Category Archives: News

March 2024: New GLO Discussion Papers. Free to Access.

New research from the GLO network free to access: 11 Discussion Papers on artificial intelligence, migration, refugees, gender, inclusive labor markets, stoicism, elderly parents, dementia, hockey, China, among others.

New Research DPs March 2024

1409 “Bad Jobs” in “Good Industries”: The Precarious Employment of Migrant Workers in the Manufacturing Sector of the Emilia-Romagna Region  Download PDF
by Landini, Fabio & Rinaldi, Riccardo

1408 Artificial Intelligence Capital and Employment Prospects  Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

1407 Breaking the Divide: Can Public Spending on Social Infrastructure Boost Female Employment in Italy?  Download PDF
by Reljic, Jelena & Zezza, Francesco

1406 Fiscal policy instruments for inclusive labour markets: A review  Download PDF
by Ernst, Ekkehard & Merola, Rossana & Reljic, Jelena

1405 Stoicism and the Tragedy of the Commons  Download PDF
by Ponthiere, Gregory

1404 Can AI Bridge the Gender Gap in Competitiveness?  Download PDF
by Mourelatos, Evangelos & Zervas, Panagiotis & Lagios, Dimitris & Tzimas, Giannis

1403 How China’s “Later, Longer, Fewer” Campaign Extends Life Expectancy: A Study of Intergenerational Support for Elderly Parents  Download PDF
by Bansak, Cynthia & Dziadula, Eva & Wang, Sophie Xuefei

1402 Healthcare Quality and Dementia Risk  Download PDF
by Aravena, José M. & Chen, Xi & Levy, Becca R.

1401 Strategic Behaviours in a Labour Market with Mobility-Restricting Contractual Provisions: Evidence from the National Hockey League  Download PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Longley, Neil & Palermo, Alberto & Rossi, Giambattista

1400 Estimating the wage premia of refugee immigrants: Lessons from Sweden  Download PDF
by Baum, Christopher F. & Lööf, Hans & Stephan, Andreas & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

1399 The Wage Effects of Polytechnic Degrees: Evidence from the 1999 China Higher Education Expansion  Download PDF
by Dai, Li & Martins, Pedro S.

February 2024: New GLO Discussion Papers. Free to Access.

New research from the GLO network free to access: 19 Discussion Papers on issues including Covid & wage polarization, vaccination hesitation, robots & employment, gender gaps, poverty data, feudal human capital, ethnic identity, Hukou status, climate emergency policies, working from home, mental illness, among others.

New Research DPs February 2024

1398 COVID 19 and Wage Polarization: A task based approach Download PDF
by Schettino, Francesco & Scicchitano, Sergio & Suppa, Domenico

1397 The Lasting Impact of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: COVID-19 Vaccination Hesitation among African Americans Download PDF
by Hou, Xiaolong & Jiao, Yang & Shen, Leilei & Chen, Zhuo

1396 The impact of COVID-19 on health workers: A health labor market perspective to improve response Download PDF
by Bustamante Izquierdo, Juana Paola & Cometto, Giorgio & Diallo, Khassoum & Zurn, Pascal & Campbell, Jim

1395 Will robot replace workers? Assessing the impact of robots on employment and wages with meta-analysis Download PDF
by Guarascio, Dario & Piccirillo, Alessandro & Reljic, Jelena

1394 From A to Z: Effects of a 2nd-grade reading intervention program for struggling readers Download PDF
by Lopes, João & Martins, Pedro S. & Oliveira, Célia & Ferreira, João & Oliveira, João Tiago & Crato, Nuno

1393 Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap: Evidence from Ethiopia Download PDF
by Bedaso, Fenet Jima

1392 Using Survey-to-Survey Imputation to Fill Poverty Data Gaps at a Low Cost: Evidence from a Randomized Survey Experiment Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh & Kilic, Talip & Hlasny, Vladimir & Abanokova, Kseniya & Carletto, Calogero

1391 Bride Kidnapping and Informal Governance Institutions Download PDF
by Porreca, Zachary

1390 The Entrepreneur’s Cognitive and Behavioral Journey: Understanding Heuristics and Bias under Risk and Uncertainty Download PDF
by Cucchiarini, Veronica & Scicchitano, Sergio & Viale, Riccardo

1389 The long-lasting effect of feudal human capital: Insights from Vietnam Download PDF
by Hoang, Trung Xuan & Nguyen, Cuong Viet

1388 Family background, education, and earnings: The limited value of “test-score transmission” Download PDF
by Friedman-Sokuler, Naomi & Justman, Moshe

1387 Ethnic identity and educational outcomes Download PDF
by Randazzo, Teresa & Piracha, Matloob

1386 Hukou status and children’s education in China Download PDF
by Sun, Yue & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

1385 Weather Conditions and Physical Activity: Insights for Climate Emergency Policies Download PDF
by Belloc, Ignacio & Gimenez-Nadal, José Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto

1384 Childhood Circumstances and Health of American and Chinese Older Adults: A Machine Learning Evaluation of Inequality of Opportunity in Health Download PDF
by Huo, Shutong & Feng, Derek & Gill, Thomas M. & Chen, Xi

1383 Reviewing Assessment Tools for Measuring Country Statistical Capacity Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Pullinger, John & Serajuddin, Umar & Stacy, Brian

1382 Working from home and job satisfaction: The role of gender and personality traits Download PDF
by Esposito, P. & Mendolia, S. & Scicchitano, S. & Tealdi, C.

1381 Exploring the Spillover Effects of Internally Displaced Settlements on the Wellbeing of Children of the Locales Download PDF
by Uchenna, Efobi & Joseph, Ajefu

1380 Occupational Differences in the Effects of Retirement on Hospitalizations for Mental Illness among Female Workers: Evidence from Administrative Data in China Download PDF
by Wang, Tianyu & Sun, Ruochen & Sindelar, Jody L. & Chen, Xi

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion.  Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

Ends;

Naples-Italy. Global SITES-GLO Conference on September 11-13, 2024. Call for Contributions. Deadline May 15.

The IX Annual SITES Conference of the Italian Association of Development Economists is organized jointly with GLO, and in collaboration with the CRISEI Institute (Department of Business and Economics, University of Naples Parthenope) in Naples, Italy. The conference is hosted by the University of Naples Parthenope on 11-13 September 2024. Submission deadline: May 15, 2024. Conference Website.

Conference topic:
Social Inclusion, Migration, and Global Inequalities

The conference aims to provide a forum for development and labor economists to identify the roots of social exclusion and discrimination and to discuss policies to sustain inclusive growth and reduce global inequalities.

The international SITES-GLO conference 2024 invites the submission of full papers, long abstracts, or complete sessions (three or four papers) related to the topics of the conference and the general themes of development and labor economics.

Submissions online (deadline May 15): https://www.conftool.net/sites-glo-2024/
More information and links: Conference Website.

brochure_SITES_GLO_2024-1

Ends;

January 2024: New GLO Discussion Papers. Free to Access.

New research from the GLO network free to access: 14 Discussion Papers on issues including gender gap, loneliness, poverty dynamics, premarital migration, involuntary part-time employment, Great Chinese Famine, school closures under Covid, corporate globalization, math and gender, gender quotas, intergenerational mobility, urbanization and political elites, among others.

1379 The effect of COVID-19 on the gender gap in remote work  Download PDF
by Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

1378 Social interactions, loneliness and health: A new angle on an old debate  Download PDF
by Casabianca, Elizabeth & Kovacic, Matija

1377 Union structure and product quality differentiation  Download PDF
by Meccheri, Nicola & Vergari, Cecilia

1376 Tackling the Last Hurdles of Poverty Entrenchment: An Investigation of Poverty Dynamics for Ghana during 2005/06-2016/17  Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Raju, Dhushyanth & Tanaka, Tomomi & Abanokova, Kseniya

1375 Men’s premarital migration and marriage payments: Evidence from Indonesia  Download PDF
by Champeaux, Hugues & Gautrain, Elsa & Marazyan, Karine

1374 Navigating the Precarious Path: Understanding the Dualisation of the Italian Labour Market through the Lens of Involuntary Part-Time Employment  Download PDF
by Cuccu, Liliana & Royuela, Vicente & Scicchitano, Sergio

1373 Early Life Exposure to the Great Chinese Famine (1959-1961) and the Health of Older Adults in China: A Meta-Analysis (2008-2023)  Download PDF
by Shen, Chi & Chen, Xi

1372 COVID-19, School Closures, and Student Learning Outcomes: New Global Evidence from PISA  Download PDF
by Jakubowski, Maciej & Gajderowicz, Tomasz & Patrinos, Harry

1371 Digital Mobility of Financial Capital Across Different Time Zones, Factor Prices and Sectoral Composition  Download PDF
by Mandal, Biswajit

1370 Citizenship, math and gender: Exploring immigrant students’ choice of majors  Download PDF
by Murat, Marina

1369 Corporate Globalization and Worker Representation  Download PDF
by Jirjahn, Uwe

1368 Gender Quotas, Board Diversity and Spillover Effects. Evidence from Italian Banks  Download PDF
by Del Prete, Silvia & Papini, Giulio & Tonello, Marco

1367 Intergenerational (im)mobility in Pakistan: Is the social elevator broken?  Download PDF
by Andlib, Zubaria & Sadiq, Maqsood & Scicchitano, Sergio

1366 Urbanization and the Change in Political Elites  Download PDF
by Franck, Raphaël & Gay, Victor

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion.  Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

Program GLO-JOPE Online Workshop February 26-27 2024

Since January 2024, the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) follows Continuous Article Publishing: accepted articles are published immediately and included in the current issue of the journal. The journal is committed to speed and high quality. JOPE continuously organizes workshops presenting fresh publications in online workshops. This is a unique opportunity to follow exciting new research and come into contact with the authors.

The GLO-JOPE Online Workshop on February 26-27, 2024 will follow this tradition. Please find below the papers to be presented and the links to register for the meeting. The papers are all in production and you will find links to access them freely (Open Access) or to read them online as soon as they are published.

Please register in advance as soon as possible. You will receive a confirmation afterwards; and a reminder with the link close to the meeting again. The entire workshop has three parts, and you will need to register for all 3 parts separately (links below next to the parts).

Time allocation is 15 min per paper, 10 min presentation, 5 min Q&A. So use your chances to interact with the authors.

All sessions will be recorded and the videos will be made available on the GLO website here.
All articles of Vol. 37, Issue 1, 2024 are here asa online published: Issue 1, 2024.

For abstracts of all papers currently in production see: LINK

Follow the evolution & ranking of JOPE papers within the JOPE Google Scholar Citations Ranking.

JOPE Editors present next to Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann:

PART I: Feb 26; 3-5 pm CET. Chair: Milena Nikolova (JOPE Editor)
Time Zone Converter

VIDEO OF PART I

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR PART I: CLOSED

Happiness & Wellbeing

3:00-3:15 pm CET. David G Blanchflower, Alex Bryson
The Female Happiness Paradox
OPEN ACCESS: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-00981-5

3:15-3:30 pm CET. Enghin Atalay
A Twenty-First Century of Solitude? Time Alone and Together in the United States
https://rdcu.be/dxVs6

3:30-3:45 pm CET. Claudia Senik, Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D’Ambrosio, Anthony Lepinteur, Carsten Schröder
Teleworking and Life Satisfaction in Germany during COVID-19: The Importance of Family Structure
https://rdcu.be/dxMle

3:45-4:00 pm CET. Jeehoon Han, Caspar Kaiser
Time use and happiness: US evidence across three decades
https://rdcu.be/dyoiv

4:00-4:15 pm CET. Philippe Sterkens, Stijn Baert, Eline Moens, Joey Wuyts, Eva Derous
I Won’t Make the Same Mistake Again: Burnout History and Job Preferences
https://rdcu.be/dw5Kg

Labor & Family

4:00-4:15 pm CET. Jiyoon Kim     
The Effects of Paid Family Leave – Does It Help Fathers’ Health, Too?

OPEN ACCESS: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-00994-0

4:14-4:30 pm CET. Joanna Lahey, Roberto Mosquera
Age and Hiring for High School Graduate Hispanics in the United States
https://rdcu.be/dyMpO

4:14-4:30 pm CET. Stanislao Maldonado
Empowering women through multifaceted interventions: Long-term evidence from a double matching design

https://rdcu.be/dxMkH

PART II: Feb 27; 9:00-10:30 am CET. Chair: Kompal Sinha (JOPE Editor)
Time Zone Converter

VIDEO OF PART II

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR PART II: CLOSED

Migration (9:00-10:00 am CET)

9:00-9:15 am CET. Guanchun Liu, Yuanyuan Liu,Jinyu Yang, Yanren Zhang
Labor Contract Law and Inventor Mobility: Evidence from China

https://rdcu.be/dxMlp

9:15-9:30 am CET. Olivier Charlot, Claire Naiditch, Radu Vranceanu
Smuggling of Forced Migrants to Europe: A Matching Model
https://rdcu.be/dyMok

9:30-9:45 am CET. Federico Maggio, Carlo Caporali
The Impact of Police Violence on Migration: Evidence from Venezuela
https://rdcu.be/dzlzD

9:45 BREAK

Historical Demography (10:00-10:30 am CET)

10:00-10:15 am CET. Xuechao Qian 
Revolutionized Life: Long-term Effects of Childhood Exposure to Persecution on Human Capital and Marital Sorting

10:15-10:30 am CET. Nikos Benos, Stelios Karagiannis, Sofia Tsitou
Geography, Landownership Inequality and Literacy: Historical Evidence from Greek Regions
OPEN ACCESS.
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-024-01002-1

PART III: Feb 27; 3-5 pm CET  Chair: Terra McKinnish (JOPE Editor)
Time Zone Converter

VIDEO OF PART III

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR PART III: CLOSED

Elderly Care

3:00-3:15 pm CET. Julien Bergeot
Care for Elderly Parents: Do Children Cooperate?

https://rdcu.be/dxMls

Violence

3:15-3:30 pm CET. Veronica Grembi, Anna Rosso, Emilia Barili
Domestic Violence Perception and Gender Stereotypes
OPEN ACCESS: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-024-00986-0

3:30-3:45 pm CET. Riccardo Ciacci
Banning the purchase of sex increases cases of rape: evidence from Sweden

Health

3:45-4:00 pm CET. Li Zhou; Zongzhi Liu; Xi Tian 
Threat Beyond the Border: Kim Jong-un’s Nuclear Tests and China’s Rural Migration
https://rdcu.be/dw5J6

4:00-4:15 pm CET. Fabian Duarte, Valentina Paredes, Cristobal Bennett, Isabel Poblete
Impact of an extension of maternity leave on infant health
https://rdcu.be/dxVts

4:15-4:30 pm CET. Davide Furceri, Pietro Pizzuto, Khatereh Yarveisi
The Effect of Pandemic Crises on Fertility

https://rdcu.be/dw5Kf

4:30-4:45 pm CET. Jose Ignacio García-Pérez, Manuel Serrano-Alarcon, Judit Vall-Castello
Long-term unemployment subsidies and middle-aged disadvantaged workers’ health
OPEN ACCESS: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-024-01000-3

Ends;

Visit lovely Berlin for a productive research conference: GLO Berlin 2024, April 18-20. Submission deadline: February 29.

GLO Berlin 2024 Conference – Call for Papers 

Call for contributed papers or sessions for the GLO Berlin 2024 Conference on April 18-20. Contributions are invited to broadly defined labor, population, family, health, crime, conflict and other human resources issues.

The event is jointly organized with EBES 47 at FOM University of Applied Sciences, Berlin. GLO organizes a separate program with separate registration and paper call. Participants of EBES 47 Berlin and GLO Berlin 2024 will have access to all program parts of both conferences. All program parts can be followed either in-person or online.

The event is HYBRID: Presentations on the first two days will be in-person only, and on the last day only online. Online attendees can follow all the program parts of the conference on all three days.

I invite you to visit lovely Berlin for a productive research conference! The city is a vibrant place offering many surprising features. For instance, it is known for its extensive waterways, including rivers, canals, and lakes.

Submissions can be (i) individual contributions with abstract only or full papers with abstract, or (ii) full sessions with six contributions consisting of six abstracts and possibly papers. Providing full papers increases the chance of acceptance.

Individual contributions submitter have to decide whether they want to be considered for (i) a regular contributed session or (ii) a Journal of Population Economics Express Evaluation Session (JOPE-EES).

JOPE-EES: Submissions for this category require a full paper and abstract. Those rejected for this session will still be considered for regular contributed sessions. If accepted for JOPE-EES, authors have to register for the conference either for the in-person or online version of the conference; they also have to submit their paper to JOPE while registering to the conference after the acceptance decision. These submissions will pass the desk rejection phase of the journal and receive an express evaluation within six weeks after the conference. Topics related to JOPE’s collections are particularly welcome, see https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections

Sergio Scicchitano

Program Committee: Sergio Scicchitano (John Cabot University, Rome, Italy; Chair )
Guido Cozzi (University of St. Gallen, Switzerland); Shuaizhang Feng (Jinan University, Guangzhou, China) Alfonso Flores-Lagunes (Syracuse University, USA); Andrea Fracasso (Trento University, Italy); Oded Galor (Brown University, USA); Hilary Ingham (Lancaster University, UK); Jungmin Lee (Seoul National University, South-Korea); Ilaria Mariotti (Polytechnic of Milan); Terra McKinnish (University of Colorado); Valentina Meliciani (Luiss University); Silvia Mendolia (Turin University, Italy); Milena Nikolova (University of Groningen, The Netherlands); Matloob Piracha (University of Kent, UK); Vicente Royuela (University of Barcelona, Spain); Kompal Sinha (Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia); Cristina Tealdi (Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK); Chiara Mussida (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore– Piacenza, Italy); Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO, UNU-MERIT & FU Berlin, The Netherlands, Germany)

The Program (joint with EBES) will include an evening event, speeches and contributions by Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin (Vice President, EBES & Istanbul Medeniyet University), Alessio Brown (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht), Martin Kahanec (Central European University), Christos Kollias (University of Thessaly), Alexander Kritikos (DIW Berlin & Potsdam University), Lucie Merkle (Berlin, Free State of Bavaria), Dorothea Schäfer (DIW Berlin and Jönköping University), Sergio Scicchitano (John Cabot University, Rome, Chair GLO Program), Klaus F. Zimmermann (Free University Berlin, UNU-MERIT & GLO/EBES), Manuela Zipperling, (FOM University of Applied Sciences, Berlin)

Keynote speech: Martin Kahanec Rebuilding Ukraine in Higher Education

Submissions through:  https://editorialexpress.com/conference/GLOBerlin2024/
Submission open since January 24, 2024 – no submission fee
Deadline: March 6, 2024. CLOSED.
Open until midnight on US east coast time = midnight CET Berlin + 6 hours.

Decisions were communicated.
Conference registration see ORGANIZATIONAL DETAILS below.

Participation fees: To be paid upon conference registration (see Organizational Details).

Regular: in-person € 500, online € 350
JOPE-EES: in-person € 600, online € 450
Fees for in-person participants include coffee breaks and lunch during the conference as well as the conference reception on April 18, 2024.

To participate with no paper please pay the regular fee (in-person € 500, online € 350) as explained in “Organizational Details” and send a registration email to Office@glabor.org with the subject “GLO-Berlin-2024-No-Paper”.

Fees for all participants provide access to the full joint program of EBES 47 & GLO Berlin 2024 either online or in person. JOPE-EES authors will receive the express journal service.

ORGANIZATIONAL DETAILS

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

Conference venue: FOM University of Applied Sciences Berlin, Bismarckstraße 107, 10625 Berlin

Questions to Office@glabor.org

Ends;

Call for contributions: 47th EBES Conference – Berlin/Germany April 18-20, 2024. Submission deadline: February 29, 2024.

The 47th EBES Conference – Berlin will take place on April 18th, 19th, and 20th, 2024 in Berlin, Germany. EBES 47 is supported by the Istanbul Economic Research Association and jointly organized with the GLO 2024 Berlin conference of the Glabor Labor Organization. Both collaborative conferences will be hosted by the FOM University of Applied Sciences Berlin branch and are organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). Participants of EBES 47 Berlin and GLO 2024 Berlin will have access to all program parts of both conferences.

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation considerations.

Deadline for Abstract/Paper Submission is February 29, 2024.

EBES Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, Istanbul Medeniyet University, EBES, Turkey
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 29, 2024.

For submission, please visit our website at at
https://ebesweb.org/47th-ebes-onference/berlin-abstract-submission/
no submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29 (Vol. 1), and 30th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: April 18-20, 2024
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 29, 2024
Reply-by: March 4, 2024*
Registration Deadline: March 15, 2024
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: March 16, 2024
Announcement of the Program: March 29, 2024
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): March 16, 2024**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 15, 2024

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before February 29, 2024, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by March 16, 2024.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Dr. Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference LINK

Ends;

New GLO Discussion Papers by Barry Chiswick, Jere Behrman, Olena Nizalova, Eva Dziadula, Milena Nikolova, Jan van Ours and Colleagues.

New research from the GLO network free to access: 15 Discussion Papers on issues including returns to schooling, digital platforms-military nexus, poverty in the Arab region, food insecurity, Ukraine, innovation and globalization, freedom of speech, healthy aging, high temperatures and work, inequality, and many more….. by experts from around the globe.

1365 Estimating Returns to Schooling and Experience: A History of Thought  Download PDF
by Chiswick, Barry R.

1364 Blurring boundaries: An analysis of the digital platforms-military nexus  Download PDF
by Coveri, Andrea & Cozza, Claudio & Guarascio, Dario

1363 Female headship and poverty in the Arab region: Analysis of trends and dynamics based on a new typology  Download PDF
by AlAzzawi, Shireen & Dang, Hai-Anh & Hlasny, Vladimir & Abanokova, Kseniya & Behrman, Jere

1362 Health Inequalities Among People Experiencing Food Insecurity. An Intersectional Approach  Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

1361 Human values and selection into supervisory positions: Evidence from nine European countries  Download PDF
by Hazans, Mihails & Masso, Jaan & Maurseth, Per Botolf

1360 Impact of TB Epidemic on Worker and Firm Productivity: Regional Perspective from Ukraine  Download PDF
by Nizalova, Olena & Shepotylo, Oleksandr

1359 The Gendered Impact of In-State Tuition Policies on Undocumented Immigrants’ College Enrollment, Graduation, and Employment  Download PDF
by Averett, Susan & Bansak, Cynthia & Condon, Grace & Dziadula, Eva

1358 Does international trade promote economic growth? Europe, 19th and 20th centuries  Download PDF
by Bajo-Rubio, Oscar & Ramos-Herrera, María del Carmen

1357 Innovation and Globalization: Benefactors or Barriers to Inclusive Growth?  Download PDF
by Duong, Khanh & Nguyen Phuc Van

1356 Rethinking the Inequality-Growth Nexus: Short-Term Gains and Long-Term Challenges  Download PDF
by Duong, Khanh & Nguyen Phuc Van

1355 Echoes of the Past: The Enduring Impact of Communism on Contemporary Freedom of Speech Values  Download PDF
by Nikolova, Milena & Popova, Olga

1354 Household Wealth and Body Mass Index: Towards a Healthy Ageing?  Download PDF
by Belloc, Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge

1353 The impact of high temperatures on performance in work-related activities  Download PDF
by Picchio, Matteo & Ours, Jan C. van

1352 Inequality is not always a political choice, but reducing it (to an optimal degree) is  Download PDF
by Khanh Duong & Nguyen Phuc Van

1351 Price Matching in Online Retail  Download PDF
by Bottasso, Anna & Robbiano, Simone & Marocco, Paolo

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion.  Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

Forthcoming Articles in Issue 1- 2024 of the Journal of Population Economics.

The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) has recently accepted 26 articles for publication in its upcoming Volume 37, Issue 1 (2024). These articles are currently in production and are scheduled to be published soon. A comprehensive overview of their key findings will be presented by the authors during an online GLO – JOPE workshop scheduled for February 26-27, 2024. Specific details regarding the workshop will be communicated in due time. The paper abstracts, titles and author names are listed below.

Effective since January 1, 2024, JOPE has transitioned to a Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) model. Under this new approach, all accepted articles will be directly published in the ongoing issue, bringing an end to the previous backlog policy. To facilitate this shift, JOPE published all available articles last year, successfully clearing the backlog. Notably, of the 90 articles included in JOPE issues in 2023, only 45 were accepted in the past year, and the other 45 were from previous years.

This policy change addresses the confusion surrounding the publication status of online articles, now widely recognized as published. When included in a journal issue with delay because of a backlog, this created two publication dates in the past practice.

Additionally, the policy change reflects JOPE’s commitment to expeditious publishing. The decision to organize the online GLO – JOPE workshops aligns with JOPE’s effective communication strategy, aimed at disseminating significant research findings in time to a broader audience within academia and society.

Articles accepted for publication in the Journal of Population Economics.

1. David G Blanchflower, Alex Bryson: The Female Happiness Paradox

Using data across countries and over time we show that women have worse mental health than men in negative affect equations, irrespective of the measure used – anxiety, depression, fearfulness, sadness, loneliness, anger – and they have more days with bad mental health and more restless sleep. Women are also less satisfied with many aspects of their lives, such as democracy, the economy, the state of education and health services. They are also less satisfied in the moment in terms of peace and calm, cheerfulness, feeling active, vigorous, fresh and rested. However, prior evidence on gender differences in happiness and life satisfaction is less clear cut. Differences vary over time, location, and with model specification and the inclusion of controls, especially marital status. We now find strong evidence that males have higher levels of both happiness and life satisfaction in recent years even before the onset of pandemic. As in the past women continue to have worse mental health. A detailed analysis of several data files, with various metrics, for the UK confirms that men now are happier than women and the size of the effect is not trivial.          

2. Jeehoon Han, Caspar Kaiser: Time Use and Happiness: US Evidence Across three Decades

We use diary data from representative samples from the United States to examine determinants and historical trends in time-weighted happiness. To do so, we combine fine-grained information on self-reported happiness at the activity level with data on individuals’ time use. We conceptually distinguish time-weighted happiness from evaluative measures of wellbeing and provide evidence of the validity and distinctiveness of this measure. Although timeweighted happiness is largely uncorrelated with economic variables like unemployment and income, it is predictive of several health outcomes, and shares many other determinants with evaluative wellbeing. We illustrate the potential use of time-weighted happiness by assessing historical trends in the gender wellbeing gap. For the largest part of the period between 1985 and 2021, women’s time-weighted happiness improved significantly relative to men’s. This is in stark contrast to prominent findings from previous work. However, our recent data from 2021 indicates that about half of women’s gains since the 1980s were lost during the Covid-19 pandemic. Hence, as previously shown for several other outcomes, women appear to have been disproportionally affected by the pandemic. Our results are replicable in UK data, and robust to alternative assumptions about respondents’ scale use.

3. Enghin Atalay: A Twenty-First Century of Solitude? Time Alone and Together in the United States

This paper explores trends in time alone and with others in the United States. Since 2003, Americans have increasingly spent their free time alone on leisure at home and have decreasingly spent their free time with individuals from other households. These trends are more pronounced for non-White individuals, for males, for the less educated, and for individuals from lower-income households. Survey respondents who spend a large fraction of their free time alone report lower subjective well-being. As a result, differential trends in time alone suggest that between-group subjective wellbeing inequality may be increasing more quickly than previous research has reported.

4. Philippe Sterkens, Stijn Baert, Eline Moens, Joey Wuyts, Eva Derous: I Won’t Make the Same Mistake Again: Burnout History and Job Preferences

The burnout literature has focused on the determinants of burnout, whereas its careers consequences remain understudied. Therefore, we investigate whether recently burned-out individuals differ in job preferences from non-burned-out workers. We link these differences in preferences with (1) perceptions of job demands and resources, as well as (2) the weighting of such perceptions. To this end, a sample of 582 employees varying in their history of burnout judged job offers with manipulated characteristics in terms of their willingness to apply as well as perceived job demands and resources. We find that recently burned-out employees appreciate possibilities to telework and fixed feedback relatively more, while being relatively less attracted to learning opportunities. These findings can be partially explained by differences in the jobs’ perceived resources.

5. Claudia Senik, Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D’Ambrosio, Anthony Lepinteur, Carsten Schröder: Teleworking and Life Satisfaction in Germany during COVID-19: The Importance of Family Structure

We carry out a difference-in-differences analysis of a real-time survey conducted as part of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) survey and show that teleworking had a negative average effect on life satisfaction over the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. This average effect hides considerable heterogeneity, reflecting gender-role asymmetries: lower life satisfaction is found only for unmarried men and for women with school-age children. The negative effect for women with school-age children disappears in 2021, suggesting adaptation to new constraints and/or the adoption of coping strategies.

6. Davide Furceri, Pietro Pizzuto, Khatereh Yarveisi: The Effect of Pandemic Crises on Fertility

This paper examines the dynamic effects of pandemic crises on fertility rates for a large, unbalanced sample of 182 developed and developing countries during the period 1996-2019. We find that major pandemics are associated with significant and persistent declines in fertility rates of about 2 percent, on average. These effects are significantly larger for pandemics characterized by a very large number of confirmed cases relative to the population (up to 6½ percent) and by deep recessions (up to 5 percent). In addition, the effects are larger in advanced economies (up to 5 percent) and for younger women, on average.

7. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, Cristina Borra, Chunbei Wang: Asian Entrepreneurship in the Coronavirus Era

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a deleterious impact on the world economy. Studies have documented the disproportional impact of the pandemic on minorities, immigrants, and business owners in the United States. In this study, we use Current Population Survey monthly data spanning from January 2014 through December 2021 to examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected Asian entrepreneurship. We show that the pandemic disproportionally hurt Asian entrepreneurship, particularly among immigrants, up until the end of 2020. A detailed analysis of Asian business dynamics reveals a substantial increase in self-employment exits during the first year of the pandemic. We fail to find convincing evidence of differential industry/job-type concentration, individual preferences, majority-minority disparities, narrower clientele, or differential access to government support as primary drivers for such patterns. Instead, we find suggestive evidence of discrimination playing a non-negligible role that subsided in 2021, coinciding with the rollout of vaccines.

8. Riccardo Ciacci: Banning the Purchase of Sex Increases Cases of Rape: Evidence from Sweden

This paper leverages the timing of a ban on the purchase of sex to assess its impact on rape offenses. Relying on Swedish high-frequency data from 1997 to 2014, I find that the ban increases the number of rapes by around 44%–62%. The results are robust to several econometric specifications that exploit different identification assumptions. The increase reflects a boost in completed rapes both in the short- and long run. However, it is not accompanied by a decrease in the number of pimps. Taken together, the empirical evidence hints at the notion that the rise in rapes is not connected to the supply of prostitution but rather to changes in the demand for prostitution due to the ban. The results here have the opposite sign but larger magnitudes in absolute value than results in the literature on the decriminalization of prostitution.

9. Veronica Grembi, Anna Rosso, Emilia Barili: Domestic Violence Perception and Gender Stereotypes

Using a survey of more than 4,500 Italian women, we address the link between gender stereotypes and perceptions of domestic violence. We define a new measure of stereotypes at the individual level and show that women with stronger stereotypes are less likely to state that violence is common in their area of residence and are more likely to classify physical violence as less severe than privacy breaches. This ranking is associated with a victim-blaming mindset among respondents with stronger stereotypes, who are also more li(e.g., economic distress) than to personal characteristics of abusers (e.g., psychological issues) and to advise a hypothetical victim not to react to violence.

10. Stanislao Maldonado: Empowering Women through Multifaceted Interventions: Long-term Evidence from a Double Matching Design

Empowering women is a policy goal that has received a lot of interest from policy-makers in the developing world in recent years, yet little is known about effective ways to promote it sustainably. Most existing interventions fail to address the multidimensional nature of empowerment. Using a double matching design to construct the sampling frame and to estimate causal effects, I evaluate the long-term impact of a multifaceted policy intervention designed to improve women’s empowerment in the Atlantic region in Colombia. This intervention provided information about women’s rights, soft skills and vocational training, seed capital, and mentoring simultaneously. I find that this intervention has mixed results: there are improvements in incomes and other economic dimensions along with large political and social capital effects, but limited or null impacts on women’s rights knowledge and control over one’s body. Using a list experiment, I even find an increase in the likelihood of intra-household violence. The results highlight the importance of addressing the multidimensional nature of women’s empowerment in policy innovations designed to foster it and incorporating men in these efforts.

11. Jinglin Wen: Female Chief Officers and Crime: Evidence from England and Wales

I study the impact of the appointment of female chief police officers on crimes typically committed against females: sexual and rape offenses. Evidence suggests that adding more female chief officers leads to a statistically significant increase in documented sexual crimes in England and Wales. Yet, this rise is good news because it is due not to a rise in actual crimes committed or improved police recording practices but, rather, to more reporting of sexual crimes. I also find that appointing a female chief officer is associated with a reduction of around 1.1 homicides against women, which is equivalent to 21 percent of the mean value. Exploration of mechanisms suggests that the reduction may reflect an increase in policing resources devoted to women’s protection.

12. Li Zhou; Zongzhi Liu; Xi Tian: Threat Beyond the Border: Kim Jong-un’s Nuclear Tests and China’s Rural Migration

Between 2006 and 2017, North Korea conducted six nuclear weapons tests near its border with China, which clearly posed an existential threat to China. Utilizing data from a representative sample of rural households and adopting a quasi-experimental framework, this study analyzes the effects of human-made nuclear threats on the coping strategies of China’s rural households living on the border with North Korea. Our results show that nuclear tests have sizable causal effects on different aspects of non-farm employment and land rented out by rural residents in the border area of China. It is particularly noteworthy to emphasize that the results of this study demonstrate that, due to the human-made radiation risk resulting from North Korean nuclear tests, households in the border regions of China bordering North Korea increase labor out migration and land lease out. Multiple robustness tests consistently support this conclusion. Next, the paper attempts to identify various mechanisms behind these effects, such as the nuclear risk’s effect on the village’s economic viability, ultimately leading households to move out. We also find that the impact of moving away from rural areas due to nuclear tests is more pronounced for households with higher human capital, higher income, and a lower proportion of elderly family members. In conclusion, as rural households respond to nuclear threats by migrating out, North Korea’s nuclear tests exacerbate the phenomenon of rural hollowing in China’s border regions.

13. Xuechao Qian: Revolutionized Life: Long-term Effects of Childhood Exposure to Persecution on Human Capital and Marital Sorting

This paper investigates the effects of early-life exposure to persecution risk on human capital formation and marital sorting, while also analyzing how these effects are influenced by the timing of the exposure during early life. Utilizing the context of China’s “class struggle” period, which targeted various classes including landlords, capitalists, and intellectuals, this study demonstrates that individuals who experienced persecution risk during their childhood exhibit lower formal education attainment, reduced cognitive skills, and lower earnings. They are more likely to form marriages with individuals from classes that were previously favored by the regime but have comparatively lower human capital outcomes. Moreover, the study highlights that the most substantial and enduring impacts occur when the exposure to class struggle persecution risk takes place during early childhood.

14. Olivier Charlot, Claire Naiditch, Radu Vranceanu: Smuggling of Forced Migrants to Europe: A Matching Model

This paper develops a matching model to analyze the smuggling market for forced migrants, building on the empirical evidence related to the smuggling of migrants from the Horn of Africa and the Middle East to Europe in the last decade. Comparative statics for the equilibrium solution reveal that coercion-based measures targeting the smugglers reduce the number of irregular migrants and smugglers at the expense of migrants’ overall welfare. Slightly increasing legal migration opportunities has the interesting feature of reducing irregular flows, without deteriorating migrants’ welfare or increasing the total number of migrants. An extremely restrictive asylum policy has similar effects in terms of the flows of irregular migrants as a quite loose one, with the largest flows of irregular migrants occurring under a “middle-range” policy.

15. Federico Maggio, Carlo Caporali: The Impact of Police Violence on Migration: Evidence from Venezuela

This study unveils the causal effect of authoritative violence on individuals’ likelihood to migrate. Specifically, we examine the migration patterns of Venezuelans during the 2017-2018 political and economic crisis. We draw insights from regional-level data on civilian casualties caused by security forces, along with information extracted from the ENCOVI-2018 survey data that captures migration flows. The estimates rely on travel time from the capital city as an instrumental variable and are robust to the inclusion of several household and socio-economic regional-level characteristics. The findings strongly suggest that authoritative violence is a significant non-economic push factor for international migration. Moreover, additional evidence indicates that this type of violence influences the skill composition of migrants, especially in the context of South-to-South migration flows.

16. Guanchun Liu, Yuanyuan Liu,Jinyu Yang, Yanren Zhang: Labor Contract Law and Inventor Mobility: Evidence from China

This paper investigates the causal effect of employment protection on inventor mobility. Taking the enactment of China’s Labor Contract Law in 2008 as a quasi-natural experiment, our difference-in-differences estimate utilizes two-dimensional variations: firm ownership (i.e., SOEs vs. non-SOEs) and year (i.e., before and after 2008). Using combined data on patent applications filed at the State Intellectual Property Office of China and listed manufacturing companies over 2004–2012, we find that the law plays a sizeable positive role in reducing the likelihood of inventor mobility. This effect is more pronounced for firms with higher labor intensity, stricter law enforcement, higher innovation dependence, lower R&D team stability, and inventors that work outside the core of R&D networks. Further, we provide consistent evidence for two plausible mechanisms for the positive effect: limiting the ability of employers to unfairly dismiss inventors, and substituting low-skilled workers with inventors. In addition, the law causes firms to obtain more high-quality patents and reduces bankruptcy risk. Overall, our findings shed new light on the economic effects of labor protection in a typical emerging market.

17. Jiyoon Kim: The Effects of Paid Family Leave – Does It Help Fathers’ Health, Too?

I investigate the effects of California’s paid family leave (CA-PFL) program, the first statemandated paid leave available to both mothers and fathers in the U.S. I examine the effects on the overall health of mothers and fathers during two distinct periods: health immediately around childbirth, and health following childbirth. To do so, I leverage the variation in the timing of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) health care topical module relative to the exact year and month of childbirth. I find that CA-PFL has improved mothers’ health during pregnancy and immediately after childbirth. This improvement in health is accompanied by a reduced likelihood of mothers not working or taking unpaid work absence. Some improvements manifest in fathers’ health too during the same period. However, I observe that fathers report more instances of feeling sick, starting around five months after childbirth. Further analysis reveals that the share of fathers not working or taking unpaid work absence rises temporarily when the leave period ends. Understanding the effects on fathers’ health and leave utilization is pivotal to evaluating the program’s overall benefits and potential unintended consequences given the growing focus on enhancing equal access to paid leave for both mothers and fathers.

18. Fabian Duarte, Valentina Paredes, Cristobal Bennett, Isabel Poblete: Impact of an Extension of Maternity Leave on Infant Health

We study the effect of a 12-week maternity leave extension in Chile on the health of infants between 6 and 12 months old. Using unique administrative sick leave data for working women enrolled in the private health insurance system who gave birth between 2011 and 2013, we estimate the effect of this extension on the number of paid sick days taken by the mother due to her child being ill. We find that extending maternity leave improved infant health and decreased the number of sick days by 6.43 (0.18sd) days on average. Additionally, we show that mothers with extended maternity leave take their infant to the pediatrician less often than mothers without the extended leave. Our results are consistent with a decrease in daycare attendance, which decreases exposure to communicable diseases.

19. Julien Bergeot: Care for Elderly Parents: Do Children Cooperate?

Do children cooperate when they decide to provide informal care to their elderly parent? This paper assesses whether a cooperative or non-cooperative model drives the caregiving decisions of children. Focusing on families with two children and one single parent, I use use data from a survey of older adults in France to compare the predictive power of the two models. Results suggest that children are more likely to behave according to a non-cooperative model, and that a cooperative model overestimates the level of care received by the parents. I construct an indicator of the degree of non-cooperativeness between two children and explore the determinants of non-cooperation. Finally, I show that this indicator is positively correlated with the number of unmet needs the parent has. This latter result suggests that the current level of informal care provided to a parent appears to suffer from a public good problem and the lack of cooperativeness between children has detrimental consequences for the parent.

20. Trine Engh Vattø, Kjersti Misje Østbakken: Do Means-tested Childcare Subsidies Discourage Work?

We examine how means-tested childcare subsidies affect parental labor supply. Using the introduction of reduced childcare prices for low-income families in Norway in 2015, we show that these subsidies may have the unintended effect of discouraging work rather than promoting employment. First, structural labor supply simulations suggest that a negative parental labor supply effect dominates, ex ante. Ex post, we find a small and insignificant effect of means-tested childcare subsidies on parental labor supply in the reform year. We find no statistically significant bunching around the income limits in subsequent years, but we do find negative labor supply effects in subsequent expansions of the reform. Our results suggest that in a context where both parental employment and participation in formal childcare are high, means-tested childcare subsidies may have unintended parental labor supply effects.

21. Caroline Hall, Inés Hardoy, Kristine von Simson: Policies for Young Adults with Reduced Work Capacity: Labour Market Impact in Sweden and Norway

The rising numbers of young people with disability pension concerns many advanced economies. We present results from a comparative analysis of the neighbouring countries Sweden and Norway on the impacts of differing policy mixes aimed at enhancing the employability of the work disabled. Using rich longitudinal data, we follow unemployed young adults (ages 2529) with work-impairment up to four years after they became unemployed to investigate the effect of different types of labour market policies. Our results indicate that, despite differences in programme composition and strategies, there are surprisingly small country differences in treatment effect patterns and signs of estimated impacts. In line with previous studies, we find strong lock-in effects of both workplace-related programmes and training/educational programmes. After participation, workplace-related programmes about double the likelihood of entering regular employment or education. Participating in training courses also increases this likelihood, but effect sizes are smaller.

22. Jose Ignacio García-Pérez, Manuel Serrano Alarcon, Judit Vall-Castello: Long-term Unemployment Subsidies and Middle-aged Disadvantaged Workers’ Health

This paper examines the labour market and health effects of a non-contributory long-term unemployment (LTU) benefit targeted at middle-aged disadvantaged workers. To do so, we exploit a Spanish reform introduced in July 2012 that increased the age eligibility threshold to receive the benefit from 52 to 55. Our results show that men who were eligible for the benefit experience a reduction in injury hospitalizations by 12.9% as well as a 2 percentage points drop in the probability of a mental health diagnosis. None of the results are significant for women. We document two factors that explain the gender differences: the labour market impact of the reform is stronger for men, and eligible men are concentrated in more physically demanding sectors, like construction. Importantly, we also find evidence of a program substitution effect between LTU and partial disability benefits. Our results highlight the role of long-term unemployment benefits as a protecting device for the (physical and mental) health of middle-aged, low-educated workers who are in a disadvantaged position in the labour market.

23. Jindong Pang, Shulin Shen: Do Subways Improve Labor Market Outcomes for Low-Skilled Workers?

This paper evaluates the labor market effects of subway systems on low-skilled workers. A simple model of labor supply predicts that access to subway services can decrease transportation costs and improve labor force participation, but have ambiguous effects on the intensive margin of labor market outcomes. Empirical estimates from US cities show that a ten percent expansion in subway miles increases the labor force participation of low-skilled individuals without a car by eight percentage points. However, subway expansions, have no significant effect on the labor force participation of low-skilled individuals who own automobiles or on high-skilled workers. In contrast, expansions of light rails and buses have no significant effect on the labor market outcomes of low-skilled individuals. Improved subway services do not affect wages, hours worked, and commuting times, suggesting the labor market benefits of subways mainly lie in the extensive margin of labor supply.

24. Joanna Lahey, Roberto Mosquera: Age and Hiring for High School Graduate Hispanics in the United States

The intersection of age with ethnicity is understudied, particularly for labor force outcomes. We explore the labor market for Hispanic high school graduates in the United States by age using information from the US Census, American Community Survey, Current Population Survey, and three laboratory experiments with different populations. We find that the differences in outcomes for Hispanic and non-Hispanic high school graduates do not change across the lifecycle. Moving to a laboratory setting, we provided participants with randomized resumes for a clerical position that are, on average, equivalent except for name and age. In all experiments, participants treated applicants with Hispanic and non-Hispanic names the same across the lifecycle. These findings are in stark contrast to the differences and patterns across the lifecycle for corresponding Black workers and job applicants. We argue that these null results may explain the much smaller literature on labor market discrimination against less-educated Hispanic workers.

25. Nikos Benos, Stelios Karagiannis, Sofia Tsitou: Geography, Landownership Inequality and Literacy: Historical Evidence from Greek Regions

Our work sheds light on the joint role of human capital and geography during the early stages of the transition from stagnation to growth in early 20th century Greece. We uncover a robust association between geography and literacy. We also show that geography is correlated with land inequality and thus establish that land distribution is a channel through which geography influences literacy. Finally, the impact of geography on human capital formation weakens with industrialization. Our work contributes to the literature on geography and human capital in the transition from stagnation to growth since Greece was at the early stages of the industrial era during the study period.

26. Evelyn Skoy: Household Impacts of Child Health Shocks

Women bear a disproportionate share of the unpaid labor within a household, which contributes to gender gaps in life and relationship satisfaction. This paper examines how an exogenous shock that increases the workload within the household impacts the burden of unpaid labor. By exploiting a rich longitudinal dataset from Australia, I estimate the gendered impacts to parental workload and stress, life and relationship satisfaction, and household division of labor when parents have a child with a significant health shock. I find evidence that women experience a decrease in their satisfaction with parenting and life satisfaction. These results are most pronounced for households where the mother is less active in the labor market or less educated. Point estimates indicate that men do not experience the same negative effects.

Ends;

Operating from Medellin and the World Congress of the International Economics Association (IEA).

Medellin, EAFIT December 11-15, 2023. World Congress of the International Economics Association (IEA) with over 1,000 participants from all parts of the world. Fantastic organization, up to the highest standards both form the local setting as well as from the quality of the academic program. Congratulations to EAFIT & IEA for an outstanding conference.

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is participating to represent GLO at the Executive Board and Council Meeting of IEA, speak with authors and potential contributors of the Journal of Population Economics as its Editor-in-Chief and presenting some of his research on “Parental Gender Stereotypes and Student Wellbeing in China”.

The GLO President was just recently elected Senator of Leopoldina and Chair (“Obmann”) of its Section 25 “Economics and Empirical Social Sciences” starting on December 13, 2023 for a period of 4 years. Leopoldina originated in 1652 as a classical scholarly society and is the German National Academy of Sciences. It complements his earlier work as Section Chair of the Section “Economics, Business and Management Sciences”, Academia Europaea, the European Academy of Sciences, over 2014 – 2021.

Below: left Andreu Mas-Colell; middle Ashwini Deshpande; right: Steven Durlauf, John Earle, Kaushik Basu, Martin Kahanec

Ends;

2024 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Yinjunjie Zhang & Robert Breunig of the Australian National University for their research on female breadwinning and domestic abuse in Australia.

Yinjunjie Jacquelyn Zhang and Robert Breunig of the Australian National University receive the 2024 Kuznets Prize for their OPEN ACCESS article Female breadwinning and domestic abuse: evidence from Australia, which was published in the Journal of Population Economics (2023), 36, pp. 2925–2965. The annual prize honors the best article published in the Journal of Population Economics in the previous year. 

The prize will be awarded in a public online event during the 2023 GLO – JOPE Global Conference on December 4, 2023 on 10:00 pm – 12.00 am CET Berlin = December 4, 2023 on 16:00 pm – 18.00 pm EST Philadelphia = December 5, 2023 on 8:00 am – 10:00 am AEDT Sydney. For the program and to register for the event see LINK.

December 6, 2023: Missed the event? Here is the video of the session.
VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Sessions A6-A7 (Kuznets Prize Session)


Biographical Abstracts

Yinjunjie Zhang (Jacquelyn) is a research fellow affiliated at Arndt-Corden Department of Economics and Tax and Transfer Policy Institute in Crawford School of Public Policy at Australian National University. Dr Zhang obtained her PhD at Texas A&M University in 2018. She has her research interest spanning the areas of labor economics, public economics, and experimental economics. A common thread is in understanding the impact of public policy on people’s behavior, choice, and welfare. She has published research articles in peer-reviewed economic journals and worked on a range of research projects aimed at providing insights on social policies and labor market outcomes.

Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at the Crawford School of Public Policy. He is one of Australia’s leading Public Policy Economists. He has published in over 50 international academic journals in economics and public policy. Professor Breunig has made significant policy impact through a number of his research projects: the relationship between child care and women’s labor supply; the effect of immigration to Australia on the labor market prospects of Australians; the effect of switching to cash from food stamps in the U.S. food stamp program and the inter-generational transmission of disadvantage. Professor Breunig’s research is motivated by important social policy issues and debates. His work is characterized by careful empirical study and appropriate use of statistical technique.

Paper Abstract

We explore the relationship between heterosexual partners’ relative income and the incidence of both domestic violence and emotional abuse. Using Australian data drawn from society-wide surveys, we find women who earn more than their male partners are subject to a 33% increase in partner violence and a 20% increase in emotional abuse compared to mean levels. We show the relationship between relative spouse income and female partner abuse is best modelled by a binary variable that captures “female breadwinning.” This finding differs from those of some earlier studies that considered only serious abuse and found a continuous negative relationship between female partners’ relative income and abuse. Instead, our findings suggest a mechanism related to gender norms generating domestic violence. We find no link between relative income and abuse of male partners.

More about the Kuznets Prize & previous prize winners.

Further research & video presentations on domestic violence in the Journal of Population Economics:

JOPE Collections and calls for papers: One focus (collection) is Sexual and Domestic Violence. JOPE Associate Editors Astghik Mavisakalyan and Dave Ribar are important advisors in the JOPE Editorial Board for this focus.

Recommended reading:
Prettyman, A., Ribar, D.C. (2022). Child Abuse and Neglect. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_234-1
Hsu, L., Henke, A. (2022). Intimate Partner Violence. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_309-2

*****

The Sixth IESR-GLO Joint Workshop at Jinan University, October 26-27, 2023, had covered papers on “Gender Issues and Domestic Violence”: REPORT

Ends;

Announcement: GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 will take place online December 4-6. Paper highlights, strategy & 2024 Kuznets Prize

A 3-days online event on December 4-6 celebrates recent successes and informs about publication highlights from 2023 issues 3 and 4 of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE). New JOPE publication directions are explained. The 2024 JOPE Kuznets Prize for the best paper published in 2023 is presented.

  • Event presents highlights of JOPE articles of issues 3 + 4 of 2023
    https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-3
    https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-4
  • Kuznets Prize Ceremony
  • Journal Success Report (IF: 6.1; CiteScore: 9.2)
  • JOPE 2023 report and announcements
    Exciting news: JOPE has now moved to a zero-backlog policy implying immediate publication of all newly published papers into the running quarterly issue of the journal. JOPE will start in 2024 with about two dozens of high quality research papers.
  • General time-frame all CET (Dec 4: 3pm-12am; Dec 5: 2pm-5pm; Dec 6: 2pm-4:15pm)
    CET – Central European Time: Time Zone Converter
    You need to register for all three days separately, see below.
  • NOTE: The event is video-taped.

Full Program below: Current draft December 6, 2023, 7:00 am CET Berlin

GLO – JOPE 2023 Global Conference, Dec 4-6

ALL CET – Central European Time: Time Zone Converter

DAY I – MONDAY, DEC 4: 3 pm – 12 am CET

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR DAY I: terminated.
ALL CET – Central European Time: Time Zone Converter

VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Sessions A1-A5
VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Sessions A6-A7
(Kuznets Prize Session)

A1 – Environment, Weather, Climate – Chair: JOPE Editor Shuaizhang Feng

3:00 pm. Jia Wu, Lin, J. & Han, X. Compensation for girls in early childhood and its long-run impact: family investment strategies under rainfall shockshttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00901-5  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbILc

3:15 pm. Xin Zhang, Zhang, X., Liu, Y. et al. The morbidity costs of air pollution through the Lens of Health Spending in China.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00948-y 
Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbIPy

3:30 pm. Yue Hua, Qiu, Y. & Tan, X. The effects of temperature on mental health: evidence from Chinahttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00932-y  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbKwT

3:45 pm. Masahiro Shoji  Gendered effects of early childhood weather shocks on locus of control: evidence from 28 agricultural countrieshttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00923-z  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbKyE

4:00 pm. BREAK

A2 – Health, Vaccinations, Risky Behaviors – Chair: JOPE Editor Xi Chen

4:30 pm. Yarine Fawaz, Mira, P. Social isolation, health dynamics, and mortality: evidence across 21 European countries. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00956-y  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCU8

4:50 pm. Beghelli, S., Augustin De Coulon & O’Mahony, M. Health benefits of reducing aircraft pollution: evidence from changes in flight paths. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00964-y OPEN ACCESS.

5:10 pm. Elodie Djemai, Renard, Y. & Samson, AL. Mothers and fathers: education, co-residence, and child healthhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00966-w  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dlAFr

5:30 pm. BREAK

A3 – Education – Chair: JOPE Editor Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

6:00 pm. Kendall Kennedy Hidden schooling: endogenous measurement error and bias in education and labor market experience. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00918-w  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbKxP

6:15 pm. Ruzica Savcic, Theodoropoulos, N. & Xefteris, D. Conscription and educational outcomeshttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00944-2 Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diC0V

6:30 pm. BREAK

A4 + A5 – Migration and Refugee Issues – Chair: JOPE Editor Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

7:00 pm. Yuanyuan Chen, Fu, W. Migration control policy and parent–child separation among migrant families: evidence from Chinahttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00971-z Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCUx

7:15 pm. El-Bialy, N., Aranda, E.F., Andreas Nicklisch, A. Voigt, S. et al. No man is an island: trust, trustworthiness, and social networks among refugees in Germany
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00969-7 OPEN ACCESS.

7:30 pm. Robert Bernhardt., Wunnava, P.V. Does asking about citizenship increase labor survey non-response?  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00945-1 
Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCZ4

7:45pm. Kovacic, M., Cristina Elisa Orso Who’s afraid of immigration? The effect of economic preferences on tolerance. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00947-z  OPEN ACCESS

8:00 pm. BREAK

A6 – Gender Issues and Preferences – Chair: JOPE Editor Kompal Sinha.

Note that December 4, 2023, 10:00 pm – 12.00 am CET Berlin = December 4, 2023 on 16:00 pm – 18.00 pm EST Philadelphia = December 5, 2023, 8:00 am – 10:00 am AEDT Sydney.  
Time Zone Converter

10:00 pm. Jones, T.R., Matthew Millington & Price, J. Changes in parental gender preference in the USA: evidence from 1850 to 2019https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00957-x Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCXe

10:20 pm. Yinjunjie Zhang & Robert Breunig (Australian National University)
Female breadwinning and domestic abuse: evidence from Australia https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00975-9 OPEN ACCESS.
Kuznets Prize 2024 winning paper for the best JOPE article published in 2023. MORE INFO.
Questions & remarks: GLO VirtYS Scholars 2023/2024
Tarana Chauhan (Cornell University) & Xinyan Liu (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

11:00 pm.

A7 – JOPE Annual Report & JOPE Kuznets Prize Ceremony. Chair: JOPE Editor Kompal Sinha.

  • JOPE Annual Report:  Klaus F. Zimmermann (JOPE & GLO)   
  • The Kuznets Prize Ceremony: Kompal Sinha (Macquarie University)
  • Kuznets Prize LaudatioAstghik Mavisakalyan (Curtin University)
  • Response: Kuznets Prize Winner

12:00 am. END OF DAY I

DAY II – TUESDAY, DEC 5: 2 pm – 5 pm CET

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR DAY II: terminated
ALL CET – Central European Time: Time Zone Converter

VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Sessions B1-B3

B1 & B2 – Family & Fertility: Chair: JOPE Editor Milena Nikolova

2:00 pm. Jisoo Hwang, Kim, S.K. Unexpected longevity, intergenerational policies, and fertilityhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00943-3 OPEN ACCESS

2:15 pm. Anna Adamecz-Völgyi, A., Henderson, M. & Shure, N. The labor market returns to “first-in-family” university graduateshttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00908-y OPEN ACCESS

2:30 pm. Congdon Fors, H., Annika Lindskog Son preference and education Inequalities in India: the role of gender-biased fertility strategies and preferential treatment of boys. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00941-5 OPEN ACCESS

2:45 pm. Casarico, A., Elena del Rey Canteli, E. & Silva, J.I. Child care costs, household liquidity constraints, and gender inequality. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00936-2  OPEN ACCESS

3:00 pm. Casarico, A., Salvatore Lattanzio Behind the child penalty: understanding what contributes to the labour market costs of motherhood. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00937-1 Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbIRU

3:15 pm. BREAK

B3 – Fertility and Marriage – Chair: JOPE Editor Terra McKinnish

4:00 pm. Jie Zhang, Liu, H. Differential fertility, school enrollment, and development. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00954-0 OPEN ACCESS.

4:15 pm. Madhulika Khanna, Kochhar, N.: Do marriage markets respond to a natural disaster? The impact of flooding of the Kosi river in India. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00955-z Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCVT

4:30 pm. Bastian Schulz, Siuda, F. Marriage and divorce: the role of unemployment insurancehttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00961-1 OPEN ACCESS.

B4 – Aspirations and Preferences – Chair: JOPE Editor Terra McKinnish

VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Session B4

4:45 pm. Otrachshenko, V., Nikolova, M. & Olga Popova Double-edged sword: persistent effects of Communist regime affiliations on well-being and preferences. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00930-0  OPEN ACCESS.

5:00 pm. END OF DAY II

DAY III – WEDNESDAY, DEC 6: 2 pm – 4:15 pm CET

ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK FOR DAY III: terminated
ALL CET – Central European Time: Time Zone Converter

VIDEO of GLO-JOPE Global Conference 2023 Sessions C1-C3

C1 & C2 – Historical Demography – Chair: JOPE Editor Oded Galor

2:00 pm. Raphael Franck The impact of industrialization on secondary schooling during the industrial revolution: evidence from nineteenth-century France.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00962-0 Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCUM

2:15 pm. Angus Chu Natural selection and Neanderthal extinction in a Malthusian economyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00939-z  Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbJ00

2:30 pm. Bai, Y., Yanjun Li & Lam, P.H. Quantity-quality trade-off in Northeast China during the Qing dynasty. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00933-x  
Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbJ1F

2:45 pm. BREAK

3:15 pm. Kwan Lee The impact of a local human capital shock: evidence from World War II veterans. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00919-9 Readlink: https://rdcu.be/dbKzA

3:30 pm. Sijie Hu Survival of the literati: Social status and reproduction in Ming–Qing China. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00960-2 Readlink: https://rdcu.be/diCX5

C3 – Retirement – Chair: JOPE Editor Gregory Ponthiere

3:45 pm. Enrique Pardo Reinoso Mandatory retirement savings in the presence of an informal labor market. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-023-00967-9 OPEN ACCESS.

Final Remarks – Season’s Greetings – Chair: JOPE Managing Editor Madeline Zavodny

4:00 pm – 4:15 pm. Remarks and conference ending.

Just another cog in the machine? A worker-level view of robotization and tasks. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova, Anthony Lepinteur and Femke Cnossen.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that while robotization reduces physically demanding activities, the reduction in manual work does not coincide with a shift to more challenging and interesting tasks.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1350, 2023

Just another cog in the machine? A worker-level view of robotization and tasks  Download PDF
by Nikolova, Milena & Lepinteur, Anthony & Cnossen, Femke

GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova, Anthony Lepinteur and Femke Cnossen

Author Abstract: Using survey data from 20 European countries, we construct novel worker-level indices of routine, abstract, social, and physical tasks across 20 European countries, which we combine with industry-level robotization exposure. Our conceptual framework builds on the insight that robotization simultaneously replaces, creates, and modifies workers’ tasks and studies how these forces impact workers’ job content. We rely on instrumental variable techniques and show that robotization reduces physically demanding activities. Yet, this reduction in manual work does not coincide with a shift to more challenging and interesting tasks. Instead, robotization makes workers’ tasks more routine, while diminishing the opportunities for cognitively challenging work and human contact. The adverse impact of robotization on social tasks is particularly pronounced for highly skilled and educated workers. Our study offers a unique worker-centric viewpoint on the interplay between technology and tasks, highlighting nuances that macro-level indicators overlook. As such, it sheds light on the mechanisms underpinning the impact of robotization on labor markets.

Featured image: Alex-Knight-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

December 4-6: Global Online GLO-JOPE Conference 2023 on ‘Population Economics’ with highlights of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) issues 3 & 4 of 2023 including the presentation of the JOPE 2024 Kuznets Prize. More information forthcoming.

JUST PUBLISHED
Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Cultural similarity and migration: New evidence from a gravity model of international migration. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Tobias Grohmann.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds no support for the hypothesized positive effect of cultural similarity. However, religious similarity has a significant negative effect on migration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1349, 2023

Cultural similarity and migration: New evidence from a gravity model of international migration  Download PDF
by Grohmann, Tobias

GLO Affiliate Tobias Grohmann

Author Abstract: Theory suggests that cultural similarity increases migration flows between countries. This paper brings best practices from the trade gravity literature to migration to test this prediction. In my preferred specification, I use lags of time-varying similarity variables in a panel of international and domestic migration flows (>200 countries, 1990-2019, 5-year intervals) and estimate a theory-consistent structural gravity model with origin-year, destination-year, and corridor fixed effects. The results do not show the hypothesized positive effect of cultural similarity on migration. Instead, religious similarity has a significant negative effect on migration, while WVS-based attitudinal similarities regarding individualism, indulgence, and trust are insignificant. Additional results suggest that cultural selection and sorting can explain these findings, where migrants are attracted by destinations that are culturally similar to their personal cultural beliefs rather than the average cultural beliefs of their home country. Results of a two-stage fixed effects (TSFE) procedure and a gravity-specific matching estimator, which both allow the estimation of time-invariant similarity variables, confirm that the relationship between cultural similarity and migration is more nuanced than previously thought.

Featured image: joshua-hoehne-on-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

December 4-6: Global Online GLO-JOPE Conference 2023 on ‘Population Economics’ with highlights of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) issues 3 & 4 of 2023 including the presentation of the JOPE 2024 Kuznets Prize. More information forthcoming.

JUST PUBLISHED
Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Theory and Empirics of Short-Time Work: A Review. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Muriel Dejemeppe and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the positive impact in the short term still makes short-time work desirable even without positive employment effects in the long term.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1348, 2023

Theory and Empirics of Short-Time Work: A Review  Download PDF
by Bermudez, Natalia & , Muriel & Tarullo, Giulia

GLO Fellow Muriel Dejemeppe

Author Abstract: Following massive take-up rates during the COVID-19 period, short-time work (STW) policies have attracted renewed interest. In this paper, we take stock of this policy instrument and provide a critical review of STW systems in Europe. We focus on the objectives of STW programs and their primary characteristics, as well as the inefficiencies associated with these policies, such as excessive use and slower worker reallocation. Additionally, we take a stroll through the main contributions of STW impact evaluations. Finally, we identify relevant directions for the refinement of the main design features of the scheme, key lessons, and avenues for future research.

Featured image: Jose-Antonio-Gallego-Vázquez-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

December 4-6: Global Online GLO-JOPE Conference 2023 on ‘Population Economics’ with highlights of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) issues 3 & 4 of 2023 including the presentation of the JOPE 2024 Kuznets Prize. More information forthcoming.

JUST PUBLISHED
Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

You’ll never walk alone: Unemployment, social networks and leisure activities. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Matteo Picchio and Mattia Filomena.

A new GLO Discussion Paper using Dutch panel data finds that unemployment does not lead to social exclusion.

Matteo Picchio

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1346, 2023

You’ll never walk alone: Unemployment, social networks and leisure activities  Download PDF
by Filomena, Mattia & Picchio, Matteo

GLO Fellow Matteo Picchio

Author Abstract: We analyse how unemployment affects individuals’ social networks, leisure activities, and the related satisfaction measures. Using the LISS panel, a representative longitudinal survey of the Dutch population, we estimate the effects by inverse propensity score weighting in a difference-in-differences design in order to deal with unobserved heterogeneity and unbalanced covariate distribution between treated and control units potentially associated with the dynamics of the outcome variables. We find that, after job loss, individuals increase their network size by strengthening their closest contacts within the family, spending more time with neighbors, and making more use of social media. Although they devote their extra leisure time mostly to private activities, our results do not support the hypothesis of social exclusion following unemployment.

Featured image: Jose-Antonio-Gallego-Vázquez-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

December 4-6: Global Online GLO-JOPE Conference 2023 on ‘Population Economics’ with highlights of JOPE issues 3 & 4 of 2023 including the presentation of the JOPE 2024 Kuznets Prize. More information forthcoming.

JUST PUBLISHED
Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Nonmonetary Awards and Innovation: Evidence from Winning China’s Top Brand Contest. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Zhiming Cheng and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that firms that received the China Top Brand Award have a higher number, and better quality, of filed patents.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1345, 2023

Nonmonetary Awards and Innovation: Evidence from Winning China’s Top Brand Contest  Download PDF
by Luo, Lianfa & Cheng, Zhiming & Ye, Qingqing & Cheng, Yanjun & Smyth, Russell & Yang, Zhiqing & Zhang, Le

GLO Fellow Zhiming Cheng

Author Abstract: We use the short-lived, but high-profile, China Top Brand Award to examine the causal effects of nonmonetary awards on firm innovation. To do so, we create a panel dataset by matching official China Top Brand Award recipients to the innovation outputs of listed companies. Results from difference-in-differences estimates show that firms that received the China Top Brand Award have a higher number, and better quality, of filed patents. We find that the positive effects of winning the China Top Brand Award on innovation outputs operate through higher government subsidies to winning firms. We also find that the positive effects of award-winning are stronger among state-owned enterprises, larger enterprises, and better-performing enterprises, as well as in provinces with stronger intellectual property rights protection. Our results are robust to a series of sensitivity checks.

Featured image: aaron-greenwood-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

December 4-6: Global Online GLO-JOPE Conference 2023 on ‘Population Economics’ with highlights of JOPE issues 3 & 4 of 2023 including the presentation of the JOPE 2024 Kuznets Prize. More information forthcoming.

JUST PUBLISHED
Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Does Global Warming Worsen Poverty and Inequality? An Updated Review. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds temperature change has larger impacts in the short term and more impacts on chronic poverty than transient poverty.

Hai-Anh Dang

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1347, 2023

Does Global Warming Worsen Poverty and Inequality? An Updated Review  Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Hallegatte, Stephane & Trinh, Trong-Anh

GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang

Author Abstract: We offer an updated and comprehensive review of recent studies on the impact of climate change, particularly global warming, on poverty and inequality, paying special attention to data sources as well as empirical methods. While studies consistently find negative impacts of higher temperature on poverty across different geographical regions, with higher vulnerability especially in poorer Sub-Saharan Africa, there is inclusive evidence on climate change impacts on inequality. Further analyzing a recently constructed global database at the subnational unit level derived from official national household income and consumption surveys, we find that temperature change has larger impacts in the short term and more impacts on chronic poverty than transient poverty. The results are robust to different model specifications and measures of chronic poverty and are more pronounced for poorer countries. Our findings offer relevant inputs into current efforts to fight climate change.

Featured image: wesley-tingey-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

December 4-6: Global Online GLO-JOPE Conference 2023 on ‘Population Economics’ with highlights of JOPE issues 3 & 4 of 2023 including the presentation of the JOPE 2024 Kuznets Prize. More information forthcoming.

JUST PUBLISHED
Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Wage and Employment Cyclicalities at the Establishment Level. A new GLO Discussion paper by GLO Fellow Christian Merkl and Heiko Stüber.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that acyclical and countercyclical wage establishments are key drivers for stronger labor market reactions in recessions than in booms.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1344, 2023

Wage and Employment Cyclicalities at the Establishment Level  Download PDF
by Merkl, Christian & Stüber, Heiko

GLO Fellow Christian Merkl

Author Abstract: Although the quantitative relationship between employment cyclicality and wage cyclicality is central for the dynamics of macroeconomic models, there is little empirical evidence on this topic. We use the German AWFP dataset to document that wage cyclicalities are very heterogeneous across establishments. Based on this heterogeneity, we estimate the relationship between employment cyclicality and wage cyclicality at the establishment level. We use this micro-estimate as a calibration target for a macro labor market flow model with heterogeneous wage dynamics that nests the standard search and matching model. Based on this micro-macro linkage, we provide a new quantitative benchmark for the role of wage rigidity in search and matching models. Furthermore, we show that acyclical and countercyclical wage establishments are key drivers for stronger labor market reactions in recessions than in booms.

Featured image: volodymyr-hryshchenko-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Time allocation of daughters-in-law and mothers-in-law in India: The role of education as bargaining power. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Leena Bhattacharya.

A new GLO Discussion Paper using time-use data for India suggests that policies that aim to increase women’s education and promote gender-equal attitudes among men can enhance the daughter-in-law’s bargaining power and time allocation.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1343, 2023

Time allocation of daughters-in-law and mothers-in-law in India: The role of education as bargaining power  Download PDF
by Bhattacharya, Leena

GLO Fellow Leena Bhattacharya

Video presentation of the paper

Author Abstract: The paper addresses the less-researched topic of intrahousehold dynamics of female in-laws in developing countries by focusing on the bargaining between mother-in-law and daughter-inlaw and its influence on the latter’s time allocation. Using the first nationally representative Time Use Survey of India, 2019, the paper answers two questions. First, how does the presence of the parents-in-law, particularly the mother-in-law, shape the daughter-in-law’s distribution of time between paid and unpaid activities? Second, how does the relative bargaining power among the female in-laws affect the daughter-in-law’s time allocation across different activities, where their education levels are used as indicators of bargaining power? The findings show that the daughter-in-law’s participation in paid work increases in the presence of her mother-in-law and she allocates more time to paid work and less time to household production. The effect is evident for the daughters-in-law who co-reside with mothers-in-law who have completed at least secondary education. The mother-in-law’s time allocated to household production and childcare increases when she co-resides with a daughter-in-law who has completed tertiary education. The father-in-law’s presence consistently diminishes the daughter-in-law’s engagement in paid work and increases both women’s time spent on household production. Heterogeneity in results is observed by socio-religious groups and by the extent of patriarchy in the state of residence. Overall, the results suggest that policies that aim to increase women’s education and promote gender-equal attitudes among men can enhance the daughter-in-law’s bargaining power and time allocation.

Featured image: Trevor-Cole-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Social Insurance against a Short Life: Ante-Mortem versus Post-Mortem Policies. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Gregory Ponthiere.

A new GLO Discussion Paper compares two insurance devices reducing well-being volatility due to the risk of early death finding that a youth allowance leads to a higher lifetime well-being.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1342, 2023

Social Insurance against a Short Life: Ante-Mortem versus Post-Mortem Policies  Download PDF
by Ponthiere, Gregory

GLO Fellow Gregory Ponthiere

Author Abstract: Welfare States do not insure citizens against the risk of premature death, i.e., the risk of having a short life. Using a dynamic OLG model with risky lifetime, this paper compares two insurance devices reducing well-being volatility due to the risk of early death: (i) an ante-mortem age-based statistical discrimination policy that consists of an allowance given to all young adults (including the unidentified adults who will die early); (ii) a post-mortem subsidy on accidental bequests due to early death. Each policy is financed by taxing old-age consumption. Whereas each device can yield full insurance, the youth allowance is shown to imply a higher lifetime well-being at the stationary equilibrium. The marginal utility of consumption exceeding the marginal utility of giving when being dead, the youth allowances system is, despite imperfect targeting, a more efficient mechanism of insurance against the risk of early death.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Congratulations, Professor Galor!

Oded Galor

Today, we celebrate the 70th birthday of Professor Oded Galor, a North Star in the field of economics. His groundbreaking work has illuminated our understanding of humanity’s economic journey. His dedication to research has inspired countless individuals around the world. The Journal of Population Economics and the GLO global network is grateful for his endless support and great inspirations. On this special day, we honor his remarkable contributions and wish him a very happy birthday. May his path continue to be marked by curiosity, discovery, and success.

Ends;

The societal costs of inflation and unemployment. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Olga Popova & Milena Nikolova and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper analyzing a dataset of over 1.9 million individuals from 156 countries finds that both inflation and unemployment associates negatively with confidence in financial institutions.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1341, 2023

The societal costs of inflation and unemployment  Download PDF
by Popova, Olga & See, Sarah Grace & Nikolova, Milena & Otrachshenko, Vladimir

GLO Fellows Olga Popova & Milena Nikolova

Author Abstract: What are the broad societal implications of inflation and unemployment? Analyzing a dataset of over 1.9 million individuals from 156 countries via the Gallup World Poll spanning 2005 to 2021, alongside macroeconomic data at the national level, we find that both inflation and unemployment have a negative link with confidence in financial institutions. While inflation is generally unassociated with confidence in government and leadership approval, unemployment still has a strong negative association with these outcomes. While we find no gender differences in the consequences of inflation and unemployment for confidence in political and financial institutions, the associations we document are more substantial for the cohorts that are likely to bear a disproportionate burden from inflation and unemployment-the middle-aged, lower-educated, and unmarried individuals, and for those living in rural areas. Uncertainty about the country’s economic performance and one’s own economic situation are the primary channels behind the associations we identify. These findings hold significant implications for policymakers, Central Banks, and public discourse, necessitating targeted strategies to alleviate the social consequences of inflation and unemployment.

Featured image: paul-fiedler-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

New members of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Population Economics: Ashwini Deshpande, Anthony Lepinteur and Nina Smith

The Journal of Population Economics and its publisher Springer warmly welcomes three new members of the journal editorial team:

The new members will support the editorial efforts in many areas of research like gender, discrimination, affirmative action, family, child development, migration, education, labor, income inequality and health. 

Ends;

Sixth IESR-GLO Joint Workshop at Jinan University, October 26-27, 2023: REPORT.

The 6th IESR-GLO joint workshop on “Gender Issues and Domestic Violence” took place in Guangzhou, Jinan University, China, on October 26-27, 2023. The event was jointly organized by the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) with the support of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE).

The two-days workshop discussed family, gender and child issues including gender equality and sexual & domestic violence. These issues are and remain of particular interest for future publications of JOPE. The event also reviewed and celebrated the recent success JOPE has achieved with impact factor IF = 6.1 and CiteScore 9.2.

On the invitation of IESR Director Shuaizhang Feng, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann had already given a public lecture at Jinan University on “Economic Preferences Across Generations” on October 25.

Day 1 October 26
12:00-2:00 PM Lunch

2:00-2:45 PM

  • Welcome Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University and GLO
  • Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) & IESR-GLO Collaboration
    Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT and GLO, JOPE Editor-in-Chief


Impact Factor 2022 IF = 6.1
CiteScore 2022 = 9.2


Among the top 12 best cited articles for the 2022 Impact Factor are two papers with IESR authors:

Rank 1: Qiu, Y., Chen, X. & Shi, W. Impacts of social and economic factors on the transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China. JOPE 33, 1127–1172 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-020-00778-2 OPEN ACCESS.
Rank 11: Meng, X., Xue, S. Social networks and mental health outcomes: Chinese rural–urban migrant experience. JOPE 33, 155–195 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-019-00748-3 Free to read: https://rdcu.be/dpLbO

From the left: Wei Shi, Yun Qiu, JOPE Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann, JOPE Editor Shuaizhang Feng & Sen Xue. The handling editor of both articles was the Editor-in-Chief.

JOPE Collections and calls for papers: One focus (collection) is Sexual and Domestic Violence. JOPE Associate Editors Astghik Mavisakalyan and Dave Ribar are important advisors in the JOPE Editorial Board for this focus.

Recommended reading:
Prettyman, A., Ribar, D.C. (2022). Child Abuse and Neglect. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_234-1
Hsu, L., Henke, A. (2022). Intimate Partner Violence. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_309-2

Session I – Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann

2:45-3:30 PM

  • Intimate Partner Violence and Child Health

Tushar Bharati (University of Western Australia), Michael Dockery (Curtin University),
Astghik Mavisakalyan (Curtin University and GLO) and Loan Vu (Curtin University)

3:30-4:00 PM Break

4:00-4:45 PM 

  • No Pain, More Gain: Anti-domestic Violence Law and Female Wages in Rural China

Liu Xinyan, CUHK and GLO
The author is a 2023-24 VirtYS scholar, Astghik Mavisakalyan her mentor in this program.

4:45-5:30 PM

  • Women, Violence and Work: Threat of Sexual Violence and Women’s Decision to Work

Tanika Chakraborty, Indian Institute of Management and GLO; Nafisa Lohawala,
University of Michigan

5:30 PM: JOPE internal meeting

Discussion of Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann & Editor Shuaizhang Feng with JOPE Associate Editors Astghik Mavisakalyan & Dave Ribar (online) as well as Tanika Chakraborty & Xiao Zhang about the focus Sexual and Domestic Violence.

Shuaizhang Feng, Tanika Chakraborty, Astghik Mavisakalyan & Klaus F. Zimmermann

Day 2 October 27

Sen Xue (left) & Shuaizhang Feng

Session II – Chair: Sen Xue

9:00-:9:45 AM

  • The Impact of Ozone Pollution on Mortality: Evidence from China

Yunning Liu, Chinese Center for Disease Prevention and Control; Yun Qiu, Jinan University and GLO; Wei Shi, Jinan University and GLO; Maigeng Zhou, Chinese Center for Disease Prevention and Control

9:45-10:30 AM

  • Parental Migration, Parenting and Children’s Skill Development

Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University and GLO; James J. Heckman, University of Chicago and GLO; Jun Hyung Kim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and GLO; Yuejie Han, Jinan University; Sen Xue, Jinan University and GLO

10:30-11:00 AM Break

Session III – Chair: Shuaizhang Feng

11:00-11:45 AM

  • Shaping Gender Role Attitudes: Intergenerational Impacts of Parental Occupational Differences during Adolescence

Shu Cai, Jinan University and GLO; Wei Luo, Jinan University and GLO; Zheng Zhong, Jinan University

11:45-12:30 AM 

  • Parental Gender Stereotypes and Student Wellbeing in China

Shuai Chu, Renmin University and GLO, Xiangquan Zeng, Renmin University and GLO & Klaus
F. Zimmermann
, UNU-MERIT and GLO

Summary
Shuaizhang Feng
, Jinan University & GLO

Lunch

Ends;

Sixth Renmin University of China & GLO Conference 2023. Program & Report.

The 6th Renmin University of China, Beijing & GLO Conference 2023 on Chinese labor market issues took place in person October 7-8 at Renmin University of China organized by the School of Labor and Human Resources together with GLO. The event was supported by the Journal of Population Economics.

Organizers: Liqiu Zhao (Renmin University of China and GLO); Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton and GLO, Associate Editor Journal of Population Economics); Zhong Zhao (Renmin University of China and GLO, Associate Editor Journal of Population Economics), and GLO President & Editor-in-Chief Journal of Population Economics Klaus F. Zimmermann (Renmin University of China & Free University of Berlin).

The full academic program is provided below; conference photo at the end.
See also: Conference program.

The conference was opened by Zhong Zhao, who is also the Dean of the School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University, and Klaus F. Zimmermann for GLO.

The first keynote speaker was Junsen Zhang (Zhejiang University and GLO), who spoke about “Aging in a Dual Economy: Urban Aging, Massive Migration, and Agricultural Development”.

In his keynote (“Publishing in Research Journals at the Time of AI”), Zimmermann mentioned that the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) has published important Chinese studies and will continue to do so. Among the top 12 best cited articles for the 2022 Impact Factor (with a top value for JOPE of IF = 6.1) are four articles from Chinese authors with contributors of three articles present at the conference.

From the left: Sen Xue, Junsen Zhang, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Zhong Zhao, Liqiu Zhao

Among the top 12 best cited articles for the 2022 JOPE Impact Factor are four papers with authors based in China:

Rank 1: Qiu, Y., Chen, X. & Shi, W. Impacts of social and economic factors on the transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China. JOPE 33, 1127–1172 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-020-00778-2 OPEN ACCESS.
Handling Editor: Klaus F. Zimmermann
Rank 8: Du, H., Xiao, Y. & Zhao, Liqiu Education and gender role attitudes. JOPE 34, 475–513 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-020-00793-3 Free to read: https://rdcu.be/dpTur
Handling Editor: Shuaizhang Feng
Rank 11: Meng, X., Xue, Sen Social networks and mental health outcomes: Chinese rural–urban migrant experience. JOPE 33, 155–195 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-019-00748-3 Free to read: https://rdcu.be/dpLbO
Handling Editor: Klaus F. Zimmermann
Rank 12: Tang, C., Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong Does free education help combat child labor? The effect of a free compulsory education reform in rural China. JOPE 33, 601–631 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-019-00741-w Free to read: https://rdcu.be/dpU9i
Handling Editor: Junsen Zhang

Day 1: Saturday. October 7, 2023

Day 2: Sunday. October 8, 2023

Ends;

Report on Scientific Collaborations with Renmin University of China

Reflections and debate on the 40th Anniversary of the School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University of China. A large day-long event took place on October 4, 2023 at Renmin University, Beijing, China. Since its creation, GLO had annual research conferences with the School, the 6th RUC-GLO conference took place on October 7-8, 2023. However, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann had organized international collaborations and exchange with the School already over a period of three decades before in his previous roles as Founding Director of IZA Bonn (for two decades) and his tenure as Professor and Director of SELPO at the University of Munich (in the decade before).

Consequently, the GLO President was one of the main (and the only foreign) speakers among a long list of distinguished authorities during the morning (19 speeches) congratulating the School for its rise to excellence, success and international recognition. Zimmermann said: “I extend my heartfelt congratulations on your decades of escalating success! The success reflects your commitment to advancing science, particularly in the field of economics through research and policy advice. Your contributions through international visibility and collaborations are commendable. Since its establishment in 1983, the School has grown into a leading institution in labor research and education in China with global recognition. One of its notable achievements includes the creation of China’s first research program for a PhD degree in labor economics in 1994, among many others. The School has made significant strides in areas such as employment, income distribution, labor relations, human resource development and management, social security, and more.”

The presentations in the afternoon discussed the evolution of the discipline and the contributions the School was engaged with. In this context, Klaus F. Zimmermann gave a speech on “Family Economics: From Constraints to Preferences and Stereotypes” reviewing also the collaborative work he has done and is still doing with Chinese researchers. He further detailed the long-term contacts he has been involved with and thanked in particular former Dean Xiangquan Zeng and current Dean Zhong Zhao for the many years of successful collaborations.

In a special speech, Dean Zhong Zhao honored Xiangquan Zeng and Klaus F. Zimmermann in the name of the School for their long-term strong efforts to foster scientific collaborations with a certificate (see below).

On Friday October 6, 2023 Xiangquan Zeng gave an opening speech at the 2023 Annual Meeting of the Chinese Labor Society which also took place at Renmin University of China. Klaus F. Zimmermann was invited to deliver a keynote lecture on “Migrant Local Identity and Labor Market Success”.

October 4, 2023; Morning Session.

40th Anniversary of the School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University of China: Building a Discipline of Labor Economics and Management with Chinese Characteristics

First row GLO Fellows Yang Du & Desheng Lai; second row, right Zhong Zhao, Dean of the School (and GLO Fellow) on his way to provide his speech at the end of the morning celebrations.

October 4, 2023; Afternoon Session.

40th Anniversary of the School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University of China: Global Forum of Labor Economics and Management Disciplines

GLO Fellow Xiangquan Zeng and Klaus F. Zimmermann receiving the certificates of the School of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University.

Dean Zhong Zhao and Klaus F. Zimmermann with respect for the achievements.

October 6, 2023

2023 Annual Meeting of the Chinese Labor Society


Renmin University of China Professor Xiangquan Zeng during his opening speech at the 2023 Annual Meeting of the Chinese Labor Society.

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann delivered a keynote lecture on “Migrant Local Identity and Labor Market Success”.

Ends;

Contested Transparency: Digital Monitoring Technologies and Worker Voice. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Gabriel Burdin, Fabio Landini & Ignacio Belloc.

A new GLO Discussion Paper using a cross-sectional sample of more than 21,000 European establishments finds that establishments with employee representation are more likely to utilize digital monitoring technologies than establishments without.

Ignacio Belloc

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1340, 2023

Contested Transparency: Digital Monitoring Technologies and Worker Voice  Download PDF
by Burdin, Gabriel & Dughera, Stefano & Landini, Fabio & Belloc, Filippo

GLO Fellows Gabriel Burdin, Fabio Landini & Ignacio Belloc

Author Abstract: Advances in artificial intelligence and data analytics have notably expanded employers’ monitoring and surveillance capabilities, facilitating the accurate observability of work effort. There is an ongoing debate among academics and policymakers about the productivity and broader welfare implications of digital monitoring (DM) technologies. In this context, many countries confer information, consultation and codetermination rights to (ER) bodies on matters related to workplace organization and the introduction of new technologies, which could potentially discourage employers from making DM investments. Using a cross-sectional sample of more than 21000 European establishments, we find instead that establishments with ER are more likely to utilize DM technologies than establishments without ER. We also document a positive effect of ER on DM utilization in the context of a local-randomization regression discontinuity analysis that exploits size-contingent policy rules governing the operation of ER bodies in Europe. We rationalize this unexpected finding through the lens of a theoretical framework in which shared governance via ER create organizational safeguards that mitigate workers’ negative responses to monitoring and undermines the disciplining effect of DM technologies.

Featured image: artificial-intelligence-Pixabay-e1612455547910

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Where have all Tech Layoffs gone? A Model of Two Worker Types with Outsourcing. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Sugata Marjit and GLO Fellow Gouranga Das.

A new GLO Discussion Paper develops a model to show how contraction in demand for IT-enabled works will determine how much of works to be completed in the US (home) and the remainder to be sourced out to say, India (abroad).

Viet Kong
Gouranga G. Das

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1338, 2023

Where have all Tech Layoffs gone? A Model of Two Worker Types with Outsourcing Download PDF
by Marjit, Sugata & Das, Gouranga G.

GLO Fellow Gouranga Das

Author Abstract: The flourishing of IT-sector and IT-enabled services has led to emergence of different activities by leaps and bounds thanks to proliferation of Virtual plattorm-based transactions, and E-commerce. However, massive layoffs started in 2022, as all tech giants encountered revenue declines amidst supply chain issues, inflation, Ukraine war, leading to deflation and fears of recession squeezing consumer and business spending. This has happened across the globe. In the context of the countries supplying low- wage labor (skilled wage in Indian Silicon Valley at Bengaluru is lower than that in the Californian Silicon Valley), similar episodes unfolded but to a different extent. The evidence suggests that layoffs in developing economies like India is much less than that in the US with limited impact on Indian industry despite severe global downturn. Jobs and hiring will move out of the developed markets to these emerging markets with cost advantages owing to lower salaries, as with low demand, drive to cutdown costs will induce firms to outsource some operations outside while focusing on core functions provided the cost of outsourcing is not too high. In this paper, we build a model to show how contraction in demand for IT-enabled works will determine how much of works to be completed in the US (home) and the remainder to be sourced out to say, India (abroad). We identify the conditions under which switching from pure domestic production to outsourcing using hired foreign workers will happen. We show that in both cases of perfectly competitive homogeneous product as well as in case of differentiated goods oligopoly scenarios that the hiring ceases drastically in the home while the outsourced workers will not suffer to a large extent. Home bears the burden of adjustment due to the sheer cost disadvantages of the home.

Featured image: Alex-Knight-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Impact of the Energy Conservation Law on Enterprise Energy Efficiency: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Chinese Firms. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Zhiming Cheng and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the energy regulation has a positive impact on enterprise energy efficiency.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1339, 2023

The Impact of the Energy Conservation Law on Enterprise Energy Efficiency: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Chinese Firms  Download PDF
by Yu, Hongwei & Chen, Wenjin & Wang, Xinyi & Delina, Laurence & Cheng, Zhiming & Zhang, Le

GLO Fellow Zhiming Cheng

Author Abstract: We employ a regression discontinuity design (RDD) to investigate the causal effect of China’s Energy Conservation Law (ECL) on the energy efficiency of Chinese firms. Using data from the 2018 China Employer-Employee Survey (CEES), we find that the energy regulation has a positive impact on enterprise energy efficiency. Furthermore, we observe that the effects of the regulation vary across industries, ownership types, and firm ages. We also find that energy management system (EnMS) and technological innovation are mechanisms through which the energy regulation helps improve enterprise energy efficiency. These findings underscore the importance of well-designed and effectively implemented energy regulations in fostering energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions in the industrial sector. They also highlight the need to consider the heterogeneity of the regulatory impact when designing energy-saving policies.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Sixth IESR-GLO Joint Workshop at Jinan University, October 26-27, 2023.

The 6th IESR-GLO joint workshop on “Gender Issues and Domestic Violence” takes place in Guangzhou, Jinan University, China, on October 26-27, 2023. The event is jointly organized by the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) with the support of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE).

Day 1 October 26
12:00-2:00 PM Lunch

2:00-2:45 PM

  • Welcome Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University and GLO
  • Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) & IESR-GLO Collaboration
    Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT and GLO, JOPE Editor-in-Chief

    Recommended reading: Prettyman, A., Ribar, D.C. (2022). Child Abuse and Neglect. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_234-1

Session I – Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann

2:45-3:30 PM

  • Intimate Partner Violence and Child Health

Tushar Bharati (University of Western Australia), Michael Dockery (Curtin University),
Astghik Mavisakalyan (Curtin University and GLO) and Loan Vu (Curtin University)

3:30-4:00 PM Break

4:00-4:45 PM 

  • No Pain, More Gain: Anti-domestic Violence Law and Female Wages in Rural China

Liu Xinyan, CUHK and GLO

4:45-5:30 PM

  • Women, Violence and Work: Threat of Sexual Violence and Women’s Decision to Work

Tanika Chakraborty, Indian Institute of Management and GLO; Nafisa Lohawala,
University of Michigan

5:30 PM: JOPE internal meeting

Day 2 October 27

Session II – Chair: Sen Xue

9:00-:9:45 AM

  • The Impact of Ozone Pollution on Mortality: Evidence from China

Yunning Liu, Chinese Center for Disease Prevention and Control; Yun Qiu, Jinan University and GLO; Wei Shi, Jinan University and GLO; Maigeng Zhou, Chinese Center for Disease Prevention and Control

9:45-10:30 AM

  • Parental Migration, Parenting and Children’s Skill Development

Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University and GLO; James J. Heckman, University of Chicago and GLO; Jun Hyung Kim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and GLO; Yuejie Han, Jinan University; Sen Xue, Jinan University and GLO

10:30-11:00 AM Break

Session III – Chair: Shuaizhang Feng

11:00-11:45 AM

  • Shaping Gender Role Attitudes: Intergenerational Impacts of Parental Occupational Differences during Adolescence

Shu Cai, Jinan University and GLO; Wei Luo, Jinan University and GLO; Zheng Zhong, Jinan University

11:45-12:30 AM 

  • Parental Gender Stereotypes and Student Wellbeing in China

Shuai Chu, Renmin University and GLO, Xiangquan Zeng, Renmin University and GLO & Klaus
F. Zimmermann
, UNU-MERIT and GLO

Summary
Shuaizhang Feng
, Jinan University & GLO

Lunch

Ends;

Human Capital Workshop Call for Papers by Bank of Italy.

The Bank of Italy is pleased to announce a one-day workshop on “Human Capital” to be held on March 22, 2024.

The workshop brings together leading researchers in the field of education and human capital to present their theoretical and empirical research.

The deadline to submit a paper is January 8, 2024.

The keynote lecture will be given by Lance Lochner (University of Western Ontario).

The scientific committee is composed by: Giulia Bovini, Antonio Dalla Zuanna, Domenico Depalo, Annalisa Loviglio (University of Bologna), Monica Langella (University of Naples Federico II).

We kindly ask you to circulate the call and submit your research.

More information:
https://www.bancaditalia.it/media/notizia/4th-bank-of-italy-human-capital-workshop/?com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language

The post was suggested by GLO Fellow Domenico Depalo.

Featured image: david-kohler-unsplash

Ends;

Forced Labor and Health-Related Outcomes. The Case of Beggar Children. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals the determinants of child begging.

Xi Chen
Nick Drydakis

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1337, 2023

Forced Labor and Health-Related Outcomes. The Case of Beggar Children – Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis

Author Abstract: The study aims to examine whether beggar children are victims of forced labor, as well as to identify the manifestations of forced labor in beggar children, and assess whether forced child begging relates to deteriorated health-related quality of life and mental health. The study focused on the capital city of Greece, Athens, where beggar children are not a hard-to-reach group. Cross-sectional data were collected in 2011, 2014, 2018 and 2022, with 127 beggar children taking part in the study. The study adopted the Anti-Slavery International research toolkit, which sets methodological guidelines on researching child begging. A scale was developed to quantify forced child begging based on the International Labour Organization’s definition of forced labor. The study found that most beggar children were forced by others to beg, experienced threats of violence, physical and verbal harassment aimed at forcing them to beg, and difficulty in terms of being allowed by others to stop begging. It was found that forced child begging was positively associated with living with unknown people, hunger due to food unavailability the previous week, and negatively associated with native beggar children. It was discovered that forced child begging was negatively associated with health-related quality of life and mental health for beggar children. Child begging encompasses elements of coercion and the deprivation of human freedom. These factors collectively amount to instances of forced labor and/or modern slavery. Policies should ensure that beggar children are removed from harm’s way, and that those forcing children to beg are brought to justice.

Featured image: Beth-Macdonald-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Power to choose? Examining the link between contraceptive use and domestic violence. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Manini Ojha and Karan Babbar.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for India that if the decision to use contraceptives is solely taken by the woman, she is at a significantly higher risk of physical, sexual and emotional domestic violence.

Manini Ojha

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1336, 2023

Power to choose? Examining the link between contraceptive use and domestic violence – Download PDF
by Ojha, Manini & Babbar, Karan

GLO Fellow Manini Ojha

Author Abstract: Contraception is a crucial tool that empowers women to control their bodily autonomy. Concurrently, violence against women remains a pressing public-health issue depleting women’s autonomy. We establish a causal link between the decision to use contraception and the occurrence of intimate partner violence. Utilizing newly available nationally representative data for India, we use an instrumental variable approach to estimate our causal effects. Using exogenous variation in the cluster average of women’s exposure to family planning messages via radio, we find that if the decision to use contraceptives is solely taken by the woman, she is at a significantly higher risk of physical, sexual and emotional domestic violence. We estimate bounds of our effects by assuming the IV to be plausibly exogenous where we relax the exogeneity condition. Our findings underscore the importance of reproductive health in initiatives that reduce domestic violence and targeted policies towards men’s understanding of family planning.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Life Expectancy, Income and Long-Term Care: The Preston Curve Reexamined. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Gregory Ponthiere & Emmanuel Thibault.

The new GLO Discussion Paper provides an explanation for the absence of the Preston Curve in countries where old-age dependency is more acute.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1335, 2023

Life Expectancy, Income and Long-Term Care: The Preston Curve Reexamined – Download PDF
by Ponthiere, Gregory & Thibault, Emmanuel

GLO Fellows Gregory Ponthiere & Emmanuel Thibault

Author Abstract: The Preston Curve – the increasing relation between income per capita and life expectancy – cannot be observed in countries where old-age dependency is widespread (that is, where long-term care (LTC) spending per capita is high). The absence of the Preston Curve in countries with high old-age dependency can be related to two other stylized facts: (1) the inverted-U relation between LTC spending and life expectancy; (2) the inverted-U relation between LTC spending and preventive health investments. This paper develops a two-period OLG model where survival to the old age depends on preventive health spending chosen by individuals while anticipating (fixed) old-age LTC costs. In that model, anticipated LTC costs are shown to have a non-monotonic effect on preventive health investment, thus rationalizing stylized facts (1) and (2). This framework is shown to provide an explanation for the absence of the Preston Curve in countries where old-age dependency is more acute.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Call for contributions: 46th EBES Conference – Rome/Italy January 10-12, 2024. Abstract deadline: November 30, 2023.

The 46th EBES Conference – Rome will take place on January 10th,11th, and 12th, 2024 in Rome, Italy. The conference will be hosted by the Faculty of Economics, Sapienza University of Rome with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person).

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation considerations.

Deadline for Abstract/Paper Submission is November 30, 2023.

EBES Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, Istanbul Medeniyet University, EBES, Turkey
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than November 30, 2023.

For submission, please visit our website at https://ebesweb.org/46th-ebes-conference-rome/46th-abstract-submission/ no submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, and 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29 (Vol. 1), and 30th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: January 10-12, 2024
Abstract Submission Deadline: November 30, 2023
Reply-by: December 10, 2023*
Registration Deadline: December 19, 2023
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: December 20, 2023
Announcement of the Program: December 25, 2023
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): December 20, 2023**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: March 16, 2024

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before November 30, 2023, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by December 20, 2023.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Dr. Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference LINK

Ends;

Finding Love Abroad: Who Marries a Migrant and What Do They Gain? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Eva Dziadula & Madeline Zavodny.

A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that U.S. immigration policy plays an important role in whether immigrants bring in a spouse. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1334, 2023

Finding Love Abroad: Who Marries a Migrant and What Do They Gain? – Download PDF
by Dziadula, Eva & Zavodny, Madeline

GLO Fellows Eva Dziadula & Madeline Zavodny

Author Abstract: This study explores the role of individual and local marriage market characteristics in whether recently wed U.S. residents “imported” a spouse instead of marrying someone already present in the country. Our findings indicate that U.S. natives and immigrants whose spouse is a “marriage migrant” (someone who arrived in the U.S. the same year as the marriage occurred) are positively selected along some dimensions but negatively along others. The results also suggest that U.S. immigration policy plays an important role in whether immigrants bring in a spouse. We further investigate the trade-offs in spouse characteristics associated with having a marriage-migrant spouse. There appear to be several advantages to marrying a migrant, including that marriage-migrant spouses tend to be relatively younger and less likely to have been previously married. Immigrants’ gains to marrying a migrant are bigger among naturalized citizens, showcasing the desirability of someone who can easily sponsor a spouse for permanent residence.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Artificial Intelligence and Employment: A Look into the Crystal Ball. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Dario Guarascio, GLO Affiliate Jelena Reljic and Roman Stöllinger.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that AI exposure has a positive impact on regional employment in Europe.

Jelena Reljic

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1333, 2023

Artificial Intelligence and Employment: A Look into the Crystal Ball – Download PDF
by Guarascio, Dario & Reljic, Jelena & Stöllinger, Roman

GLO Fellow Dario Guarascio & GLO Affiliate Jelena Reljic

Author Abstract: This study provides evidence of the employment impact of AI exposure in European regions, addressing one of the many gaps in the emerging literature on AI’s effects on employment in Europe. Building upon the occupation-based AI-exposure indicators proposed by Felten et al. (2018, 2019, 2021), which are mapped to the European occupational classification (ISCO), following Albanesi et al. (2023), we analyse the regional employment dynamics between 2011 and 2018. After controlling for a wide range of supply and demand factors, our findings indicate that, on average, AI exposure has a positive impact on regional employment. Put differently, European regions characterised by a relatively larger share of AI-exposed occupations display, all else being equal and once potential endogeneity concerns are mitigated, a more favourable employment tendency over the period 2011-2018. We also find evidence of a moderating effect of robot density on the AI-employment nexus, which however lacks a causal underpinning.

Featured image: Alex-Knight-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Ten Years of China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

China’s Belt and Road Initiative “has now been active for ten years and has led to China engaging in $1.01 trillion worth of investment and construction in 148 countries around the world.” (statista) The initiative has been under debate ever since the beginning.

  • Lauren A. Johnston (2023). China’s Belt and Road Initiative: Human Capital Implications. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_412-1

    In 2013 China launched a flagship global development and geoeconomics initiative, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). From the lens of the contents of the two launch speeches the BRI can be understood as having five policy-related objectives which should be achieved via and alongside five delivery-related principles. These include direct human resources–related objectives, including fostering people-to-people ties, and goals that have vast implicit human resources–related implications, including those calling for fostering greater trade and investment. This chapter outlines those launch speeches, and China’s economic circumstances at the time of their delivery. This sets the context for onward elaboration of the BRI’s human resources–related policy announcements and goals, and the mechanisms for their delivery, including educational scholarships and in-country technical and vocational training, alongside language training, mainly via Confucius Institutes. Since none of China’s BRI activities happen in a controlled vacuum, and the BRI’s implementation context typically varies across time, country, and sector, it is difficult to draw specific human resource–related conclusions as to the BRI’s related implications. Case studies around the use of Chinese labor, and Chinese management, are, however, explored, and emphasis is placed on capacity to co-shape the human resources–related evolution of the BRI going forward.

  • Michele Bruni (2022). China, the Belt and Road Initiative, and the Century of Great Migration. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    GLO Interview with the author.

  • 2019 IESR-GLO Workshop on ‘Belt and Road’ – Labor Markets.

Source: statista

Ends;

Unintended Consequences of Youth Entrepreneurship Programs: Experimental Evidence from Rwanda. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Moussa P. Blimpo & Todd Pugatch.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that youth entrepreneurship programs may steer some participants away from their comparative advantage.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1332, 2023

Unintended Consequences of Youth Entrepreneurship Programs: Experimental Evidence from Rwanda – Download PDF
by Blimpo, Moussa P. & Pugatch, Todd

GLO Fellows Moussa P. Blimpo & Todd Pugatch

Author Abstract: The persistently high employment share of the informal sector makes entrepreneurship a necessity for youth in many developing countries. We exploit exogenous variation in the implementation of Rwanda’s entrepreneurship education reform in secondary schools to evaluate its effect on student economic outcomes up to three years after graduation. Using a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated a three-year intensive training for entrepreneurship teachers, finding pedagogical changes as intended and increased entrepreneurial activity among students. In this paper, we tracked students following graduation and found that increased entrepreneurship persisted one year later, in 2019. Students from treated schools were six percentage points more likely to be entrepreneurs, an increase of 19 percent over the control mean. However, gains in entrepreneurship faded after three years, in 2021. Employment was six percentage points lower in the treatment group. By some measures, income and profits were lower in the treatment group, with no robust differences in these outcomes overall. Lower incomes and profits were concentrated among marginal students induced into entrepreneurship by the program. Youth entrepreneurship programs may therefore steer some participants away from their comparative advantage. Nonetheless, the program increased university enrollment, suggesting the potential for higher long run returns.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Human Capital Misallocation and Output per Worker Differences: Beyond Cobb-Douglas. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Jan Trenczek and GLO Fellow Konstantin M. Wacker.

A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that physical and human capital are less substitutable than Cobb-Douglas assumes.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1331, 2023

Human Capital Misallocation and Output per Worker Differences: Beyond Cobb-Douglas – Download PDF
by Trenczek, Jan & Wacker, Konstantin M.

GLO Fellow Konstantin M. Wacker

Author Abstract: Misallocation of human capital across sectors can have substantial negative implications for aggregate output. So far, the literature examining this type of labor misallocation has assumed a Cobb-Douglas production function. Our paper departs from this assumption and instead considers more exible CES production functions with different labor skill types as individual inputs. Our estimates from sectoral data of 39 countries suggest that physical and human capital are less substitutable than Cobb-Douglas assumes. Our counterfactual results indicate that human capital misallocation can explain approximately 15% of output per worker variation across countries, which is substantially less than under a Cobb-Douglas specification (21%).

Featured image: nikko-macaspac-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Technological Sovereignty and Strategic Dependencies: The case of the Photovoltaic Supply Chain. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Dario Guarascio and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that reinforcing technological specialization may help mitigating strategic dependencies.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1330, 2023

Technological Sovereignty and Strategic Dependencies: The case of the Photovoltaic Supply Chain – Download PDF
by Caravella, Serenella & Crespi, Francesco & Cucignatto, Giacomo & Guarascio, Dario

GLO Fellow Dario Guarascio

Author Abstract: This work sheds new light on the Photovoltaic Supply Chain (PVSC), providing fresh evidence on strategic dependencies (SDs) and (asymmetrically distributed) technological capabilities. Bridging the perspectives of ‘technological sovereignty’ and ‘strategic autonomy’, a number of contributions are provided. First, we carry out a fine-grained mapping of the PVSC, combining trade and patent data. Second, we assess the long-term evolution of trade and technological hierarchies, documenting processes of polarization and growing SDs. Third, we zoom-in on critical PV areas (i.e. products and related technologies), providing a ‘strategic intelligence’ activity which may prove useful for tailoring trade, industrial and innovation policies. Fourth, we explore the relationship between technological specialization and productive capabilities showing that, in the upstream segment, reinforcing the former may help mitigating SDs.

Featured image: Pixabay-on-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Protests, Long-term Preferences, and Populism. Evidence from 1968 in Europe. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Andrea Fazio.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that higher exposure to protests in 1968 leads to higher dissatisfaction toward national governments and raises the probability of voting for populist parties. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1329, 2023

Protests, Long-term Preferences, and Populism. Evidence from 1968 in Europe – Download PDF
by Fazio, Andrea

GLO Fellow Andrea Fazio

Author Abstract: In 1968, young people grew up in an atmosphere of strong dissatisfaction and distrust against the status quo. We show that higher exposure to protests in 1968 leads to higher dissatisfaction toward national governments and raises the probability of voting for populist parties. Consistently with the impressionable years hypothesis, we find these effects valid only for those aged between 18 and 25 during 1968. Our results are robust to a series of placebo tests and to alternative definitions of our treatment and control groups. We find that our results are driven by individuals with a middle or low level of education. We also find suggestive evidence that the mechanisms driving our results can depend on individuals’ level of education: within our treated cohort people with an elementary level of education appear more attracted by the populist rhetoric, while people with a middle level of education are more likely to care about traditional values.

Featured image: arnaud-jaegers-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

EBES – GLO Conference Collaborations: Budapest, Rome, Berlin

The 45th EBES Conference took place on October 11-13, 2023 in Budapest, Hungary. The conference was hosted by Mathias Corvinus Collegium and organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). GLO & EBES President Klaus F. Zimmermann gave a welcome speech together with Ender Demir (EBES) and Zoltan Csefalvay (Mathias Corvinus Collegium). Zimmermann also chaired the Editors’ Panel Session presenting the two EBES journals Eurasian Economic Review and the Eurasian Business Review next to his own Journal of Population Economics.

EBES 45 Budapest Conference Program

The next conferences were discussed and announced (mark your calendars):

  • January 10-12, 2024: Rome, Italy.  46th EBES HYBRID conference. Submission deadline November 30, 2023.  Call for contributions.
  • April 18-20, 2024: Berlin, Germany47th EBES HYBRID conference. (The first two days will be in person only.) Jointly Organized with GLO and FOM University of Applied SciencesBerlin. GLO will organize a separate program part with separate registration and paper call. Participants will have access to all program parts of both conferences.

Ends;

Temperature exposure and sleep duration: Evidence from time use surveys. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Tamás Hajdu.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows by scenarios that global warming will substantially decrease sleep duration. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1328, 2023

Temperature exposure and sleep duration: Evidence from time use surveys – Download PDF
by Hajdu, Tamás

GLO Fellow Tamás Hajdu

Author Abstract: The Earth’s climate is projected to warm significantly in the 21st century, and this will affect human societies in many ways. Since sleep is a basic human need and part of everyone’s life, the question of how temperature affects human sleep naturally arises. This paper examines the effect of daily mean temperature on sleep duration using nationally representative Hungarian time use surveys between 1976 and 2010. Compared to a mild temperature (5-10 °C), colder temperatures do not influence sleep duration. However, as daily mean temperatures rise, sleep duration starts to strongly decline. The effect of a hot (>25 °C) day is −12.4 minutes. The estimated sleep loss is especially large on weekends and public holidays, for older individuals, and for men. Combining the estimated effects with temperature projections of twenty-four climate models under four climate change scenarios shows that the warming climate will substantially decrease sleep duration. The projected impacts are especially large when taking into account of the effects of heatwave days. This study also shows that different groups in society are likely to be affected in significantly different ways by a warming climate.

Featured image: jordan-whitt-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Overeducation, Performance Pay and Wages: Evidence from Germany. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Mehrzad B. Baktash.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that overeducation associates with a higher likelihood of sorting into performance pay jobs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1327, 2023

Overeducation, Performance Pay and Wages: Evidence from Germany – Download PDF
by Baktash, Mehrzad B.

GLO Affiliate Mehrzad B. Baktash

Author Abstract: Overeducated workers are more productive and have higher wages in comparison to their adequately educated coworkers in the same jobs. However, they face a series of challenges in the labor market, including lower wages in comparison to their similarly educated peers who are in correctly matched jobs. Yet, less consensus exists over the adjustment mechanisms to overcome the negative consequences of overeducation. This study examines the hypotheses that overeducated workers sort into performance pay jobs as an adjustment mechanism and that performance pay moderates their wages. Using German Socio-Economic Panel, I show that overeducation associates with a higher likelihood of sorting into performance pay jobs and that performance pay moderates the wages of overeducated workers positively. It also holds in endogenous switching regressions accounting for the potential endogeneity of performance pay. Importantly, the positive role of performance pay is particularly larger for the wages of overeducated women.

Featured image: Jason-Leung-on-unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Unionised dockworkers and port ownership structure in an international oligopoly. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Nicola Meccheri.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that relative to endogenous port ownership structures, state-owned ports appear as the most likely equilibrium result.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1326, 2023

GLO Fellow Nicola Meccheri

Unionised dockworkers and port ownership structure in an international oligopoly Download PDF
by Meccheri, Nicola

Author Abstract: In an international duopoly with two markets and two ports, this paper investigates the role of dockworkers unionisation in affecting welfare outcomes under public and private ports, as well as in determining the endogenous choice by governments of port ownership structure. While private ports maximise profits, public ports maximise domestic welfare and face a budget constraint, which is binding when unions are sufficiently wage-oriented and shipping costs are not too high. Consumer surplus, total wage bill and domestic welfare are generally higher under public ownership, especially when unions are wage-oriented. The opposite holds true for firm profits, whilst privatisation always increases port profits. Moreover, relative to endogenous port ownership structures, state-owned ports appear as the most likely equilibrium result although all possible configurations may arise in equilibrium, including an asymmetric structure with a state-owned port and a private port.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Can a ban on child labour be self-enforcing? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Alessandro Cigno.

A new GLO Discussion Paper explains the conditions when the ban is not self-enforcing.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1325, 2023

Can a ban on child labour be self-enforcing?Download PDF
by Cigno, Alessandro

GLO Fellow Alessandro Cigno

Author Abstract: Basu and Van (1998) show that a ban on child labour may be self-enforcing if, above the subsistence level, no amount of consumption can compensate parents for the disutility of child labour. We show that a partial ban may be self-enforcing, but a total one never is, if education is available, and the disutility of child labour can be compensated by the expected utility of future consumption. If some of the work children do is not observable by the government, a ban may be only apparently self-enforcing, or actually counterproductive. If the government wants to reduce child labour and raise education to the efficient level, it can borrow from the international credit market to subsidize parents, and tax their children’s future wages to pay the loan back with interests.

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Teen Social Interactions and Well-being during the COVID-19 Pandemic. A new GLO Discussion Paper of Charlene Marie Kalenkoski and GLO Fellow Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia.

A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that socializing and communicating with others improves teens’ well-being over other activities. Thus, teens’ well-being in the USA was severely impacted by the pandemic.

Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1324, 2023

Teen Social Interactions and Well-being during the COVID-19 Pandemic Download PDF
by Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie & Wulff Pabilonia, Sabrina

GLO Fellow Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia

Author Abstract: Adolescence is an important developmental period when teens begin spending less time with their parents and more time with friends and others outside their households as they transition into adulthood. Using the 2017-2021 American Time Use Surveys and the 2012, 2013, and 2021 Well-being Modules, we examine how the time teens spent alone and with parents, friends, and others changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, shedding light on how the social isolation of the pandemic disrupted this crucial development period. We also examine how time spent on various activities changed during the pandemic. Teens spent more time alone during the pandemic than before and spent more of their leisure time alone, with large increases in time spent playing computer games, on social media, and watching TV. Results suggest that socializing and communicating with others improves teens’ well-being over other activities. Thus, teens’ well-being was severely impacted by the pandemic.

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash

Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
JOPE (2022): CiteScore 9.2 (LINK) & Impact Factor 6.1; 524 K Downloads

JUST PUBLISHED
ONLINE FIRST: 32 articles forthcoming in Volume 36, Issue 4, 2023. Covered issues: Historical demography; fertility and marriage; migration and refugee issues; health, vaccinations, risky behaviors; education; retirement; gender issues and preferences

CALL FOR PAPERS
JOPE invites paper submissions for the following collections:
– Abortions
– Covid-19 and diseases
– Lifecycle fertility models
– Sexual and domestic violence
– Sexuality including LGBT issues
– Statistics & measurement of population economics

For more details and for examples of already published papers in these collections see: 
https://glabor.org/collections-journal-of-population-economics-invites-paper-submissions-in-six-research-areas/
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/collections
JOPE Collections are a set of published papers on issues of significant relevance for the journal. Authors are continuously invited to submit their related work for evaluation stating their specific interest to contribute in the submission cover letter. JOPE Editors will treat those submissions with particular interest and speedy handling. Articles will be immediately published after final acceptance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;