Category Archives: Post-23

Analyzing household cost functions using direct wellbeing measures.

The study of GLO Fellow Arie Kapteyn (University of Southern California) published in 1994 in the Journal of Population Economics demonstrated that subjective wellbeing measures fully identify household cost functions.

Happy birthday and 77 thanks to a role model in the field of population economics.

Kapteyn, A. The measurement of household cost functions. Journal of Population Economics 7:4, 333–350 (1994).

https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00161471 
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c4SAL

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Child Gender and Subjective Well-being of Older Parents in China. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Fengyu Wu and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that daughters make older parents happy.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1229, 2023

Child Gender and Subjective Well-being of Older Parents in China – Download PDF
by Lei, Lei & Wu, Fengyu & Xia, Yiming

GLO Fellow Fengyu Wu

Fengyu Wu

Author Abstract: In many societies, parents prefer sons over daughters, but the well-being effects of child gender, especially in later life, are less studied. Using the latest two waves of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), this paper evaluates the impacts of having daughters on older parents’ subjective well-being (SWB) in China, which has a rapidly aging population and the traditional preference for sons. Studying the cohort of parents whose child gender is as good as random, we find that having more daughters promotes older parents’ SWB, especially overall life satisfaction, satisfaction with health, and satisfaction with children. Our results suggest that the increase in SWB is achieved through better health, more financial support from daughters, more spending on leisure and a lower probability of working. The positive SWB effects of daughters are found to be more salient among more vulnerable groups, including those who are older, less educated, and with fewer children.

Featured image: jixiao-huang-on-unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Works Councils and Workers’ Party Preferences in Germany. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn and Thi Xuan Thu Le.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the presence of a works council is negatively associated with preferences for extreme right-wing parties and positively associated with preferences for the Social Democratic Party and The Left.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1228, 2023

Works Councils and Workers’ Party Preferences in Germany – Download PDF
by Jirjahn, Uwe & Le, Thi Xuan Thu

GLO Fellow Uwe Jirjahn

Uwe Jirjahn

Author Abstract: Research on the consequences of works councils has been dominated by economic aspects. Our study provides evidence that works councils have nonfinancial consequences for civic society that go beyond the narrow boundaries of the workplace. Using panel data from a large sample of male workers, the study shows that works councils have an influence on workers’ party preferences. The presence of a works council is negatively associated with preferences for extreme right-wing parties and positively associated with preferences for the Social Democratic Party and The Left. These results holds in panel data estimations including a large set of controls and accounting for unobserved individual-specific factors. Our findings fit the notion that workplace democracy increases workers’ generalized solidarity and their awareness of social and political issues.

Featured image: arnaud-jaegers-unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Measuring Economic Mobility in India Using Noisy Data: A Partial Identification Approach. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Punarjit Roychowdhury and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper casts doubt on the conventional wisdom that marginalized households are catching up.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1227, 2023

1227 Measuring Economic Mobility in India Using Noisy Data: A Partial Identification Approach – Download PDF
by Li, Hao & Millimet, Daniel L. & Roychowdhury, Punarjit

GLO Fellow Punarjit Roychowdhury

Punarjit Roychowdhury

Author Abstract: We examine economic mobility in India while accounting for misclassification to better understand the welfare e§ects of the rise in inequality. To proceed, we extend recently developed methods on the partial identification of transition matrices. Allowing for modest misclassification, we find overall mobility has been remarkably low: at least 65 percent of poor households remained poor or at-risk of being poor between 2005 and 2012. We also find Muslims, lower caste groups, and rural households are in a more disadvantageous position compared to Hindus, upper caste groups, and urban households. These findings cast doubt on the conventional wisdom that marginalized households in India are catching up.

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Quantity-quality trade-off in Northeast China during the Qing dynasty. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

The study provides supportive evidence for the unified growth theory, showing that the decreased fertility rates in pre-transition China could be a result of rational behaviors perpetuated by households in response to higher educational returns and accessibility.

Bai, Y., Li, Y. & Lam, P.H. Quantity-quality trade-off in Northeast China during the Qing dynasty. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00933-x
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c3X9x

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Social security, economic growth, and social welfare in an overlapping generation model with idiosyncratic TFP shock and heterogeneous workers. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

In terms of social welfare within the Rawlsian welfare function, if people are highly risk-averse and therefore strongly inequality-averse, a pay-as-you-go system with no savings credit outperforms a fully funded system. 

Tamai, T. Social security, economic growth, and social welfare in an overlapping generation model with idiosyncratic TFP shock and heterogeneous workers. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00934-w
Free link to read: https://rdcu.be/c3X6q

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Persistent effects of Communist regime affiliations on well-being and preferences. Published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new study shows that those connections still matter much for wellbeing and mark differences concerning preferences for democracy and market economy, for levels of optimism, and risk tolerance.

Otrachshenko, V., Nikolova, M. & Popova, O. Double-edged sword: persistent effects of Communist regime affiliations on well-being and preferences. J Popul Econ (2023).

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00930-0 OPEN ACCESS

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Economic geography of contagion: a study of COVID-19 outbreak in India. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

A new study provides direct evidence that the positive relationship between regional inequality and COVID-19 infection is driven by mobility. 

Chakraborty, T., Mukherjee, A. Economic geography of contagion: a study of COVID-19 outbreak in India. J Popul Econ (2023).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00935-9



Free to READ: https://rdcu.be/c3XPS

GLO Fellow Tanika Chakraborty

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;

Poverty Imputation in Contexts without Consumption Data: A Revisit with Further Refinements. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that adding household utility expenditures to a basic imputation model with household-level demographic and employment variables provides accurate estimates of poverty.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1226, 2023

Poverty Imputation in Contexts without Consumption Data: A Revisit with Further Refinements – Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Kilic, Talip & Abanokova, Kseniya & Carletto, Calogero

GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang

Hai-Anh Dang

Author Abstract: Household consumption data are often unavailable, not fully collected, or incomparable over time in poorer countries. Survey-to-survey imputation has been increasingly employed to address these data gaps for poverty measurement, but its effective use requires standardized protocols. We refine existing poverty imputation models using 14 multi-topic household surveys conducted over the past decade in Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Vietnam. We find that adding household utility expenditures to a basic imputation model with household-level demographic and employment variables provides accurate estimates, which even fall within one standard error of the true poverty rates in many cases. Further adding geospatial variables improves accuracy, as does including additional community-level predictors (available from data in Vietnam) related to educational achievement, poverty, and asset wealth. Yet, within-country spatial heterogeneity exists, with certain models performing well for either urban areas or rural areas only. These results offer cost-saving inputs into future survey design.

Featured image: Mika-Baumeister-on-Unsplash

RELATED STUDY – free access:
Dang, HA.H., Verme, P. Estimating poverty for refugees in data-scarce contexts: an application of cross-survey imputation. Journal of Population Economics (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00909-x OPEN ACCESS

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Ability composition in the class and the school performance of immigrant students. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Elena Meschi and Caterina Pavese.

A new GLO Discussion Paper using Italian data shows that while native students are mostly influenced by the average quality of their peers, immigrant children are detrimentally affected by the fraction of very low achievers in the classroom.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1225, 2023

Ability composition in the class and the school performance of immigrant students – Download PDF
by Meschi, Elena & Pavese, Caterina

GLO Fellow Elena Meschi

Author Abstract: Using longitudinal data from the Italian National Institute for the Evaluation of the Education System (INVALSI), this paper investigates whether the ability of classmates affects the educational attainment of immigrant students. We focus not only on the average quality of peers in the class, but we further investigate which part of the ability distribution of peers drives the effect, by assessing the role played by the extreme tails of the ability distribution. Our empirical strategy addresses students’ endogenous sorting into classes by exploiting the within-student across-subjects variation in achievements and the simultaneity problem by using predetermined measures of peers’ ability. We show that peers’ ability matters. While native students are mostly influenced by the average quality of their peers, immigrant children are detrimentally affected by the fraction of very low achievers in the classroom. Our findings provide valuable guidance to policymakers concerning the allocation of students to classes in order to foster immigrant students’ integration and learning.

Featured image: cdc on unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Women’s Education and Fertility in China. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Affiliate Zheyuan Zhang & GLO Fellow Zhong Zhao.

A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that an additional year of schooling lowered the number of children a woman would have by approximately 0.09 children, postponed the age of first childbirth by 0.7 years, and reduced the probability of having a second child or more children by 0.18 among those mothers whose first child was a girl.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1223, 2023

Women’s Education and Fertility in China – Download PDF
by Zhang, Zheyuan & Zhao, Zhong

GLO Affiliate Zheyuan Zhang & GLO Fellow Zhong Zhao

Zhong Zhao

Author Abstract: Using data from the China Family Panel Studies, this paper exploits the Compulsory Education Law of China implemented in the 1980s to empirically examine the causal impact of women’s education on fertility in rural China by difference-in-differences methods. The results show that an additional year of schooling lowered the number of children a woman would have by approximately 0.09 children, postponed the age of first childbirth by 0.7 years, and reduced the probability of having a second child or more children by 0.18 among those mothers whose first child was a girl. In addition to the income effect, these results are also partly explained by more educated women preferring quality to quantity of children, placing a greater value on leisure and no longer perceiving children as the sole focus in their lives.

Featured image: Rui Xu on Unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The unemployment invariance hypothesis and the implications of added and discouraged worker effects in Latin America. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Ángel Maridueña-Larrea and GLO Fellow Ángel L. Martín-Román.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals a clear gender bias towards the added worker effect for women, while the discouraged worker effect is confirmed for men.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1224, 2023

The unemployment invariance hypothesis and the implications of added and discouraged worker effects in Latin America – Download PDF
by Maridueña-Larrea, Ángel & Martín-Román, Ángel

GLO Fellow Ángel L. Martín-Román

Ángel L. Martín-Román

Author Abstract: This research explores the long-term equilibrium relationship between unemployment and labour force participation rates for six selected countries in Latin America at both aggregate and gender-disaggregated levels. Cointegration analysis focused on the study of time series is used to validate the unemployment invariance hypothesis and explore added and discouraged worker effects in depth. The results suggest mixed dynamics for the aggregate model; however, a clear gender bias is revealed towards the added worker effect for women, while the discouraged worker effect is confirmed for men. The validity of the unemployment invariance hypothesis in several countries appears to reflect some rigidities that prevent the improvement of nations’ labour markets, exposing issues that economic policies must strategically address.

Featured image: Jose-Antonio-Gallego-Vázquez-on-Unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Ethnic differences in intergenerational housing mobility in England and Wales. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Emma Gorman & Min Zhang and colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals another dimension of ethnicity-based inequality now and in the future.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1222, 2023

Ethnic differences in intergenerational housing mobility in England and Wales – Download PDF
by Buscha, Franz & Gorman, Emma & Sturgis, Patrick & Zhang, Min

GLO Fellows Emma Gorman & Min Zhang

Emma Gorman

Author Abstract: In this paper we use linked Census data to document rates of intergenerational housing mobility across ethnic groups in England and Wales. While home ownership has declined across all ethnic groups, we find substantial differences between them, with Black, Pakistani and Bangladeshi households experiencing the strongest intergenerational link between parent and child housing tenure, and Black individuals having the highest rates of downward housing mobility. In contrast, those of Indian origin have homeownership rates similar to White British families, and a weaker link between parent and child housing tenure. These patterns are likely, in turn, to exacerbate existing gradients in other dimensions of ethnicity-based inequality now and in the future.

Featured image: T.H. Chia on Unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

A Historical Note on the Assimilation Rates of Foreign-Born Women in the U.S. – A new GLO Discussion Paper by Dan Dowhan and GLO Fellows Harriet Duleep & Xingfei Liu.

A new GLO Discussion Paper is challenging the perception that the quality of U.S. immigrants fell after the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1221, 2023

A Historical Note on the Assimilation Rates of Foreign-Born Women in the U.S – Download PDF
by Duleep, Harriet & Dowhan, Dan & Liu, Xingfei

GLO Fellows Harriet Duleep & Xingfei Liu

Harriet Orcutt Duleep

Author Abstract: Using historical, longitudinal data on individuals, we track the earnings of immigrant and U.S.-born women. Following individuals, instead of synthetic cohorts, avoids biases in earnings-growth estimates caused by compositional changes in the cohorts that are followed. The historical data contradict key predictions of the Family Investment Hypothesis, shed light on its genesis, and inform its further testing. Challenging the perception that the quality of U.S. immigrants fell after the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, immigrant women, as previously found for immigrant men, have high earnings growth.

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

The Evolution of Labor Market Disparities between Hispanic and non-Hispanic Men: 1970-2019. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Ioannis Kospentaris and GLO Fellow Leslie Stratton.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that Hispanics have gained substantially with employment and somewhat with earnings.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1220, 2023

The Evolution of Labor Market Disparities between Hispanic and non-Hispanic Men: 1970-2019 Download PDF
by Kospentaris, Ioannis & Stratton, Leslie S.

GLO Fellow Leslie Stratton

Leslie Stratton

Author Abstract: We describe how ethnic disparities in the labor market between prime aged Hispanic and non-Hispanic white men have evolved over the last 50 years. Using data from the March CPS, the Census, and the ACS, we examine several employment and earning outcomes. Hispanics have experienced sizable gains to employment: from a negative 2% prior to 1990 to a positive 4% after 2010 compared to non-Hispanics. In terms of earnings, Hispanics face a substantial negative disparity between 20% and 30% with some improvement after 2000. Most of the employment gain is driven by those with less than a high school degree, while the earnings disparity increases with education. Comparing Hispanic immigrants with natives reveals much of the employment and earnings gains are attributable to Hispanic immigrants, particularly immigrants not fluent in English.

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Employers’ Associations, Worker Mobility, and Training. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Pedro Martins and Jonathan P. Thomas.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that firm membership in an employers’ association reduces worker mobility. 

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1219, 2023

Employers’ Associations, Worker Mobility, and Training – Download PDF
by Martins, Pedro S. & Thomas, Jonathan P.

GLO Fellow Pedro Martins

Petro Martins

Author Abstract: This paper studies firm-provided training in a context of potential worker mobility. We argue that such worker mobility may be reduced by employers’ associations (EAs) through no-poach agreements. First, we sketch a simple model to illustrate the impact of employer coordination on training. We then present supporting evidence from rich matched panel data, including firms’ EA affiliation and workers’ individual training levels. We find that workers’ mobility between firms in the same EA is considerably lower than mobility between equivalent firms not in the same EA. We also find that training provision by EA firms is considerably higher, even when drawing on within-employee variation and considering multiple dimensions of training. We argue that these results are consistent with a role played by EAs in reducing worker mobility.

Featured image: Employee-Training-unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Finance, Trade, Man and Machines: A New-Ricardian Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson Model. A new GLO Discussion Paper by Sugata Marjit & GLO Fellow Gouranga Das.

A new GLO Discussion Paper develops the model where the machine-intensive sector will expand at the expense of the labour-intensive sector suggesting the observed secular decline in the labour income share.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1218, 2023

Finance, Trade, Man and Machines: A New-Ricardian Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson Model – Download PDF
by Marjit, Sugata & Das, Gouranga G.

GLO Fellow Gouranga Das

Gouranga Das

Author Abstract: This paper attempts to build up a Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson model of production and trade where capital is introduced outside the production process as a financial capital or credit as per the classical Ricardian wage fund framework. Stock of credit or financial capital as past savings, finances employment and machines or capital goods used in the process of production with Ricardian fixed coefficient technology. Availability of finance does not affect production or pattern of trade only nominal factor prices. International financial flows will not alter pattern of trade, but movement of labour and machines will. Such results change drastically when we consider a model with unemployment and finance dictates real outcomes much more than before. Introducing finance affects trade patterns with unemployment and especially with imperfect credit markets. In a two-period extension with credit demand being allocated for financing R&D expenditure, a rise in interest rate in the subsequent period will motivate perpetual tendencies to invest in machine via R&D so that machine-intensive sector will expand at the expense of the labour-intensive sector. This can account for the secular decline in labour income share as has been observed for some time. Our results are consistent with contemporary empirical evidence and have serious policy implications for role of financial development and quality of institutions for innovation and economic development. Numerical illustration corroborates this.

Featured image: Alex-Knight-on-Unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

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The Morbidity Costs of Air Pollution through the Lens of Health Spending in China. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellow Xi Chen & colleagues.

A new GLO Discussion Paper is one of the first study investigating the causal evidence of the morbidity costs of fine particulates in a developing country, here in China.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1217, 2023

The Morbidity Costs of Air Pollution through the Lens of Health Spending in China – Download PDF
by Zhang, Xin & Zhang, Xun & Liu, Yuehua & Zhao, Xintong & Chen, Xi

GLO Fellow Xi Chen

Xi Chen

Author Abstract: This study is one of the first investigating the causal evidence of the morbidity costs of fine particulates (PM2.5) for all age cohorts in a developing country, using individual-level health spending data from a basic medical insurance program in Wuhan, China. Our instrumental variable (IV) approach uses thermal inversion to address potential endogeneity in PM2.5 concentrations and shows that PM2.5 imposes a significant impact on healthcare expenditures. The 2SLS estimates suggest that a 10 μg/m3 reduction in monthly average PM2.5 leads to a 2.36% decrease in the value of health spending and a 0.79% decline in the number of transactions in pharmacies and healthcare facilities. Also, this effect, largely driven by the increased spending in pharmacies, is more salient for males and children, as well as middle-aged and older adults. Moreover, our estimates may provide a lower bound to individuals’ willingness to pay, amounting to CNY 43.87 (or USD 7.09) per capita per year for a 10 μg/m3 reduction in PM2.5.

Featured image: Ella-Ivanescu-on-Unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

In Need of a Roof: Pandemic and Housing Vulnerability. A new GLO Discussion Paper by GLO Fellows Kusum Mundra & Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that individuals in the USA overvalue their housing vulnerability during the recent Covid pandemic.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 1216, 2023

In Need of a Roof: Pandemic and Housing Vulnerability – Download PDF
by Mundra, Kusum & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth

GLO Fellows Kusum Mundra & Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere

Author Abstract: Housing is a basic need and is intricately connected to a household’s health and wellness. The current pandemic has exposed the housing vulnerability for certain subgroups of the population and further jeopardized these household’s health and stability. Using the Household Pulse Survey launched by the US Census Bureau since April 2020, we examine the correlates of housing vulnerability during the pandemic. We explore both subjective and objective measures of vulnerability. In addition, we explore heterogeneity in the evolution of housing vulnerability along demographic characteristics such as ethnicity and housing type (renter vs owner) during the pandemic. Our results suggest that individuals perception on their housing vulnerability in the immediate future is on average higher than the objective evaluation of their current vulnerability. In addition, not being employed, lower levels of education and household size all increase home vulnerability. We also find significant heterogeneity across race in the evolution of vulnerability during the pandemic (2000-2022) with a “chilling effect” on Asians.

Featured image: Adli-Wahid-on-Unsplash

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

Call for contributions: 43nd EBES Conference – Madrid/Spain April 12-14, 2023. Abstract deadline: February 24, 2023

The 43rd EBES Conference – Madrid will take place on 12th, 13th, 14th, 2023 in Madrid, Spain. The conference will be hosted by the Faculty of Economics and Business, Universidad Complutense de Madrid with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person).

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration.

Deadline for Abstract Submission is February 24, 2023.

More details!

EBES Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, Istanbul Medeniyet University, EBES, Turkey
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 24, 2023.

For submission, please visit https://ebesweb.org/43rd-ebes-conference-madrid/43rd-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, and 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29 (Vol. 1), and 30th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: April 12-14, 2023
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 24, 2023
Reply-by: February 28, 2023*
Registration Deadline: March 15, 2023
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: March 16, 2023
Announcement of the Program: March 21, 2023
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): March 16, 2023**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 14, 2023

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before September 9, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by September 21, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference LINK

Ends;

The effects of temperature on mental health: evidence from China. Published free to read in the Journal of Population Economics.

Temperatures over 30°C significantly increase the likelihood of depression!

Hua, Y., Qiu, Y. & Tan, X. The effects of temperature on mental health: evidence from China. J Popul Econ (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-022-00932-y

Free to READ: https://rdcu.be/c2zRN

PUBLISHED
Vol. 36, Issue 1, January 2023: Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) 16 articles. https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/36-1
Watch the videos of article presentations on December 1, 2022 during the GLO Global Conference 2022.

JOPE has CiteScore 6.5 (2021, LINK) & Impact Factor 4.7 (2021, LINK)

Ends;