Category Archives: News

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap. A new paper published freely accessible in the Journal of Population Economics by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that the minimum working age raised from 14 to 16 in Spain, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%.

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap

by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cq2lY

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In 1980, a few years after its democratization process, Spain raised the minimum working age from 14 to 16, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. This reform changed the within-cohort incentives to remain in the educational system. We use a difference-in-differences approach, where our treated and control individuals only differ in their month of birth, to analyze the gender asymmetries in mortality generated by this change. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%. This is driven by increases in HIV mortality, as well as by diseases related to the nervous and circulatory systems. We show that women’s health habits deteriorated as a consequence of the reform, while this was not the case for men. The gender differences in the impact of the reform on smoking and drinking should be understood in the context of the gender equalization process that affected women were experiencing when the reform took place. All in all, these patterns help explain the narrowing age gap in life expectancy between women and men in many developed countries while, at the same time, they provide important policy implications for middle-income countries that are undergoing those gender equalization processes right now.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Retirement, housing mobility, downsizing and neighbourhood quality – A causal investigation. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Ha Nguyen and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that retirement leads to a statistically significant and sizable increase in the probability of making a residential move or the likelihood of becoming outright homeowners.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 882, 2021

Retirement, housing mobility, downsizing and neighbourhood quality – A causal investigation Download PDF
by
Nguyen, Ha Trong & Mitrou, Francis & Zubrick, Stephen R.

GLO Fellow Ha Nguyen

Ha Nguyen

Author Abstract: This paper provides the first causal evidence on the impact of retirement on housing choices. Our empirical strategy exploits the discontinuity in the eligibility ages for state pension as an instrument for the endogenous retirement decision and controls for time-invariant individual characteristics. The results show that retirement leads to a statistically significant and sizable increase in the probability of making a residential move or the likelihood of becoming outright homeowners. We also find that individuals downsize both physically and financially and tend to move to better neighbourhoods or closer to the coast upon retirement. We additionally discover that some housing adjustments take place up to 6 years before retirement. Moreover, our results reveal significant heterogeneity in the retirement impact by gender, marital status, education, housing tenue, income and wealth. Within couple households, housing mobility choices are primarily influenced by the wife’s retirement while housing downsizing decisions are only affected by the husband’s retirement. The results suggest that failing to address the endogeneity of retirement often under-states the retirement impact on such housing arrangements.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Financial education for youth: A randomized evaluation in Uruguay. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Fernando Borraz and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper evaluates the impact of an economic and financial education program targeted to senior high-school students and finds positive effects.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 881, 2021

Financial education for youth: A randomized evaluation in Uruguay Download PDF
by
Borraz, Fernando & Caro, Ana & Caño-Guiral, Maira & Roa, María José

GLO Fellow Fernando Borraz

Fernando Borraz

Author Abstract: Using data from a randomized control trial in Uruguay, we evaluate the impact of an economic and financial education program targeted to senior high-school students. The program is based on an innovative playful approach workshop about monetary policy and financial supervision. We find that the workshop has a positive and significant impact on student knowledge. Our results shed light on the importance of economic and financial education for the youth in developing countries.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Coronagraben in Switzerland: culture and social distancing in times of COVID-19. New paper by Neha Deopa & Piergiuseppe Fortunato published ONLINE FIRST & WITH OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS finds that within the Swiss context, high trusting areas exhibited a smaller decline in mobility.

Coronagraben in Switzerland: culture and social distancing in times of COVID-19

by Neha Deopa & Piergiuseppe Fortunato

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics

OPEN ACCESS. And PDF. GLO Discussion Paper No. 857.

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Author Abstract: Social distancing measures help contain the spread of COVID-19, but actual compliance has varied substantially across space and time. We ask whether cultural differences underlie this heterogeneity using mobility data across Switzerland between February and December 2020. We find that German-speaking cantons decreased their mobility for non-essential activities significantly less than French-speaking cantons. However, we find no such significant differences for bilingual cantons. Contrary to the evidence in the literature, we find that within the Swiss context, high trusting areas exhibited a smaller decline in mobility. Additionally, cantons supporting a limited role of the state in matters of welfare also experienced a smaller reduction in mobility.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Poverty in Russia: A Bird’s-Eye View of Trends and Dynamics in the Past Quarter of Century. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Kseniya Abanokova and GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that poverty in Russia has been steadily decreasing, with most of the poor having a transient rather than a chronic nature.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 880, 2021

Poverty in Russia: A Bird’s-Eye View of Trends and Dynamics in the Past Quarter of Century Download PDF
by
Abanokova, Kseniya & Dang, Hai-Anh H.

GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang

Hai-Anh Dang

Author Abstract: Hardly any recent study exists that broadly reviews poverty trends over time for Russia. Analyzing the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Surveys between 1994 and 2019, we offer an updated review of poverty trends and dynamics for the country over the past quarter of century. We find that poverty has been steadily decreasing, with most of the poor having a transient rather than a chronic nature. The bottom 20 percent of the income distribution averages an annual growth rate of 5 percent, which compares favorably with that of 3.3 percent for the whole population. Income growth, particularly the shares that are attributed to labor incomes and public transfers, have important roles in reducing poverty. Our findings are relevant to poverty and social protection policies.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap. A new paper published freely accessible in the Journal of Population Economics by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that the minimum working age raised from 14 to 16 in Spain, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%.

Minimum working age and the gender mortality gap

by Cristina Bellés-Obrero, Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall Castello

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cq2lY

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In 1980, a few years after its democratization process, Spain raised the minimum working age from 14 to 16, while the compulsory education age remained at 14. This reform changed the within-cohort incentives to remain in the educational system. We use a difference-in-differences approach, where our treated and control individuals only differ in their month of birth, to analyze the gender asymmetries in mortality generated by this change. The reform decreased mortality at ages 14–29 among men by 6.4% and women by 8.9%, mainly from a reduction in deaths due to traffic accidents. However, the reform also increased mortality for women ages 30–45 by 7%. This is driven by increases in HIV mortality, as well as by diseases related to the nervous and circulatory systems. We show that women’s health habits deteriorated as a consequence of the reform, while this was not the case for men. The gender differences in the impact of the reform on smoking and drinking should be understood in the context of the gender equalization process that affected women were experiencing when the reform took place. All in all, these patterns help explain the narrowing age gap in life expectancy between women and men in many developed countries while, at the same time, they provide important policy implications for middle-income countries that are undergoing those gender equalization processes right now.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Deteriorated sleep quality does not explain the negative impact of smartphone use on academic performance. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Suncica Vujic & Stijn Baert and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper using data of Belgian students finds no statistically significant mediating effect of sleep quality in the relationship between smartphone use and academic performance.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 879, 2021

Deteriorated sleep quality does not explain the negative impact of smartphone use on academic performance Download PDF
by
Amez, Simon & Vujić, Sunčica & Abrath, Margo & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellows Suncica Vujic & Stijn Baert

Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: University students’ smartphone use has recently been shown to negatively affect their academic performance. Surprisingly, research testing the empirical validity of potential mechanisms underlying this relationship is very limited. In particular, indirect effects of negative health consequences due to heavy smartphone use have never been investigated. To fill this gap, we investigate, for the first time, whether deteriorated sleep quality drives the negative impact on academic performance. To this end, we examine longitudinal data on 1,635 students at two major Belgian universities. Based on a combination of a random effects approach and seemingly unrelated regression, we find no statistically significant mediating effect of sleep quality in the relationship between smartphone use and academic performance.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Immigration and economic mobility. New paper by Maria F. Hoen, Simen Markussen and Knut Røed published ONLINE FIRST & WITH OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that immigration from low-income countries reduces intergenerational mobility and thus steepens the social gradient
in natives’ labor market outcomes, whereas immigration from high-income countries levels it.

Immigration and economic mobility

by Maria F. Hoen, Simen Markussen and Knut Røed

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics

OPEN ACCESS. PDF.

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Author Abstract: We examine how immigration affects natives’ relative prime-age labor market outcomes by economic class background, with class background established on the basis of parents’ earnings rank. Exploiting alternative sources of variation in immigration patterns across time and space, we find that immigration from low-income countries reduces intergenerational mobility and thus steepens the social gradient in natives’ labor market outcomes, whereas immigration from high-income countries levels it. These findings are robust with respect to a wide range of identifying assumptions. The analysis is based on high-quality population-wide administrative data from Norway, which is one of the rich-world countries with the most rapid rise in the immigrant population share over the past two decades. Our findings suggest that immigration can explain a considerable part of the observed relative decline in economic performance among natives with a lower-class background.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Can a supranational medicines agency restore trust after vaccine suspensions? The case of Vaxzevria. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Andrea Albanese & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies the impact of the European Medicines Agency’s 2021 March 18th statement assuring the public of the safety of Vaxzevria and the immediate reinstatement of the vaccine by most countries to find that survey respondents’ intention to get vaccinated substantially restored.

Andrea Albanese

GLO Discussion Paper No. 878, 2021

Can a supranational medicines agency restore trust after vaccine suspensions? The case of Vaxzevria Download PDF
by
Albanese, Andrea & Fallucchi, Francesco & Verheyden, Bertrand

GLO Fellow Andrea Albanese

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Author Abstract: Over the first half of March 2021, the majority of European governments suspended Astrazeneca’s Vaxzevria vaccine as a precaution following media reports of rare blood clots. We analyse the impact of the European Medicines Agency’s (EMA) March 18th statement assuring the public of the safety of Vaxzevria and the immediate reinstatement of the vaccine by most countries on respondents’ intention to get vaccinated. By relying on survey data collected in Luxembourg and neighbouring areas between early March and mid-April, we observe that the willingness to be vaccinated was severely declining in the days preceding the EMA statement. We implement a regression discontinuity design exploiting the time at which respondents completed the survey and find that the vaccine reinstatement substantially restored vaccination intentions.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Optimal lockdown and social welfare. New paper by GLO Fellows Pierre Pestieau and Grégory Ponthière published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible examines the robustness of the optimal lockdown strategy to the postulated social welfare criterion.

Optimal lockdown and social welfare

by Pierre Pestieau and Grégory Ponthière

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cpRlF

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Author Abstract: This paper examines the robustness of the optimal lockdown strategy to the postulated social welfare criterion. We show that utilitarianism can, under some conditions, imply a COVID-19 variant of Parfit’s (1984) Repugnant Conclusion: for any (interior) lockdown with life periods of low quality, there must be a stricter lockdown that is regarded as better, even though this reduces the quality of life periods even more. On the contrary, the ex post egalitarian criterion (giving priority to the worst-off ex post) implies zero lockdown. Varying between its minimal and its maximal levels, the optimal lockdown is not robust to the postulated ethical criterion. We also identify a general ethical dilemma between the goal of saving lives (modeled by the Survivors Number Count axiom) and the goal of giving priority to the worst-off (Hammond Equity).

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

How Collective Bargaining Shapes Poverty: New Evidence for Developed Countries. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Kevin Pineda-Hernández & GLO Fellows François Rycx & Melanie Volral.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that a poverty-reducing effect of collective bargaining institutions stems from the political strength of trade unions in promoting public social spending rather than from any direct effect on earnings inequalities.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 877, 2021

How Collective Bargaining Shapes Poverty: New Evidence for Developed Countries Download PDF
by
Pineda-Hernández, Kevin & Rycx, François & Volral, Mélanie

GLO Fellows François Rycx & Melanie Volral

Author Abstract: Although many studies point to the significant influence of collective bargaining institutions on earnings inequalities, evidence on how these institutions shape poverty rates across developed economies remains surprisingly scarce. It would be a mistake, though, to believe that the relationship between earnings inequalities and poverty is straightforward. Indeed, whereas earnings inequalities are measured at the individual level, poverty is calculated at the household level using equivalised (disposable) incomes. Accordingly, in most developed countries poverty is not primarily an issue of the working poor. This paper explicitly addresses the relationship between collective bargaining systems and working-age poverty rates in 24 developed countries over the period 1990-2015. Using an up-to-date and fine-grained taxonomy of bargaining systems and relying on state-of-the-art panel data estimation techniques, we find that countries with more centralised and/or coordinated bargaining systems display significantly lower working-age poverty rates than countries with largely or fully decentralised systems. However, this result only holds in a post-tax benefit scenario. Controlling for country-fixed effects and endogeneity, our estimates indeed suggest that the poverty-reducing effect of collective bargaining institutions stems from the political strength of trade unions in promoting public social spending rather than from any direct effect on earnings inequalities.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Do Elections Accelerate the COVID-19 Pandemic? Evidence from a Natural Experiment. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Ján Palguta and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper confirms for the Czech Republic that elections in 2020 propagated the spread of Covid-19.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 891, 2021

Do Elections Accelerate the COVID-19 Pandemic? Evidence from a Natural Experiment Download PDF
by
Ján Palguta & Levínský, René & Škoda, Samuel

Forthcoming: Journal of Population Economics

GLO Fellow Jan Palguta

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Author Abstract: Elections define representative democracies, but also produce spikes in physical mobility if voters need to travel to electoral rooms. In this paper, we examine whether large-scale, in-person elections propagate the spread of COVID-19. We exploit a natural experiment from the Czech Republic which biannually renews mandates in 1/3 of Senate constituencies rotating according to the 1995 election law. We show that in the second and third weeks after the 2020 elections (held on October 9-10), new COVID-19 infections grow significantly faster in voting compared to non-voting constituencies. A temporarily-related peak in hospital admissions and essentially no changes in test positivity rates suggest that the acceleration is not merely due to increased testing. The acceleration is absent in population above 65, consistently with strategic risk-avoidance by older voters. Our results have implications for postal voting reforms or postponing of large-scale, in-person (electoral) events during viral outbreaks.

Featured image: Photo-by-Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Sexual Orientation and Earnings. A Meta-Analysis 2012-2020. New paper by GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

The meta-analysis provided in a new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that gay men earned less than heterosexual men; lesbian women earned more than heterosexual women, while bisexual men earned less than heterosexual men.

Sexual Orientation and Earnings. A Meta-Analysis 2012-2020.

by Drydakis, Nick

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cpeNT

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Nick Drydakis

Author Abstract: This meta-analysis utilizes 24 papers published between 2012-2020 that focus on earnings differences by sexual orientation. The papers cover the period between 1991 and 2018, and countries in Europe, North America and Australia. The meta-analysis indicates that gay men earned less than heterosexual men. Lesbian women earned more than heterosexual women, while bisexual men earned less than heterosexual men. Bisexual women earned less than heterosexual women. According to the meta-analysis, in data sets after 2010, gay men and bisexual men and women continue to experience earnings penalties, while lesbian women continue to experience earnings premiums. Τhe meta-regression estimates indicate relationships between study characteristics and the estimated earnings effects for sexual minorities. For instance, regions, sexual minority data set sizes, and earnings classifications influence the outcomes. The persistence of earnings penalties for gay men and bisexual men and women in the face of anti-discrimination policies represents a cause for concern and indicates the need for comprehensive legislation and workplace guidelines to guarantee that people receive fair pay and not experience any form of workplace inequality simply because of their sexual orientation.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 862, 2021 (Download PDF)

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Skipping the doctor: evidence from a case with extended self-certification of paid sick leave. New paper by Bruno Ferman, Gaute Torsvik & Kjell Vaage published ONLINE FIRST & OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

Norway extended to workers the right to self-certify sickness absence from work. A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics rules out large absence increases after the reform but provides evidence that the policy change caused a reduction in absence for female workers.

Skipping the doctor: evidence from a case with extended self-certification of paid sick leave

by Bruno Ferman, Gaute Torsvik & Kjell Vaage

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS: PDF

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Author Abstract: This paper examines the impact of a policy reform in a municipality in Norway that extended to workers the right to self-certify sickness absence from work. After the reform, workers were no longer obliged to obtain a certificate from a physician to receive sickness benefits. They could call in sick directly to their line leader and had to engage in a counselling program organized by the employer. To estimate the effect of this reform, we contrast the change in sickness absence among employees who were granted the extended right to self-certify absence with absence among employees who had to obtain a physician’s certificate to be entitled to sickness benefits. We use both a standard difference-in-differences method and the synthetic control method to estimate the effect of the reform. We can rule out large positive effects on absence after the reform, with strong evidence that the policy change actually resulted in a reduction in absence for female workers.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

I am a survivor, keep on surviving: early-life exposure to conflict and subjective survival probabilities in adult life. New paper by Bruno Arpino, Pierluigi Conzo & Francesco Salustri published ONLINE FIRST & OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics presents evidence to support the hypothesis that personal growth and life appreciation emerge after traumatic events, thereby leading to optimistic perceptions of longevity.

I am a survivor, keep on surviving: early-life exposure to conflict and subjective survival probabilities in adult life

by Bruno Arpino, Pierluigi Conzo & Francesco Salustri

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS: PDF

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Author Abstract: Life-course studies have shown that early-life conditions predict health and socio-economic status in adult life. This study analyzes whether experiencing a traumatic event in childhood, i.e., the Second World War (WW2), affects subjective survival probabilities (SSPs). We rely on a representative sample of European adults who were differentially exposed to WW2 during childhood as a result of their date and place of birth. Results show that exposure to WW2 increases SSPs, with socio-economic and health characteristics not playing a mediating role. War exposure also counterbalances the adverse effects of health impairments on SSPs, but it does not affect health outcomes per se. This fact, jointly with low mortality rates of the cohort under investigation, suggests that selective mortality and post-traumatic stress are not the main channels. Instead, the results support the hypothesis that personal growth and life appreciation emerge after traumatic events, thereby leading to optimistic perceptions of longevity.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease. New paper by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter published ONLINE FIRST & WITH OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

As the first country in the world, Slovakia implemented and repeated mass rapid antigen testing. A new paper published ONLINE FIRST OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics has shown that this had reduced infections substantially.

The impact of repeated mass antigen testing for COVID-19 on the prevalence of the disease

by Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs & Bernhard Schmidpeter

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS: PDF

Martin Kahanec
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: In the absence of effective vaccination, mass testing and quarantining of positive cases and their contacts could help to mitigate pandemics and allow economies to stay open. We investigate the effects of repeated mass testing on the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, using data from the first ever nationwide rapid antigen testing implemented in Slovakia in autumn 2020. After the first round of testing, only districts above an ex ante unknown threshold of test positivity were re-tested. Comparing districts above and below the threshold, we provide evidence that repeated mass antigen testing can temporarily reduce the number of new infections. Our results suggest that mass testing coupled with the quarantining of positive cases and their contacts could be an effective tool in mitigating pandemics. For lasting effects, re-testing at regular intervals would likely be necessary.

Featured image: Mufid-Majnun-on-Unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Aging and automation in economies with search frictions. New paper by Xiaomeng Zhang, Theodore Palivos & Xiangbo Liu published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible shows that an increase in life expectancy raises the level as well as the inequality of income.

Aging and automation in economies with search frictions

by Xiaomeng Zhang, Theodore Palivos & Xiangbo Liu

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/coNTX

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of an increase in life expectancy on the level and the distribution of income in the presence of skill heterogeneity and automation. It shows analytically that an increase in life expectancy induces the replacement of low-skilled workers by automation capital and high-skilled workers. Moreover, it raises the skill premium and has an ambiguous effect on total income. A simulation exercise, based on US data, shows that an increase in life expectancy raises the level as well as the inequality of income. We consider redistributive policies that can mitigate some of the adverse effects of an increase in life expectancy for low-skilled workers.

Featured image: Andy-Kelly-on-Unsplash

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Deeds or words? The local influence of anti-immigrant parties on foreigners’ flows in Italy. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Augusto Cerqua and Federico Zampollo.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the election of a mayor supported by an anti-immigrant coalition significantly affect immigrants’ location choices only when considering the most recent years.

Augusto Cerqua


GLO Discussion Paper No. 876, 2021

Deeds or words? The local influence of anti-immigrant parties on foreigners’ flows in Italy Download PDF
by
Cerqua, Augusto & Zampollo, Federico

GLO Fellow Augusto Cerqua

Author Abstract: We investigate the influence of anti-immigrant parties on foreigners’ location choices in Italy. Considering municipal elections from 2000 to 2018, we create a database that includes a scientific-based classification on the anti-/pro-immigration axis of all Italian political parties based on experts’ opinions. Via the adoption of a regression discontinuity design, we find that the election of a mayor supported by an anti-immigrant coalition significantly affect immigrants’ location choices only when considering the most recent years. This finding does not appear to be driven by the enactment of policies against immigrants but by an ‘inhospitality effect’, which got stronger over time due to the exacerbation of political propaganda at the national and local level.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Local inequalities of the COVID-19 crisis. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Augusto Cerqua & Marco Letta.

A new GLO Discussion Paper for Italy documents that the economic effects of the COVID-19 shock are dramatically unbalanced across the Italian territory and spatially uncorrelated with the epidemiological pattern of the first wave.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 875, 2021

Local inequalities of the COVID-19 crisis Download PDF
by
Cerqua, Augusto & Letta, Marco

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

GLO Fellows Augusto Cerqua & Marco Letta

Author Abstract: This paper assesses the impact of the first wave of the pandemic on the local economies of one of the hardest-hit countries, Italy. We combine quarterly local labor market data with the new machine learning control method for counterfactual building. Our results document that the economic effects of the COVID-19 shock are dramatically unbalanced across the Italian territory and spatially uncorrelated with the epidemiological pattern of the first wave. The heterogeneity of employment losses is associated with exposure to social aggregation risks and pre-existing labor market fragilities. Finally, we quantify the protective role played by the labor market interventions implemented by the government and show that, while effective, they disproportionately benefitted the most developed Italian regions. Such diverging trajectories and unequal policy effects call for a place-based policy approach that promptly addresses the uneven economic geography of the current crisis.

Featured image: Photo-by-Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Does Paid Family Leave Save Infant Lives? Evidence from United States. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Feng Chen.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the implementation of a six-week paid family leave in California/USA reduced the post-neonatal mortality rate with larger effects for infants with married mothers and infant boys.


GLO Discussion Paper No. 874, 2021

Does Paid Family Leave Save Infant Lives? Evidence from United States Download PDF
by
Chen, Feng

GLO Affiliate Feng Chen

Author Abstract: One goal of the paid family leave (PFL) is to help working mothers balance their careers and family responsibilities and hence improve the well-being of their infants. However, most studies of PFL on early childhood outcomes have been based on the analyses of surviving infants. If PFL reduces infant deaths, such analyses would understate the effects. Using the linked birth and infant death data in the U.S. with a difference-in-differences framework, I find that the implementation of a six-week PFL in California reduced the post-neonatal mortality rate by 0.135, or it saved approximately 339 infant lives. The effects were driven by death from internal causes, and there were larger effects for infants with married mothers and infant boys. Additional robustness checks and placebo examinations indicate that the effect is not due to confounding factors or contemporary shocks but causal.

Featured image: Derek-Owens-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Labour Standards. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Morley Gunderson.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reflects and evaluates the literature on labour standards against the background of changes in the nature of labour , the workplace and societal needs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 873, 2021

Labour Standards Download PDF
by
Gunderson, Morley

GLO Fellow Morley Gunderson

Author Abstract: This chapter deals with the question of whether labour standards are less relevant or more relevant for the new world of work which is vastly different from the old world of work when most labour standards were first established. The various rationales for labour standards are first outlined. This is followed by a discussion of the changing pressures in the labour market that emanate from various forces: the pressures affecting employers and hence their demand for labour; the changing nature of the supply of labour; changes in forms of employee representation and the legal and regulatory environment in which the parties operate; and changes in the workplace and human resource practices within firms. These pressures lead to a changing role and need for labour standards, generally increasing the need, but also tending to reduce the ability of governments to provide such standards. Some illustrative evidence of the impact of specific labour standards is outlined, followed by a discussion of labour standards in developing and emerging economies. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible elements of smart regulation in this area to deal with the difficult trade-off between the increased need for labour standards confronting the reduced ability of governments to provide such standards.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Run, graduate, run: Internationally mobile students’ reactions to changing political landscapes in Europe. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Reinhard Weisser.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that international students move away strongly in response to recent political factors suggesting a considerable loss for European economies.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 872, 2021

Run, graduate, run: Internationally mobile students’ reactions to changing political landscapes in Europe Download PDF
by
Weisser, Reinhard A.

GLO Affiliate Reinhard Weisser

Author Abstract: Over the last decades, Europe attracted an increasing number of internationally mobile students. The related influx of talent into European labour markets constituted an important factor to the knowledge economy. This research addresses the question whether changing political landscapes in Europe, e.g. an increasing scepticism concerning migrants or support for right-wing parties, translated into a diminishing attractiveness of European economies. To this end, international graduates’ staying behaviour in 28 European destination countries is investigated based on bilateral stay rates for almost 150 countries of origin in the years 2009 to 2019. Controlling for various immigration regimes and institutional settings, international graduates are found to display a high level of sensitivity with respect to political dynamics: A distinct dominance of the right political spectrum may lower the number of international graduates willing to stay by up to 50%. The effect is particularly strong in election years when voters’ political preferences become more salient. Eventually, this amounts to a considerable loss for European economies since international graduates have acquired destination country specific human capital and are easily integrated into host societies.

Featured image: Photo-by-j-zamora-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Update: Impact Factor now 2.8 (2020) from 1.8 (2019)! Journal of Population Economics Report 2020: Over 40% rise in submissions, faster editorial decisions.

Newly released:

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)
SSCI Journal Citation Indicator (JCI) = 1.20 (2020).JoPE has 20% more citation impact than the average in its category.
Rank by JCI in 2020: 98/549, Q1 Economics; 10/49, Q1 in Demography
CiteScore (Scopus): 3.9 (2020)
SJR (Scimago Journal Rank): 1.89 (2020)
IDEAS/RePEc ranking (July 2021) was 77/2,698 journals (based on the Simple Impact Factor 17.327, for Journals and all years)

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019)

Report of the Editor-in-Chief 2020
PDF of Report revised, July 9, 2021

The Journal of Population of Economics is an international quarterly that publishes original theoretical and applied research in all areas of population economics, household economics, and human resources. This report contains information about the Journal and its editorial process in the past year and some earlier years.

Figure 1: Number of Submissions

The number of submissions has substantially increased over recent years (Figure 1). Between 2011 and 2013, the Journal received about 400 submissions per year; by 2016 the number of submissions neared 500, and in 2020, 871 manuscripts were received. This marks an annual increase of submissions of 41%. Over the decade 2010-2020, the manuscript inflow rose from 337 to a level 2.6 times higher. The additional workload was managed through an efficient desk rejection policy for initial screening.

Figure 2: Origin of Submissions

In line with past years, the largest single share of submissions made in 2020 were from corresponding authors based in Europe (Figure 2). Nearly 40% of all submissions originated from Europe, and over one-third (34%) of submissions came from authors based in Asia and the Middle East. Under one-fifth (17%) of submissions came from authors based in North America. The remaining submissions came from contributors from Africa (6%), Oceania (Australia and New Zealand; 4%), and South and Central America (4%).

Figure 3: Visits by World Region 2019

Figure 3 contains the internet visits to the Journal on the Springer website from the world regions. With over a third of visits coming from North America and 29% from Europe, followed by the Asia-pacific region (22%), the Journal is globally accessed and read.


Figure 4: Days to First Decision

Figure 4 shows that the average number of days between submission and first decision has generally declined over time. Despite a slight uptick in the turnaround time for first decisions between 2015 and 2016, which may be partially attributed to the increased volume of submissions, there was a substantial reduction in turnaround time in following years. In 2020, the average time for first decisions was 24 days. The Journal is committed to keep the time between submission and decisions low, including eventual publication. Since 2013 the Journal has executed a desk rejection policy to provide authors with an early signal for better targeting of their work. The large number of submissions combined with an annual quota of 40 manuscripts keeps the acceptance rates of the Journal  very low.

Table 1 shows three acceptance rate measures: 1) the number of manuscripts accepted in a given year as a share of all final decisions made in that year; 2) the number of published articles in a given year as a share of all submissions in that year; and; 3) the number of articles published in a given year divided by the number of the previous year’s submissions.

The number of accepted papers (submitted at any point in time) in a given year as a share of all decisions made in that year has shifted over time. The acceptance rate has declined from 7% in 2018 to 4.9% in 2019, slightly increasing in 2020 to 5.4%. If acceptance rate is measured as the number of published manuscripts as a share of total submissions received in that year, the acceptance rate was slightly higher, at 4.6% in 2020 (at 40 manuscripts from among 871 submissions), falling from 7.1% in 2018 and 6.5% in 2019. Measuring the acceptance rate as the number of publications as a share of the number of submissions received in the previous year (2019) would yield a 2020 rate of 6.5%, which is lower than the previous years (7.6% in 2018 and 7.1% in 2019).

Table 1: Acceptance Rates

Index                   Year201820192020
No. accepted /      Total No. decisions7.0%4.9%5.4%
No. articles publ. /    No. submissions7.1%6.5%4.6%
No. articles publ. /   No. subm. prev. year7.6%7.1%6.5%

Table 2 reports  the status of papers submitted in the given year for years 2018 – 2020. The Journal’s Impact Factor has increased substantially over time (Figure 5). In 2020 Impact Factor was 2.813, and the 5-year Impact Factor was 3.318. The Journal ranked 104/377 in economics and 10/29 in demography in 2020. As of July 2021, the Journal’s IDEAS/RePEc ranking was 77/2,698 (based on the Simple Impact Factor 17.327, for Journals and all years).

Table 2: Status of Papers Submitted in Particular Year

                    Outcome/Year201820192020
Accept 39 35 47
Revise 68 125 81
Reject 522 551 737

The Journal is ranked in: Social Science Citation Index, Journal Citation Reports/Social Sciences, SCOPUS, EconLit, Google Scholar, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest, CAB International, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, Academic OneFile, Academic Search, Bibliography of Asian Studies, CAB Abstracts, CSA Environmental Sciences, Current Contents/Social & Behavioral Sciences, ECONIS, ERIH PLUS, Gale, Global Health, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), JSTOR, OCLC, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Review of Population Reviews, SCImago, and Summon by ProQuest.

International Research on the Economics of Population, Household, and Human Resources

Klaus F. Zimmermann,
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Population Economics

Ends;

Why Making Promotion After a Burnout Is Like Boiling the Ocean. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Stijn Baert and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper identifies burnout stigma as a source of promotion discrimination.

Stijn Baert

GLO Discussion Paper No. 871, 2021

Why Making Promotion After a Burnout Is Like Boiling the Ocean Download PDF
by
Sterkens, Philippe & Baert, Stijn & Rooman, Claudia & Derous, Eva

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: Recent studies have explored hiring discrimination as an obstacle to former burnout patients. Many workers, however, return to the same employer, where they face an even more severe aftermath of burnout syndrome: promotion discrimination. To our knowledge, we are the first to directly address this issue in research. More specifically, we conducted a vignette experiment with 406 genuine managers, testing the potential of the main burnout stigma theoretically described in the literature as potential mediators of promotion discrimination. Estimates reveal that compared to employees without an employment interruption, former burnout patients have no less than a 34.4% lower probability of receiving a promotion. Moreover, these employees are perceived as having low (1) leadership, (2) learning capacity, (3) motivation, (4) autonomy and (5) stress tolerance, as well as being (6) less capable of taking on an exemplary role, (7) having worse current and (8) future health, (9) collaborating with them is regarded more negatively, and (10) managers perceive them as having fewer options to leave the organisation if denied a promotion. Four of these perceptions, namely lower leadership capacities, stress tolerance, abilities to take on an exemplary role and chances of finding another job explain almost half the burnout effect on promotion probabilities.

Featured image: Morgan Basham on Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The effect of compulsory schooling laws and child labor restrictions on fertility: evidence from the early twentieth century: New paper by Yannay Shanan published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE READ ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that changes in legislation across time and between US states during the early twentieth century make parents chose to have fewer children in response to the constraints imposed.

The effect of compulsory schooling laws and child labor restrictions on fertility: evidence from the early twentieth century

by Yannay Shanan

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cn2UZ

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper uses census data to examine the impact of child labor restrictions imposed by compulsory schooling laws and child labor regulation on fertility. By exploiting variation induced by changes in legislation across time and between US states during the early twentieth century, I show that parents chose to have fewer children in response to the constraints imposed on the labor supply of their potential children and the increase in their expected quality. My findings suggest that compulsory schooling laws and child labor regulation contributed to the demographic transition in the US and provide additional empirical support for the notion that financial incentives play a role in determining household fertility decisions.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020

SSCI IMPACT FACTOR 2.813 (2020) from 1.840 (2019) & 1.253 (2018)
SSCI 5-Year Impact Factor 3.318 (2020) from 2.353 (2019) & 2.072 (2018)


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF




The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The More the Gloomier: development of informal employment and its effect on wages in Turkey. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Anil Duman & Alper Duman.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies various aspects of the wage gaps between formal and informal sector workers in Turkey: The decline in informal employment is not uniform, returns to informality vary significantly, and the rise of white collar low skilled service jobs is mainly responsible for the increasing wage gap at the bottom end.

Anil Duman

GLO Discussion Paper No. 870, 2021

The More the Gloomier: development of informal employment and its effect on wages in Turkey Download PDF
by
Duman, Anil & Duman, Alper

GLO Fellow Anil Duman

Author Abstract: Various studies found wage gaps between formal and informal sector workers even after controlling for a number of individual and firm level characteristics. It has also been shown that earnings differentials across these sectors are quite stable over the years. While there is limited amount of research considering the same issues focusing on Turkish labor market, the development of wage gap between formal and informal employment has not been examined. In our paper, we carry this analysis for Turkey and estimate the wage gap between formal and informal sector workers by utilizing the Household Labor Force Survey (LFS) for the period of 2005 and 2019. There are three main findings; first, decline in informal employment is not uniform and especially after 2012 there is a slight increase in the share of informal jobs at the lower end of wage distribution. Second, we demonstrate that returns to informality vary significantly across quantiles even after a matching technique through inverse probability treatment weights are considered. While at the upper end of the distribution, the penalty is extremely small and stable over the years, at the bottom end, the informal sector considerably reduces wages, and the effect becomes larger over time. The negative and increasing penalty is observable well before the refugee inflows. The last part of our analysis looks at the occupational composition within formal and informal sectors over time and points out that the rise of white collar low skilled service (WCLS) jobs among informal employment is mainly responsible for the increasing wage gap for the workers at the bottom end.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Domestic Violence and Gender Stereotypes: Perceptions, Justifications, and Reactions. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Veronica Grembi and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for Italian women that those with stronger stereotypes are more likely to state that they know a victim of violence but are not more likely to state that violence (physical or psychological) is widespread in their area of residence.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 869, 2021

Domestic Violence and Gender Stereotypes: Perceptions, Justifications, and Reactions Download PDF
by
Barili, Emilia & Grembi, Veronica & Rosso, Anna C.

GLO Fellow Veronica Grembi

Author Abstract: Using a new measure of the strength of gender stereotypes defined at the individual level and based on responses to a survey conducted with more than 4,500 Italian women in July 2020, we show that women with stronger stereotypes are more likely to state that they know a victim of violence but are not more likely to state that violence (physical or psychological) is widespread in their area of residence. They are also more likely to rank behaviours meant to control a victim’s interpersonal contacts and access to financial resources as more serious than physically and sexually violent behaviours and to justify violent acts using distressing, event-specific circumstances (e.g., a period of economic distress) rather than the deep-seated psychological issues of the attackers. Finally, when personal stereotyping is stronger, respondents are more likely to suggest that a hypothetical victim of violence either not react to or deal directly with the partner rather than look for formal help. Using different controls for the impact of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on the respondents’ personal and economic lives does not affect our main findings.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Sexual Orientation and Earnings. A Meta-Analysis 2012-2020. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis.

The meta-analysis provided in a new GLO Discussion Paper finds that gay men earned less than heterosexual men; lesbian women earned more than heterosexual women, while bisexual men earned less than heterosexual men.

Nick Drydakis

GLO Discussion Paper No. 862, 2021

Sexual Orientation and Earnings. A Meta-Analysis 2012-2020 Download PDF
by
Drydakis, Nick

GLO Fellow Nick Drydakis

Forthcoming: Journal of Population Economics.

Author Abstract: This meta-analysis utilizes 24 papers published between 2012-2020 that focus on earnings differences by sexual orientation. The papers cover the period between 1991 and 2018, and countries in Europe, North America and Australia. The meta-analysis indicates that gay men earned less than heterosexual men. Lesbian women earned more than heterosexual women, while bisexual men earned less than heterosexual men. Bisexual women earned less than heterosexual women. According to the meta-analysis, in data sets after 2010, gay men and bisexual men and women continue to experience earnings penalties, while lesbian women continue to experience earnings premiums. Τhe meta-regression estimates indicate relationships between study characteristics and the estimated earnings effects for sexual minorities. For instance, regions, sexual minority data set sizes, and earnings classifications influence the outcomes. The persistence of earnings penalties for gay men and bisexual men and women in the face of anti-discrimination policies represents a cause for concern and indicates the need for comprehensive legislation and workplace guidelines to guarantee that people receive fair pay and not experience any form of workplace inequality simply because of their sexual orientation.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Communication Barriers and Infant Health: Intergenerational Effects of Randomly Allocating Refugees Across Language Regions. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Johannes Kunz and Daniel Auer.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for Switzerland that children born to mothers who were exogenously allocated to an environment that matched their linguistic heritage are on average healthier than those that were allocated to an unfamiliar language environment.

Johannes Kunz

GLO Discussion Paper No. 867, 2021

Communication Barriers and Infant Health: Intergenerational Effects of Randomly Allocating Refugees Across Language Regions Download PDF

by Auer, Daniel & Kunz, Johannes S.

GLO Fellow Johannes Kunz

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the intergenerational effect of communication barriers on child health at birth using a natural experiment in Switzerland. We leverage the fact that refugees arriving in Switzerland originate from places that have large shares of French (or Italian) speakers for historical reasons and upon arrival are by law randomly allocated across states that are dominated by different languages but subject to the same jurisdiction. Our findings based on administrative records of all refugee arrivals and birth events between 2010 and 2017 show that children born to mothers who were exogenously allocated to an environment that matched their linguistic heritage are on average 72 gram heavier (or 2.2%) than those that were allocated to an unfamiliar language environment. The differences are driven by growth rather than gestation and manifest in a 2.9 percentage point difference in low birth weight incidence. We find substantial dose-response relationships in terms of language exposure in both, the origin country and the destination region. Moreover, French (Italian) exposed refugees only benefit from French-(Italian-) speaking destinations, but not vice versa. Contrasting the language match with co-ethnic networks, we find that high quality networks are acting as a substitute rather than a complement.

Featured image: Ra-Dragon-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The impact of University reopenings on COVID-19 cases in Scotland. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Hector Rufrancos, Mirko Moro & Eva Moore.

A new GLO Discussion Paper for Scottish universities finds a substantial and persistent increase in cases in areas containing halls and evidence of persistent spillovers.

Hector Rufrancos

GLO Discussion Paper No. 868, 2021

The impact of University reopenings on COVID-19 cases in Scotland Download PDF
by
Rufrancos, Héctor & Moro, Mirko & Moore, Eva

GLO Fellow Hector Rufrancos

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Author Abstract: This paper estimates the impact of University reopenings in Scotland in Autumn 2020 on COVID-19 cases in Scottish neighbourhoods. We geolocate all student halls in Scotland, and merge this data with neighbourhood-level case data. We employ a local differences-indi fferences strategy and tackle two research questions. First, we ask what was the impact of the start of semester on cases in the student neighbourhoods? Next, we turn our attention to the spillover of cases in the nearby communities to student neighbourhoods. University semester start dates in Scotland are staggered over the month of September, and we deal with this by focusing on each start cluster, as well as implementing the Callaway and Sant’Anna (2020) estimator. We find a substantial and persistent increase in cases in areas containing halls and evidence of persistent spillovers. These effects are linked to the group of Universities that started on 14th September, which include large Universities located in the major urban areas. The cases began to rise on 21st September, with 100 extra cases per 100,000 per day, and peaked a week later with 400 additional cases per 100,000 per day, after which they started declining, but persist until the Autumn tightening of coronavirus restrictions bit in November, two months after the restrictions were enacted. Our results invite a re-think of how close contact activities may safely resume.

Featured image: Photo-by-Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

2021-22 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS). Deadline for Applications: September 6, 2021.

Global Labor Organization (GLO) invites interested young scholars to apply for participation in the 2021-22 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS). This is the third cohort of the successful GLO venture to support career developments of young researchers. It also provides a unique opportunity to interact with the large and very active GLO global network.

Ends;

A Political Economy and Voicing Model of the Institutional Impact of Brain Drain, Human Capital, Inequality and Country Size. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Frederic Docquier & Maurice Schiff.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies the brain drain, human capital, and inequality’s institutional impact in a model where a rent-seeking elite taxes residents and voicing affects the likelihood of regime change.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 866, 2021

A Political Economy and Voicing Model of the Institutional Impact of Brain Drain, Human Capital, Inequality and Country Size Download PDF

by Docquier, Frédéric & Schiff, Maurice

GLO Fellows Frederic Docquier & Maurice Schiff

Maurice Schiff

Author Abstract: Brain drain BD, human capital h, and inequality’s institutional impact is examined in a model where a rent-seeking elite taxes residents and voicing affects the likelihood of regime change. We find that BD and h’s impact on institutional quality (Q) are as follows: i) Q is a U-shaped function of BD, with maximum (minimum) at BD = 0 (0 ) BD1, and is maximized at BD = 0; vi) Q increases in a high (low) BD country under a host country’s immigration promotion (restriction); vii) a high BD country’s institutions improve (worsen) under a large (small) reduction in BD; viii) the latter is particularly relevant for small and micro states where BD and Q are likely to be greater than in large but otherwise similar countries.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

36th EBES Conference, Istanbul/Turkey, July 1-3, 2021. Highlight from day 2: GLO Handbook Session on “Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards” chaired by GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn. VIDEO available!

The 36th EBES Conference in Istanbul took place July 1-3, 2021 in Hybrid Mode. A highlight of the second day was the GLO Handbook Session on “Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards” chaired by GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn. GLO and EBES are collaborating organizations.

EBES Website Conference Page Conference Program

Uwe Jirjahn


The conference included a GLO Handbook Session on “Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards” organized and chaired by Uwe Jirjahn (University of Trier and GLO), who is a Section Editor of the Handbook. The event took place on July 2, 3.50-5.50 pm, Istanbul time.

VIDEO OF THE HANDBOOK SESSION

GLO Handbook Session: Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards

“Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics” edited by Klaus F. Zimmermann.

July 2, 2021. 3.50-5.50 pm local time Istanbul

Uwe Jirjahn

Chair: Uwe Jirjahn (University of Trier and GLO)

  • Decent Work and the Quality of Work and Employment
    Francis Green (University College London and GLO)
  • Union Membership and Collective Bargaining: Trends and Determinants
    Claus Schnabel (Universität Erlangen Nürnberg)
  • Unions, Worker Participation and Worker Well-Being
    Benjamin Artz (University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and GLO) and John S. Heywood (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and GLO)
  • Worker Voice and Political Participation in Civil Society
    John Budd (University of Minnesota and GLO) and Ryan Lamare (University of Illinois and GLO)
  • Works Councils
    Jens Mohrenweiser (Bournemouth University)
  • Board-Level Worker Representation
    Aleksandra Gregoric (Copenhagen Business School)

2021 World Congress of the International Economic Association (IEA) takes place online on July 2-6, 2021. Participation Free. Recording of the three GLO-IEA Invited Sessions.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is iea-logo-world-congress-2021-205x300.jpg

The Covid-19 delayed IEA World Congress (“Bali”) now takes place virtually on 2-6 July 2021.

On invitation of the International Economic Association (IEA) the Global Labor Organization (GLO) has organized three sessions for the IEA World Congress, which were recorded by GLO with support of Kent University on June 10, 2021. See program details, report and video access: LINK

The video is also available here: LINK and on the congress website of the IEA World Congress 2021.

The GLO Sessions have the following themes:

  • Session I. “Socioeconomic Status and Identity”.
  • Session II.The Migration Challenge“.
  • Session III. “Wage gaps”.

Ends;

36th EBES Conference, Istanbul/Turkey, July 1-3, 2021. Highlights of Day 1. EBES Fellow Award to Barry Eichengreen.

The 36th EBES Conference in Istanbul took place July 1-3, 2021 in Hybrid Mode. Highlights of the first day included a session of journal editors on journal publishing and the presentation of the EBES Fellow Award to Barry Eichengreen who delivered his Fellow Speech on “Financial Regulation for the Platform Economy”. The sessions were chaired by EBES & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann. GLO and EBES are collaborating organizations.

EBES WebsiteConference PageConference Program

Just announced IF Impact Factors for 2020 by Clarivate Web of Science:
Journal of Population Economics: 2.813
Finance Research Letters: 5.596
Journal of International Financial Markets Institutions and Money: 4.211
Emerging Markets Review: 4.073
Eurasian Business Review: 3.500

EBES Fellow Speech: “Financial Regulation for the Platform Economy”

Barry Eichengreen is the George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1987. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR). He worked as Senior Policy Advisor at the IMF. He is a regular monthly columnist for Project Syndicate. He has held Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships and has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Palo Alto) and the Institute for Advanced Study (Berlin).

His larger number of books include recently
In Defense of Public Debt (with Asmaa El-Ganainy, Rui Esteves and Kris Mitchener), Oxford University Press, 2021
How to Achieve Inclusive Growth (edited with Valerie Serra, Asmaa El-Ganainy and Martin Schindler), Oxford University Press, 2021
The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era (2018),
How Global Currencies Work: Past, Present, and Future, with Livia Chitu and Arnaud Mehl, (2017)
The Korean Economy: From a Miraculous Past to a Sustainable Future (Harvard East Asian Monographs) with Wonhyuk Lim, Yung Chul Park and Dwight H. Perkins, (2015)
Renminbi Internationalization: Achievements, Prospects, and Challenges, co-edited with Masahiro Kawai, (2015)
Hall of Mirrors: The Great Depression, The Great Recession, and the Uses-and Misuses-of History, (2015)

He was awarded the Economic History Association’s Jonathan R.T. Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 2002 and the University of California at Berkeley Social Science Division’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 2004. He is also the recipient of a doctor honoris causa from the American University in Paris. He is ranked as one of the top economists by IDEAS: 6th (number of works), 22 (average rank score) etc. •His research interests are: exchange rates and capital flows; the gold standard and the Great Depression; the European economy; European integration; the impact of China on the international economic and financial system; IMF policy. His research was published in top journals such as Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Economic Journal, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control,Economic Policy, and Journal of International Economics.

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The Effects of COVID-19 on Employment, Labour Markets and Gender Equality in Central America. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Allan Webster, Sangeeta Khorana & Francesco Pastore.

A new GLO Discussion Paper based on data collected by the World Bank suggests that a significant proportion of surviving firms in Central America are vulnerable to permanent closure.

Francesco Pastore

GLO Discussion Paper No. 865, 2021

The Effects of COVID-19 on Employment, Labour Markets and Gender Equality in Central America Download PDF
by
Webster, Allan & Khorana, Sangeeta & Pastore, Francesco

GLO Fellows Allan Webster, Sangeeta Khorana & Francesco Pastore

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Author Abstract: This study considers the economic impact of Covid-19 on enterprises in four Central American countries – El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. At the time of the analysis neither the pandemic nor its economic consequences had fully run their course. It is not, therefore, a definitive analysis but it is important to try to draw important lessons as soon as possible. The main focus of the study was the initial impact on labour markets. The analysis was based on World Bank enterprise surveys§ undertaken before the outbreak of Covid-19 and follow-up surveys on the effects of the pandemic, also undertaken by the World Bank. These were combined with data on government containment measures and on morbidity and mortality rates.

The use of enterprise data to analyse labour market issues has some limitations but also many strengths. The data is useful for analysing the consequences for gender equality in employment. Since the demand for labour is a derived demand firm level data provides a clear link to labour market effects. The pandemic has caused a significant loss in sales for many firms, This creates a loss of liquidity which, in turn, has caused some firms to reduce employment, working hours and wages. Government containment measures necessary to save lives such as temporary workplace closures have added to the burden for both firms and employees.

The study starts by using the surveys to identify the important stylised facts. Although some issues are already well documented anecdotally through media reports this provides a more evidence based approach. It also helps identify several issues, such as the impact on gender equality which have received less journalistic attention. The study is further supported by a regression analysis (OLS and SURE) of several key outcomes (changes in sales, employment, the share of females in employment and firm expectations of survival). A limitation of such analysis with any enterprise level is heterogeneity and, in consequence, a risk of sample selection bias. To provide robustness checks we use a matching approach.

The results suggest that a significant proportion of surviving firms are vulnerable to permanent closure. The ability of firms to retain labour depends on sales which are affected by both the pandemic itself and the government containment measures. Only a small proportion of firms have received government support and there is evidence that it could help both firm survival and the retention of labour. There is some doubt whether the four countries have the institutional capacity to provide effective support. If such doubts prove well founded then support may need to be externally driven.

Featured image: Photo-by-Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

An Ex-Ante Assessment on Poverty and Cash Transfer Benefits in Viet Nam under the Covid-19 Pandemic. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Cuong Nguyen and Long Thanh Giang & Aiko Kikkawa.

A new GLO Discussion Paper on Vietnam suggests that COVID-19 leads to a substantial reduction in household’s per-capita income and to additional 1.7 million poor people.

Cuong Nguyen

GLO Discussion Paper No. 864, 2021

An Ex-Ante Assessment on Poverty and Cash Transfer Benefits in Viet Nam under the Covid-19 Pandemic Download PDF
by
Giang, Long Thanh & Kikkawa, Aiko & Nguyen, Cuong Viet

GLO Fellow Cuong Nguyen

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Author Abstract: Using household data from the Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey (VHLSS) and the sector-specific growth and remittance inflow projections by Asian Development Bank (ADB), this study first estimated the COVID-19 pandemic on income and poverty status of the Vietnamese households, and then simulated the impact of cash transfer programs by the government of Vietnam on the income and poverty status of households. Our simulations suggest that COVID-19 leads to substantial reduction in household’s per-capita income, and results in additional 1.7 million poor people. The cash transfers would be pro-poor and helps bring about 1.2 million people out of poverty. The transfers would be particularly pro-poor for ethnic minority and rural persons and those working in severely affected economic sectors. Based on the findings, we discussed various policies to implement appropriate measures to help households cope with adverse economic impact of COVID-19.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Even more discouraged? The NEET generation at the age of COVID-19. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Carmen Aina, Irene Brunetti, Chiara Mussida and Sergio Scicchitano.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the probability of being NEET significantly increased during the pandemic in Italy.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 863, 2021

Even more discouraged? The NEET generation at the age of COVID-19 Download PDF
by
Aina, Carmen & Brunetti, Irene & Mussida, Chiara & Scicchitano, Sergio

GLO Fellows Carmen Aina, Chiara Mussida and Sergio Scicchitano

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Sergio Scicchitano

Author Abstract: This paper evaluates if and to what extend the risk of becoming Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEET) has worsened during the Covid-19 pandemic in Italy. The analysis is based on a unique dataset from the merging of two sample surveys, the Italian Labor Force Survey and the Institutional Quality Index dataset. We find that the probability of being NEET significantly increased during the pandemic, but heterogeneously between age cohorts and geographical areas. The most affected categories have been young people (aged 25-34) and those living in North-West regions. Females are mostly affected compared to males, especially those experiencing motherhood and living in a Southern province. Investment in education reduces the NEET status, mainly for age-group 25-34 in the South. Participation in the civil society significantly reduces the probability to being NEET. Finally, active policies conducted at regional level are a further educational investment that protect from becoming NEET, although their effectiveness is not significant in the Southern regions. We provide novel evidence to inform policymakers and help building evidence-based policies, tailored on local needs.

Featured image: Photo-by-Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

36th EBES Conference, Istanbul/Turkey, July 1-3, 2021. Program now available including a GLO Handbook Session on “Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards” chaired by GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn.

The 36th EBES Conference in Istanbul will take place on July 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 2021 in Hybrid Mode. This is a GLO supported event. EBES is the Eurasia Business and Economics Society, a strategic partner and institutional supporter of GLO. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. (Invited speakers see below)

EBES Website Conference Page Conference Program

Uwe Jirjahn


The conference includes a GLO Handbook Session on “Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards” organized and chaired by Uwe Jirjahn (University of Trier and GLO), who is a Section Editor of the Handbook. The event takes place on July 2, 3.50-5.50 pm, Istanbul time.

GLO Handbook Session: Worker Representation, Labor-Management Relations and Labor Standards

“Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics” edited by Klaus F. Zimmermann.

July 2, 2021. 3.50-5.50 pm local time Istanbul

Chair: Uwe Jirjahn (University of Trier and GLO)

  • Decent Work and the Quality of Work and Employment
    Francis Green (University College London and GLO)
  • Union Membership and Collective Bargaining: Trends and Determinants
    Claus Schnabel (Universität Erlangen Nürnberg)
  • Unions, Worker Participation and Worker Well-Being
    Benjamin Artz (University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and GLO) and John S. Heywood (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and GLO)
  • Worker Voice and Political Participation in Civil Society
    John Budd (University of Minnesota and GLO) and Ryan Lamare (University of Illinois and GLO)
  • Works Councils
    Jens Mohrenweiser (Bournemouth University)
  • Board-Level Worker Representation
    Aleksandra Gregoric (Copenhagen Business School)

Invited Speakers of EBES 36

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues Barry EichengreenNarjess Boubakri, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Jonathan Batten will join the conference as the keynote speakers and/or invited editors.

Barry Eichengreen is the George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1987. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR). He worked as Senior Policy Advisor at the IMF. He is a regular monthly columnist for Project Syndicate. His books include The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era (2018), How Global Currencies Work: Past, Present, and Future, with Livia Chitu and Arnaud Mehl, (2017), The Korean Economy: From a Miraculous Past to a Sustainable Future (Harvard East Asian Monographs) with Wonhyuk Lim, Yung Chul Park and Dwight H. Perkins, (2015), Renminbi Internationalization: Achievements, Prospects, and Challenges, co-edited with Masahiro Kawai, (2015), Hall of Mirrors: The Great Depression, The Great Recession, and the Uses-and Misuses-of History, (2015). He was awarded the Economic History Association’s Jonathan R.T. Hughes Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 2002 and the University of California at Berkeley Social Science Division’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 2004. He is also the recipient of a doctor honoris causa from the American University in Paris. He is ranked as one of the top economists by IDEAS: 6th (number of works), 22 (average rank score) etc. His research interests are: exchange rates and capital flows; the gold standard and the Great Depression; the European economy; European integration; the impact of China on the international economic and financial system; IMF policy. His research was published in top journals such as Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, and Journal of International Economics.

Narjess Boubakri is professor of Finance at American University of Sharjah (AUS) (United Arab Emirates) where she joined in 2007. She is currently the Dean of the School of Business Administration at AUS as well. She has taught at Laval University and HEC Montreal School of Business (Canada). She has also several editorial roles at leading journals such as Editor (Finance Research Letters), Co-Editor (Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance), Associate Editor (Journal of Corporate Finance), and Subject Editor (Emerging Markets Review; Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions, and Money; and Journal of International Business Policy). Her papers were published in well-known journals such as Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Corporate Finance, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of Accounting Research. Her research has been widely cited (Google Scholar=6,000+). Her research areas are Corporate Governance, Privatization, Corporate Finance, International Finance, Mergers and Acquisitions, Legal and Political Institutions, Lobbying, and Earnings Management.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (em.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin and Renmin University of China; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea (Chair of its Section for Economics, Business and Management Sciences). Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia; EBES Fellow Award 2018. He has published in many top journals including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. His research fields are population, labor, development, and migration.

Jonathan Batten is professor of finance and CIMB-UUM Chair in Banking and Finance at the School of Economics, Finance and Banking at the University Utara Malaysia (Malaysia). Prior to this position, he worked at the Monash University (Australia), Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong), and Seoul National University (Korea). He is a well-known academician who has published articles in many of the leading economics and finance journals and currently serves as the Editor of Emerging Markets Review (SSCI), Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions & Money (SSCI), and Finance Research Letters (SSCI). He was also the President of EBES from July 2014 till December 2018. His current research interests include: financial market development and risk management; spread modelling arbitrage and market integration; and the investigation of the non-linear dynamics of financial prices.

Last day & flashlights of previous days: Fourth IESR-GLO Conference on ‘Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs’ online on June 24-26, 2021. With keynote of Timothy Smeeding. Reminder.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fourth IESR-GLO Virtual Conference. The conference this year is held from June 24 (Thursday) to June 26 (Saturday), 2021 through Zoom. The theme is Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs. Robert Moffitt and Timothy Smeeding are the keynote speakers. (Feng of IESR right & Zimmermann of GLO left)

CONFERENCE PROGRAM PDF & BELOW

Day 1; June 24:

Speakers on June 24 from the left:
Michael Christl, Jinyuan Yang, Sen Xue
Shuaizhang Feng, Robert Moffitt, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Feng Chen, Laura V. Zimmermann, Xi Chen

Day 2; June 25:

Program

8.00-11.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.05 am New York / 1:00-4:05 pm London
JUNE 24 (Thursday). Chair: Sen Xue (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

8.00-8.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-8.05 am New York / 1:00-1:05 pm London
Opening Remarks by Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO) & Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

8.05-9.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:05-9.05 am New York / 1:05-2:05 pm London
Keynote Lecture: Take-up in Social Assistance Programs: Theory and Evidence
Keynote Speaker: Robert Moffitt (Johns Hopkins University)

9.05-9.35 pm Beijing Time / 9:05-9.35 am New York / 2:05-2:35 pm London
The Power of Lakshmi: Monetary Incentives for Raising a Girl
Nabaneeta Biswas (Marshall University), Christopher Cornwell (University of Georgia) & Laura V. Zimmermann (University of Georgia & GLO)

9.35-10.05 pm Beijing Time / 9:35-10.05 am New York / 2:35-3:05 pm London
Grandfathers and Grandsons: Social Security Expansion and Child Health in China
Jinyuan Yang (Virginia Tech) & Xi Chen (Yale University & GLO)

10.05-10.35 pm Beijing Time / 10:05-10.35 am New York / 3:05-3:35 pm London
Trapped in inactivity? Social Assistance and Labour Supply in Austria
Michael Christl (European Commission & GLO) & Silvia De Poli (European Commission)

10.35-11.05 pm Beijing Time / 10:35-11.05 am New York / 3:35-4:05 pm London
Does Paid Family Leave Save Infant Lives? Evidence from California
Feng Chen (Tulane University & GLO)

8.00-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.00 am New York / 1:00-4:00 pm London
June 25 (Friday). Policy Forum on Social Assistance Systems
Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

8.00-8.45 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-8.45 am New York / 1:00-1:45 pm London
Japan. Masayoshi Hayashi (University of Tokyo)
Public Assistance in Japan: Current State and Challenges

8.45-9.30 pm Beijing Time / 8:45-9.30 am New York / 1:45-2:30 pm London
South Korea. Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University)
Social Assistance in South Korea: Policy Developments, Impacts and Implications for Future Reform

9.30-10.15 pm Beijing Time / 9:30-10.15 am New York / 2:30-3:15 pm London
Germany. Alexander Spermann (FOM/Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO)
Basic Income in Germany 1991-2021: Challenges After Reunification, Hartz Reforms and the Current Reform Debate

10.15-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 10.15-11.00 am New York / 3:15-4:00 pm London
Sweden. Björn Gustafsson (University of Gothenburg and GLO)
Social Assistance in Sweden – Provision, Recipients and Challenges

8.00-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.00 am New York / 1:00-4:00 pm London
JUNE 26 (Saturday). Chair: Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

8.00-9.00 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-9.00 am New York / 1:00-2:00 pm London
Keynote Lecture: Poverty and Income Support Around the World: China, India and Asia in Comparative Perspective
Keynote Speaker: Timothy Smeeding (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

9.00-9.30 pm Beijing Time / 9:00-9.30 am New York / 2:00-2:30 pm London
The Health of Disability Insurance Enrollees: An International Comparison
Enrica Croda (Ca’Foscari University of Venice & GLO), Jonathan Skinner (Dartmouth College) & Laura Yasaitis (Dartmouth College)

9.30-10.00 pm Beijing Time / 9:30-10.00 am New York / 2:30-3:00 pm London
The Unintended Effect of Medicaid Aging Waivers on Informal Caregiving
Xianhua (Emma) Zai (Ohio State University & GLO)

10.00-10.30 pm Beijing Time / 10:00-10.30 am New York / 3:00-3:30 pm London
Housing Vouchers, Labor Supply and Household Formation: A Structural Approach
Ning Zhang (University of Pittsburgh)

10.30-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 10:30-11.00 am New York / 3:30-4:00 pm London
The Structure and Incentives of a COVID related Emergency Wage Subsidy
Jules Linden (National University Ireland Galway & Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Reesarch), Cathal O’Donoghue (National University Ireland Galway), Denisa M. Sologon (Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Reesarch)

Keynote speakers

Robert Moffitt on June 24; 8.00 pm Beijing Time

Robert A. Moffitt is the Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University and holds a joint appointment at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He obtained his Ph.D. degree from Brown University. His research interests are in the areas of labor economics and applied microeconometrics, with a special focus on the economics of issues relating to the low-income population in the U.S.. A large portion of his research has concerned the labor supply decisions of female heads of family and its response to the U.S. welfare system. He has published on the AFDC, Food Stamp, and Medicaid programs.

Moffitt has served as Chief Editor of the American Economic Review, Coeditor of the Review of Economics and Statistics, Chief Editor of the Journal of Human Resources, and as Chair of the National Academy of Sciences Panel to Evaluate Welfare Reform. He is currently editor of Tax Policy and the Economy.

Moffitt is also a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a recipient of a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health, a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Past President of the Population Association of America.

Timothy Smeeding on June 26; 8.00 pm Beijing Time


Timothy Smeeding is Lee Rainwater Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs and Economics of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He was director of the Institute for Research on Poverty from 2008–2014 and was the founding director of the Luxembourg Income Study from 1983-2006. He was named the John Kenneth Galbraith Fellow, American Academy of Political and Social Science in 2017.

Professor Smeeding’s recent work has been on social and economic mobility across generations, inequality of income, consumption and wealth, and poverty in national and cross-national contexts.

His recent publications include: SNAP Matters: How Food Stamps Affect Health and Well Being (Stanford University Press, 2015); Monitoring Social Mobility in the 21st Century (Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 2015); From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage (Russell Sage Foundation, 2012); Persistence, Privilege and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility (Russell Sage Foundation, 2011); The Handbook of Economic Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2009); Poor Kids in a Rich Country: America’s Children in Comparative Perspective (Russell Sage Foundation, 2003); and The American Welfare State: Laggard or Leader?, (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Policy Forum on Social Assistance Systems 

June 25th: 8:pm-11pm Beijing Time/ 8:00am-11am New York / 1:00pm-4:00pm London
Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

  • 8:00-8:45 pm: Japan. Masayoshi Hayashi (University of Tokyo)
    Public Assistance in Japan: Current State and Challenges
  • 8:45-9:30 pm: Korea. Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University)
    Social Assistance in South Korea: Policy Developments, Impacts and Implications for Future Reform
  • 9:30-10:15 pm: Germany. Alexander Spermann (FOM/Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO)
    Basic Income in Germany 1991-2021: Challenges After Reunification, Hartz Reforms and the Current Reform Debate
  • 10:15-11:00 pm: Sweden. Björn Gustafsson (University of Gothenburg and GLO)
    Social Assistance in Sweden – Provision, Recipients and Challenges

Masayoshi Hayashi (University of Tokyo)
Professor of Economics at the University of Tokyo, and the President of the Japan Institute of Public Finance. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Queen’s University at Kingston, Canada. His research interests include redistribution, taxation and fiscal federalism.

Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University)
Professor at the Department of Social Welfare, Seoul National University. He is currently working as the President of the Korean Academy of Social Welfare. His research has been focusing on poverty, inequality and social policy. 

Alexander Spermann (FOM/Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO)
Has started his research on social assistance more than thirty years ago. After finishing his dissertation and habilitation at the University of Freiburg, he held leading positions at international research institutes (ZEW, IZA) and is currently Professor of Economics at FOM Cologne and University of Freiburg. He has been a regular contributor to the media for decades.

Björn Gustafsson (University of Gothenburg and GLO)
Professor Emeritus, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He has published several papers on social assistance in Sweden. Since the 1990s he has also studied various aspects on income among Chinese households.  

From the left: Masayoshi Hayashi, Inhoe Ku, Alexander Spermann, and Björn Gustafsson

  • Organizers

Institute for Economic and Social Research, Jinan University
Global Labor Organization

  • Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Sen Xue, Jinan University

  • Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

IESR Conference Website

Ends;

Baby commodity booms? The impact of commodity shocks on fertility decisions and outcomes. New paper published ONLINE FIRST & WITH FREE ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by GLO Fellow Francisco Gallego & Jeanne Lafortune.

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds that commodity shocks lead to an increase in the number of births and the birth rate in Chile.

Baby commodity booms? The impact of commodity shocks on fertility decisions and outcomes

by Francisco Gallego & Jeanne Lafortune

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cnd2y

GLO Fellow Francisco Gallego

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: This paper uses international commodity prices and local natural resource endowments as a source of plausibly exogenous variation in local Chilean economic conditions to study how these shocks impact fertility behavior of families in a small, emerging open economy where non-marital fertility is common but parental obligations are not well enforced. We find that these commodity shocks lead to an increase in the number of births and the birth rate. We argue that these results are consistent with most women experiencing an income effect and a limited substitution effect from commodity booms. This is confirmed by looking at groups that would have experienced a larger income than substitution effect: higher-order births, births within marital relationships, and those by mothers who do not experience an increase in their employment probability respond more strongly to these commodity booms.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

More goals, fewer babies? On national teams’ performance and birth rates. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Luca Fumarco & Francesco Principe.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that an increase in national teams’ performance in international cups is associated with a drop in birth rates nine months after the event.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 860, 2021

More goals, fewer babies? On national teams’ performance and birth rates Download PDF
by
Fumarco, Luca & Principe, Francesco

GLO Fellow Luca Fumarco

Luca Fumarco

Author Abstract: Does national team performance boost birth rates? We compiled a unique dataset combining country-level monthly birth rates for 50 European countries, along 56 years, with measures of national teams’ performance in 27 international football events. We find that an increase in national teams’ performance in international cups is associated with a drop in birth rates nine months after the event. We hypothesize that these results might be explained by individuals’ time allocation choices.

Featured image: daniel-norin-on-unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Fourth IESR-GLO Conference on ‘Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs’ online on June 24-26, 2021. Day 1 (June 24) & registration information.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fourth IESR-GLO Virtual Conference. The conference this year will be held from June 24 (Thursday) to June 26 (Saturday), 2021 through Zoom. The theme is Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs. Robert Moffitt and Timothy Smeeding are the keynote speakers. To register see below.

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the Labor Markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019. (Feng of IESR right & Zimmermann of GLO left)

  • To participate

No participation fee. For registration, please click the link:
https://www.wjx.cn/vj/mKRDcqR.aspx

FULL CONFERENCE PROGRAM PDF & ON THE GLO WEBSITE.

Program of Day 1 (June 24)

8.00-11.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.05 am New York / 1:00-4:05 pm London
JUNE 24 (Thursday). Chair: Sen Xue (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

Speakers on June 24 from the left:
Michael Christl, Jinyuan Yang, Sen Xue
Shuaizhang Feng, Robert Moffitt, Klaus F. Zimmermann
Feng Chen, Laura V. Zimmermann, Xi Chen

8.00-8.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-8.05 am New York / 1:00-1:05 pm London
Opening Remarks by Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO) & Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

8.05-9.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:05-9.05 am New York / 1:05-2:05 pm London
Keynote Lecture: Take-up in Social Assistance Programs: Theory and Evidence
Keynote Speaker: Robert Moffitt (Johns Hopkins University)

9.05-9.35 pm Beijing Time / 9:05-9.35 am New York / 2:05-2:35 pm London
The Power of Lakshmi: Monetary Incentives for Raising a Girl
Nabaneeta Biswas (Marshall University), Christopher Cornwell (University of Georgia) & Laura V. Zimmermann (University of Georgia & GLO)

9.35-10.05 pm Beijing Time / 9:35-10.05 am New York / 2:35-3:05 pm London
Grandfathers and Grandsons: Social Security Expansion and Child Health in China
Jinyuan Yang (Virginia Tech) & Xi Chen (Yale University & GLO)

10.05-10.35 pm Beijing Time / 10:05-10.35 am New York / 3:05-3:35 pm London
Trapped in inactivity? Social Assistance and Labour Supply in Austria
Michael Christl (European Commission & GLO) & Silvia De Poli (European Commission)

10.35-11.05 pm Beijing Time / 10:35-11.05 am New York / 3:35-4:05 pm London
Does Paid Family Leave Save Infant Lives? Evidence from California
Feng Chen (Tulane University & GLO)

  • Organizers

Institute for Economic and Social Research, Jinan University
Global Labor Organization

  • Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Sen Xue, Jinan University

  • Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

IESR Conference Website

Ends;

Religiosity, Smoking and Other Addictive Behaviors. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Monica Roman, Klaus F. Zimmermann & Aurelian-Petruș Plopeanu.

Using data for young Romanians, a new GLO Discussion Paper finds that it is external religiosity that interacts with weaker addictive behaviors like smoking, drinking and using drugs.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 859, 2021

Religiosity, Smoking and Other Addictive BehaviorsDownload PDF
by
Roman, Monica & Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Plopeanu, Aurelian-Petruș

Author Abstract: While under communism, identity-providing religion was suppressed, religiosity is strong today even among the youth in post-communist countries. This provides an appropriate background to investigate how external and internal religiosity relates to addictive behaviors like smoking, drinking and drugs among the young. This study shows that not religion as such or internal religiosity, but largely observable (external) religiosity prevents them from wallowing those vices.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Starting TODAY 1 pm London/UK time: Fourth IESR-GLO Conference on ‘Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs’ online on June 24-26, 2021. Program and registration information.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fourth IESR-GLO Virtual Conference. The conference this year will be held from June 24 (Thursday) to June 26 (Saturday), 2021 through Zoom. The theme is Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs. Robert Moffitt and Timothy Smeeding will be the keynote speakers. To register see below.

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the Labor Markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019. (Feng right & Zimmermann left)

  • To participate

No participation fee. For registration, please click the link:
https://www.wjx.cn/vj/mKRDcqR.aspx

CONFERENCE PROGRAM PDF.

Program

8.00-11.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.05 am New York / 1:00-4:05 pm London
JUNE 24 (Thursday). Chair: Sen Xue (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

8.00-8.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-8.05 am New York / 1:00-1:05 pm London
Opening Remarks by Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO) & Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

8.05-9.05 pm Beijing Time / 8:05-9.05 am New York / 1:05-2:05 pm London
Keynote Lecture: Take-up in Social Assistance Programs: Theory and Evidence
Keynote Speaker: Robert Moffitt (Johns Hopkins University)

9.05-9.35 pm Beijing Time / 9:05-9.35 am New York / 2:05-2:35 pm London
The Power of Lakshmi: Monetary Incentives for Raising a Girl
Nabaneeta Biswas (Marshall University), Christopher Cornwell (University of Georgia) & Laura V. Zimmermann (University of Georgia & GLO)

9.35-10.05 pm Beijing Time / 9:35-10.05 am New York / 2:35-3:05 pm London
Grandfathers and Grandsons: Social Security Expansion and Child Health in China
Jinyuan Yang (Virginia Tech) & Xi Chen (Yale University & GLO)

10.05-10.35 pm Beijing Time / 10:05-10.35 am New York / 3:05-3:35 pm London
Trapped in inactivity? Social Assistance and Labour Supply in Austria
Michael Christl (European Commission & GLO) & Silvia De Poli (European Commission)

10.35-11.05 pm Beijing Time / 10:35-11.05 am New York / 3:35-4:05 pm London
Does Paid Family Leave Save Infant Lives? Evidence from California
Feng Chen (Tulane University & GLO)

8.00-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.00 am New York / 1:00-4:00 pm London
June 25 (Friday). Policy Forum on Social Assistance Systems
Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

8.00-8.45 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-8.45 am New York / 1:00-1:45 pm London
Japan. Masayoshi Hayashi (University of Tokyo)
Public Assistance in Japan: Current State and Challenges

8.45-9.30 pm Beijing Time / 8:45-9.30 am New York / 1:45-2:30 pm London
South Korea. Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University)
Social Assistance in South Korea: Policy Developments, Impacts and Implications for Future Reform

9.30-10.15 pm Beijing Time / 9:30-10.15 am New York / 2:30-3:15 pm London
Germany. Alexander Spermann (FOM/Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO)
Basic Income in Germany 1991-2021: Challenges After Reunification, Hartz Reforms and the Current Reform Debate

10.15-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 10.15-11.00 am New York / 3:15-4:00 pm London
Sweden. Björn Gustafsson (University of Gothenburg and GLO)
Social Assistance in Sweden – Provision, Recipients and Challenges

8.00-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-11.00 am New York / 1:00-4:00 pm London
JUNE 26 (Saturday). Chair: Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

8.00-9.00 pm Beijing Time / 8:00-9.00 am New York / 1:00-2:00 pm London
Keynote Lecture: Poverty and Income Support Around the World: China, India and Asia in Comparative Perspective
Keynote Speaker: Timothy Smeeding (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

9.00-9.30 pm Beijing Time / 9:00-9.30 am New York / 2:00-2:30 pm London
The Health of Disability Insurance Enrollees: An International Comparison
Enrica Croda (Ca’Foscari University of Venice & GLO), Jonathan Skinner (Dartmouth College) & Laura Yasaitis (Dartmouth College)

9.30-10.00 pm Beijing Time / 9:30-10.00 am New York / 2:30-3:00 pm London
The Unintended Effect of Medicaid Aging Waivers on Informal Caregiving
Xianhua (Emma) Zai (Ohio State University & GLO)

10.00-10.30 pm Beijing Time / 10:00-10.30 am New York / 3:00-3:30 pm London
Housing Vouchers, Labor Supply and Household Formation: A Structural Approach
Ning Zhang (University of Pittsburgh)

10.30-11.00 pm Beijing Time / 10:30-11.00 am New York / 3:30-4:00 pm London
The Structure and Incentives of a COVID related Emergency Wage Subsidy
Jules Linden (National University Ireland Galway & Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Reesarch), Cathal O’Donoghue (National University Ireland Galway), Denisa M. Sologon (Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Reesarch)

Keynote speakers

Robert Moffitt on June 24; 8.00 pm Beijing Time

Robert A. Moffitt is the Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University and holds a joint appointment at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He obtained his Ph.D. degree from Brown University. His research interests are in the areas of labor economics and applied microeconometrics, with a special focus on the economics of issues relating to the low-income population in the U.S.. A large portion of his research has concerned the labor supply decisions of female heads of family and its response to the U.S. welfare system. He has published on the AFDC, Food Stamp, and Medicaid programs.

Moffitt has served as Chief Editor of the American Economic Review, Coeditor of the Review of Economics and Statistics, Chief Editor of the Journal of Human Resources, and as Chair of the National Academy of Sciences Panel to Evaluate Welfare Reform. He is currently editor of Tax Policy and the Economy.

Moffitt is also a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a recipient of a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health, a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Past President of the Population Association of America.

Timothy Smeeding on June 26; 8.00 pm Beijing Time


Timothy Smeeding is Lee Rainwater Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs and Economics of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He was director of the Institute for Research on Poverty from 2008–2014 and was the founding director of the Luxembourg Income Study from 1983-2006. He was named the John Kenneth Galbraith Fellow, American Academy of Political and Social Science in 2017.

Professor Smeeding’s recent work has been on social and economic mobility across generations, inequality of income, consumption and wealth, and poverty in national and cross-national contexts.

His recent publications include: SNAP Matters: How Food Stamps Affect Health and Well Being (Stanford University Press, 2015); Monitoring Social Mobility in the 21st Century (Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 2015); From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage (Russell Sage Foundation, 2012); Persistence, Privilege and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility (Russell Sage Foundation, 2011); The Handbook of Economic Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2009); Poor Kids in a Rich Country: America’s Children in Comparative Perspective (Russell Sage Foundation, 2003); and The American Welfare State: Laggard or Leader?, (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Policy Forum on Social Assistance Systems 

June 25th: 8:pm-11pm Beijing Time/ 8:00am-11am New York / 1:00pm-4:00pm London
Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

  • 8:00-8:45 pm: Japan. Masayoshi Hayashi (University of Tokyo)
    Public Assistance in Japan: Current State and Challenges
  • 8:45-9:30 pm: Korea. Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University)
    Social Assistance in South Korea: Policy Developments, Impacts and Implications for Future Reform
  • 9:30-10:15 pm: Germany. Alexander Spermann (FOM/Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO)
    Basic Income in Germany 1991-2021: Challenges After Reunification, Hartz Reforms and the Current Reform Debate
  • 10:15-11:00 pm: Sweden. Björn Gustafsson (University of Gothenburg and GLO)
    Social Assistance in Sweden – Provision, Recipients and Challenges

Masayoshi Hayashi (University of Tokyo)
Professor of Economics at the University of Tokyo, and the President of the Japan Institute of Public Finance. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Queen’s University at Kingston, Canada. His research interests include redistribution, taxation and fiscal federalism.

Inhoe Ku (Seoul National University)
Professor at the Department of Social Welfare, Seoul National University. He is currently working as the President of the Korean Academy of Social Welfare. His research has been focusing on poverty, inequality and social policy. 

Alexander Spermann (FOM/Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO)
Has started his research on social assistance more than thirty years ago. After finishing his dissertation and habilitation at the University of Freiburg, he held leading positions at international research institutes (ZEW, IZA) and is currently Professor of Economics at FOM Cologne and University of Freiburg. He has been a regular contributor to the media for decades.

Björn Gustafsson (University of Gothenburg and GLO)
Professor Emeritus, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He has published several papers on social assistance in Sweden. Since the 1990s he has also studied various aspects on income among Chinese households.  

From the left: Masayoshi Hayashi, Inhoe Ku, Alexander Spermann, and Björn Gustafsson

  • Organizers

Institute for Economic and Social Research, Jinan University
Global Labor Organization

  • Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Sen Xue, Jinan University

  • Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

IESR Conference Website

Ends;

Does vocational education pay better, or worse, than academic education? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Jie Chen and GLO Fellow Francesco Pastore.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for China that vocational upper secondary graduates face a wage penalty compared to academic upper secondary graduates.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 858, 2021

Does vocational education pay better, or worse, than academic education? Download PDF
by
Chen, Jie & Pastore, Francesco

GLO Affiliate Jie Chen and GLO Fellow Francesco Pastore

Author Abstract: In this paper, we use the Chinese General Social Survey data to analyse the returns to upper secondary vocational education in China. To address possible endogeneity of vocational training due to omitted heterogeneity, we construct a novel instrumental variable using the proportion of tertiary education graduates relative to the entire population by year. Our main finding is that, although returns to vocational upper secondary education appear higher than returns to academic upper secondary education according to the Mincerian equation, the results from the instrumental variable method tell the opposite story: vocational upper secondary graduates face a wage penalty compared to academic upper secondary graduates. The wage penalty is confirmed by an alternative and more recent IV method – the Lewbel method (Lewbel, 2012). Our findings highlight the importance of properly accounting for endogeneity when estimating the returns to vocational education.

Photo-by-J-Zamora-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Confidence in public institutions is critical in containing the COVID-19 pandemic. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Anna Adamecz-Volgyi & Ágnes Szabó-Morvai.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that confidence in public institutions is one of the most important predictors of deaths attributed to COVID-19.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 861, 2021

Confidence in public institutions is critical in containing the COVID-19 pandemic Download PDF
by
Adamecz-Völgyi, Anna & Szabó-Morvai, Ágnes

GLO Fellow Anna Adamecz-Volgyi

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the relative importance of confidence in public institutions to explain cross-country differences in the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic. We extend the related literature by employing regression and machine learning methods to identify the most critical predictors of deaths attributed to the pandemic. We find that a one standard deviation increase (e.g., the actual difference between the US and Finland) in confidence is associated with 350.9 fewer predicted deaths per million inhabitants. Confidence in public institutions is one of the most important predictors of deaths attributed to COVID-19, compared to country-level measures of individual health risks, the health system, demographics, economic and political development, and social capital. Our results suggest that effective policy implementation requires citizens to cooperate with their governments, and willingness to cooperate relies on confidence in public institutions.

Photo-by-Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Local mortality estimates during the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. New paper published ONLINE FIRST & OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Augusto Cerqua, Roberta Di Stefano, Marco Letta & Sara Miccoli

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible demonstrate for Italy that supervised machine learning techniques outperform the official statistical method by substantially improving the prediction accuracy of local mortality.

Local mortality estimates during the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy

by Augusto Cerqua, Roberta Di Stefano, Marco Letta & Sara Miccoli

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
OPEN ACCESS and PDF.

GLO Fellow Marco Letta

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 002-Cover-Page-JPopEa.jpg

Author Abstract: Estimates of the real death toll of the COVID-19 pandemic have proven to be problematic in many countries, Italy being no exception. Mortality estimates at the local level are even more uncertain as they require stringent conditions, such as granularity and accuracy of the data at hand, which are rarely met. The “official” approach adopted by public institutions to estimate the “excess mortality” during the pandemic draws on a comparison between observed all-cause mortality data for 2020 and averages of mortality figures in the past years for the same period. In this paper, we apply the recently developed machine learning control method to build a more realistic counterfactual scenario of mortality in the absence of COVID-19. We demonstrate that supervised machine learning techniques outperform the official method by substantially improving the prediction accuracy of the local mortality in “ordinary” years, especially in small- and medium-sized municipalities. We then apply the best-performing algorithms to derive estimates of local excess mortality for the period between February and September 2020. Such estimates allow us to provide insights about the demographic evolution of the first wave of the pandemic throughout the country. To help improve diagnostic and monitoring efforts, our dataset is freely available to the research community.

Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The George Soros Visiting Chair at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU). The deadline to apply for the next term is June 30, 2021.

The George Soros Visiting Chair or Practitioner Chair is awarded to scholars or practitioners who have demonstrated outstanding achievement or a distinguished record of participation in the academic, professional, journalistic, political, or civic world of public policy.

Deadline for applications is June 30, 2021.

Further Information: https://spp.ceu.edu/gs-chair

Attachment: PDF icongschairscallforapplications2022.pdf

Ends;

Stay-at-home orders, social distancing, and trust. New paper published ONLINE FIRST & FREE ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics by Abel Brodeur, Idaliya Grigoryeva & Lamis Kattan

A new paper published ONLINE FIRST freely accessible finds for the USA that mobility decreases significantly more in high-trust counties than in low-trust counties after stay-at-home orders are implemented.

Stay-at-home orders, social distancing, and trust

by Abel Brodeur, Idaliya Grigoryeva & Lamis Kattan

Published ONLINE FIRST 2021: Journal of Population Economics
ACCESS. FREE READLINK: https://rdcu.be/cmSoY

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Author Abstract: A clear understanding of community response to government decisions is crucial for policy makers and health officials during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we document the determinants of implementation and compliance with stay-at-home orders in the USA, focusing on trust and social capital. Using cell phone data measuring changes in non-essential trips and average distance traveled, we find that mobility decreases significantly more in high-trust counties than in low-trust counties after the stay-at-home orders are implemented, with larger effects for more stringent orders. We also provide evidence that the estimated effect on post-order compliance is especially large for confidence in the press and governmental institutions, and relatively smaller for confidence in medicine and in science.

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Number of submissions, 2010-2020
EiC Report 2020


Journal of Population Economics
Access to the recently published Volume 34, Issue 3, July 2021.

LEAD ARTICLE OF ISSUE 3, 2021:
The safest time to fly: pandemic response in the era of Fox News
by Maxim Ananyev, Michael Poyker and Yuan Tian

OPEN ACCESS: Free ReadlinkDownload PDF

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