLO Fellow and Cluster Lead “Economics of Happiness”) will organize again special sessions at the 21st ISQOLS Annual Conference that will take place in Rotterdam, the Netherlands in 2023. Further information and call for papers to follow. 

These special sessions are invitation-based to guarantee that the presentations are of high quality. 

GLO – EHERO organizers

Dr. Martijn Hendriks (EHERO and GLO), Dr. Milena Nikolova (University of Groningen and GLO), and Dr. Martijn Burger (EHERO and Open Universiteit).

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash.

Program of the GLO/EHERO Special Sessions at ISQOLS 2022

Ends;

Early Life Circumstances and the Health of Older Adults: A Research Note. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Xi Chen.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reviews the latest evidence, in particular the impact of the Great Chinese Famine (1959-1961). 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1158, 2022

Early Life Circumstances and the Health of Older Adults: A Research Note  Download PDF
by Chen, Xi

GLO Fellow Xi Chen

Xi Chen

Author Abstract: This paper reviews the latest evidence of the effects of early life circumstances on old-age health, distinguishing in utero exposures from childhood exposures to a wide range of environments. We then leverage the growing number of studies of the impact of the Great Chinese Famine (1959-1961) on the health of older adults to perform a meta-analysis and discuss potential mechanisms. Recent studies assembling multiple domains of early life circumstances are evaluated to better understand how various circumstances may coalesce and manifest in shaping long-term health.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Australian Gender Economics Workshop 2023, February 9-10; Submission deadline October 30, 2022.

The Australian Gender Economics Workshop 2023 (AGEW) is held in Perth, Australia on the 9th and 10th of February 2023. GLO Fellow Silvia Salazar, Curtin University, is chair of the organizing committee. More info below. AGEW website: see here. Deadline Submissions:  30th October 2022

GLO supports gender research through its gender research cluster and the Journal of Population Economics.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-on-unsplash

Provided by the organizers:

On behalf of the organizing committee, we are delighted to invite you to the 6th Australian Gender Economics Workshop (AGEW 2023), hosted by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, the University of Western Australia and the Women in Economics Network.

The workshop will be held in-person in Perth on the 9th-10th of February 2023.

Submissions are currently open and will close on Sunday 30th October 2022

Ends;

We Need to Talk about Mechanical Turk: What 22,989 Hypothesis Tests Tell us about p-Hacking and Publication Bias in Online Experiments: a new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Abel Brodeur and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds evidence of widespread p-hacking, publication bias and over-reliance on results from plausibly under-powered studies. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1157, 2022

We Need to Talk about Mechanical Turk: What 22,989 Hypothesis Tests Tell us about p-Hacking and Publication Bias in Online Experiments  Download PDF
by Brodeur, Abel & Cook, Nikolai & Heyes, Anthony

GLO Fellow Abel Brodeur

Abel Brodeur

Author Abstract: Amazon’s Mechanical Turk is a very widely-used tool in business and economics research, but how trustworthy are results from well-published studies that use it? Analyzing the universe of hypotheses tested on the platform and published in leading journals between 2010 and 2020 we find evidence of widespread p-hacking, publication bias and over-reliance on results from plausibly under-powered studies. Even ignoring questions arising from the characteristics and behaviors of study recruits, the conduct of the research community itself erodes substantially the credibility of these studies’ conclusions. The extent of the problems vary across the business, economics, management and marketing research fields (with marketing especially afflicted). The problems are not getting better over time and are much more prevalent than in a comparison set of non-online experiments. We explore correlates of increased credibility.

Featured image: Mika-Baumeister-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Economic Preferences and the Self-selection of Immigrants. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Crystal Zhan and Sumit Deole.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds a higher migration propensity among individuals who are more altruistic, patient, and trusting. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1156, 2022

Economic Preferences and the Self-selection of Immigrants  Download PDF
by Zhan, Crystal & Deole, Sumit

GLO Fellows Crystal Zhan and Sumit Deole

Sumit Deole

Author Abstract: Classical theories hypothesize individual economic preferences, including preferences toward risk, time, and trust, as determinants for migration intention. In the paper, we combine data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, European Social Survey, and World Values Survey to investigate how immigrants to Germany are self-selected from the origin population based on their preferences. We find a higher migration propensity among individuals who are more altruistic, patient, and trusting, conditional on age, gender, education, and a series of origin country’s economic and political factors. However, individuals are positively selected on risk appetite in low-risk countries but adversely selected in high-risk countries. The degree of selectivity regarding preferences is also heterogeneous across demographics and origin-country characteristics.

Featured image: joshua-hoehne-on-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Returns to Education in the Public and Private Sectors: Europe and Central Asia. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Claudio Montenegroa and GLO Fellow Harry Patrinos.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that while the public sector pays on average more than the private sector, the effect of education on earnings is stronger in the private sector.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1155, 2022

Returns to Education in the Public and Private Sectors: Europe and Central Asia  Download PDF
by Montenegroa, Claudio M. & Patrinos, Harry Anthony

GLO Fellow Harry Patrinos

Harry Patrinos

Author Abstract: The returns to schooling are estimated for 28 European and Central Asian countries using the Mincerian function. Our results show that while the public sector pays on average more than the private sector, the effect of education on earnings is stronger in the private sector. However, the returns to tertiary education are higher in the private sector.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Losing Prospective Entitlement to Unemployment Benefits. Impact on Educational Attainment. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Muriel Dejemeppe and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that the prospect of financial loss in case of unemployment can significantly raise degree completion and reduce dropout in higher education, but not in high school. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1154, 2022

 Losing Prospective Entitlement to Unemployment Benefits. Impact on Educational Attainment  Download PDF
by Cockx, Bart & Declercq, Koen & Dejemeppe, Muriel

GLO Fellow Muriel Dejemeppe

Author Abstract: Providing income support to unemployed education-leavers reduces the returns to investments in education because it makes the consequences of unemployment less severe. We evaluate a two-part policy reform in Belgium to study whether conditioning the prospective entitlement to unemployment benefits for education-leavers on age or schooling attainment can affect educational achievements. The results show that the prospect of financial loss in case of unemployment can significantly raise degree completion and reduce dropout in higher education, but not in high school. We argue that the higher prevalence of behavioral biases among lower educated and younger students could explain these contrasting findings.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

COVID-19 and entrepreneurship entry and exit: Opportunity amidst adversity. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Olga Popova and Milena Nikolova & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that acquiring new skills during the pandemic helps maintain an existing business and encourages start-ups in sectors other than information technology (IT).

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1153, 2022

COVID-19 and entrepreneurship entry and exit: Opportunity amidst adversity  Download PDF
by Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga & Nikolova, Milena & Tyurina, Elena

GLO Fellows Olga Popova and Milena Nikolova

Author Abstract: We theoretically and empirically examine how acquiring new skills and increased financial worries influenced entrepreneurship entry and exit intentions during the pandemic. To that end, we analyze primary survey data we collected in the aftermath of the COVID-19’s first wave in Russia, which has had one of the highest COVID-19 infection rates globally. Our results show that acquiring new skills during the pandemic helps maintain an existing business and encourages start-ups in sectors other than information technology (IT). For IT start-ups, having previous experience matters more than new skills. While the pandemic-driven financial worries are associated with business closure intentions, they also inspire new business start-ups, highlighting the creative destruction power of the pandemic. Furthermore, preferences for formal employment and remote work also matter for entrepreneurial intentions. Our findings enhance the understanding of entrepreneurship formation and closure in a time of adversity and suggest that implementing entrepreneurship training and upskilling policies during the pandemic can be an important policy tool for innovative small business development.

Featured image: Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-30, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Now – Program, Video & Event Pictures.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) were jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 30, 2022 through Zoom
  • Theme: Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

The event was attended by over 60 scholars from institutions worldwide.

Fifth IESR-GLO Joint Conference Program

August 29 – August 30, 2022

PDF of Program IESR Website
VIDEO DAY 1 VIDEO VIDEO DAY 2 (Keynote Zhang incomplete)

August 29 (Monday)

15:00-18:00 Beijing Time/ 9:00-12:00 German Time 8:00-11:00 London Time/17:00-20:00 Melbourne Time

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

Lisa Cameron
Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon TimeMelbourne Time
15:00-15:409:00-9:408:00-8:4017:00-17:40
Keynote Lecture
Information, Intermediaries, and International Migration
Lisa Cameron (The University of Melbourne & GLO)

15:40-16:10

9:40-10:10

8:40-9:10

17:40-18:10
Do Social Movement Change Empathy Bias? Evidence from Black Lives Matter
Authors: Kaixin Liu (IESR, Jinan University), Ande Shen, Jiwei Zhou, Junda Zhang

16:10-16:40

10:10-10:40

9:10-9:40

18:10-18:40
Does a Tragic Event Affect Different Aspects of Attitudes toward Immigration?
Authors: Odelia Heizler (Tel-Aviv-Yaffo Academic College & GLO), Osnat Israeli

16:40-17:10

10:40-11:10

9:40-10:10

18:40-19:10
Culture Breakers and Policy Implementation——How did China Promote Later Marriage in the 1970s?
Author: Yi Chen (ShanghaiTech University & GLO)

17:10-17:40

11:10-11:40

10:10-10:40

19:10-19:40
Do Good Deeds Really Earn Chits? Evidence from Targeted Poverty Alleviation Information Disclosure and Stock Price Crash Risk
Authors: Yu Zhang (Sun Yat-sen University), Zixun Zhou

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5 -10 minute Q&A.

August 30 (Tuesday)

19:00-22:00 Beijing Time/ 13:00-16:00 German Time/ 12:00-15:00 London Time

Chair: Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

Junsen Zhang
Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon Time
19:00-19:4013:00-13:4012:00-12:40
Keynote Lecture
An Economic Analysis of Fertility in China: Challenges and Policy Recommendations
Junsen Zhang (Zhejiang University & GLO)

19:40-20:10

13:40-14:10

12:40-13:10
Gender Imbalance, Assortative Matching and Household Income Inequality in China
Authors: Chen Huang (University of Southampton), Serhiy Stepanchuk
20:10-20:4014:10-14:4013:10-13:40
Heterogeneous Peer Effects for the Disadvantaged Students
Author: Yi Zhang (IESR, Jinan University)

20:40-21:10

14:40-15:10

13:40-14:10
Migrant Children’s Take-up of Social Health Insurance: Experimental Evidence from China
Authors: Menghan Shen (Sun Yatsen University), Zhiwei Tang, Xiaoyang Ye

21:10-21:40

15:10-15:40

14:10-14:40
A Tale of An Aging Society with Digital Revolution Authors
Authors: Mingxing Huang (Peking University), Xun Li

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5-10 minute Q&A.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University & GLO
Sen Xue, Jinan University & GLO

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

The Motherhood Penalty in China: Having A Child Increases Gender Inequality in the Labor Market. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Yue Wang & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that becoming a mother implies a sharp decline in labor earnings, labor market participation, working hours and wage rate, while fathers’ outcomes remain unaffected.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1152, 2022

The Motherhood Penalty in China: Having A Child Increases Gender Inequality in the Labor Market  Download PDF
by Zhang, Mingxue & Hou, Lingling & Wang, Yue

GLO Affiliate Yue Wang

Author Abstract: Using a comprehensive individual panel dataset in China and an event study method, we examined the effects of having a child on gender inequality from the perspectives of labor market outcomes and its mechanisms. Results show that becoming a mother implies a sharp decline in labor earnings, labor market participation, working hours and wage rate, while fathers’ outcomes remain unaffected. These outcomes are driven by two potential channels: career choices and social norms. After having a child, mothers have a higher likelihood for engaging in informal jobs and less possibility of being promoted if they work in the formal sector. Moreover, social norms towards gender roles lead mothers to devote more time to housework and babysit, which generate motherhood earnings penalty in labor market. Finally, well-being analysis shows that subjective happiness and life satisfaction of both males and females are barely not changed after childbirth, and females experience an increase in social status after child arrival.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Income shocks, bride price and child marriage in Turkey. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Isabelle Chort & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that girls living in provinces with a high practice of bride-price and exposed to a negative income shocks when aged 12-14 have a 28% higher probability to be married before the age of 15 than girls not exposed to shocks. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1151, 2022

Income shocks, bride price and child marriage in Turkey  Download PDF
by Chort, Isabelle & Hotte, Rozenn & Marazyan, Karine

GLO Fellow Isabelle Chort

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of income shocks and bride price on early marriage in Turkey. The practice of bride-price, still vivid in many regions of the country, may provide incentives for parents to marry their daughter earlier, when faced with a negative income shock. In addition, marriages precipitated by negative income shocks may present specific features (endogamy, age and education difference between spouses). Weather shocks provide an exogenous source of variation of household income through agricultural production. Data on weather shocks are merged with individual and household level data from the Turkish Demographic and Health Surveys 1998 to 2013. To study the role of payments to the bride’s parents, we interact our measure of shocks with a province-level indicator of a high prevalence of bride-price. We find that girls living in provinces with a high practice of bride-price and exposed to a negative income shocks when aged 12-14 have a 28% higher probability to be married before the age of 15 than girls not exposed to shocks. This effect is specific to provinces with a high prevalence of bride price. Compared to women who experienced the same shock but lived in a province where bride price is infrequent, such women are also more likely to give birth to their first child before 18 and for those who married religiously first, the civil ceremony is delayed by 2 months on average. Our results suggest that girl marriage still participates to household strategies aimed at mitigating negative income shocks in contemporary Turkey.

Featured image: bethany-laird-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The effects of sleep duration on child health and development. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Ha Trong Nguyen and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that sleeping longer improves selected general developmental, behavioral and health outcomes in children and adolescents. 

Ha Trong Nguyen

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1150, 2022

The effects of sleep duration on child health and development  Download PDF
by Nguyen, Ha Trong & Zubrick, Stephen R. & Mitrou, Francis


GLO Fellow Ha Trong Nguyen

Author Abstract: This paper studies the extent to which sleep duration causally affects health, cognitive and noncognitive development in children and adolescents. Using over 50 thousand time use diaries from two cohorts of Australian children spanning over 16 years, we first document that children sleep significantly less on days with longer daylight duration, partly by going to sleep later and waking up earlier. We then exploit variations in local daily daylight duration measured on predetermined diary dates across the same individuals through time as an instrument in an individual fixed effects regression model to draw causal estimates of sleep duration on a comprehensive set of child development indicators. Our results show that sleeping longer improves selected general developmental, behavioural and health outcomes in children and adolescents. By contrast, sleeping more statistically significantly increases their BMI scores, mainly by increasing the risk of being overweight. Moreover, while the impact of sleep duration on general and behavioural outcomes is more pronounced for females or older individuals, the effect on BMI is largely driven by males. The results indicate a null or relatively small positive impact of sleeping longer on cognitive skills.

Featured image: jordan-whitt-on-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The UK Gender Pay Gap: Does Firm Size Matter?A New GLO Discussion Paper by Melanie Jones and GLO Fellow Ezgi Kaya.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that large firms have smaller within-firm raw gender pay gaps and similar unexplained gender pay gaps when compared to smaller firms.

Ezgi Kaya

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1149, 2022

The UK Gender Pay Gap: Does Firm Size Matter? Download PDF
by Jones, Melanie & Kaya, Ezgi


GLO Fellow Ezgi Kaya

Author Abstract: Motivated by the introduction of the UK Gender Pay Gap Reporting legislation to large firms, defined as over 250 employees, we use linked employee-employer panel data from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings to explore pre-legislation variation in the gender pay gap by firm size. In doing so, we integrate two prominent but distinct empirical regularities in the labour economics literature, namely the gender pay gap and firm-size wage premium. We find evidence of both a larger raw and unexplained gender pay gap among large relative to smaller firms in the UK private sector even after controlling for unobserved worker heterogeneity, consistent with the legislation being effectively targeted. However, this conclusion changes after accounting for unobserved firm level heterogeneity and focusing on within-firm gender pay gaps. Large firms have smaller within-firm raw gender pay gaps and similar unexplained gender pay gaps when compared to smaller firms. We find that this conclusion is not specific to the current firm size threshold of 250 employees but holds more generally, including at proposed extensions of the legislation to smaller firms.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-on-unsplash

The gender pay gap in the USA: a matching study
Katie Meara, Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster
OPEN ACCESS: Journal of Population Economics 33 (2020): 271–305
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-019-00743-8

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Long-term Services and Supports and Disease Management among Older Chinese Adults in Different Stages of Cognitive Impairment. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Zhuoer Lin and GLO Fellow Xi Chen.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that while access to long-term care services and supports from spouse or home-based services significantly facilitate active disease management behaviors, the effects are only evident among older adults with no cognitive impairment.

Xi Chen

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1148, 2022

Long-term Services and Supports and Disease Management among Older Chinese Adults in Different Stages of Cognitive Impairment – Download PDF
by Lin, Zhuoer & Chen, Xi

GLO Fellow Xi Chen

Author Abstract: Rapid population aging elevates burden of chronic and non-communicable diseases among older adults. Despite the critical role of self-management in disease prevention and control, effective management of diseases can be cognitively demanding and may require additional supports from family and social services. Using nationally representative data from China, this paper reveals great challenges in disease management and characterizes the differential effects of long-term care services and supports (LTSS) on disease management among older adults in different stages of cognitive impairment (CI). In specific, we use preventive care utilization and hypertension management as key indicators to assess the performance of disease management. We show that while access to LTSS from spouse or home-based services significantly facilitate active disease management behaviors, the effects are only evident among older adults with no CI. By contrast, access to LTSS has very modest effect for cognitively impaired individuals. In addition, older adults in more severe stages of CI perform worse in disease prevention, hypertension awareness and management. These findings reveal the vulnerability of older adults with CI in disease management and point to the importance of promoting targeted interventions to reduce barriers of accessing LTSS, especially among cognitively impaired population.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Personality traits, remote work and productivity. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Nicolas Gavoille and GLO Fellow Mihails Hazans.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds strong links between personality, productivity, and willingness to work from home post-pandemic using survey data for Latvia.

Mihails Hazans

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1145, 2022

Personality traits, remote work and productivity  Download PDF
by Gavoille, Nicolas & Hazans, Mihails


GLO Fellow Mihails Hazans

Author Abstract: The future of teleworking ultimately depends on its impact on workers’ productivity and wellbeing, yet the effect of remote working on productivity is not well understood. This paper investigates the link between personality traits and workers’ productivity when working from home. We exploit a survey providing measures of the “Big Five” personality traits for more than 1700 recent teleworkers. We document strong links between personality, productivity, and willingness to work from home post-pandemic. Ceteris paribus, Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience are positively associated with a higher productivity from home, especially for females. On the other hand, the link between Extraversion and preference for teleworking is negative. These results suggest that a one-size-fits-all policy is unlikely to maximize neither firms’ productivity nor workers’ satisfaction.

Featured image: The-Coherent-Team-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The effects of economic austerity on pro-sociality: Evidence from Greece. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Elena Nikolova & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals a strong relationship between job loss in the household and decreased altruism.

Elena Nikolova

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1144, 2022

The effects of economic austerity on pro-sociality: Evidence from Greece  Download PDF
by Sambanis, Nicholas & Nikolova, Elena & Schultz, Anna

GLO Fellow Elena Nikolova

Author Abstract: The European sovereign debt crisis resulted in policies of fiscal austerity and economic downturn in Greece, marked by a prolonged period of recession and high unemployment. This article explores the social impact of the economic crisis, focusing on its effects on altruism using new household-level survey data and quasi-behavioral outcomes. We focus on the effects of joblessness, the most severe form of economic hardship imposed as a result of the crisis. Our findings reveal a strong relationship between job loss in the household and decreased altruism. We provide experimental evidence of these effects and of in-group bias in charitable giving as a result of joblessness. Our results show that joblessness intensifies survey respondents’ preferences for national as opposed to foreign charities.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Do Pre-Registration and Pre-analysis Plans Reduce p-Hacking and Publication Bias? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Abel Brodeur and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that pre-registered studies that have a complete pre-analysis plan are significantly less p-hacked.

Abel Brodeur

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1147, 2022

Do Pre-Registration and Pre-analysis Plans Reduce p-Hacking and Publication Bias?  Download PDF
by Brodeur, Abel & Cook, Nikolai M. & Hartley, Jonathan S. & Heyes, Anthony

GLO Fellow Abel Brodeur

Author Abstract: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly prominent in economics, with pre-registration and pre-analysis plans (PAPs) promoted as important in ensuring the credibility of findings. We investigate whether these tools reduce the extent of p-hacking and publication bias by collecting and studying the universe of test statistics, 15,992 in total, from RCTs published in 15 leading economics journals from 2018 through 2021. In our primary analysis, we find no meaningful difference in the distribution of test statistics from pre-registered studies, compared to their non-pre-registered counterparts. However, pre-registered studies that have a complete PAP are significantly less p-hacked. These results point to the importance of PAPs, rather than pre-registration in itself, in ensuring credibility.

Featured image: Mika-Baumeister-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Did the nation-wide implementation of e-FMS in MGNREGS result in reduced expenditures? A re-examination of the evidence. A new GLO Discussion Paper of GLO Fellow Deepti Goel and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper questions the substantial 19 percent reduction in labor expenditures of the reform in India’s national workfare program found in recent literature on methodological grounds.

Deepti Goel

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1146, 2022

Did the nation-wide implementation of e-FMS in MGNREGS result in reduced expenditures? A re-examination of the evidence  Download PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Meenakshi, J. V. & De Souza, Zaeen

GLO Fellow Deepti Goel

Author Abstract: This paper revisits a part of the analysis by Banerjee et al. (2020), in which they examine the consequences of the nation-wide scale up of reforms to the funds management system (e-FMS) in India’s national workfare programme, using a two-way fixed effects specification. They report a substantial 19 percent reduction in labour expenditures. We exploit the recent literature that highlights the limitations of the TWFE estimator in the presence of staggered roll out and effect a Goodman-Bacon decomposition of the TWFE coefficient, to pinpoint sources of identifying variation. We undertake a detailed examination of subsamples of six constituent and valid DiDs based on timing of treatment that are averaged into the TWFE coefficient to identify heterogeneity in treatment effects. This disaggregated subsample analysis does not support the conclusion of any reductions in MGNREGS labour expenditures, suggesting that the TWFE coefficient based on the full sample is indeed biased.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Home computer ownership and educational outcomes of adolescents in Greece. A new GLO Discussiuon Paper by Vladana Djinovic and GLO Fellow Nicholas Giannakopoulos.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that adolescents with access to ICT have better educational outcomes compared to their peers without access to such equipment.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1143, 2022

Home computer ownership and educational outcomes of adolescents in Greece Download PDF
by Djinovic, Vladana & Giannakopoulos, Nicholas

GLO Fellow Nicholas Giannakopoulos

Nicholas Giannakopoulos

Author Abstract: In this paper we investigate whether human capital accumulation, during adolescence, depends on home investments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) equipment. Using micro-level data, for children aged 17-18 years old, drawn from the Greek part of the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EUSILC) for the period 2003-2019 we measure school dropout for individuals residing in households with and without access to home computer. We found that adolescents with access to ICT have better educational outcomes compared to their peers without access to such equipment (almost 5 percentage points lower probability of school dropout). These estimates are robust to different model specifications and data restrictions. Our results support the hypothesis that technology diffusion promotes educational outcomes and provides additional evidence regarding the formation of human capital during adolescence.

Featured image: The-Coherent-Team-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The lock-in effect of marriage: Work incentives after saying, “Yes, I do.” A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Michael Christl and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that marriage bonuses contribute to a lock-in effect, where second earners, typically women, are incentivized to work less, with negative economic consequences.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1142, 2022

The lock-in effect of marriage: Work incentives after saying, “Yes, I do.” Download PDF
by Christl, Michael & De Poli, Silvia & Ivaškaitė-Tamošiūnė, Viginta

GLO Fellow Michael Christl

Michael Christl

Author Abstract: In this paper, we use EUROMOD, the tax-benefit microsimulation model of the European Union, to investigate the impact of marriage-related tax-benefit instruments on the labour supply of married couples. For each married partner, we estimate their individual marginal effective tax rate and net replacement rate before and after marriage. We show that the marriage bonus, which is economically significant in eight European countries, decreases the work incentives for women and, particularly, on the intensive margin. In contrast, the incentives on the intensive margin increase for men once they are married, pointing to the marriage-biased and gender-biased taxbenefit structures in the analysed countries. Our results suggest that marriage bonuses contribute to a lock-in effect, where second earners, typically women, are incentivised to work less, with negative economic consequences.

Featured image: Charles-Deluvio-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Political Spillovers of Workplace Democracy in Germany. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn and Thi Xuan Thu Le.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds a positive association between the presence of a works council and workers’ interest in politics.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1141, 2022

Political Spillovers of Workplace Democracy in Germany Download PDF
by Jirjahn, Uwe & Le, Thi Xuan Thu

GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn

Author Abstract: Purpose: While works councils provide a highly developed mechanism to promote workplace democracy, research on their consequences has been dominated by economic aspects. This study brings a new perspective to the understanding of works councils by examining their influence on workers’ political behavior. Political spillover theory suggests that participation in the firm’s decision making has the potential to foster workers’ political participation in civic society. Our study for Germany indeed finds a positive association between the presence of a works council and workers’ interest in politics. This holds in panel data estimations including a large set of controls and accounting for unobserved individual-specific factors. However, separate estimations by gender show a positive association between works councils and political interest only for men, but not for women. Traditional gender roles and disproportionate responsibility for family may make it difficult for women to be politically engaged even when a works council is present.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Employers’ associations and trade unions: co-existence or more? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Nicholas Giannakopoulos & Daphne Nicolitsas.

A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that at the aggregate level there is potentially a dependence between membership in the two types of organizations

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1140, 2022

Employers’ associations and trade unions: co-existence or more? Download PDF
by Giannakopoulos, Nicholas & Nicolitsas, Daphne

GLO Fellows Nicholas Giannakopoulos & Daphne Nicolitsas

Author Abstract: Purpose: We discuss the interrelationship between membership in employers’ associations and the existence of trade unions. The analysis is based on both aggregate data for 13 European countries for 1980{2019 and firm-level data for 12 of these countries from the European Company Survey (ECS) for 2013 and 2019. Our findings suggest that at the aggregate level there is potentially a dependence between membership in the two types of organizations despite the fact that membership in the two organizations appear to respond differently to macroeconomic conditions and to different institutional parameters. The firm-level data suggest that such a dependence might exist in some countries while the two organizations simply co-exist in most countries. The firm-level analysis confirms a number of stylized facts found in other analyses; larger and longer-established firms are more likely to belong to an EA and firms enforcing a collective agreement signed outside the remit of the firm are also more likely to be members of an EA and have union presence. The analysis is fraught with difficulties as, inter alia, the evolving nature of the two types of organizations makes it more difficult to ascertain the type of co-habitation between the two.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The (big) Role of Family Constellations in Return Migration and Transnationalism. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Bresena Kopliku Dema and GLO Affiliate Elvisa Drishti.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies for Albanian migration how transnational life becomes a family project.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1139, 2022

The (big) Role of Family Constellations in Return Migration and Transnationalism  Download PDF
by Kopliku Dema, Bresena & Drishti, Elvisa

GLO Affiliate Elvisa Drishti

Elvisa Drishti

Author Abstract: Purpose: The Albanian migration has always reflected a family character, be that before 1945 when Albania was not yet completely isolated, as well as after 1990 when borders were reopened. This feature characterized all types of movement, internal or international, permanent or seasonal migration, return migration or transnational movements, and remigration. The role of the family has been very important in making decisions regarding migration and answering questions from why to how to migrate, from when to where, whom to ask for help or how to invest remittances. Design/methodology/approach: Based on the case study of a rural area in Northern Albania, The Administrative Unit of Dajç, this article explores in detail the roles of family and kinship on decisions regarding return migration, the re-adjustment process, remigration or transnational life. Findings: By exploring the role of the family context in remigration and vice-versa the article reflects that the family biography – including the lifestyle, plans for the future or expectations – has changed due to previous migration experiences or challenges and difficulties when returning to the home country. Originality/value: It demonstrates how individual decisions to migrate or to ‘return home’ are negotiated and supported within families making transnational life a family project. The article adopts a new approach in the Albanian Migration Studies which may be implied on broader areas for further research in the future.

Featured image: sandy-millar-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Estimating Inequality with Missing Incomes. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Paolo Verme and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the comparative assessment of correction methods indicates that most methods are able to partially correct for missing data biases. Sample reweighting based on probabilities on non-response produces inequality estimates quite close to true values in most simulated missing data patterns.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1138, 2022

Estimating Inequality with Missing Incomes  Download PDF
by Brunori, Paolo & Salas-Rojoy, Pedro & Verme, Paolo

GLO Fellow Paolo Verme

Paolo Verme

Author Abstract: The measurement of income inequality is affected by missing observations, espe- cially if they are concentrated on the tails of an income distribution. This paper conducts an experiment to test how the different correction methods proposed by the statistical, econometric and machine learning literature address measurement biases of inequality due to item non response. We take a baseline survey and artificially corrupt the data employing several alternative non-linear functions that simulate pat- terns of income non-response, and show how biased inequality statistics can be when item non-responses are ignored. The comparative assessment of correction methods indicates that most methods are able to partially correct for missing data biases. Sample reweighting based on probabilities on non-response produces inequality estimates quite close to true values in most simulated missing data patterns. Matching and Pareto corrections can also be effective to correct for selected missing data patterns. Other methods, such as Single and Multiple imputations and Machine Learning meth- ods are less effective. A final discussion provides some elements that help explaining these findings.

Featured image: Jason-Leung-on-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-30, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Program & Call for Online Participation.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 30, 2022 through Zoom
  • Theme is Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers are: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

Fifth IESR-GLO Joint Conference Program

August 29 – August 30, 2022

ZOOM Meeting LINK. PLEASE REGISTER NOW!
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81353820206?pwd=WFE5UEphazhETHpUbVlXSGZ1Nk1jQT09

PDF of Program

August 29 (Monday)

15:00-18:00 Beijing Time/ 9:00-12:00 German Time 8:00-11:00 London Time/17:00-20:00 Melbourne Time

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon TimeMelbourne Time
15:00-15:409:00-9:408:00-8:4017:00-17:40
Keynote Lecture
Information, Intermediaries, and International Migration
Lisa Cameron (The University of Melbourne & GLO)

15:40-16:10

9:40-10:10

8:40-9:10

17:40-18:10
Do Social Movement Change Empathy Bias? Evidence from Black Lives Matter
Authors: Kaixin Liu (IESR, Jinan University), Ande Shen, Jiwei Zhou, Junda Zhang

16:10-16:40

10:10-10:40

9:10-9:40

18:10-18:40
Does a Tragic Event Affect Different Aspects of Attitudes toward Immigration?
Authors: Odelia Heizler (Tel-Aviv-Yaffo Academic College & GLO), Osnat Israeli

16:40-17:10

10:40-11:10

9:40-10:10

18:40-19:10
Culture Breakers and Policy Implementation——How did China Promote Later Marriage in the 1970s?
Author: Yi Chen (ShanghaiTech University & GLO)

17:10-17:40

11:10-11:40

10:10-10:40

19:10-19:40
Do Good Deeds Really Earn Chits? Evidence from Targeted Poverty Alleviation Information Disclosure and Stock Price Crash Risk
Authors: Yu Zhang (Sun Yat-sen University), Zixun Zhou

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5 -10 minute Q&A.

August 30 (Tuesday)

19:00-22:00 Beijing Time/ 13:00-16:00 German Time/ 12:00-15:00 London Time

Chair: Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon Time
19:00-19:4013:00-13:4012:00-12:40
Keynote Lecture
An Economic Analysis of Fertility in China: Challenges and Policy Recommendations
Junsen Zhang (Zhejiang University & GLO)

19:40-20:10

13:40-14:10

12:40-13:10
Gender Imbalance, Assortative Matching and Household Income Inequality in China
Authors: Chen Huang (University of Southampton), Serhiy Stepanchuk
20:10-20:4014:10-14:4013:10-13:40
Heterogeneous Peer Effects for the Disadvantaged Students
Author: Yi Zhang (IESR, Jinan University)

20:40-21:10

14:40-15:10

13:40-14:10
Migrant Children’s Take-up of Social Health Insurance: Experimental Evidence from China
Authors: Menghan Shen (Sun Yatsen University), Zhiwei Tang, Xiaoyang Ye

21:10-21:40

15:10-15:40

14:10-14:40
A Tale of An Aging Society with Digital Revolution Authors
Authors: Mingxing Huang (Peking University), Xun Li

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5-10 minute Q&A.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University & GLO
Sen Xue, Jinan University & GLO

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

Personality and Entrepreneurship. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Alexander Kritikos.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that possessing certain personality characteristics will make it more likely that an individual will start an own business and hire staff. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1137, 2022

Personality and Entrepreneurship  Download PDF
by Kritikos, Alexander

GLO Fellow Alexander Kritikos

Alexander Kritikos

Author Abstract: Does personality matter? Is an individual who is open to experience more or less likely to become an entrepreneur? Is it better to score low or high in agreeableness for surviving as an entrepreneur? To the extent that personality captures one part of entrepreneurial abilities, which are usually unobservable, the analysis of traits and personality characteristics helps better understanding such abilities. This article reviews research on the relationship between personality and entrepreneurship since 2000 and shows that possessing certain personality characteristics will make it more likely that an individual will start an own business and hire staff. More specifically, with respect to the entry decision, research finds that nearly all so-called Big Five factors as well as several specific personality characteristics influence the entry probability into entrepreneurship. Further, entrepreneurs are more likely to hire, the higher they score in risk tolerance, trust, openness to experience, and conscientiousness. However, different factors such as low scores in agreeableness, the only Big Factor that does not affect entrepreneurial entry, influence entrepreneurial survival. And for some of characteristics that influence entrepreneurial entry, like high scores in the factor openness for experience or in risk tolerance, “revolving door effects” are found, explaining why some entrepreneurs subsequently exit again the market.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Board-level worker representation. A new GLO Discussion Paper of GLO Fellow Aleksandra Gregoric.

A new GLO Discussion Paper explains the establishment of this mechanism of employee voice and reviews the impacts .

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1136, 2022

Board-level worker representation  Download PDF
by Gregorič, Aleksandra

GLO Fellow Aleksandra Gregoric

Aleksandra Gregoric

Author Abstract: This chapter reviews the literature on board-level worker representation (BLWR). BLWR refers to workers’ legally sanctioned rights to take part in the decisions of their employers’ board of directors as full or consultative members, regardless of their underlying equity investments. It provides information about the incidence of BLWR across countries, and the factors that likely contributed to the establishment of this mechanism of employee voice. It reviews theory on the positive and negative impacts of BLWR for workers and firms, summarizes the related empirical evidence, and concludes by pointing to the open gaps as avenues for future research.

Featured image: tim-gouw-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Job Satisfaction and Trade Union Membership in Germany. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Laszlo Goerke & Yue Huang.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds no causal impact of individual union membership on job satisfaction for Germany from 1985 to 2019.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1135, 2022

Job Satisfaction and Trade Union Membership in Germany  Download PDF
by Goerke, Laszlo & Huang, Yue

GLO Fellows Laszlo Goerke & Yue Huang

Yue Huang

Author Abstract: Using panel data from 1985 to 2019, we provide the first comprehensive investigation of the relationship between trade union membership and job satisfaction in Germany. Cross-sectional analyses reveal a negative correlation, while fixed effects estimates indicate an insignificant relationship. This is also true if we incorporate information on collective bargaining coverage or the existence of works councils in subsamples for which this data is available. To address the endogeneity of union membership, we generate information on the union density individuals faced in their industry and region. This time-variant IV suggests no causal impact of individual union membership on job satisfaction. Finally, using different estimation models, we investigate whether the effects vary by gender, age, birth year, and employment status.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Economic recession, parental unemployment and adolescents’ health-related quality of life and mental health outcomes in Greece. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds parental unemployment detrimental to adolescents’ health-related quality of life and mental health .

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1134, 2022

Economic recession, parental unemployment and adolescents’ health-related quality of life and mental health outcomes in Greece  Download PDF
by 
Drydakis, Nick

GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis

Author Abstract: This study examines whether an association exists between parental unemployment and health-related quality of life and mental health for adolescents aged 15-18 in Athens, Greece. The gathered dataset covers the same upper high schools in two periods, 2011-2013 and 2017-2019. The study finds that parental unemployment bears an association with decreased health-related quality of life and increased adverse mental health symptoms for adolescents. Moreover, the 2011-2013 period, a period of increased parental unemployment, saw a decrease in health-related quality of life and increased adverse mental health symptoms for adolescents. In addition, parental unemployment proved more detrimental to adolescents’ health-related quality of life and mental health in 2011-2013 than in 2017-2019. The present research ranks among the first studies to examine whether parental unemployment could be associated with worse health-related quality of life and mental health for adolescents during periods of increased parental unemployment. Public policies that can reduce the adverse effects of parental unemployment on adolescents’ health-related outcomes require consideration. This approach proves critical because deteriorated health-related quality of life and mental health can negatively impact on adolescents’ human capital, progression, income, and future health.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

GLO-EBES events: Report on EBES-40/Istanbul & announcement of EBES-41 in Berlin

EBES-40 in Istanbul took place on July 6-8, 2022 in hybrid mode (see EBES program). GLO had supported the event with two sessions (see program, link to session videos and pictures below). A plenary session was the monthly GLO Virtual Seminar, the second session was on human resources issues with chapters from the Springer Nature Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics.

EBES-41 in Berlin is jointly organized hybrid with GLO in collaboration with FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022. Submission deadline: September 9! Further details.

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (EBES & GLO & UNU-MERIT, The Netherlands & Free University Berlin, Germany). Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics

  • Climate Change in Historical Perspective: Violence, Conflict, and Migration
    Qing Pei* (Education University of Hong Kong and GLO), Yingqi Long (Education University of Hong Kong) and Xiaolin Lin (Education University of Hong Kong)
  • Labor Market Agglomeration Economies
    Shihe Fu (Xiamen University and GLO)
  • Well-being in Old and Very Old Age
    Johanna Hartung* (University of Bonn); Janina Nemitz (Helsana Insurance Company Ltd) and Gizem Hülür (University of Bonn)
  • Earnings Discrimination in the Workplace
    John Forth (Bayes Business School) and Nikolaos Theodoropoulos* (University of Cyprus and GLO)
  • Age at Marriage
    Pavel Jelnov (University of Hannover and GLO)
  • Maternity Leave
    Krishna Regmi (Kennesaw State University) and Le Wang (University of Oklahoma and GLO)

* presenting

GLO Virtual Seminar and Video

GLO Handbook Session and Video

Ends;

How does intrahousehold bargaining power impact labor supply? European cross-country evidence (2004-2019). A new GLO Discussion Paper by Ignacio Belloc and GLO Fellows José Alberto Molina & Jorge Velilla.

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides results consistent with theoretical sharing rules, and distribution factors that empower a given spouse are mainly positively correlated with increases in the share of income they attract from intrahousehold bargaining.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1132, 2022

 How does intrahousehold bargaining power impact labor supply? European cross-country evidence (2004-2019)  Download PDF
by Belloc, Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge

GLO Fellows José Alberto Molina & Jorge Velilla

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes how intrahousehold bargaining power impacts labor supply, for seventeen European countries. To that end, we estimate a collective model using the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions for the period 2004-2019, and we study the validity of several potential distribution factors; that is to say, variables that impact labor supply only through intrahousehold bargaining power. Results show some degree of heterogeneity in the responses of labor supply to intrahousehold bargaining power. Spouses’ education and the age gap operate as distribution factors in central European countries, such as Austria, Belgium, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland. On the other hand, in the Mediterranean South countries, the share of unearned income of the wife operates as a distribution factor in Italy, Portugal, and Spain, and in countries of Eastern Europe (Czech Republic, Hungary, Latvia, and Lithuania), the sex ratio, wives’ non-labor income share, spouses’ age and education gap, and the fertility rate all operate as distribution factors. In northern economies, such as Denmark and Estonia, we find evidence for share of unearned income, age gap, and fertility rate, while in islands, such as Ireland and the United Kingdom, the sex ratio, the share of unearned income, the age and education gap, and the fertility rate are suitable bargaining power variables. The results are consistent with theoretical sharing rules, and distribution factors that empower a given spouse are mainly positively correlated with increases in the share of income they attract from intrahousehold bargaining.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Call for contributions: 41th EBES Conference jointly organized hybrid with GLO in collaboration with FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022. Submission deadline: September 9!

41st EBES Conference – Berlin will take place on October 12th, 13th, 14th, 2022 in Berlin, Germany with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association. The event is jointly organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person) with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and in collaboration with the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

FOM, GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. GLO will provide a number of invited sessions to the program announced in time.

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration.

Invited Speakers

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues Cristiano Antonelli, Dorothea Schäfer, Marco Vivarelli and Klaus F. Zimmermann will participate as keynote speakers and/or invited editors.

Cristiano Antonelli holds the chair of Political Economy of the University of Torino. He is Fellow of the Collegio Carlo Alberto where he guides the BRICK (Bureau of Research on Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge) and the Managing Editor of Economics of Innovation and New Technology (since volume 5 1997-1998). His recent books include: Antonelli, C. (2017), “Endogenous Innovation: The Economics of an Emergent System Property”, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar; Antonelli, C. (2018), “The Evolutionary Complexity of Endogenous Innovation. The Engines of the Creative Response”, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar; Antonelli, C. (2019), “The Knowledge Growth Regime: A Schumpeterian Approach” London, Palgrave MacMillan, Antonelli, C. and Colombelli, A. (2022), “The Creative Response: Knowledge and Innovation”, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, Antonelli, C. ed. (2022), Encyclopedia on the Economics of Knowledge and Innovation, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.

Dorothea Schäfer is the Research Director of Financial Markets at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and Adjunct Professor of Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University. She has also worked as an evaluator for the European Commission, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and Chairwoman of Evaluation Committee for LOEWE (Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung Wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz des Bundeslandes Hessen). She managed various research projects supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the EU Commission, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the Stiftung Geld und Währung. Her researches were published in various journals such as Journal of Financial Stability; German Economic Review; International Journal of Money and Finance; and Small Business Economics. She is regularly invited as an expert in parliamentary committees, including the Finance Committee of the Bundestag and gives lectures on financial market issues in Germany and abroad. She is also a member of the Editorial Board and Editor-in-Chief of the policy-oriented journal “Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung” and Editor-in-Chief of Eurasian Economic Review. Her research topics include financial crisis, financial market regulation, financing constraints, gender, and financial markets, financial transaction tax.

Marco Vivarelli is a full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics EJournal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as a referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics, Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization, Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, and World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment, and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of EBES; President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (ret.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin, Renmin University of China and Lixin University; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea. Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia; EBES Fellow Award 2018. He has published in many top journals including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. His research fields are population, labor, development, and migration.

Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than September 9, 2022.

For submission, please visit https://ebesweb.org/41st-ebes-conference/41st-berlin-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: October 12-14, 2022
Abstract Submission Deadline: September 9, 2022
Reply-by: September 12, 2022*
Registration Deadline: September 20, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: September 21, 2022
Announcement of the Program: September 26, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): September 21, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: December 9, 2022

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before September 9, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by September 21, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference Link

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-31, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Second Call for Papers Deadline August 14.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 31, 2022 through Zoom
  • Theme is Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers are: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

The event is observed by the Journal of Population Economics.

Submission

  • We welcome papers on topics related to social policies, especially social assistance and its reform experience.
  • Please submit full papers or extended abstracts to https://www.wjx.top/vm/YMFHgNK.aspx
    no later than August 14, 2022 (Beijing Time, GMT+8).
  • The corresponding author will be notified of the decision by August 22, 2022.
  • No submission or participation fee is required.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Sen Xue, Jinan University

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

Profits, Pandemics, and Lockdown Effectiveness in Nursing Home Networks. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Guy Tchuente and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for the USA that ‘for-profit’ nursing homes experience higher COVID-19 death rates than ‘not-for-profit’ nursing homes.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1131, 2022

Profits, Pandemics, and Lockdown Effectiveness in Nursing Home Networks Download PDF
by Pongou, Roland & Sidie, Ghislain Junior & Tchuente, Guy & Tondji, Jean-Baptiste

GLO Fellow Guy Tchuente

Guy Tchuente

Author Abstract: How do pandemics affect for-profit and not-for-profit organizations differently? To address this question, we analyze optimal lockdowns in a two-sector continuous-time individual-based mean-field epidemiological model. We uncover a unique solution that depends on network structure, lockdown effectiveness, and the planner’s tolerable infection incidence. Using unique data on nursing home networks in the United States, we calibrate the model and jointly quantify state-level lockdown effectiveness and preference for enforcing stringent containment strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also empirically validate simulation results derived from the theoretical analyses. We find that for-profit nursing homes experience higher COVID-19 death rates than not-for-profit nursing homes. In addition, this differential health effect increases with lockdown effectiveness.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The gasoline price and the commuting behavior: Towards sustainable modes of transport. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Ignacio Belloc & GLO Fellows José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal and José Alberto Molina.

A new GLO Discussion Paper using data from the American Time Use Survey for the years 2003-2019, and collecting data on gasoline price by state and year, finds that higher gasoline prices are related to less commuting by private car, and more commuting by public transport, walking, and cycling.

José Alberto Molina

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1130, 2022

The gasoline price and the commuting behavior: Towards sustainable modes of transport Download PDF
by Belloc, Ignacio & Giménez-Nadal, José Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto

GLO Fellows José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal and José Alberto Molina


Author Abstract: This paper analyzes how gasoline price is related to the time workers in the US spend commuting by private vehicle, public transport, walking, or cycling. Using data from the American Time Use Survey for the years 2003-2019, and collecting data on gasoline price by state and year, we find that higher gasoline prices are related to less commuting by private car, and more commuting by public transport, walking, and cycling, the latter being transportation alternatives that are more eco-friendly. A 1% increase in gas prices is associated with an increase of 0.325%, 0.568% and 0.129% in the commuting time by public and physical modes (walking and cycling), respectively. By contrast, a decrease of 0.638% is found in the proportion of commuting done by private car. Furthermore, the elasticity differs by urban characteristics, showing relatively larger values in urban areas for private and public modes. By analyzing the relationship between commuting time, and gasoline prices in the US, our results may serve to inform future policies aiming to develop a low-carbon transport system, especially in urban areas where workers may be more affected by gasoline prices (and thus taxation).

Featured image: Manuel-Lardizabal-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Re-examining adaptation theory using Big Data: Reactions to external shocks. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Talita Greyling and Stephanie Rossouw.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that Covid-19 and the Russian war against Ukraine both had negative effects on Gross National Happiness across the world.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1129, 2022

Re-examining adaptation theory using Big Data: Reactions to external shocks Download PDF
by Greyling, Talita & Rossouw, Stephanié

GLO Fellows Talita Greyling and Stephanie Rossouw

Author Abstract: During the global response to COVID-19, the analogy of fighting a war was often used. In 2022, the world faced a different war altogether, an unprovoked Russian invasion of Ukraine. Since 2020 the world has faced these unprecedented shocks. Although we realise these events’ health and economic effects, more can be known about the happiness effects on the people in a country and how it differs between a health and a war shock. Additionally, we need to investigate if these external shocks do affect wellbeing, how they differ from one another, and how long it takes happiness to adapt to these shocks. Therefore, this paper aims to compare these two external shocks for ten countries spanning the Northern and Southern hemispheres to investigate the effect on happiness. By investigating the aforementioned, we also re-examine the adaptation theory and see whether it holds at the country level. We use a unique dataset derived from tweets extracted in real-time per country. We derive each tweet’s underlying sentiment by applying Natural Language Processing (machine learning). Using the sentiment score, we apply algorithms to construct daily time-series data to measure happiness (Gross National Happiness (GNH)). Our Twitter dataset is combined with data from Oxford’s COVID-19 Government Response Tracker. We find that in both instances, the external shocks caused a decrease in GNH. Considering both types of shocks, the adaptation to previous happiness levels occurred within weeks. Understanding the effects of external shocks on happiness is essential for policymakers as effects on happiness have a spillover effect on other variables such as production, safety and trust. Furthermore, the additional macro-level results on the adaptation theory contribute to previously unexplored fields of study.

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Unemployment and Health: A Meta-Analysis. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Matteo Picchio and Michele Ubaldi.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the average effect of unemployment on health is negative, but small.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1128, 2022

Unemployment and Health: A Meta-Analysis Download PDF
by Picchio, Matteo & Ubaldi, Michele

GLO Fellow Matteo Picchio

Matteo Picchio

Author Abstract: This paper is a meta-analysis on the relationship between unemployment and health. Our meta-dataset is made up of 327 study results coming from 65 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2021. We find that publication bias is important, but only for those study results obtained through differencein- differences or instrumental variables estimators. The average effect of unemployment on health is negative, but small in terms of partial correlation coefficient. We investigate if findings are heterogeneous among several research dimensions. We find that unemployment is mostly effective on the psychological domains of health and that short- and long-term unemployment spells equally affect health. Dealing with endogeneity issues is important and, when this is done, the unemployment effects on health are closer to be nil.

Featured image: Jose-Antonio-Gallego-Vázquez-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Gendered Language and Gendered Violence. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Astghik Mavisakalyan & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that speaking a gendered language is associated with the belief that intimate partner violence is justifiable.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1127, 2022

Gendered Language and Gendered Violence Download PDF
by Davis, Lewis & Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Weber, Clas

GLO Fellow Astghik Mavisakalyan

Astghik Mavisakalyan

Author Abstract: This study establishes the influence of sex-based grammatical gender on gendered violence. We demonstrate a statistically significant relationship between gendered language and the incidence of intimate partner violence in a cross-section of countries. Motivated by this evidence, we conduct an individual-level analysis exploiting the differences in the language structures spoken by individuals with a shared religious and ethnic background residing in the same country. We show that speaking a gendered language is associated with the belief that intimate partner violence is justifiable. Our results are consistent with the theoretical possibility that gendered language activates gender schemata in the minds of speakers, increasing the salience of gender distinctions and existing gender norms which legitimize gendered violence.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Over-education Wage Penalty Among PhD Holders: A European Perspective. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow François Rycx and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that over-educated PhD holders face a wage penalty ranging from 25 to 13.5% with respect to their well-matched counterparts.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1126, 2022

The Over-education Wage Penalty Among PhD Holders: A European Perspective Download PDF
by Rycx, François & Santosuosso, Giulia & Vermeylen, Guillaume

GLO Fellow François Rycx

Author Abstract: While the literature on the incidence and wage effects of over-education is substantial, specific results for doctoral graduates are surprisingly scarce. This article aims to fill this gap, not only by measuring the prevalence of over-educated PhD holders in Europe (i.e. in EU Member States and the UK), but also by estimating their wage penalty relative to what they could have earned in a job corresponding to their level of education. Using a unique pan-European dataset, we rely on two alternative measures of over-education and control stepwise for four groups of covariates (i.e. socio-demographic characteristics, skills needed for the job, other job-specific characteristics and motivations for employment) in order to interpret the over-education wage penalty in light of theoretical models. Depending on the specification adopted, we find that over-educated PhD holders face a wage penalty ranging from 25 to 13.5% with respect to their well-matched counterparts. Our results also show that the over-education wage penalty is significantly higher for PhD holders who are both over-educated and over-skilled and especially for those who are both over-educated and dissatisfied with their jobs. Finally, unconditional quantile regressions highlight that the over-education wage penalty among PhD holders increases greatly along the wage distribution.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Job Satisfaction, Structure of Working Environment and Firm Size.A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Aysit Tansel.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds lower levels of job satisfaction in larger firms in the United Kingdom.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1125, 2022

Job Satisfaction, Structure of Working Environment and Firm Size Download PDF
by Tansel, Aysit

GLO Fellow Aysit Tansel

Author Abstract: Employees’ wellbeing is important to the firms. Analysis of job satisfaction may give insight into various aspect of labor market behavior, such as worker productivity, absenteeism and job turn over. Little empirical work has been done on the relationship between structure of working environment and job satisfaction. This paper investigates the relationship between working environment, firm size and worker job satisfaction. We use a unique data of 28,240 British employees, Workplace Employee Relations Survey. In this data set the employee questionnaire is matched with the employer questionnaire. Four measures of job satisfaction considered are satisfaction with influence over job, satisfaction with amount of pay, satisfaction with sense of achievement and satisfaction with respect from supervisors. They are all negatively related to the firm size implying lower levels of job satisfaction in larger firms. The firm size in return is negatively related to the degree of flexibility in the working environment. The small firms have more flexible work environments. This is the first study that explore the effect of work amenities. We further find that, contrary to the previous results lower levels of job satisfaction in larger firms can not necessarily be attributed to the inflexibility in their structure of working environment.

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Does Hotter Temperature Increase Poverty? Global Evidence from Subnational Data Analysis. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang and Trong-Anh Trinh.

A new GLO Discussion Paper, analyzing a new global dataset of subnational poverty in 166 countries, confirms that higher temperature indeed increases poverty.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1124, 2022

Does Hotter Temperature Increase Poverty? Global Evidence from Subnational Data Analysis Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Trinh, Trong-Anh

GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang

Hai-Anh Dang

Author Abstract: Despite a vast literature documenting the negative effects of climate change on various socio-economic outcomes, surprisingly hardly any evidence exists on the global impacts of hotter temperature on poverty. Analyzing a new global dataset of subnational poverty in 166 countries, we find higher temperature to increase poverty. This finding is robust to various model specifications, data samples, and measures of temperature. Our preferred specification shows that a 1°C increase leads to a 2.1 percent increase in the headcount poverty rate, using the US$ 1.90 daily poverty threshold. Regional heterogeneity exists, with Sub-Saharan African countries being most vulnerable to higher temperature. We find suggestive evidence that reduction in crop yields could be a key channel that explains the effects of rising temperature. Further simulation indicates that global warming can significantly increase poverty, with more pronounced effects occurring in poorer regions and under scenarios of higher greenhouse gas emissions without mitigation policies.

Featured image: wesley-tingey-unsplash

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

A Lasting Crisis affects R&D decisions of smaller firms: the Greek experience. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Alexander Kritikos and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper explores the link between R&D, innovation, and productivity for different size groups of Greek manufacturing firms during the prolonged crisis.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1122, 2022

 A Lasting Crisis affects R&D decisions of smaller firms: the Greek experience  Download PDF
by Giotopoulos, Ioannis & Kritikos, Alexander S. & Tsakanikas, Aggelos

GLO Fellow Alexander Kritikos

Alexander Kritikos

Author Abstract: We use the prolonged Greek crisis as a case study to understand how a lasting economic shock affects the innovation strategies of firms in economies with moderate innovation activities. Adopting the 3-stage CDM model, we explore the link between R&D, innovation, and productivity for different size groups of Greek manufacturing firms during the prolonged crisis. At the first stage, we find that the continuation of the crisis is harmful for the R&D engagement of smaller firms while it increased the willingness for R&D activities among the larger ones. At the second stage, among smaller firms the knowledge production remains unaffected by R&D investments, while among larger firms the R&D decision is positively correlated with the probability of producing innovation, albeit the relationship is weakened as the crisis continues. At the third stage, innovation output benefits only larger firms in terms of labor productivity, while the innovation-productivity nexus is insignificant for smaller firms during the lasting crisis.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 4, October 2022: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE): 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-4
Just released: CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021)! LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020)! LINK

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;