Category Archives: Post-22

Call for contributions: 39th EBES Conference, Rome/Italy, 6-8 April 2022. Submission deadline for abstracts is February 14!

Interested researchers are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration. The 39th EBES Conference in Rome will take place on April 6-8, 2022 in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). The event is supported by the Istanbul Economic Research Association and hosted by the Faculty of Economics Sapienza, University of Rome. GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES.

Featured image: david-kohler-VFRTXGw1VjU-unsplash

Invited Speakers

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues David B. Audretsch, Giovanni Dosi, Kevin Lang, Keun Lee, Marco Vivarelli and Klaus F. Zimmermann will participate as keynote speakers and/or invited editors.

David Bruce Audretsch is an American economist. He is a distinguished professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) at Indiana University and also serves as director of the SPEA International Office, Ameritech Chair of Economic Development, and director of SPEA’s Institute for Development Strategies (IDS). He is co-founder and co-editor of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal, and also works as a consultant to the United Nations, the World Bank, the OECD, the EU Commission, and the U.S. Department of State. He was the Director of the Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group at the Max Planck Institute of Economics in Germany from 2003 to 2009.[2] Since 2020, he also serves as a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship at the University of Klagenfurt. Audretsch is a member of the advisory board to a number of international research and policy institutes, including chair of the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin, chair of the Foundation for the Promotion of German Science (Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft), New York Academy of Sciences, the Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, and the Jackstädt Centre for Entrepreneurship in Wuppertal, Germany. He has received honorary doctorate degrees from Jonköping University in Sweden and University of Augsburg in Germany. He is an honorary professor of Industrial Economics and Entrepreneurship at the WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany. In addition, Audretsch serves as a visiting professor at the King Saud University in Saudi Arabia, honorary professor at the University of Jena in Germany, and is a research fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London. He was awarded the 2011 Schumpeter Prize from the University of Wuppertal and the 2001 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research by the Swedish Foundation for Small Business Research.

Giovanni Dosi is Professor of Economics and Director of the Institute of Economics at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna in Pisa. He is the Co-Director of the task forces “Industrial Policy” and “Intellectual Property” at the Initiative for Policy Dialogue at Columbia University. Dosi is Continental European Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change. Included in ISI Highly Cited Researchers. His major research areas, where he is author and editor of several works, include economics of innovation and technological change, industrial organization and industrial dynamics, theory of the firm and corporate governance, evolutionary theory, economic growth and development. A selection of his works has been published in two volumes: Innovation, Organization and Economic Dynamics. Selected Essays, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 2000; and Economic Organization, Industrial Dynamics and Development: Selected Essays, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 2012.

Kevin Lang is a professor of economics at Boston University. He is also an elected Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He is the author of Poverty and Discrimination and over 100 papers and articles on topics in Labor Economics. Lang received his BA in philosophy, politics and economics (PPE) from Oxford University, his MSc in economics from the University of Montreal, and his PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1982. He went on to become an assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine, and he spent a year serving as an Olin Foundation Fellow at the NBER. In 1987, he joined the faculty at Boston University, where he served as chair of the economics department from 2005 to 2009. His recent research has focused on the economics of labor markets and education, including topics such as discrimination, unemployment, the relation between education and earnings, and the relation between housing prices, taxes and local services.

Keun Lee is a Professor of Economics at the Seoul National University, and the winner of the 2014 Schumpeter Prize for his monograph on Schumpeterian Analysis of Economic Catch-up (2013 Cambridge Univ. Press). He is an editor of Research Policy, an associate editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, and a council member of the World Economic Forum since 2016. He served as the President of the International Schumpeter Society (2016- 18), a member of the Committee for Development Policy of UN (2014-18). He obtained Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. One of his most cited articles is a paper on Korea’s Technological Catch-up published in Research Policy, with 1,275 citations (Google Scholar). His H-index is now 44 with 114 papers with more than 10 citations. He has a new book entitled as The Art of Economic Catch-up: barriers, detours, and leapfrogging, which will be published by the Cambridge Univ. Press, March 2019. editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, and a council member of the World Economic Forum since 2016. He served as the President of the International Schumpeter Society (2016- 18), a member of the Committee for Development Policy of UN (2014-18). He obtained Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. One of his most cited articles is a paper on Korea’s Technological Catch-up published in Research Policy, with 1,275 citations (Google Scholar). His H-index is now 44 with 114 papers with more than 10 citations. He has a new book entitled as The Art of Economic Catch-up: barriers, detours, and leapfrogging, which will be published by the Cambridge Univ. Press, March 2019.

Marco Vivarelli is a full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics EJournal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as a referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics, Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization, Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, and World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment, and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of EBES; President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (ret.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin, Renmin University of China and Lixin University; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea. Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia; EBES Fellow Award 2018. He has published in many top journals including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. His research fields are population, labor, development, and migration.

Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 14, 2022.

For submission, please visit our website at https://ebesweb.org/39th-ebes-rome/abstract-submission/  

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org.

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: April 6-8, 2022
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 14, 2022
Reply-by: February 16, 2022*
Registration Deadline: March 14, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: March 16, 2022
Announcement of the Program: March 19, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): March 16, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 15, 2022

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before February 14, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by March 16, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Dr. Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference Link

Dead-end jobs or steppingstones? Precarious work in Albania. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Elvisa Drishti and Fiona Carmichael.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the research is more supportive of the dead-end hypothesis than the idea that a lower quality job can be a steppingstone into a better job.

Elvisa Drishti

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1011, 2022

Dead-end jobs or steppingstones? Precarious work in Albania Download PDF
by Drishti, Elvisa & Carmichael, Fiona

GLO Affiliate Elvisa Drishti

Author Abstract: Purpose: This study asks whether lower quality forms of employment lead to career transitions into higher quality forms of employment acting as steppingstones, or bridges or, whether instead they lead to dead-ends, or traps, in which workers move between unstable jobs with low prospects for upward mobility and unemployment. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses a unique dataset recording retrospective monthly employment states over 3 years for 373 individuals in the Albanian city of Shkoder. The analysis uses sequence and regression analysis to investigate whether people employed in lower quality, more precarious jobs remain in these kinds of jobs or instead are able to transition into higher quality, permanent and füll-time employment. Findings: In line with previous evidence for the region and Europe, the analysis confirms the precarization of many working lives particularly for women, young people and those with lower educational attainment. This evidence is more supportive of the dead-end hypothesis than the idea that a lower quality job can be a steppingstone into a better job. Originality: This study contributes to the limited knowledge of labour market functioning in developing post-socialist Western Balkans countries. Recent flexicurity policies have generated an increased prevalence of more precarious employment arrangements in Albania. This investigation addresses previous research limitations regarding point-in-time transitions and unobserved heterogeneity using retrospective recall data and controlling for personality traits.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Does relative age affect speed and quality of transition from school to work? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Luca Fumarco and Stijn Baert & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that an increase in relative age increases the likelihood of being employed, having a permanent contract , and having full-time employment.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1010, 2022

Does relative age affect speed and quality of transition from school to work? Download PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Vandromme, Alessandro & Halewyck, Levi & Moens, Eline & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellows Luca Fumarco and Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: We are the first to estimate the impact of relative age (i.e., the difference in classmates’ ages) on both speed and quality of individuals’ transition from education to the labour market. Moreover, we are the first to explore whether and how this impact passes through characteristics of students’ educational career. We use rich data pertaining to schooling and to labour market outcomes one year after graduation to conduct instrumental variables analyses. We find that a one-year increase in relative age increases the likelihood of (i) being employed then by 3.5 percentage points, (ii) having a permanent contract by 5.1 percentage points, and (iii) having full-time employment by 6.5 percentage points. These relative age effects are partly mediated by intermediate outcomes such as having had a schooling delay at the age of sixteen or taking on student jobs. The final mediator is particularly notable as no earlier studies examined relative age effects on student employment.We are the first to estimate the impact of relative age (i.e., the difference in classmates’ ages) on both speed and quality of individuals’ transition from education to the labour market. Moreover, we are the first to explore whether and how this impact passes through characteristics of students’ educational career. We use rich data pertaining to schooling and to labour market outcomes one year after graduation to conduct instrumental variables analyses. We find that a one-year increase in relative age increases the likelihood of (i) being employed then by 3.5 percentage points, (ii) having a permanent contract by 5.1 percentage points, and (iii) having full-time employment by 6.5 percentage points. These relative age effects are partly mediated by intermediate outcomes such as having had a schooling delay at the age of sixteen or taking on student jobs. The final mediator is particularly notable as no earlier studies examined relative age effects on student employment.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Effects of teaching practices on life satisfaction and test scores: evidence from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). A new GLO Discussion Paper by Stefano Bartolini & GLO Fellow Kelsey J. O’Connor.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that teaching practices (group discussion) can improve student life satisfaction.

Kelsey J. O’Connor

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1009, 2022

Effects of teaching practices on life satisfaction and test scores: evidence from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) Download PDF

by Bartolini, Stefano & O’Connor, Kelsey J.

GLO Fellow Kelsey J. O’Connor

Author Abstract: Schools are ripe for policy intervention. We demonstrate that implementing different teaching practices is effective, finding a greater prevalence of group discussion used in schools positively affects students’ life satisfaction and noncognitive skills but has no impact on test scores. The benefits do not apply to girls, however, unless they attend all-girl schools. These findings are based on a sample from the 2015 PISA which includes more than 35 thousand students from approximately 1500 schools in 14 countries or regions. We perform regressions of student life satisfaction on the prevalence of group discussion and lecturing used in their school, including a battery of individual, teacher, and school controls, as well as random intercepts by school. For robustness we use instrumental variables and methods to account for school-selection. The average impact of group discussion is not small – a one standard deviation leads to an increase in life satisfaction that is about one-half of the negative association with grade repetition. On the other hand, more or less lecturing does not affect life satisfaction, noncognitive skills, nor test scores. We conclude that teaching practices – group discussion – can be used to improve student life satisfaction, thereby likely positively affecting future economic outcomes and well-being.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

COVID-19, Gender and Labor. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Marcella Corsi & Ipek Ilkkaracan.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reviews the literature to find that Covid-19 may endanger progress in gender equality but has also contributed to increased awareness around the globe of the importance of caring labor and care workers.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1012, 2022

COVID-19, Gender and Labour Download PDF
by Corsi, Marcella & Ilkkaracan, Ipek

GLO Fellow Marcella Corsi

Author Abstract: The Covid-19 pandemic has triggered simultaneously a global health crisis and a global economic crisis which have further deepened existing inequalities along several dimensions, including gender. Increasing gender inequalities in paid and unpaid work has been a primary outcome of the pandemic and the associated economic crisis. Given the disproportionate gender division of labor, women were foremost in bearing the brunt of the increased demands on unpaid care work under the lockdown conditions. At the same time, women were also overrepresented in informal employment and service sectors hard-hit by the pandemic resulting in more severe job loss for female workers overall. In many labor markets, women constituted the majority of so-called essential workers, who were protected from job loss yet exposed to increased health risks and prolonged work hours under distressed work conditions. The increasing demand for household production and the unpaid work burden contributed to weakening women’s labor market attachment resulting in higher declines in female labor force participation than male. The increased prevalence of teleworking under the pandemic has the potential to provide improved work-life balance conditions, yet at the risk of widening the gender inequalities in the labor market. While these outcomes point to the threat that Covid-19 poses at rolling back the gains achieved in gender equality, the experiences under the pandemic conditions have also contributed to increased awareness around the Globe of the importance of caring labor and care workers, establishing a solid basis for advocacy of gender equal care policies.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-on-unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Covid-19 and Working from Home: toward a “new normal”? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Sergio Scicchitano and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper discusses the potential of working from home as the “new normal”.

Sergio Scicchitano

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1013, 2022

Covid-19 and Working from Home: toward a “new normal”? Download PDF
by Kosteas, Vasilios D. & Renna, Francesco & Scicchitano, Sergio

GLO Fellow Sergio Scicchitano

Author Abstract: The COVID pandemic that took the world economy by surprise at the beginning of 2020 brought many drastic changes to the way individuals carry on their daily lives. One that will have long lasting effects, even after the spread of the virus is contained, is a shift towards flexible work arrangements, including remote work options. Initially implemented to comply with government imposed stay-at-home orders, many employers decided to allow remote work even after the orders were lifted. In this chapter we will review some of the metrics used in the literature to measure the potential that a specific occupation is suitable for telework. This is important because Working From Home was often the only option for businesses to remain open during the first part of the pandemic. We also review the results of the literature on two important dimensions of inequality: the gender wage gap and income inequality, Moreover, we review some evidence of the effect of WFH on worker’s productivity in general and during the pandemic and on physical and mental health. We conclude with a description of what WFH may look like after the pandemic, by describing the process towards a possible “new normal” in the labour market.

Featured image: Charles-Deluvio-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Call for submissions: GLO-sponsored conference, Well-being 2022, 1 – 4 June, Luxembourg. Deadline: 31 January.

On behalf of the GLO Happiness Cluster, we are pleased to announce the call for submissions for the conference Wellbeing 2022: Knowledge for informed decisions, organized by STATEC Research. The conference organizing team includes GLO Fellows Francesco Sarracino and Kelsey O’Connor and is supported by an international Scientific Committee, including among others, GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova (GLO Cluster Lead Happiness) and Stephanie Rossouw. For complete details, see the website https://www.wellbeing2022.lu.

This international conference will bring together leading scholars to discuss the quest for better lives, including the measurement of well-being, its causes and consequences, and related questions in presentations of their work.

The program features:

  • Three keynote talks (Stefano Bartolini, University of Siena; GLO Fellow Carol Graham, Brookings Institution and University of Maryland, College Park; and Andrew Oswald, University of Warwick);
  • A roundtable discussion on how policy-makers can integrate the findings from well-being studies (GLO Fellow Andrew Clark, Paris School of Economics; Carrie Exton, OECD; Linda Laura Sabbadini (ISTAT); and three MPs from the Parliament of Luxembourg);
  • An opening talk given by a well-being activist (John de Graaf);
  • And a workshop on the recently updated World Database of Happiness, given by its creator, Ruut Veenhoven.

Paper submission and deadlines

To apply, please, submit an abstract complete with name of the author/s and a title to: submitSWB2020@statec.etat.lu.

Extended abstracts and full manuscripts are welcome. The deadline for application is the 31 January 2022. We will notify the authors of accepted papers by the end of March 2022. submitSWB2020@statec.etat.lu.

For more information, please, visit our conference website (www.wellbeing2022.lu) or send an e-mail to: infoSWB2020@statec.etat.lu

We look forward to welcoming you in Luxembourg!

The scientific committee

Serge Allegrezza, STATEC
Martijn Burger, Erasmus University of Rotterdam
Conchita d’Ambrosio, University of Luxembourg
Johannes Hirata, Osnabruck University
Milena Nikolova, University of Groningen, GLO
Kelsey O’Connor, STATEC Research, GLO
Chiara Peroni, STATEC Research
Maurizio Pugno, University of Cassino
Stephanie Rossouw, Auckland University of Technology, GLO
Francesco Sarracino, STATEC Research, GLO

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COVID-19 and School Closures. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Helena Svaleryd & GLO Fellow Jonas Vlachos.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reviews the literature to find that initial school closures contributed to a reduction of virus transmission, but schools could reopen safely when substantial within-school preventive measures were implemented; students learned less and learning inequalities widened when school closed.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1008, 2022

COVID-19 and School Closures Download PDF
by Svaleryd, Helena & Vlachos, Jonas

GLO Fellow Jonas Vlachos

Author Abstract: To reduce the spread of COVID-19, schools closed to an unprecedented degree in the spring of 2020. To varying extent, students have moved between in-person and remote learning up until the spring of 2021. This chapter surveys the literature on the implications of school closures of primary to upper-secondary schools for virus transmission, student learning, and mental health among children and adolescents in high-income countries. Subject to severe methodological challenges, most studies indicate that the initial school closures at least to some extent contributed to a reduction of virus transmission. However, several studies find that schools could reopen safely, especially when substantial within-school preventive measures were implemented and the general level of transmission was moderate. Student age also matters and keeping schools open for younger students contributes less to overall virus transmission. Most studies find that students learned less and that learning inequalities widened when school closed. These patterns are particularly pronounced for younger students who face more challenges adjusting to remote instruction. Essentially nothing can be said concerning the implications for vocational training. High-quality evidence on the impact on mental health is scarce and the results are mixed, but there are some indications that older students coped better with school closures also in this regard. On balance, closing schools for younger students is less well-motivated than for older students.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Do Economic Incentives Promote Physical Activity? Evidence from the London Congestion Charge. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Andrea Albanese and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals a statistically significant but small impact on active commuting (i.e. cycling and walking) around the border of the charging zone. The effect is larger for lower-income households and car owners. The findings are robust against multiple specifications and validation tests.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1006, 2021

Do Economic Incentives Promote Physical Activity? Evidence from the London Congestion Charge Download PDF
by Nakamura, Ryota & Albanese, Andrea & Coombes, Emma & Suhrcke, Marc

GLO Fellow Andrea Albanese

Andrea Albanese

Author Abstract: This study investigates the impact of economic incentives on travel-related physical activity, leveraging the London Congestion Charge’s disincentivising of sedentary travel modes via increasing the cost of private car use within Central London. The scheme imposes charges on most types of cars entering, exiting and operating within the Central London area, while individuals living inside the charging zone are eligible for a 90% reduction in congestion charges. Geographical location information provides the full-digit postcode data necessary to precisely identify the eligibility for the discount of participants in the London Travel Demand Survey for the period 2005-2011. Using a boundary regression-discontinuity design reveals a statistically significant but small impact on active commuting (i.e. cycling and walking) around the border of the charging zone. The effect is larger for lower-income households and car owners. The findings are robust against multiple specifications and validation tests.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Birth Order Effects, Parenting Style, and Son Preference. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Jun Hyung Kim & Shaoda Wang.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds a weakened role of son preference within families in contemporary China.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1007, 2021

Birth Order Effects, Parenting Style, and Son Preference Download PDF
by Kim, Jun Hyung & Wang, Shaoda

GLO Fellow Jun Hyung Kim

Jun Hyung Kim

Author Abstract: While it is well known that there are systematic birth order effects on life cycle outcomes, there is less consensus about underlying channels and mechanisms of birth order effects. We find negative birth order effects among Chinese adolescents, favoring earlier-born children within household in academic achievement and cognitive skill measures. We highlight harsh parenting as a novel channel of birth order effects, in which earlier-born children are less likely to be physically punished by their parents. Focusing on son preference as a potential mechanism generating birth order effects, our tests show limited support for the existence of son preference among Chinese siblings. These findings are in contrast to positive birth order effects and strong evidence of son preference among earlier generations of Chinese siblings reported in the literature, suggesting weakened role of son preference within families in contemporary China.

Featured image: Derek-Owens-on-Unsplash

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Related recent GLO Discussion Papers:

1005 Changing Patterns of Son Preference and Fertility in Pakistan Download PDF
by Javed, Rashid & Mughal, Mazhar

888 The Power of Lakshmi: Monetary Incentives for Raising a Girl Download PDF
by
Biswas, Nabaneeta & Cornwell, Christopher & Zimmermann, Laura V.

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38th EBES Conference, Warsaw/Poland, January 12-14, 2022 started.

The 38th EBES Conference on January 12-14, 2022 started in Warsaw in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). The event is supported by the Istanbul Economic Research Association and hosted by the Faculty of Economics Sciences, University of Warsaw.  GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations. The conference started on January 12 with welcome speeches by EBES Vice-President Mehmet Bilgin, Gabriela Grotkowska, Dean of the Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, and EBES President Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is also GLO President. Zimmermann also chairs a panel in the afternoon on journal publishing.

Link to the general conference program scheduling 197 papers: LINK

Gabriela Grotkowska, Dean of the Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, speaking.

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GLO Fellow Martijn Hendriks speaks on January 20, 2022 about “Happiness and Migration”

On 20 January 2022, GLO Fellow Martijn Hendriks will speak in a public seminar about Happiness and Migration. The talk is based on his Springer Handbook Chapter with Martijn Burger. The GLO Discussion Paper version of the chapter is hereFor further details see below.

Martijn Hendriks & Martijn J. Burger (2021): Happiness and Migration, in Klaus F. Zimmermann (eds.), Section Editor: Milena Nikolova, Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics, Springer Nature 2021.

Participation: https://etat.webex.com/etat/j.php?RGID=r6aa50fdf5b7f2cefe45a61b3444a9a98
Registration is mandatory for this event. Meeting password: HikAVHA@434
The webinar will be held in English via Cisco Webex and recorded.

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Changing Patterns of Son Preference and Fertility in Pakistan. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Rashid Javed and Mazhar Mughal.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies gender preferences in Pakistan across three decades to reveal that preference for boys is visible in a increasing desired sex ratio and a worsening sex ratio at last birth.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1005, 2021

Changing Patterns of Son Preference and Fertility in Pakistan Download PDF
by Javed, Rashid & Mughal, Mazhar

GLO Fellow Rashid Javed

Author Abstract: Using data from two representative Demographic and Health Surveys, we examine the change in son preference over the past three decades and its effects on Pakistani women’s fertility. We analyse a number of indicators and employ different empirical methods to come up with strong and persistent evidence for both the revealed and stated preference for sons. This disproportionate preference for boys is visible in increasing desired sex ratio and worsening sex ratio at last birth. Reliance over differential birth-stopping has significantly increased over time as couples are more likely to stop childbearing once the desired number of boys is achieved.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Related recent GLO Discussion Paper No. 888:

888 The Power of Lakshmi: Monetary Incentives for Raising a Girl Download PDF
by
Biswas, Nabaneeta & Cornwell, Christopher & Zimmermann, Laura V.

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Effects of Childhood Peers on Personality Skills. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Shuaizhang Feng, Jun Hyung Kim and Zhe Yang.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for China that having disadvantaged peers significantly lowers conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability, and social skills.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1004, 2021

Effects of Childhood Peers on Personality Skills Download PDF
by Feng, Shuaizhang & Kim, Jun Hyung & Yang, Zhe

GLO Fellows Shuaizhang Feng, Jun Hyung Kim & Zhe Yang

Author Abstract: Despite extensive literature on peer effects, the role of peers on personality skill development remains poorly understood. We fill this gap by investigating the effects of having disadvantaged primary school peers, generated by random classroom assignment and parental migration for employment. We find that having disadvantaged peers significantly lowers conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability, and social skill. The implied effects of a 10-15 percentage point change in the classroom proportion of disadvantaged peers are comparable to the effects of popular early childhood interventions. Furthermore, we find suggestive evidence that these effects are driven by the peers’ personality skills.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Further on peer effects for children:

Chakraborty, Tanika & Schüller, Simone & Zimmermann, Klaus F. (2019), Beyond the Average: Ethnic Capital Heterogeneity and Intergenerational Transmission of Education, GLO Discussion Paper No. 322. Published in: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (JEBO), Vol. 163 (2019), pp. 551-569. Published PDF.

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Vaccination Policy and Trust. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Artyom Jelnov and GLO Fellow Pavel Jelnov.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that countries perceived as less corrupt and more liberal experience higher vaccination rates.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1003, 2021

Vaccination Policy and Trust Download PDF
by Jelnov, Artyom & Jelnov, Pavel

GLO Fellow Pavel Jelnov

Pavel Jelnov

Author Abstract: We study the relationship between trust and vaccination. We show theoretically that vaccination rates are higher in countries with more transparent and accountable governments. The mechanism that generates this result is the lower probability of a transparent and accountable government to promote an unsafe vaccine. Empirical evidence supports this result. We find that countries perceived as less corrupt and more liberal experience higher vaccination rates. Furthermore, they are less likely to adopt a mandatory vaccination policy. One unit of the Corruption Perception Index (scaled from 0 to 10) is associated with a vaccination rate that is higher by one percentage point (pp) but with a likelihood of compulsory vaccination that is lower by 10 pp. In addition, Google Trends data show that public interest in corruption is correlated with interest in vaccination. The insight from our analysis is that corruption affects not only the supply but also the demand for public services.

Featured image: Markus-Spiske-on-Unsplash-

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

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Role of Professionalism in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Does a Public Health or Medical Background Help? A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Xi Chen & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for China that cities whose top officials had public health or medical backgrounds had significantly lower infection rates than cities whose top officials lacked such backgrounds.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1002, 2021

Role of Professionalism in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Does a Public Health or Medical Background Help? Download PDF
by Li, Xun & Lai, Weizheng & Wan, Qianqian & Chen, Xi

GLO Fellow Xi Chen

Xi Chen

Author Abstract: In response to the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), there have been substantial variations in policy response and performance for disease control and prevention within and across nations. It remains unclear to what extent these variations may be explained by bureaucrats’ professionalism, as measured by their educational background or work experience in public health or medicine. To investigate the effects of officials’ professionalism on their response to and performance in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, we collect information from the résumés of government and Party officials in 294 Chinese cities, and integrate this information with other data sources, including weather conditions, city characteristics, COVID-19-related policy measures, and health outcomes. We show that, on average, cities whose top officials had public health or medical backgrounds (PHMBG) had significantly lower infection rates than cities whose top officials lacked such backgrounds. We test the mechanisms of these effects and find that cities whose officials had PHMBG implemented community closure more rapidly than those lacked such backgrounds. Our findings highlight the importance of professionalism in combating the pandemic.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

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