Category Archives: Events

Call for contributions: 43nd EBES Conference – Madrid/Spain April 12-14, 2023. Abstract deadline: February 24, 2023

The 43rd EBES Conference – Madrid will take place on 12th, 13th, 14th, 2023 in Madrid, Spain. The conference will be hosted by the Faculty of Economics and Business, Universidad Complutense de Madrid with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person).

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration.

Deadline for Abstract Submission is February 24, 2023.

More details!

EBES Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, Istanbul Medeniyet University, EBES, Turkey
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 24, 2023.

For submission, please visit https://ebesweb.org/43rd-ebes-conference-madrid/43rd-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, and 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29 (Vol. 1), and 30th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: April 12-14, 2023
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 24, 2023
Reply-by: February 28, 2023*
Registration Deadline: March 15, 2023
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: March 16, 2023
Announcement of the Program: March 21, 2023
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): March 16, 2023**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 14, 2023

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before September 9, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by September 21, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference LINK

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Call for Papers – Lofoten International Symposium on Inequality and Taxation in June 2023 in Norway. Submission deadline December 15, 2022.

The Lofoten International Symposium on Inequality and Taxation (LISIT) will take place at the Scandic Svolvær hotel, in the attractive Lofoten islands, Norway, on Tuesday 27th and Wednesday 28th June 2023. The symposium will focus on the intertwined fields of economic inequality and taxation.

The symposium is jointly organized by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Roma Tre University, University College London CCSEE, and it is funded by the Research Council of Norway, with additional financial support provided by the Department of Law at the University of Roma Tre. GLO Fellow and GLO Country Lead Norway Roberto Iacono is involved in the organization of the event.

We invite submissions from interested researchers on any topic within the area of inequality and taxation. The deadline for submission (full papers, or extended abstract no shorter than 2 pages) is 23:59 CET on Thursday, 15th December 2022. Submissions must be done electronically using the following email: lisit2023@isa.ntnu.no.

Authors of submitted papers will be notified on the 1st February 2023. There will be no fees for presenters, and the symposium will cover 2 nights at Scandic Svolvær, lunch and coffee breaks, as well as the conference dinner on June 27th. However, presenters will be required to arrange and cover their own travel.

Featured image: Taxes-the-new-york-public-library-unsplash

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CISEPS 2023 Annual Workshop on Tackling Inequality: Challenges, Research, and Policies. Submission deadline December 23.

GLO Fellow Alessandra Michelangeli with the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Economics, Psychology and Social Sciences (CISEPS) is organizing an international workshop on Tackling Inequality: Challenges, Research, and Policies, which will take place in Milan on the 14th April 2023.

Featured image: christine-roy-on-unsplash

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GLO Global Conference 2022 on December 1-3. With Latest Updates & Videos.

The dramatic global challenges request close collaborations between scientist around the world and those interested in evidence-based policymaking supporting global welfare. GLO has a particular mission for this. The event serves this purpose.

But 2022 is also the year of Jacob Mincer’s 100th birthday, 30 years after the Nobel Prize for Gary Becker in Population Economics; it completes 35 years of publishing the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) and 5 years of GLO; and the world population reached 8 billion on November 15. Good reasons for reflecting the path of the discipline.

Updated December 5, 2022, 22:00 pm CET Berlin

Infographic: World Population Reaches 8 Billion | Statista

Source: statista

The GLO Global Conference Dec. 1-3, 2022, was mostly online and around time and space; some sessions were hybrid (in-person & online). We had invited and contributed, plenary and parallel, research and policy panel sessions. In-person sessions are explicitly marked.

  • Celebration of 35 years of the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE)
  • Presentation of the articles of the just online published issue 1-36, January 2023
  • Presentation of the JOPE 2023 Kuznets Prize with introduction by Ashwini Deshpande
  • Sessions with Handbook Chapters from “Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics”
  • Sessions/workshops on Alzheimer’s disease, Reconstruction of Ukraine, Gender Diversity, China, India, Migration and Happiness, among others
  • 4 sessions with candidates from the ASSA 2023 jobmarket
  • David Card, Oded Galor and Jim Heckman on “The path of population economics”
  • Sergei GurievAlexander Kritikos, Andreu Mas-ColellJonathan Portes, Reinhilde Veugelers and Klaus F. Zimmermann on “Globalization & Networking”

Technical issues to notice:

  • In-person & online sessions; 24 hours on three days
  • All sessions are 2 hours long with 4-6 papers each (4 papers: 20 min + 10 Q&A; 5 papers: 17 min +7 Q&A; 6 papers: 15 min + 5 Q&A).
  • Authors marked bold in the program are scheduled to present
  • Participation in all online and in-person sessions through Zoom possible
  • In-person sessions to attend locally upon special invitations.
  • No fees for presenters and all other participants.

ALL online conference participation through Zoom: NOW TERMINATED

  • For ALL participants: Invited, contributed speakers & other participants: No prior registration.
  • Zoom access codes are provided in the program shown below. Just click the link when you wish to enter the room of a particular session.
  • Most of the sessions take place in ROOM I; a number of sessions are in ROOM II and ROOM VI. Their entry link is the same throughout the whole event. You can stay, leave or return as you wish.
  • ROOM III, IV and V are only used once.
  • Please convert the CET Berlin time zone schedule used here to your local time! You may wish to use the Time Zone Converter.

Questions: Office@glabor.org

Call for contributed papers/sessions: CLOSED

The Program Committee has been: GLO Director Matloob Piracha (Chair), Cynthia Bansak, Shihe Fu, Massimiliano Tani and Guy Tchuente.

  • Contributed submissions started October 26, 2022 at:
    https://editorialexpress.com/conference/GLOglobal2022/
    CLOSED NOW.
  • Papers or extended abstracts were sent with deadline November 15, 2022.
    Open until midnight on US east coast time = midnight CET Berlin + 6 hours.
  • All decisions are communicated.

Junior researchers on the ASSA Job Market 2023 – get attention for your work! — SUBMISSION CLOSED!

  • 4 sessions with PhD students on the job market at ASSA 2023 include their job market papers or advanced thesis chapters.
  • Papers presented relate to labor, demography, health or human resources issues broadly defined. Proposals submitted included a paper or extended abstract and a CV either per link or as attachment.
  • The submission deadline was November 15 and the decision was communicated by November 24.
  • The sessions are scheduled on Friday December 2 and Saturday December 3 (see draft program below).
  • Submissions to: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma, Le.Wang.Econ@gmail.com

*****

The Organizing Committee of the GLO Global Conference 2022 included: M Niaz Asadullah, Alessio Brown, Xi Chen, Amelie Constant, Matloob Piracha, Martin Kahanec, Xiangbo LiuOlena NizalovaAndreas Oberheitmann, Sergio Scicchitano, Kompal Sinha, Michaella Vanore, Le Wang, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Laura V. Zimmermann.

Final Program

Day 0: Wednesday November 30, 2022; 16:00-17:15 CET Berlin time (10:00-11:15 am ET)

Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Global research insights were provided in a launch of a special issue of China CDC Weekly focused on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) worldwide with Xi Chen (Yale University and GLO, Editor of the Journal of Population Economics) as guest editor. Yale Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center was organizing together with China CDC Weekly and the Global Labor Organization a launch event as a pre-conference event of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

  • Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias worldwide
  • Organizer & Chair: Xi Chen, Yale University
  • When? Wednesday, November 30, 2022. 16:00-17:1510:00-11:15 am ET
  • What? Six presentations. See details and paper access here.
  • How? Enjoy the Video of the event

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 2022; CET Berlin time

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 20228:30 – 09:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

8.30 Global Welcome – online
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

Neil Foster-McGregor, Deputy Director UNU-MERIT; Pauline Osse, Wageindicator Foundation; Harald Beschorner, FOM Chancellor; Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, EBES; Shuaizhang Feng, Dean IESR; Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT & GLO.

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202209:00 – 11:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Journal of Population Economics Issue 1/2023: JOPE I – Family
Chair: Milena Nikolova, University of Groningen, Editor JOPE
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202211:30 – 13:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Journal of Population Economics Issue 1/2023: JOPE II- Fertility
Chair: Grégory Ponthière, UCLouvain, Editor JOPE
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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*****

Affiliated Conference: Migration and Happiness; Istanbul/Turkey, December 1 – 2 at the Turkish-German University. Istanbul is 2 hours ahead of CET Berlin. Conference starts 11:30 CET Berlin = 13:30 Istanbul. – Time Zone Converter

Program of the in-person event that can be attended online through ROOM VI

Organizer & Chair: Alpaslan Akay, University of Gothenburg & GLO

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202214:00 – 16:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Moderator: Michaella Vanore, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University, Managing Editor JOPE
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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14:00-15:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

  • 35 Years of JOPE: How it began – Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT & GLO UNU-MERIT & GLO, Editor-in-Chief JOPE
  • Remarks from the publisher: Martina Bihn, Publishing Director Journals, Business, Economics & Statistics at Springer Nature

Kuznets Prize 2023
Garima Rastogi (University of Oxford) and Anisha Sharma (Ashoka University)
Presentation of the Award: Ashwini Deshpande (Ashoka University)

15:00-16:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

PANEL:  The path of population economics
Chair: Oded Galor, Brown University
Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Economic Growth and Editor of the Journal of Population Economics; 2022 author of “The Journey of Humanity” – GLO Interview; GLO book presentation.

David Card, University of California at Berkeley
2021 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences 

Jim Heckman, University of Chicago
2000 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences 

Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT & GLO
Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202216:30 – 18:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Journal of Population Economics Issue 1/2023: JOPE III – Marriage & Fertility
Chair: Xi Chen, Yale University, Editor JOPE
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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*****

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202216:30 – 18:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

CEU-GLO-CEPR Workshop on the Reconstruction of Ukraine
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM III
https://ceu-edu.zoom.us/j/93491198448?pwd=bllrS0Q4dUdKSG1Ub3p1OGp2b1lXUT09

Organizer & Chair: Martin Kahanec, CEU Detailed Program

Hosted by the Department of Public Policy at Central European University (CEU) in collaboration with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) as a part of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

  • Format: Hybrid (On-site for the Vienna audience, online public access)
  • Venue: Central European University, Quellenstrasse 51, Vienna, Austria
  • CEU Website LINK

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202219:00 – 21:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Francesco Pastore in memoriam: School-to-work Transitions. Research Session.
Organizer & Chair: Sergio Scicchitano, INAPP & John Cabot University & Misbah Choudhry Tanveer, Lahore University of Management Sciences
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  • Introduction: Klaus F. Zimmermann, Sergio Scicchitano, Claudio Quintano, Antonella Rocca
    Obituary: Forthcoming International Journal of Manpower
  • Evaluating the Youth Guarantee Incentive: Evidence from employer-employee data
    Irene Brunetti (Inapp), Andrea Ricci (Inapp)
  • Does success stem from non-STEM field?
    Antonella Rocca, Claudio Quintano
  • Determinants of Job-finding intentions among young adults from 11 European countries
    Francisco Simoes, Jale Tosun and Antonella Rocca
  • The Francesco Pastore’s idea to enlarge the role of business in high education and in the labour market expanding permanent and recurrent training
    Claudio Quintano, Antonella Rocca
  • Federica Alfani, Fabio Clementi, Michele Fabiani, Vasco Molini, Enzo Valentini
    Once NEET, Always NEET? A Synthetic Panel Approach to Analyze the Moroccan Labor Market, World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 9238.
  • Sometimes it works: The effect of a reform of the short vocational track on school-to-work transition
    Simona Comi

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202221:30 – 23:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Research Paper Session. Issues in Labor Economics. (3:30 – 5:30pm NYT time zone)
Organizer & Chair: Amelie Constant, University of Pennsylvania
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  • Do Economists Have a Sense of Justice?
    Guillermina Jasso (New York University)
  • The Impact of Selection into the Labor Force on the Gender Wage Gap
    Francine D. Blau (Cornell University), Lawrence M. Kahn (Cornell University), Nikolai Boboshko (Cornerstone Research), Matthew Comey (Cornell University)
  • The Impact of China’s One-Child Exemptions on Mating, Work, and the Gender Wage Gap
    Solomon W. Polachek (Binghampton University), Jiani Gao (Binghampton University)
  • Goodbye Norway: Testing Neoclassical versus Other Theories of Emigration
    Amelie Constant (University of Pennsylvania), Astri Syse (National Institutes of Health), Marianne Tønnessen (Oslo Metropolitan University)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 2022; CET Berlin time

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202224:00 – 02:00 CET Berlin (10-12 am Sydney time) – Time Zone Converter

Research Paper Session: Population, Personality and Policy 
Organizer & Chair: Kompal Sinha, Macquarie University
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I – no recording

  • Gentrifying Cities, Amenities and Income Segregation: Evidence from San Francisco 
    Hasin Yousaf (University of New South Wales)
  • Retirement and Locus of Control
    Rong Zhu (Flinders University)
  • Economics of taxing sugar sweetened beverages
    Anurag Sharma (University of New South Wales)
  • Electricity markets crisis
    Rabindra Nepal (University of Wollongong)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202202:30 – 04:30 CET Berlin (9:30-11:30 am Beijing time) – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session I. Chair: Sisi Zhang, Jinan University
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I – no recording

  • The Demography of the Great Migration in China
    Rufei Guo (Wuhan University), Junsen Zhang (Zhejiang University), Minghai Zhou (Zhejiang University)
  • Family Size and Child Migration: Do Daughters Face Greater Trade-Offs than Sons?
    Christine Ho (Singapore Management University), Yutao Wang (Singapore Management University), Sharon Xuejing Zuo (Fudan University)
  • Rising Family Income Inequality: Putting the Pieces Together
    Sisi Zhang (Jinan University)

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202202:30 – 04:30 CET Berlin (9:30-11:30 am Beijing time) – Time Zone Converter

Local only: Beijing, Renmin University of China (RUC) – no recording
5th RUC-GLO joint research conference on Chinese Labor Markets
Organizer & Chair: Xiangbo Liu, RUC

  • Gender Differences in Reactions to Failure in High-Stakes Competition: Evidence from the National College Entrance Exam Retakes
    Ziteng Lei (Renmin University of China )
  • Cutting Cakes and Making Cakes: Experiment Evidence for Financial Education and Labor Supply of Rural Women in China
    Yaojing Wang (Peking University)
  • Can All Humans Benefit from AI Assistance? Relative Advantage and Algorithm Aversion
    Zeyang Chen (Renmin University of China )
  • The Tenure-Track System and Academic Research Productivity: Evidence from Reforms in Chinese Universities
    Wei Huang (Peking University)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202205:00 – 07:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session II. Chair: Jinyang Yang (Huazhong University of Science and Technology)
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I – no recording

  • Parenting During the Pandemic: An Analysis of the Time Use of Parents as K-12 Schools Reopened in the United States
    Cynthia Bansak (St. Lawrence University), Yue Bao (Jinan University), Jun Hyung Kim (Jinan University)
  • Disability and Labour Market Outcomes in Pakistan: An Empirical analysis from the Latest Round of Labour Force Survey
    Zubaira Andlib (Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology)
  • Income and Happiness: A Field Experiment in China
    Jinyang Yang (Huazhong University of Science and Technology)

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202205:00 – 07:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

GLO Virtual Young Scholars (GLO VirtYS) Alumni Session Paper Abstracts
Organizer & Chair: Olena Nizalova, University of Kent, VirtYS Program Director
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II — no recording

  • Olena Nizalova
    Introduction of GLO VirtYS
  • The intended and unintended consequences of large electricity subsidies: evidence from Mongolia
    Odmaa Narantungala
  • Climate Change, Food Productivity, and Adaptation in Production Network
    Soumya Pal
  • Consequences of Family Planning Policies on Gender Gap in Breastfeeding
    Jun Hyung Kim with co-authors Yong Cai, Minhee Chae, Jun Hyung Kim & William Lavely
  • Learning the Right Skill: The Returns to Cognitive, Social and Technical skills for Middle Educated Graduates
    Femke Cnossen

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202207:30 – 09:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Handbook Session on Covid-19
Session relates to Springer Nature Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics
Organizer & Chair: Sergio Scicchitano, INAPP & John Cabot University
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*****

Affiliated Conference: Migration and Happiness; Istanbul/Turkey, December 1 – 2 at the Turkish-German University. Istanbul is 2 hours ahead of CET Berlin. Conference starts 07:30 CET Berlin = 09:30 Istanbul. – Time Zone Converter

Program of the in-person event that can be attended online through ROOM VI
— no recording

Organizer & Chair: Alpaslan Akay, University of Gothenburg & GLO

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202210:00 – 12:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session III. Chair: Milena Nikolova, University of Groningen
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

  • Monetary compensation schemes during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for household incomes, liquidity constraints and consumption across the EU
    Michael Christl (Joint Research Center, European Commission), Silvia De Poli (JRC Seville), Francesco Figari (University of Insubria), Tine Hufkens (JRC Seville), Andrea Papini (JRC Seville), Alberto Tumino (Joint Research Centre, European Commission)
  • Does cutting child benefits reduce fertility in larger families? Evidence from the UK’s two-child limit
    Jonathan Portes (King’s College London ) and Mary Reader (London School of Economics)
  • Do Classical Studies Open your Mind?
    Giorgio Brunello (University of Padova), Piero Esposito (University of Cassino and Southern Lazio), Lorenzo Rocco (University of Padova), Sergio Scicchitano, (National Institute for Public Policies Analysis)
  • Robots, meaning, and self-determination
    Milena Nikolova, Femke Cnossen (University of Groningen), Boris Nikolaev (Colorado State University)

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202210:00 – 12:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Academia Europaea (AE)-CEU-GLO Labor Symposium: online only, public
Friday December 2, 2022 – 10.00 – 12.00 CET Berlin = Vienna time. MORE DETAILS.
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM IV
No prior registration.
Organizer & Chair: Martin Kahanec, CEU

The online symposium is hosted by the Department of Public Policy at the Central European University (CEU) in collaboration with Academia Europaea, Section “Economics, Business and Management Sciences” and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) as a part of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

  • Mandatory Wage Posting, Bargaining and the Gender Wage Gap
    Rudolf Winter-Ebmer (Johannes Kepler University Linz)
  • Management Practices and Productivity: Does Employee Representation Play a Moderating Role?
    Uwe Jirjahn (University of Trier)
  • Strangers and Foreigners: Trust and Attitudes toward Citizenship
    Graziella Bertocchi (Universita’ di Modena e Reggio Emilia)
  • Climate Variability, Female Empowerment, and Household Employment Decisions
    Olga Popova (Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies)

Note: The symposium is dedicated to the memory of Jacques Drèze, a long-standing member of Academia Europaea (since 1989), who passed away on September 25, 2022.

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202210:00 – 12:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Online Research Paper Session: Trust & Inequality, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht
Organizer & Chair: Michaella Vanore, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University

Join Zoom Meeting ROOM V — no recording

  • Globalization and Trust in Government
    Jo Ritzen (UNU-MERIT)
  • Do pandemics Lead to Rebellion? Policy Responses to COVID-19, Inequality and Protests in the USA
    Bruno Martorano (UNU-MERIT)
  • Turning COVID-19 Vaccines into Vaccinations in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Panel Survey Data
    Yannick Markof (UNU-MERIT)
  • Unequal Outcomes of Women’s Empowerment in Colombia: A Multidimensional Approach
    Zina Nimeh (UNU-MERIT)
  • Breaking Down Menstrual Health Barriers in Bangladesh
    Lonneke Nillesen (UNU-MERIT)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202212:30 – 14:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Research Paper Session: Gender Diversity
Chair: Nick Drydakis, Anglia Ruskin University
Joint GLO – Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) Session.
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202215:00 – 17:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Research Paper Session: Migration and Identity
Organizer & Chair: Matloob Piracha, University of Kent
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  • Bansak, C., Dziadula, E., Zavodny, Madeline: The Value of a Green Card in the U.S. Marriage Market: A Tale of Chain Migration?
  • Gang, Ira, Khamis, M., Landon‐Lane, J.: Migration and Household Informal Activity.
  • Cai, Shu, Zimmermann, K.F.: Social Assimilation and Labor Market Outcomes of Internal Migrant Workers.
  • Randazzo, Teresa, Piracha, M.: Ethnic Identity and Educational Aspirations

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202217:30 – 19:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

PANEL Globalization & Networking.
About the future path of globalization, the role of networking and the contribution of the scientific community.
Chair: Alexander Kritikos, DIW Berlin, member of the DIW Berlin Executive Board

Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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Panelists are

  • Sergei Guriev
    Sciences Po Provost & CEPR Director of the Populism RPN; former Chief Economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, former Rector of the New Economic School/Moscow; book: Spin Dictators: The Changing Face of Tyranny in the 21st Century, 2022 (with D. Treisman).
  • Andreu Mas-Colell
    Universitat Pompeu Fabra; Minister of Economy and Knowledge of the Government of Catalonia; book: Microeconomic Theory, org. publ. 1995, et al.
  • Jonathan Portes
    King’s College London, former Chief Economist of the UK government & former Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research; book: 50 Capitalism Ideas You Really Need to Know, 2016
  • Reinhilde Veugelers
    University of Leuven & Bruegel; former advisor at the European Commission, served on the ERC Scientific Council
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann
    GLO President & UNU-MERIT; former Program Director CEPR, Founding Director of IZA, Past-President DIW Berlin

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202220:00 – 22:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session IV. Chair: Eva Dziadula, University of Notre Dame
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

  • The Occupations of Free Women and Substitution with Enslaved Workers in the Antebellum United States
    Barry Chiswick & RaeAnn Robinson (George Washington University)
  • Who is Doing the Chores and Childcare in Dual-earner Couples during the COVID-19 Era of Working from Home?
    Victoria Vernon (Empire State College)
  • Learning Inequalities during COVID-19: Evidence from Longitudinal Surveys from Sub-Saharan Africa
    Hai-Anh Dang (World Bank)
  • The Tragedy of the Commons and Population Growth: Can Trade Prevent Economic Collapse?
    Maurice Schiff (IZA)
  • Assessing the Impact of Granting Driving Privileges to Undocumented Migrants on Traffic Safety
    Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes (University of California – Merced) and Eva Dziadula, (University of Notre Dame)

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202220:00 – 22:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session V. Chair: Alexander Yarkin (Brown University)
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II — no recording

  • COVID-19 and the Future of Work
    Phil Lord (McGill University)
  • Return migration and children’s education: The USA Mexico case
    Avinandan Chakraborty (Colgate University), Jose Bucheli (New Mexico State University), Matias Fontenla (University of New Mexico)
  • Household Production Effects of Non-Wage Benefits and Working Conditions in Ghana
    Emmanuel Orkoh (North-West University)
  • Job Satisfaction Gender Gaps in Europe
    Giuseppe Lubrano Lavadera (Link Campus University) and Nunzia Nappo (Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II)
  • Learning from the Origins
    Alexander Yarkin (Brown University)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202222:30 – 24:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter This is 15:30-17:30 (Central Standard Time, USA). 

ASSA Job Market 2023: Presentations of Candidates on the ASSA jobmarket
Research Presentations. 2 parallel online sessions (plus 2 more see Day 3).
Organizer: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma

ASSA I: Child Outcomes. Chair: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

  1. Alessandro Toppeta (UCL, alessandro.toppeta.15@ucl.ac.uk), “Skill Formation with Siblings” Personal Website
  2. Osaretin Olurotimi (University of Wisconsin-Madison, olurotimi@wisc.edu), “The Effect of Conflict on Children’s Learning Outcomes: Evidence from Uganda” Personal Website
  3. Richard Cole Campbell (University of Illinois at Chicago, rcampb25@uic.edu), “Need for Speed: Fiber and Student Achievement” Personal Website
  4. Silvia Griselda (Bocconi University, silvia.griselda@unibocconi.it), “The Gender Gap in Math: What are we Measuring?” Personal Website
  5. Vinitha Rachel Varghese (University of Illinois Chicago, vvargh2@uic.edu), “Impact Of School Consolidation On Enrollment and Achievement: Evidence From India” Personal Website

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 202222:30 – 24:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter This is 15:30-17:30 (Central Standard Time, USA). 

ASSA II: Implications of Public Policies. Chair: Tyler Ransom, University of Oklahoma
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II — no recording

  1. Seunghoon Lee (MIT, shoonlee@mit.edu), “Low-Hanging Fruit: The Benefits and Costs of a Small Food Waste Tax and Implications for Climate Change” Personal Website
  2. Shogher Ohannessian (University of Illinois Chicago, sohann2@uic.edu), “The Effect of the SSI Student Earned Income Exclusion on Education and Labor Supply” Personal Website
  3. Pablo A. Troncoso (University of Georgia, Pablo.Troncoso@uga.edu), “Employment Effect of Means-Tested Program: Evidence from a Pension Reform in Chile” Personal Website
  4. Sarah Deschênes (Northwestern University, sarah.deschenes@northwestern.edu), “Expanding Access to Schooling in Nigeria: Impact on Marital Outcomes” Personal Website
  5. Oscar Galvez-Soriano (University of Houston, ogalvezs@central.uh.edu), “Impact of English instruction on labor market outcomes: The case of Mexico” Personal Website

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 2022; CET Berlin time

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202201:00 – 03:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session VI. Chair: Elsa Fontainha, ISEG Universidade de Lisboa
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  • What the Mean Measures of Mobility Miss: Learning About Intergenerational Mobility from Conditional Variance
    Md Nazmul Ahsan (Saint Louis University), M. Emran (Initiative for Policy Dialogue at Columbia University), Hanchen Jiang (University of North Texas), Forhad Shilpi (World Bank)
  • Unintended Bottleneck and Essential Nonlinearity: Understanding the Effects of Public Primary School Expansion on Intergenerational Educational Mobility
    Md Nazmul Ahsan (Saint Louis University), M. Emran (Initiative for Policy Dialogue at Columbia University), Forhad Shilpi (World Bank)
  • When Measures Conflict: Towards a Better Understanding of Intergenerational Educational Mobility
    Md Nazmul Ahsan (Saint Louis University), M. Emran (Initiative for Policy Dialogue at Columbia University), Hanchen Jiang (University of North Texas), Orla Murphy (Dalhousie University), Forhad Shilpi (World Bank)
  • Covid-19 in Africa: threat to financial and material households resources
    Elsa Fontainha (ISEG Universidade de Lisboa)

*****

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202201:00 – 03:00 CET Berlin (8-10 am Malaysia time) – Time Zone Converter

Inequality and Public Policy in Asia COMPLETE SESSION DETAILS
Organizer & Chair: M Niaz Asadullah, Monash University Malaysia
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Session Overview: This session brings scholars from Southeast Asia to deliberate on the state of income inequality in the region. Papers selected are part of a GLO special issue edited by GLO SE Asia Cluster Lead, in collaboration with Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia. The session will be also attended by all other contributors to the Special Issue as well as Chief Editor of the Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia and other members of the editorial team.

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202203:30 – 05:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Improving Service Access and Delivery in India. Paper abstracts here
Organizer & Chair: Laura V. Zimmermann, University of Georgia
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*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202206:00 – 08:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session VII. Chair: Gouranga Das, Hanyang University
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

  • Coping Strategies in the Face of Major Life Events: New Insights into Financial Wellbeing in Australia
    John de New (University of Melbourne)
  • The Wage Impact of Immigration into the UK after the Great Recession (2009-2020)
    Deboshree Ghosh (University of Malaya) and Heather Dickey (Queen’s University Belfast)
  • Growth of Youth Population in India With and Without Jobs: Evidence from the Census and Periodic Labour Force Survey
    K. Ramesh Kumar (Alagappa University)
  • Long way to go before they sleep: Unravelling commuting time from India’s Time Use Survey
    Sila Mishra (IIT-Kanpur)
  • Contact-intensity, Disruptions in the Cultural Sector and Wage Inequality: A Model of Covid-19 crisis and its impacts
    Sugata Marjit (Indian Institute of Foreign Trade) and Gouranga Das (Hanyang University)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202208:30 – 10:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session VIII. Chair: Marco Guerrazzi (University of Genoa)
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

  • Do Alternative Work Arrangements Substitute Standard Employment? Evidence from Worker-Level Data
    Filippo Passerini (Catholic University of Milan)
  • Cousins from Overseas: The Labour Market Impact of a Major Forced Return Migration Shock
    Lara Bohnet, Susana Peralta, Joao Pereira dos Santos (Nova School of Business and Economics)
  • Who’s Got the Power? Wage Determination and its Resilience in the Great Recession
    Hugo de Almeida Vilares (London School of Economics) and Hugo Reis (Banco de Portugal)
  • In-work Poverty in Portugal: An analysis using EU-SILC data
    Elsa Fontainha, Ines Santos (ISEG Universidade de Lisboa)
  • Optimal Growth with Labour Market Frictions
    Marco Guerrazzi (University of Genoa)

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202211:00 – 13:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Research Paper Session. POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht.
Organizer & Chair: Alessio Brown, UNU-MERIT & GLO
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  • The Future Economics of Artificial Intelligence: Mythical Agents, a Singleton and the Dark ForestWim Naudé (RWTH Aachen University, Germany;  University of Johannesburg, South Africa; POP UNU-MERIT and GLO)
  • Is self-employment for migrants? Evidence from Italy, Marianna Brunetti (University of Rome Tor Vergata, CEIS and CEFIN) and Anzelika Zaiceva (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, GLO, POP UNU-MERIT and IZA)
  • Making Subsidies Work: Rules vs. Discretion, Paolo Pinotti (Bocconi University), Filippo Palomba (Princeton) and Federico Cingano (Banca d’Italia), Enrico Rettore (University of Padova, FBK-IRVAPP, IZA POP UNU-MERIT, and GLO)
  • Gender-Specific Application Behavior, Matching, and the Residual Gender Earnings Gap, Benjamin Lochner (Institute for Employment Research (IAB) and University Erlangen-Nürnberg), Christian Merkl (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), University Erlangen-Nürnberg and GLO)
  • Labor Market Regulations and Female Labor Force Participation: New Cross-Country Evidence, Nauro F. Campos (University College London, IZA, POP UNU-MERIT and GLO), Jeffrey B. Nugent, University of Southern (California and IZA), Zheng Zhang (University of Southern California).
  • Measuring labour and skills shortages using online job posting data in Canada, Kashyap Arora (Labour Market Information Council – Conseil de l’Information sur le Marché du Travail, LMIC/CIMT), Anne-Lore Fraikin (Labour Market Information Council – Conseil de l’Information sur le Marché du Travail, LMIC/CIMT, POP UNU-MERIT and GLO), Sukriti Trehan (Labour Market Information Council – Conseil de l’Information sur le Marché du Travail, LMIC/CIMT).

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202213:30 – 15:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter
PANEL: China & the World Economy.
Chair: Ferdinand Dudenhöffer, CAR Center Automotive Research
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*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202216:00 – 18:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter

Contributed Paper Session IX. Chair: Harry Patrinos (World Bank)
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I — no recording

  • Can HIV/AIDS Treatment Hurt Women? Evidence from Malawi
    Miranda Mendiola Valdez (University of Connecticut)
  • The Cultural Role of Rice Cultivation in Female Workforce Participation in India Gautam Hazarika (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)
  • How Hours Worked Affect Married Female Workers’ Marital Stability?
    Zhehui Zheng (Northeastern University)
  • Unemployment insurance generosity and labor supply – Evidence from the COVID-19 recession
    Swapnil Motghare (University of Notre Dame)
  • Does trust create trust? The effect of trust on autonomy and influence in the workplace
    Odelia Heizler (Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College) and Osnat Israeli (Ashkelon Academic College)
  • An Analysis of COVID-19 Student Learning Loss
    Harry Patrinos (World Bank)

*****

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202216:00 – 18:00 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter
FOM Research Paper Session
Organizer & Chair: Andreas Oberheitmann, FOM University of Applied Sciences
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II
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  • Management mediation in China
  • Xiaojuan Ma
  • The equity markets of the BRICS and the world: raw material suppliers vs manufacturing economies
    Angi Rösch, Harald Schmidbauer
  • Common, but differentiated responsibilities” in a new international climate regime based on cumulated per-capita emission rights
    Andreas Oberheitmann
  • Concentration and Co-Location of Retail Stores in Germany – An empirical Study using Data from Social Networks
    Sascha Frohwerk

Abstracts of Oberheitmann, Ma & Frohwerk

*** 30 min BREAK ***

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202218:30 – 20:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter This is 11:30-13:30 (Central Time, USA). 

ASSA Job Market 2023: Presentations of Candidates on the ASSA jobmarket
Research Presentations. 2 parallel online sessions (plus 2 more see Day 2).
Zoom links will be available early in the conference week.
Organizer: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma

ASSA III: Health Economics. Chair: Bingxiao Wu, Rutgers University
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I no recording

  1. Meiqing Ren (University of Illinois at Chicago, mren8@uic.edu), “Is Health Insurance a Barrier to Women’s Entrepreneurship? Evidence from State Infertility Insurance Mandates in the United States” Personal Website
  2. Miranda Mendiola Valdez (University of Connecticut, miranda.mendiola_valdez@uconn.edu), “Can HIV/AIDS Treatment Hurt Women? Evidence from Malawi” Personal Website
  3. Md Shahadath Hossain (Binghamton University, hossain@binghamton.edu), “Parental Health Shocks and Child Health in Bangladesh” Personal Website
  4. Jaclyn Yap (Fordham University, jyap4@fordham.edu), “The Heterogeneous Effects of Climate-related Disasters on Child Health: Evidence from Indonesia” Personal Website
  5. Malabi Dass (Oklahoma State, malabi.dass@okstate.edu), “The Nexus between Trade, Women labor force participation and Child Health: The Case of Indonesia”, Personal Website
  6. Michelle Escobar Carías (Monash University, m.escobarcarias@gmail.com), “Heat and Economic Preferences” Personal Website

*****

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202218:30 – 20:30 CET Berlin – Time Zone Converter This is 11:30-13:30 (Central Time, USA). 

ASSA IV: Labor and Urban Markets. Chair: Fan Wang, University of Houston
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II — no recording

  1. Minseon Park (University of Wisconsin-Madison, mpark88@wisc.edu), “Location Choice, Commuting, and School Choice” Personal Website
  2. Anjali Chandra (Fordham University, achandra7@fordham.edu), “The Roadblocks to Success: Evidence from India’s Road Construction Program” Personal Website
  3. Heejin Kim (UIUC, heejink2@illinois.edu), “The Effects of a Local Improvement on Housing Markets and Neighborhoods: Evidence from Chicago” Personal Website
  4. Xincheng Qiu (University of Pennsylvania, qiux@sas.upenn.edu), “Vacant Jobs” Personal Website
  5. Jacob Kohlhepp (UCLA, jkohlhepp@ucla.edu), “The Inner Beauty of Firms” Personal Website
  6. Nazanin Sedaghatkish (Virginia Tech, nazanins@vt.edu), “Identification of Loan Effects on Personal Finance: A Case for Small U.S. Entrepreneurs” Personal Website

*****

20:30 CET Berlin — Conference endsTime Zone Converter

Ends;

ASSA Job Market 2023: Junior researchers on the job market present their work online at the GLO Global Conference 2022

The GLO Global Conference 2022 took place online (and selectively also in-person) around the globe for 24 hours on December 1-3 with a pre-conference event on November 30, 2022. Online participation was free: FULL Program.

The GLO Global Conference 2022 program also announces 4 sessions of ASSA Job Market 2023 candidates presenting their work on December 2 & 3. By providing this opportunity, GLO promotes placement activities of junior researchers.

The ASSA Job Market 2023 program was put together by Le Wang, University of Oklahoma. It is also provided below.

Featured image: Tim-Gouw-Unsplash

Updated December 7, 2022.

Day 2: Friday December 2, 2022 – 22.30 – 24.30 CET Berlin time zone

ASSA Job Market 2023: Presentations of Candidates on the ASSA jobmarket
Research Presentations. 2 parallel online sessions (plus 2 more see Day 3).
Organizer: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma

ASSA I: Child Outcomes. Chair: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I

  1. Alessandro Toppeta (UCL, alessandro.toppeta.15@ucl.ac.uk), “Skill Formation with Siblings” Personal Website
  2. Osaretin Olurotimi (University of Wisconsin-Madison, olurotimi@wisc.edu), “The Effect of Conflict on Children’s Learning Outcomes: Evidence from Uganda” Personal Website
  3. Richard Cole Campbell (University of Illinois at Chicago, rcampb25@uic.edu), “Need for Speed: Fiber and Student Achievement” Personal Website
  4. Silvia Griselda (Bocconi University, silvia.griselda@unibocconi.it), “The Gender Gap in Math: What are we Measuring?” Personal Website
  5. Vinitha Rachel Varghese (University of Illinois Chicago, vvargh2@uic.edu), “Impact Of School Consolidation On Enrollment and Achievement: Evidence From India” Personal Website

*****

Day 2: Friday December 2, 2022 – 22.30 – 24.30 CET Berlin time zone

ASSA II: Implications of Public Policies. Chair: Tyler Ransom, University of Oklahoma
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II

  1. Seunghoon Lee (MIT, shoonlee@mit.edu), “Low-Hanging Fruit: The Benefits and Costs of a Small Food Waste Tax and Implications for Climate Change” Personal Website
  2. Shogher Ohannessian (University of Illinois Chicago, sohann2@uic.edu), “The Effect of the SSI Student Earned Income Exclusion on Education and Labor Supply” Personal Website
  3. Pablo A. Troncoso (University of Georgia, Pablo.Troncoso@uga.edu), “Employment Effect of Means-Tested Program: Evidence from a Pension Reform in Chile” Personal Website
  4. Sarah Deschênes (Northwestern University, sarah.deschenes@northwestern.edu), “Expanding Access to Schooling in Nigeria: Impact on Marital Outcomes” Personal Website
  5. Oscar Galvez-Soriano (University of Houston, ogalvezs@central.uh.edu), “Impact of English instruction on labor market outcomes: The case of Mexico” Personal Website

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 2022 – 18.30 – 20.30 CET Berlin time zone

ASSA Job Market 2023: Presentations of Candidates on the ASSA jobmarket
Research Presentations. 2 parallel online sessions (plus 2 more see Day 2).
Zoom links will be available early in the conference week.
Organizer: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma

ASSA III: Health Economics. Chair: Bingxiao Wu, Rutgers University
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I

  1. Meiqing Ren (University of Illinois at Chicago, mren8@uic.edu), “Is Health Insurance a Barrier to Women’s Entrepreneurship? Evidence from State Infertility Insurance Mandates in the United States” Personal Website
  2. Miranda Mendiola Valdez (University of Connecticut, miranda.mendiola_valdez@uconn.edu), “Can HIV/AIDS Treatment Hurt Women? Evidence from Malawi” Personal Website
  3. Md Shahadath Hossain (Binghamton University, hossain@binghamton.edu), “Parental Health Shocks and Child Health in Bangladesh” Personal Website
  4. Jaclyn Yap (Fordham University, jyap4@fordham.edu), “The Heterogeneous Effects of Climate-related Disasters on Child Health: Evidence from Indonesia” Personal Website
  5. Malabi Dass (Oklahoma State, malabi.dass@okstate.edu), “The Nexus between Trade, Women labor force participation and Child Health: The Case of Indonesia”, Personal Website
  6. Michelle Escobar Carías (Monash University, m.escobarcarias@gmail.com), “Heat and Economic Preferences” Personal Website

*****

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 2022 – 18.30 – 20.30 CET Berlin time zone

ASSA IV: Labor and Urban Markets. Chair: Fan Wang, University of Houston
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II

  1. Minseon Park (University of Wisconsin-Madison, mpark88@wisc.edu), “Location Choice, Commuting, and School Choice” Personal Website
  2. Anjali Chandra (Fordham University, achandra7@fordham.edu), “The Roadblocks to Success: Evidence from India’s Road Construction Program” Personal Website
  3. Heejin Kim (UIUC, heejink2@illinois.edu), “The Effects of a Local Improvement on Housing Markets and Neighborhoods: Evidence from Chicago” Personal Website
  4. Xincheng Qiu (University of Pennsylvania, qiux@sas.upenn.edu), “Vacant Jobs” Personal Website
  5. Jacob Kohlhepp (UCLA, jkohlhepp@ucla.edu), “The Inner Beauty of Firms” Personal Website
  6. Nazanin Sedaghatkish (Virginia Tech, nazanins@vt.edu), “Identification of Loan Effects on Personal Finance: A Case for Small U.S. Entrepreneurs” Personal Website

Ends;

India at the GLO Global Conference 2022, December 1-3.

Research on India was presented in various sessions during the GLO Global Conference 2022, December 1-3. Information below. To inspect selected videos of the conference sessions see the links below.

Updated December 7, 2022.

Day 1: Thursday December 1, 202214.00 – 16.00  CET Berlin time zone!

Moderator: Michaella Vanore, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University, Managing Editor JOPE
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
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14.00-15.00

  • 35 Years of JOPE: How it began – Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT & GLO UNU-MERIT & GLO, Editor-in-Chief JOPE
  • Remarks from the publisher: Martina Bihn, Publishing Director Journals, Business, Economics & Statistics at Springer Nature

Kuznets Prize 2023
Garima Rastogi (University of Oxford) and Anisha Sharma (Ashoka University)
Presentation of the Award: Ashwini Deshpande (Ashoka University)

DETAILS about the Prize & the Prize Winners 2023 (click the link):

2023 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Garima Rastogi & Anisha Sharma for their research on abortions in India

Day 3: Saturday December 3, 202203.30 – 05.30 CET Berlin time zone!

Improving Service Access and Delivery in India.
Organizer & Chair: Laura V. Zimmermann, University of Georgia
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I
Enjoy the Video of the event

Abstract: This paper revisits a part of the analysis by Banerjee et al. (2020), in which they examine the consequences of the nation-wide scale up of reforms to the funds management system (e-FMS) in India’s national workfare programme, using a two-way fixed effects specification. They report a substantial 19 percent reduction in labour expenditures. We exploit the recent literature that highlights the limitations of the TWFE estimator in the presence of staggered roll out and effect a Goodman-Bacon decomposition of the TWFE coefficient, to pinpoint sources of identifying variation. We undertake a detailed examination of subsamples of six constituent and valid DiDs based on timing of treatment that are averaged into the TWFE coefficient to identify heterogeneity in treatment effects. This disaggregated subsample analysis does not support the conclusion of any reductions in MGNREGS labour expenditures, suggesting that the TWFE coefficient based on the full sample is indeed biased.

  • Distributional Implications of Bank Branch Expansions: Evidence from India
    Kanika Mahajan

Abstract: How does financial development affect firm performance? We exploit a nationwide branch expansion policy in India targeted towards private banks to examine this question. The policy classified districts as “underbanked” if their ex-ante bank branch density was less than the national average. Extending a regression discontinuity design based on the change in districts’ underbanked status at the national average threshold, we find large increases in capital expenditures and credit growth by manufacturing establishments in underbanked districts. The increase in capital spending is driven by small and young establishments, who are also most likely to be credit constrained. An examination of mechanisms points to the improved ability of private banks to effectively screen borrowers and lend to small establishments with limited collateral, but high ex-ante returns to capital. Our findings show that financial deepening can aid in the relaxation of credit constraints in developing economies with imperfect capital and credit markets.

  • Contraceptive Usage and Fertility: What Happens When Doorstep Access Comes at a Price?
    Somdeep Chatterjee

Abstract: Contraceptive usage usually increases with easier access but evidently decreases as prices rise. We study a unique policy from India where home delivery of minimally priced contraceptives replaced the practice of acquiring contraceptives free of cost from village centers. Using a quasi-experimental estimation framework, we find that this intervention led to higher usage of contraceptives and lower fertility, potentially attributable to easier access. However, households substitute away from the priced modern contraception methods towards traditional or permanent forms of contraception, for which prices remained unchanged, reflecting a revealed preference towards costless contraception or high  fixed-cost but low variable-cost based methods. From the perspective of health care policy, while door-to-door delivery is a disruptive innovation in the market for health care which should ideally improve convenience for consumers; the actual welfare consequences remain ambiguous due to the potentially inefficient substitution patterns resulting from a highly elastic demand for these products at very low levels of price.

Abstract: Governments and NGOs have invested heavily in fighting corruption by designing anti-poverty programs that maximize transparency and accountability. We analyze whether corruption is still widespread in the context of one such program, a massive make-work scheme in India where every job spell is posted publicly online. Linking millions of administrative job records to local election outcomes, we measure how many jobs they self-deal. In the year after the election, winners of close elections receive 3 times as many workdays as losers and typical villagers. We find that corruption persists because of a gap between de jure and actual transparency. Only when citizens have tools to access information in a timely manner does corruption eventually vanish.

Single papers in various sessions:

  • Day 2: Friday December 2, 2022 – 22.30 – 24.30 CET Berlin time zone!

ASSA I: Child Outcomes. Chair: Le Wang, University of Oklahoma
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I

5. Vinitha Rachel Varghese (University of Illinois Chicago, vvargh2@uic.edu), “Impact Of School Consolidation On Enrollment and Achievement: Evidence From India” Personal Website

*****

  • Day 3: Saturday December 3, 2022 – 06.00 – 08.00 CET Berlin time zone!

Contributed Paper Session VI. Chair: Gouranga Das, Hanyang University
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I

Growth of Youth Population in India With and Without Jobs: Evidence from the Census and Periodic Labour Force Survey
K. Ramesh Kumar (Alagappa University)

Long way to go before they sleep: Unravelling commuting time from India’s Time Use Survey
Sila Mishra (IIT-Kanpur)

Contact-intensity, Disruptions in the Cultural Sector and Wage Inequality: A Model of Covid-19 crisis and its impacts
Sugata Marjit (Indian Institute of Foreign Trade) and Gouranga Das (Hanyang University)

*****

  • Day 3: Saturday December 3, 2022 – 16.00 – 18.00 CET Berlin time zone!

Contributed Paper Session VIII. Chair: Harry Patrinos (World Bank)
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM I

The Cultural Role of Rice Cultivation in Female Workforce Participation in India Gautam Hazarika (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)

*****

  • Day 3: Saturday December 3, 2022 – 18.30 – 20.30 CET Berlin time zone!

ASSA IV: Labor and Urban Markets. Chair: Fan Wang, University of Houston
Join Zoom Meeting ROOM II

2. Anjali Chandra (Fordham University, achandra7@fordham.edu), “The Roadblocks to Success: Evidence from India’s Road Construction Program” Personal Website

Ends;

“Take-up of Social Benefits”. US Top Economist & GLO Fellow Robert Moffitt presents his review article chaired by Regina Riphahn.

As a keynote to EBES 41 Berlin with GLO & FOM, US Top Economist & GLO Fellow Robert Moffitt (Johns Hopkins University) presented his new contribution to the Springer Nature Handbook Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics on

  • “Take-up of Social Benefits”.

The session on October 14, 2022 was chaired by Regina T. Riphahn (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Nürnberg.

Ko, W., Moffitt, R.A. (2022). Take-Up of Social Benefits. In: Zimmermann, K.F. (eds) Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57365-6_372-1

Featured image: Jose-Antonio-Gallego-Vázquez-on-Unsplash

Ends;

Academia Europaea AE-CEU-GLO Labor Symposium on December 2, 2022 as a part of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

The online symposium was hosted by the Department of Public Policy at the Central European University (CEU) in collaboration with Academia Europaea, Section “Economics, Business and Management Sciences” and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) as a part of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

Updated December 7, 2022.

  • AE-CEU-GLO Labor Symposium: Format: online only, public
  • Friday December 2, 2022 – 10.00 – 12.00 CET Berlin = Vienna time zone.
  • Join Zoom Meeting
  • Organizer & Chair: Martin Kahanec, CEU

Academia Europaea (AE) Section Economics, Business and Management Sciences is concerned with the many academic issues dealing with individual behavior up to institutions, small and national organizations, countries, and multinational structures. Recent topics covered among others are migration and identity; financial markets; regional economics; and climate change.

The AE-CEU-GLO Labor Symposium showcases some of the cutting-edge research in the areas of labor and population economics produced by section members as well as invited guests.

The symposium is dedicated to the memory of Jacques Drèze, a long-standing member of Academia Europaea (since 1989), who passed away on September 25, 2022.

Program:

  • 10:00-10:05: Welcome by Martin Kahanec (Academia Europaea section chair and CEU)
  • 10:05-10:30: Mandatory Wage Posting, Bargaining and the Gender Wage Gap
    Rudolf Winter-Ebmer (Johannes Kepler University Linz)
  • 10:30-10:55: Management Practices and Productivity: Does Employee Representation Play a Moderating Role?
    Uwe Jirjahn (University of Trier)
  • 10:55-11:20: Strangers and Foreigners: Trust and Attitudes toward Citizenship
    Graziella Bertocchi (Universita’ di Modena e Reggio Emilia)
  • 11:20-11:45: Climate Variability, Female Empowerment, and Household Employment Decisions
    Olga Popova (Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies)
  • 11:45-12:00: Discussion and closing remarks

* * *

About Jacques Drèze

Jacques Drèze, a long-standing member of Academia Europaea (since 1989) passed away on Sunday, September 25, 2022, in Verviers at the age of 93.

Jacques inspired generations of economists, through his rigorous research (e.g. on economic uncertainty, general equilibrium theory, unemployment and disequilibrium economics), as a creator and director of the Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE), initiator of the European Doctoral Program in Quantitative Economics (EDP), founding father of the European Economic Association (of which he served as the first President in 1985), and professor at Université Catholique de Louvain and Cornell University. 

Jacques combined academic excellence with an open-door approach and empathy for the personal challenges of students and colleagues seeking his advice. He has been an exemplary role model for economists as well as economic policy professionals. 

Jacques will be missed immensely.

The institutions

Academia Europaea

The Academia Europaea was established in 1988 and is the Pan-European Academy of Sciences Humanities and Letters. The object of Academia Europaea is the advancement and propagation of excellence in scholarship in the humanities, law, the economic, social, and political sciences, mathematics, medicine, and all branches of natural and technological sciences anywhere in the world for the public benefit and for the advancement of the education of the public of all ages in the aforesaid subjects in Europe. Academia Europaea is a European, non-governmental association acting as an Academy. Our members are scientists and scholars who collectively aim to promote learning, education and research. Founded in 1988, with more than 5000 members which includes leading experts from the physical sciences and technology, biological sciences and medicine, mathematics, the letters and humanities, social and cognitive sciences, economics and the law.

Department of Public Policy (DPP), Central European University

DPP is a multi-disciplinary and global public policy Department at the Central European University in Vienna aiming to create an educational experience that involves not only the acquisition of skills and knowledge but also the cultivation of a mindset that emphasizes social entrepreneurship, innovation, cultural awareness and a commitment to the public good. DPP offers four master’s degrees in public policy, and the public policy track of the Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science program. The Department boasts a team of outstanding resident faculty, world-class visiting faculty made up of top researchers, and practitioners in the public policy field who bring a wide array of academic and practical subjects to DPP’s diverse classroom.

Central European University (CEU) is a research-intensive university specializing in the social sciences, humanities, law, public policy and management. It is accredited in the United States, Austria and Hungary. CEU’s mission is to promote academic excellence, state-of-the-art research, research-based teaching and learning and civic engagement, in order to contribute to the development of open societies. CEU offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs and enrolls more than 1,400 students from over 100 countries. The teaching staff consists of resident faculty from over 50 countries and prominent visiting scholars from around the world. The language of instruction is English.

Global Labor Organization

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is a global, independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that has no institutional position. The GLO functions as an international network and virtual platform for researchers, policy makers, practitioners and the general public interested in scientific research and its policy and societal implications on global labor markets, demographic challenges and human resources. These topics are defined broadly in line with its Mission to embrace the global diversity of labor markets, institutions, and policy challenges, covering advanced economies as well as transition and less developed countries.

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Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Global research insights are provided in a launch of a special issue organized by Yale Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center with China CDC Weekly and GLO on November 30, 2022.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in older adults. Globally, over 55 million people live with dementia, and there are nearly 10 million new cases every year. The aggregate financial burden of the disease is over $1 trillion annually. As population aging accelerates, the need for a better understanding of the disease and for better treatments presents an urgent and major health challenge globally.

In recognition of November as Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, Xi Chen (Yale University and GLO) served as guest editor of a special issue of the China CDC Weekly focused on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) worldwide. The product is based on work of research teams at Yale University, London School of Economics, New York University, University of Cambridge, University of Washington, Peking University, Cornell University, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

  • That special publication can be accessed here.

Yale Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center is organizing together with China CDC Weekly and the Global Labor Organization a launch event as a pre-conference event of the GLO Global Conference 2022 (December 1-3, 2022):

Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, November 2022
CCDC Weekly Special Issue Special issue released on November 11, 2022.
Guest Editor: Xi Chen

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CEU-GLO-CEPR Workshop on the Reconstruction of Ukraine on December 1, 2022 in Vienna as part of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

Hosted by the Department of Public Policy at Central European University (CEU) in collaboration with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) as a part of the GLO Global Conference 2022.

  • Format: Hybrid (On-site for the Vienna audience, online public access)
  • Venue: Central European University, Quellenstrasse 51, Vienna, Austria
  • CEU Website LINK
  • December 1, 2022; 16:30-18:30 CET Berlin time

Updated December 7, 2022.

The destruction and death toll that the Russian invasion of Ukraine has inflicted on the country is immense. One day, however, the war will be over. To offer Ukraine a positive prospect of effective, encompassing, and inclusive reconstruction that will not only recreate the status quo ante but will enable the country to upgrade for better, a salient roadmap is needed. One of the first contributions to this effort was the CEPR blueprint on the reconstruction of Ukraine. Following up on this effort, the CEPR has put together a group of scientists around the world, with two lead authors on each chapter – one from the EU and one from Ukraine (although most chapters have more than two authors) – to provide a salient blueprint for the reconstruction from Day 1. CEU and GLO have contributed several experts to this endeavor and will now hold a workshop on the reconstruction of Ukraine covering several chapters broadly related to labor issues on December 1, 2022; 16:30-17:30, at CEU’s Department of Public Policy in Vienna as part of the round the globe, round the clock GLO Global Conference 2022.

Program

16:30-16:35 Welcome

  • Martin Kahanec, Head of the Department of Public Policy; Central European University
  • Yuriy Gorodnichenko, Editor of the CEPR book on the reconstruction of Ukraine; University of California, Berkeley

16:35-16:55 Healthcare

  • Carol Propper, Imperial College London
  • Yuriy Dzyghyr, former Deputy Minister of Finance, Ukraine
  • Kateryna Maynzyuk, Ministry of Health and Ministry of Finance expert, Ukraine
  • Adrianna Murphy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

16:55-17:15 Education

  • Martin Kahanec, Central European University, Vienna
  • Snizhana Leu-Severynenko, USAID Economic Resilience Activity
  • Anna Novosad, SavED, Ukraine, former Minister of Education and Science, Ukraine
  • Yegor Stadnyi, Kyiv School of Economics, former Deputy Minister of Education and Science, Ukraine

17:15-17:35 Labor Market

  • Giacomo Anastasia, Bocconi University, Milan
  • Tito Boeri, Bocconi University, Milan
  •  Marianna Kudlyak, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
  •  Oleksandr Zholud, National Bank of Ukraine

17:35-17:55 Business Environment

  • Yegor Grygorenko, Deloitte Ukraine
  • Monika Schnitzer, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich

17:55-18:15 EU Enlargement

  • Ivan Miklos, MESA 10 and CEU, advisor to the Slovak President, Moldovan Prime Minister, and National Council for the Recovery of Ukraine
  • Pavlo Klimkin, Centre for National Resilience and Development, former Foreign Minister of Ukraine

18:15-18:30 Discussion and Closing Remarks

            Martin Kahanec, CEU

Bio’s of all speakers see CEU website.

Department of Public Policy (DPP), Central European University

DPP is a multi-disciplinary and global public policy Department at the Central European University in Vienna aiming to create an educational experience that involves not only the acquisition of skills and knowledge but also the cultivation of a mindset that emphasizes social entrepreneurship, innovation, cultural awareness and a commitment to the public good. DPP offers four master’s degrees in public policy, and the public policy track of the Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science program. The Department boasts a team of outstanding resident faculty, world-class visiting faculty made up of top researchers, and practitioners in the public policy field who bring a wide array of academic and practical subjects to DPP’s diverse classroom.

Central European University (CEU) is a research-intensive university specializing in the social sciences, humanities, law, public policy and management. It is accredited in the United States, Austria and Hungary. CEU’s mission is to promote academic excellence, state-of-the-art research, research-based teaching and learning and civic engagement, in order to contribute to the development of open societies. CEU offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs and enrolls more than 1,400 students from over 100 countries. The teaching staff consists of resident faculty from over 50 countries and prominent visiting scholars from around the world. The language of instruction is English.

Center for Economic Policy Research

The Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) was founded in 1983 to enhance the quality of economic policy-making within Europe and beyond, by fostering high quality, policy-relevant economic research, and disseminating it widely to decision-makers in the public and private sectors. Drawing together the expertise of its Research Fellows and Affiliates, CEPR initiates, funds and coordinates research activities and communicates the results quickly and effectively to policymakers and other decision makers around the world. The Centre is an independent, non-profit organization and takes no institutional policy positions. 

Global Labor Organization

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is a global, independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that has no institutional position. The GLO functions as an international network and virtual platform for researchers, policy makers, practitioners and the general public interested in scientific research and its policy and societal implications on global labor markets, demographic challenges and human resources. These topics are defined broadly in line with its Mission to embrace the global diversity of labor markets, institutions, and policy challenges, covering advanced economies as well as transition and less developed countries.

Ends;

2022 US midterm elections & the abortion issue.

The abortion issue was relevant for the 2022 US midterm elections, but did not play the major role as inflation and crime. Those mostly concerned (see figure below) were Democrats, young, females and living in urban areas.

Abortion issues have been important in many societal debates around the globe during 2022. GLO & the Journal of Population Economics have informed the public about insightful research contributions on the topic among their publications. For free access to this research and on the organized public events:

Further:

Source: statista. Featured image: jonathan-simcoe-unsplash

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New Book: China, the Belt and Road Initiative, and the Century of Great Migration. Interview with author Michele Bruni.

New book just published analyzing the historical roots and long-term future implications of the tremendous demographical changes Europe, Asia and Africa will go through. The story uses China as the ideal case study to illustrate the major developments and implications, not only because of its history, institutional setting, and international relationships but because in the next decades it will be the country most affected by the largest shortage of labor. We discuss major points with the author in an interview (see below).

  • NOTE – Talk to the author. Michele Bruni will present highlights of his book during a public online panel (free Zoom access) on December 3, 2022, 13.30 – 15.30 CET (Berlin time) on “China in the World Economy” during the GLO Global Conference 2022. The free access online link will be provided at the GLO website and here in time.

Michele Bruni is a member of the Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) of the University of Modena and Reggio and a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

  • For more than thirty years, he has participated in and led numerous EU, ILO, IOM, and ADB development and labor market analysis projects in China, Africa, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe.
  • His research focuses on the development of stock-flow models and their application to the analysis of labor markets, education, and migration.
  • Michele holds a PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley and a Laurea in Political Science from the University of Florence.
  • He has taught at the universities of Calabria, Bologna, and Modena and was a visiting professor at the universities Jyväskylä, Le Salle, and Shanghai.
  • He is the author of “China, The Belt and Road Initiative, and the Century of Great Migration.”

INTERVIEW

Michele, this is a remarkable book with a secular perspective; very relevant, with many important and fascinating insights. I have learned a lot. Let us elaborate on some of your findings and conclusions:

GLO: What brought you to population research and the economics of China?

Michele Bruni: It is a long story. Despite demography being central to my research, I did not formally study it at the university, but I instead accidentally encountered it later in life.

During the early 1970s, one of the most influential explanations for Italy’s youth unemployment was De Cecco’s Ricardian thesis according to which the industrial sector prefers hiring prime age males as they were the most productive due to production demanding punctuality, accuracy, stamina, and reliability. However, my friend Franco Franciosi and I discovered that construction rather than manufacturing was responsible for the increase in prime-age male employment. Subsequently, we thought that the right way to identify the cause of youth unemployment was to estimate first time (generational) entries into employment and analyze the structure of these entries by sector, sex, age group, and educational level. This led us to develop a generational stock-flow model of the labor market based on the analysis of the demographic processes taking place inside the labor market (you can find this model in the book as the “China’s theater” apologue).

The empirical results of our model were at the same time surprising and obvious. We discovered that people enter into the labor force when they are young (normally immediately after the education and training phase), generally age inside the labor market, and then exit when they are old. Moreover, the average age of entry depends on the educational level requested by each sector and therefore is the lowest in construction, the highest in services, and intermediate in manufacturing; and, at that time, the average age structure of generational entries and exits of men and women were notably different. Finally, in a country whose social values and institutional setting aim to ensure the full employment of the main breadwinners, the high rate of youth unemployment is due to the labor demand in terms of flow not being sufficient to accommodate the young people entering the labor force for the first time: this is the result of the interaction between the demographic sphere that determines the generational entries into the labor market and exits from employment, and the economic sphere that determines the number of additional jobs.

In the mid-1980s, when the presence of migrants in Italy was still marginal, the stock-flow model allowed me to produce demographic and labor market scenarios that demonstrated that Italy’s supply of labor was shortly going to become largely insufficient. I also realized that the restrictive migration policies enacted by Western countries were totally unjustified as they prevented the arrival of people badly needed by the production system. My academic interest then became more and more political and humanitarian since I realized and hoped that a correct demo-economic analysis of migration flows could not only explain and forecast migrations, but also prevent the thousands of deaths caused by prejudices and wrong theoretical analyses of migration flows.

My conclusions were reinforced by UNDESA’s 2000 report Replacement migration: is it a solution to a declining and aging population. It broke an almost fifty-year-long dogma by courageously and bluntly stating that mass migration is unavoidable, something of which I am also convinced. I felt that the enormous amount of criticism levied at the report and its author, prof. Joseph Chamie, was completely undeserved and spoke volumes on academia’s inertia as well as the politically sensitive nature of migration.

Finally, in 2006, I moved to China where I began to study its labor market, demographic trends, and their connection to the country’s economic performance.

In conclusion, my book is not only a summary of my ideas on demography, labor market, and migration flows, but also the result of a lifelong academic and personal journey.

GLO: You have written a history of population from a Chinese perspective. What are the largest demographic challenges for the world today and what is specific to the Chinese case?  

Michele Bruni: This century, our planet will witness a historical event, the end of a more than 250-year-long phase of explosive demographic growth. According to the 2022 World Population Prospects the planet’s total population is projected to peak at 10.4 billion by around 2085 and then decline; and even more importantly, the planet’s working age population is expected to increase by an additional 1.2 billion in the next 50 years before decreasing in the following decades.

Several positive considerations can be drawn. Firstly, a negative trend of the total population will reduce the GDP growth required to maintain GDP per capita constant, and therefore decrease the amount of natural resources used and our impact on the environment. It will also reduce the number of jobs required to keep the employment rate constant and provide the opportunity to confront the poverty, desperation, and moral debasement that derive from the lack of job opportunities.

Unfortunately, the situation is far more complex since over the past 200 years, the demographic transition (DT) has impacted countries around the world at different times resulting in them being at different stages of the DT. The richest and more developed states have already entered the “last” phase characterized by the decline of the working age population; many developing states will soon join them. Simultaneously, the poorest countries are experiencing and will continue to experience an explosive growth of their working age population. As a consequence, there will be an unprecedented demographic polarization between an increasing number of countries affected by a structural shortage of labor and a progressively aging population, and the poorest countries instead affected by a structural excess of labor.

Therefore, the DT is generating two opposite demographic challenges. Rich countries, to continue on a path of economic growth, will have to deal with both a decreasing labor force and an increasing number of elderly people. On the other hand, poor countries will have to manage a labor supply increasing at rates that cannot be realistically absorbed by economic growth. However, it is evident that these two situations are complementary and that it is possible to transform these regional problems into a global opportunity. This would require a political conversion to a rational approach to policymaking. Potential arrival countries should accept that it is in their economic and political interest to co-manage migration flows with potential departure countries in a manner quantitatively and qualitatively coherent with the needs of their labor market.

Despite not having achieved the status of developed country, China belongs to the group of potential arrival countries and is going to be affected by the largest absolute shortage of labor and an extremely fast aging process. While it is evident that Chinese society is not immune to xenophobia and racism, Beijing’s institutional setting, capacity to pragmatically pursue long-term goals, and desire to assume international leadership could lead it to adopt measures in contrast with the feelings of its citizens but beneficial to the country as a whole, such as in the case of the one-child policy.

GLO: Please elaborate a bit on the African challenge for Europe and Asia!

Michele Bruni: Is Africa the land of opportunities or the cradle of a demographic nightmare? Is it the new frontier for business, as suggested by CNN, or the place where children die since hospitals cannot afford pills that cost a few cents, as claimed by Save the Children?

What demographic data clearly shows is that, in absence of emigration, from now to the end of this century Africa’s working age population will register a fourfold increase bringing it from 15% to 43% of the world’s total working age population. Concurrently, the working age population of all the other continents will decline. Economically developed countries should therefore start to immediately ponder the economic, social, and political implications of these trends.

It should be evident that no matter how attractive Africa could be for foreign direct investment, it is unrealistic to assume that the continent will be able to create in the next 80 years the 1.3 billion jobs necessary to keep Africa’s rate of employment at an acceptable level (such a rate of job creation would imply outperforming China’s economic miracle). Thus, the only reasonable approach to avoid turning Africa into a demographic time-bomb is to absorb its structural excess of labor, especially since such a move would allow developed countries to deal with their structural shortage of labor.

Let me also add that humanitarian organizations should consider that too often saving the life of a child condemns them to live in dismal situations, to scavenge on rubbish damps to survive, to be easy prey of criminal groups or, if they are lucky, to be exploited by companies coming  from the same countries to which he own his  life. Saving the life of a child should also create the responsibility to make that child able to go to school, find a decent job, and face old age with dignity. This is only possible with a more rational and humane international order and approach to migration.

GLO: How do you judge China’s one-child policy today? Is it possible to further stabilize fertility decline?

Michele Bruni: Let me start placing the one-child policy in the international context in which it was conceived and adopted. The first demographic projections produced after WWII made evident that poor Asian countries, and especially India, were undergoing an unprecedented population explosion, caused not by an increase in fertility, but rather by a less pronounced decline of the crude birth rate with respect to the crude death rate. It was assumed that this situation would create poverty, poverty would beget communism, that in turn would destabilize the capitalist order. Moreover, the prevailing opinion shared by the leading demographers and economists of that era was that demographic growth could not be matched by economic growth and that the only possible solution was to reduce fertility. Therefore, in 1966, US President Lyndon B. Johnson decided to make foreign development aid dependent on the adoption of family planning programs, a decision immediately replicated by Japan, Sweden, and the UK. It should be noted that the Johnson administration’s decision preceded the publication of Paul and Anne Erlich’s Population Bomb (1968) and of Limits to Growth by the Club of Rome (1972). The result was a dramatic increase in the funding available to international organizations and private institutions in charge of implementing population policies. It also paved the way for India’s infamous campaign of compulsory sterilization headed by Sanjay Gandhi, during the state of National Emergency (1975-77) declared by his mother, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.

In the meantime, China alternated between differing even contrary policies. On one hand, Mao and other high-ranking members of the CCP officially endorsed the pro-natalist Marxian position and in 1974 China helped lead Third World countries at the Bucharest Conference against the US position, under the slogan of “development is the best contraceptive”. On the other hand, family planning services were introduced in 1953 and, after an interruption during the Great Leap Forward, continued in earnest after 1964. Later on, Chinese families were urged to delay the birth of their first child, to lengthen the interval between children, and to reduce their number, a campaign encapsulated by the slogan “later, longer, fewer.” Data suggests that Chinese families shared this attitude as during the 1970s the total fertility rate (TFR) dropped from 6 to 3 children per woman.

It was in this context, characterized also by the new pragmatic and “scientific” atmosphere brought about by Deng Xiaoping’s leadership, that Beijing adopted the one-child policy, which was not an improvised measure imposed by a government devoid of humanity, but the expression of an ideology that put the nation’s interests above those of the individual. It was based on a substantially correct demographic projection made by one of China’s leading scientists and came after a debate that involved numerous national and provincial leaders, many of whom were openly against the measure. In the 1990s, China TFR fell below the replacement level of 2 children per woman, and it has remained below that figure since, despite the abolition of the one-child policy in 2016 and the subsequent measures aimed to foster fertility.

How to judge this measure? Firstly, I believe that the policy must be judged in its ideological context. At the same time, it is very difficult to assess the one-child policy’s impact with regard to the fall in fertility since at the moment of its implementation China’s TFR was already below three, in the 1990s it became a 1.5 child policy, and that other Asian countries experienced similar trends. Finally, there is no doubt that the law was kept long after it was not needed.

What is however undeniable is that the rapid fall of its TFR assisted China in lifting 800 million people out of poverty (and help to reduce global inequality as well), in surmounting an educational challenge concentrated in less than three decades, and then in facing the employment challenge with an educated labor force.

GLO: Fertility declines with development, this is the historical experience on a global level. Will fertility ever rise again with development?

Michele Bruni: In physics, an equivalent question would be asking whether gravity will one day start repelling apples from the Earth’s surface. However, while it is normally assumed that the laws of physics do not change because of the immutable nature of the universe, the laws “discovered” by social scientists do not have this universal and atemporal validity. Even assuming that human nature does not change, what is changing all the time is the demographic, socioeconomic, political, ideological, and technological context in which mankind lives and operates. Therefore, we cannot totally discard the hypothesis of a future characterized by a positive correlation between economic growth and fertility.

Before the end of this century, the Earth will enter a new demographic phase characterized by a declining population as a result not only of economic development but also of numerous other concomitant factors, including the recently acquired capacity to control the reproductive process. I suspect that this new phase will differ from our present one in numerous aspects.

The first interesting novelty is that it will be possible to improve the wellbeing of mankind while decreasing production, a feat that will however require us to drive the economic system “downhill” challenging the inbuilt inertia of the capitalist order that sees economic growth as a “natural goal.” The second is that this future society will be characterized by small families that could have fully interiorized the idea that small is beautiful. Moreover, while I doubt that the weight of reason and science will play a greater role in decision-making, it is possible that in the wake of the environmental disasters that are inevitably going to affect the planet in the next decades, humanity will have a deeper awareness of the scars that our growing population and hunger for raw material have inflicted on the Earth and will allow nature to reconquer a fair share of the planet. However, we cannot discard the possibility that some tribes produce large families. There is also a third science fiction-style possibility, that technological progress alongside the acquisition of different moral norms will bring to an externalized system of reproduction based on the quantitative and qualitative needs of the labor market.

The future is not in the hands of god, but it is the outcome of our actions, the result of chosen objectives and ways to reach them in a given material and ideological context. Therefore, economists and demographers should avoid making forecasts, limiting themselves to providing realistic scenarios to help policymakers find the best policies to reach their goals.

That said, personally I am rooting for a society that will choose to continue along a path of demographic degrowth paralleled by a degrowth in production, that aims to reduce all types of inequalities as much as possible and allow our planet to heal the deep wounds we have inflicted on it during last centuries.

GLO: What does it take to “manage” migration? Will mankind ever develop a successful institutional setting?

Michele Bruni: I believe that the most difficult step to manage (im)migration is in fact a preliminary, ideological step: to accept the idea that the labor market can be affected by a structural shortage of labor, that is a shortage that cannot be dealt with by market forces or active labor policies. This possibility is obstructed by the dominant paradigm. Moreover, this position finds support in the deeply rooted irrational – and therefore immune to any scientific refutation – prejudices successfully promoted by many populist and nationalist parties. These prejudices have also played a relevant role in assisting them to reach national prominence or even, as in the case of Italy, power.

Once a potential arrival country accepts this very simple and, in my opinion, self-evident position, these following more technical steps could be in order: estimate how many migrants are needed by educational level and skill; agree with one or more countries affected by a structural excess of labor to organize and co-manage migration flows quantitatively and qualitatively coherent with their needs; organize the transfer of migrants from the country of origin to the place where they are needed; and arrange for their placement in the labor market while supporting the social integration of their families. A fundamental aspect of my proposal deriving from my demand side explanation of migration is that recipient countries should finance and give technical support to the education and training systems of departure countries. In this way they would not only recognize the economic value of human capital they would be draining from departure countries, but this would also ensure that the migrants will have the skills they need.

A shortage of labor is already affecting North America, the EU, and numerous Asian countries and will affect many countries part of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). In the book, I suggest that China could take advantage of its leading position in the BRI and champion the adoption of immigration policies by member countries with a structural shortage of labor in accordance with member countries with a structural excess of labor, while at the same time providing departure countries with the financial, human, and organizational resources necessary to give migrants relevant skills. Since education and training represent a key to development, this rational migration policy should assist with the socioeconomic development of departure countries and eventually help them converge with the developed world. Obviously, this suggestion is valid for other groups of countries which, as in the case of the EU, already have institutions that could coordinate the migration policy I suggest. As I have already stated, what stands in the way of a rational and humane migration policy are a misleading economic paradigm and prejudices embedded not only in right-wing parties but also across a large section of academia.

GLO: Given the global demographic challenges: How can China avoid mass immigration? In your book, you argue it cannot, why? It has already seen the greatest internal migration flows ever in mankind. Would it not be the right political strategy to avoid immigration to not face rising societal instability? And if a country can do this, then would it not be China?

Michele Bruni: Starting in 2013 China’s working age population started to decrease and from 2020 to 2050 will decline by around 174 million (-17.6%). In an intermediate labour market scenario, that assumes a constant rate of participation and a modest increase of the employment level (8% over the 30-year period), China will be affected by a shortage of more than 220 million workers (28% of initial employment), that translates to around 250 million migrants. It is evident that this would generate enormous societal problems and China should adopt all the measures that can reduce the inflow of foreign workers. The question is: will these measures be sufficient to avoid mass immigration?

A labor shortage can be confronted by increasing the labor supply and by reducing labor demand. Starting from the supply side, increasing fertility would seem the most obvious answer to a declining labor force. Nevertheless, only very few countries (France in primis) through the adoption of complex and well-organized sets of pro-natalist measures have been able to achieve significant results. Moreover, while it is evident that any country should try to reduce the gap between births and deaths to avoid the destabilizing effects of an excessive natural demographic degrowth, any positive impact on the number of births would only affect the labor market after 20 years.

I have further argued that China cannot expect relevant results from other supply measures. The participation rate assumed by the intermediate scenario is already high and a further increase looks improbable. Removing the existing obstacles to internal mobility is certainly socially and economically advisable, but it will not significantly reduce the country’s national labor shortage. The lengthening of life expectancy will soon impose raising the legal age of retirement. However, this measure (that increases the number of generations co-present in the labor market, while decreasing the numbers in retirement) will have a limited and temporary impact on the labor shortage for two main reasons. Firstly, an increasing number of people above retirement age are already voluntarily remaining in the labor force; secondly, the increase in the number of elderly workers will be neutralized by a decline in the number of young workers since technological progress will determine an increase in the duration of the education and training phase.

The demand side measures that can be adopted are mainly two: delocalization and technological progress. Delocalization has been already adopted by many countries experiencing a situation of a structural shortage of labor, Italy and Japan being relevant examples, but no country has been able to solve the problem of a labor shortage in this way. Moreover, once we consider that not everything can be produced abroad and that numerous other countries with more international experience will be adopting the same approach, it becomes evident that China cannot hope to resolve its shortage of labor through this policy.

Let us finally consider the solution favored by many Chinese economists, technological progress such as AI and automation and its resulting increase in productivity. However, I have argued that we should not expect technological innovation to be the hoped-for Deus ex machina. Empirical evidence shows that once we adopt a dynamic perspective (i.e., we take into consideration also second-order effects) new technologies do not have a negative impact on the employment level, but rather lead to the substitution of labor for routine tasks with skilled labor that can perform non-routine cognitive tasks, and therefore with a higher level of educational attainment. More generally, I would argue that all the previous waves of technological change, starting with the initial Industrial Revolution, have expanded the employment level because while new technologies do destroy many jobs, they also create new jobs due to the boundless capacity of the human mind to invent new needs and the new goods necessary to satisfy them.

I believe that China’s internal migration is in fact the proof of my thesis. The unlimited supply of labor present in the countryside and in the poor inland provinces moved (was attracted) to where the local supply of labor was not sufficient to face an expanding labor demand. It also seems to prove the capacity of China to “manage” huge migration flows (the number of China’s internal migrants exceeds threefold international economic migration flows). According to my computations, the next thirty years’ labor needs are in line with the internal migrations that have taken place in China in the last thirty years. The difference is that potential migrants will not be Han Chinese. I sincerely hope that Beijing will recall that the apex of Chinese civilization was reached during the Han dynasty, an era characterized by a multi-ethnic, industrious, and creative society.

GLO: In your book, you identify a strategic advantage of China over other Asian and over European countries with similar demographic challenges: What are your suggestions for a rational and humane Chinese migration policy?

Michele Bruni: I think it is fair to state that China, while enjoying some advantages, also shares numerous disadvantages with respect to other Asian and European countries affected by a structural shortage of labor. More specifically, a large share of Chinese citizens have the same prejudices against migrants and xenophobic feelings as their Western counterparts. Furthermore, despite the different ideological background, economic thinking in China is dominated by the neoclassical paradigm.

Regarding advantages, as I have already suggested, when confronted with ”survival issues” China has been capable of embracing a pragmatic attitude and adopting measures that, while beneficial to the country as a whole, go against the feelings of its citizens. I hope that this pragmatic approach to policymaking will remain despite the increasingly ideological turn that Xi Jinping’s leadership is taking. Finally and most importantly, Beijing’s policies are guided by a long-term vision of the goals it wishes to reach both domestically and internationally and by an institutional setting that prioritizes efficiently achieving them.

GLO: Is the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) a threat or a boon for the world? In your book you argue that it will be more positive than negative, since it began in a non-competitive setting. But the upcoming reality may be quite different. New competition between the systems, struggles for world economic, technological, and military leadership, excessive burdens and dependencies for the countries involved.

Michele Bruni: The BRI is an instrument and like many instruments it can be used to do good deeds or bad deeds. I think that Beijing would prefer to stick to its long-term internal and international goals and as I have suggested the BRI could play a central role in helping China achieve them. However, there is no doubt that totally different outcomes are possible since the future depends on the complex and interwoven relationships between actors with conflicting goals. Therefore, also in this case, I prefer to be coherent with my ideas on what role an economist should play. I will therefore avoid making forecasts and continue building alternative scenarios that could eventually help make rational and humane choices.

GLO: The human factor looks rather marginal in the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) so far: Will this change and how?

Michele Bruni: For the moment the human factor has certainly played a marginal role in the BRI. My analysis suggests that the demographic trends that will affect BRI countries in the following decades could dramatically change this situation.

The total population of the estimated 65 original members of the BRI amounts to 4.8 billion people, 62% of the world population. In absence of migration, it is projected to reach a maximum of 5.6 billion in 2060 (when its share of world population will be down to 55.5%) to then decline progressively. The working age population will start to decrease 15 years earlier (in 2045) after reaching a maximum of 3.6 billion. However, as in the case of the planet, in the next 25 years the growth of the working age population of BRI countries will be the sum of the negative contributions of 24 countries including China, Thailand, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine, and the positive contributions of other countries, in particular Asian states, like India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Philippines, Afghanistan, but also African ones like Egypt.

I have argued that this situation will inevitably determine huge migration flows of up to 250 million people in the next 25 years and that it would be in the economic and political interest of China to champion organizing migration flows between BRI countries in a rational way. This would imply estimating the number of workers needed by the countries affected by a structural shortage of labor by educational level and skill typology. I have further argued that to maximize the positive impact of migration flows for both arrival and departure countries, the former and especially China should finance the education and training system of the latter and provide, when necessary, technical support. Departure and arrival countries should then organize the transfer of migrants, something which is currently very often in the hands of criminal organizations, while the latter should be in charge of their placement and the social integration of their families.

GLO: Why will China dominate the global order in this century? Has the Russian war against Ukraine not changed this perspective?

Michele Bruni: The scenario of China dominating the world depicted by Martin Jacques in 2010 is becoming more and more probable. In 2017, China became the world’s largest economy measured at PPP and has since then progressively distanced itself from its main competitors, the US and the EU whose GDP (measured at PPP constant 2017 international dollars) in 2021 was equal respectively to 84% and 79% that of China, despite the economic effects of China’s zero-COVID strategy. A further indication comes from China’s extremely fast technological progress promoted and supported by a growing number of highly educated and competent young people formed by universities whose international rankings are also steadily improving. However, what in my opinion makes this perspective very probable is the comparison between a country that has the capacity to establish long-term plans and an institutional setting that prioritizes efficiently pursuing them, and a Western world constantly engrossed in short-term issues and whose goals and the policies to achieve them are constantly being reshuffled.

In this perspective, the Russia-Ukraine war seems to me a short-term, albeit very dramatic, event that, as has been the case for the Iraq, Afghanistan and Yemen wars and the never-ending conflict in Syria, will not have a significant impact on China-US competition. It could even be argued that the war in Ukraine, while having a negative impact on Western economies where growth is slowing down due to the energy crisis and anti-inflation measures, could benefit China’s economy and global position.

Regarding Russia and Ukraine, let me recall that before the pandemic and the war, their total population and, more importantly, their working age population were in decline. The war is having an extremely heavy impact on fertility and on the working age population in both countries and will therefore modify both their short-term demographic situation and long-term demographic evolution. This will have serious implications that have not yet been considered. The first is that most probably when the war will be over, both countries will not be able to return to pre-war levels of production including of goods essentials for other countries, especially African ones. Let me also note that while Western countries are already promising a “Marshall Plan” of around 400 billion dollars to rebuild the country, nobody is asking whether Ukraine will have the labor force necessary to do so.

GLO: Given the current struggle for a new world order: Will globalization end? China does not want it, but can it be avoided? Or will it be just different?

Michele Bruni: I believe there is no going back from the international interconnection that currently characterizes the world. In many cases, such with natural resources, cutting ties would be impossible, in others it would have extremely negative economic impacts on economic growth and consumers. However, the decreasing economic weight of Western economies and the parallel increase in economic weight of developing countries opens the way to a multipolar globalized planet in which the role of Western countries and therefore the impact of their decisions will become less and less relevant. It is to be hoped that the new international order will try to reduce the negative aspects of today’s globalization, and that globalization will also include labor since it is the only way for the poorest countries to escape the poverty trap born from demographic trends and the “wall” policies dominating the planet.

******

Michele Bruni was interviewed by  Klaus F. ZimmermannGLO President.

Ends;

Inequality and Public Policy in Asia. Session as part of the GLO Global Conference 2022 on December 3. Details.

The online session Inequality and Public Policy in Asia was part of the 2022 GLO Global Conference (1-3 December 2022) scheduled for December 3 (1-3 am CET Berlin = 8-10 am Malaysia) free to participate through Zoom link without prior registration.

Updated December 7, 2022.

Session Overview: This session brings scholars from Southeast Asia to deliberate on the state of income inequality in the region. Papers selected are part of a GLO special issue edited by GLO SE Asia Cluster Lead, in collaboration with Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia. The session will be also attended by all other contributors to the Special Issue as well as Chief Editor of the Jurnal Ekonomi Malaysia and other members of the editorial team.

Chair & Moderator: M Niaz Asadullah, Monash University Malaysia

Date:               03 Dec (Saturday) 2022

Schedule:        8-10 am Malaysia (6-8 am Bangladesh; 12-2 am UK; 1-3 am Germany)

8.00-8.10 am (Malaysia time)Opening remarks: Guest Editor of JEM special issueInequality & Public Policy in Asia  
   
8.10-8.30 am (Malaysia time)Paper 1: The Resurgence of Income Inequality in Asia-Pacific: The Role of Trade Openness, Educational Attainment and Institutional Quality  Presenter: Sharon Koh Geok May Monash University Malaysia   Email: koh.geokmay@monash.edu
   
8.30-8.50 am (Malaysia time)Paper 2: Structural Transformation, Income Inequality, and Government Expenditure: Evidence from International Panel DataPresenter: Wannaphong Durongkaveroj, Ramkhamhaeng University, Thailand   Email: wannaphong@ru.ac.th  
   
8.50-9.10 am (Malaysia time)Paper 3: What Does Data on Functional Income Distribution Tell Us About Trends in and Correlates of Income Inequality in the Asia-Pacific?            Presenter: Selim Raihan, Dhaka University & SANEM, Bangladesh   Email:selim.raihan@gmail.com
   
9.10-9.30 am (Malaysia time)Paper 4: The Spanish Flu Pandemic and Income Distribution in Java: Lessons from the 1920sPresenter: A. Gunadi Brata, Atma Jaya Yogyakarta University, Indonesia   Email: gunadi.brata@uajy.ac.id  
   
9.30-9.50 am (Malaysia time)Q&A Session 
   
9.50-9.55 am (Malaysia time)Group Photo Session     
9.55-10.00 am (Malaysia time)Closing remarks: Editor-in-Chief of JEM  Dr Mariani Abdul-Majid Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia   Email: mariani@ukm.edu.my

Ends;

Sixth International ASTRIL Conference, January 19-20, 2023 on THE LABOUR MARKET IN A TIME OF CRISIS, INFLATION AND DEGLOBALISATION. Call for papers with submission deadline November 20, 2022.

January 19-20, 2023: Roma, Italy. Sixth International ASTRIL Conference on THE LABOUR MARKET IN A TIME OF CRISIS, INFLATION AND DEGLOBALISATION. In-person & online.

Call for Papers. Submission deadline: 20 November 2022.

Deadline: Abstracts and session proposals (300-500 words): 20 November 2022. Please write the topic that the paper refers to areas (1, 2, 3, 4) in the abstract and send the abstract and session proposal (4 papers at least) to: astril@uniroma3.it

Featured image: david-kohler-unsplash

Ends;

EBES 41 with GLO at FOM Berlin. Oct. 12. Keynote & Session on “Religion”: Report & Video.

41st EBES Conference – Berlin takes place on October 12th, 13th, 14th, 2022 in Berlin, Germany jointly organized with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and in collaboration with the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

For the full program see EBES 41 Conference Program
Selected sessions recorded see below (Video).

DAY 1

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Video of keynote speech Shyamal Chowdhury

The presentation was based on Shyamal Chowdhury, Matthias Sutter & Klaus F. Zimmermann (2022), “Economic Preferences across Generations and Family Clusters: A Large-scale Experiment in a Developing Country”. Journal of Political Economy, September 2022 (vol. 130, no. 9, pp. 2361-2410).
Final and free (open access) published JPE Version. (With main text, online Appendix, and data access.) Seminar Presentation Slides

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Video of Session “Religion”

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Ends;

STARTS TODAY: 41th EBES Conference jointly organized hybrid with GLO & FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022.

41st EBES Conference – Berlin takes place on October 12th, 13th, 14th, 2022 in Berlin, Germany with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association. The event is jointly organized in Hybrid Mode (in-person on October 12 only) with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and in collaboration with the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

FOM, GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. GLO provides a number of invited sessions to the program as announced below.

For the full program see EBES 41 Conference Program

Note: Berlin-German time

Z-Room 1: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87987186006
Z-Room 6: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83416987919

DAY 1

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DAY 2

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DAY 3

Ends;

41th EBES Conference jointly organized hybrid with GLO & FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022. Full Program with GLO contributions out.

41st EBES Conference – Berlin will take place on October 12th, 13th, 14th, 2022 in Berlin, Germany with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association. The event is jointly organized in Hybrid Mode (in-person on October 12 only) with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and in collaboration with the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

FOM, GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. GLO provides a number of invited sessions to the program as announced below.

For the full program see EBES 41 Conference Program

Note: Berlin-German time

DAY 1

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DAY 2

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DAY 3

Ends;

Call for contributions: 42nd EBES Conference – Lisbon January 12-14, 2023. Abstract deadline: November 11, 2022.

42nd EBES Conference – Lisbon will take place on January 12th, 13th, and 14th, 2023 in Lisbon, Portugal. The conference will be hosted by the ISCTE-IUL Instituto Universitário de Lisboa with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person).

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration.

Deadline for Abstract Submission is November 11, 2022.

More details!

EBES Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than November 11, 2022.

For submission, please visit https://ebesweb.org/42nd-ebes-lisbon/42nd-ebes-conference-lisbon-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: January 12-14, 2023
Abstract Submission Deadline: November 11, 2022
Reply-by: November 28, 2022*
Registration Deadline: December 19, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: December 20, 2022
Announcement of the Program: December 25, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): December 20, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: March 16, 2023

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before September 9, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by September 21, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference LINK

Ends;

GLO/EHERO Sessions on “Happiness Economics” 2022: Report & Videos.

Report on the GLO/EHERO Sessions on “Happiness Economics” during the 2022 Conference of the International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (3-6 August 2022 in Burlington, Vermont, USA)

The 20th International Society for Quality of Life Studies (ISQOLS) Conference (3-6 August 2022 in Burlington, Vermont) featured three GLO/EHERO Special Sessions in Happiness Economics. The sessions are a signature event of the GLO Cluster Economics of Happiness.

Chaired by GLO Fellow Martijn Hendriks, each of the three sessions featured three presentations, followed by comments by a dedicated discussant and questions from the audience. Two sessions were offered in a hybrid format, with participants online and in-person, and one session was exclusively in-person. The sessions were well-attended and spurred interesting discussions on- and off-line. 

In addition to presentations of research papers, the GLO/EHERO sessions also featured a presentation of the “Happiness and Migration” chapter by GLO Fellow Martijn Hendriks and Martijn Burger from the section “Welfare, Well-being, Happiness” of the forthcoming Springer Nature Handbook “Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics” that is edited by GLO Fellow and Happiness Economics Cluster Lead Milena Nikolova. The Handbook’s Editor-in-Chief is GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann.  

ISQOLS Conference program

For the program of the GLO/HERO sessions see below. The video recordings of the presentations are available here:

GLO/EHERO Happiness Economics Session I: https://youtu.be/yQAop2jXkvg
GLO/EHERO Happiness Economics Session II:  https://youtu.be/_gPfMZAYAwM
GLO/EHERO Happiness Economics Session III: https://youtu.be/Y6MbIVqyzQA

Given the success of the sessions, the co-organizers Martijn Hendriks (GLO/EHERO), Martijn Burger (EHERO), and Milena Nikolova (GLO Fellow and Cluster Lead “Economics of Happiness”) will organize again special sessions at the 21st ISQOLS Annual Conference that will take place in Rotterdam, the Netherlands in 2023. Further information and call for papers to follow. 

These special sessions are invitation-based to guarantee that the presentations are of high quality. 

GLO – EHERO organizers

Dr. Martijn Hendriks (EHERO and GLO), Dr. Milena Nikolova (University of Groningen and GLO), and Dr. Martijn Burger (EHERO and Open Universiteit).

Featured image: Elijah-Hail-on-Unsplash.

Program of the GLO/EHERO Special Sessions at ISQOLS 2022

Ends;

Australian Gender Economics Workshop 2023, February 9-10; Submission deadline October 30, 2022.

The Australian Gender Economics Workshop 2023 (AGEW) is held in Perth, Australia on the 9th and 10th of February 2023. GLO Fellow Silvia Salazar, Curtin University, is chair of the organizing committee. More info below. AGEW website: see here. Deadline Submissions:  30th October 2022

GLO supports gender research through its gender research cluster and the Journal of Population Economics.

Featured image: dainis-graveris-on-unsplash

Provided by the organizers:

On behalf of the organizing committee, we are delighted to invite you to the 6th Australian Gender Economics Workshop (AGEW 2023), hosted by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, the University of Western Australia and the Women in Economics Network.

The workshop will be held in-person in Perth on the 9th-10th of February 2023.

Submissions are currently open and will close on Sunday 30th October 2022

Ends;

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-30, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Now – Program, Video & Event Pictures.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) were jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 30, 2022 through Zoom
  • Theme: Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

The event was attended by over 60 scholars from institutions worldwide.

Fifth IESR-GLO Joint Conference Program

August 29 – August 30, 2022

PDF of Program IESR Website
VIDEO DAY 1 VIDEO VIDEO DAY 2 (Keynote Zhang incomplete)

August 29 (Monday)

15:00-18:00 Beijing Time/ 9:00-12:00 German Time 8:00-11:00 London Time/17:00-20:00 Melbourne Time

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

Lisa Cameron
Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon TimeMelbourne Time
15:00-15:409:00-9:408:00-8:4017:00-17:40
Keynote Lecture
Information, Intermediaries, and International Migration
Lisa Cameron (The University of Melbourne & GLO)

15:40-16:10

9:40-10:10

8:40-9:10

17:40-18:10
Do Social Movement Change Empathy Bias? Evidence from Black Lives Matter
Authors: Kaixin Liu (IESR, Jinan University), Ande Shen, Jiwei Zhou, Junda Zhang

16:10-16:40

10:10-10:40

9:10-9:40

18:10-18:40
Does a Tragic Event Affect Different Aspects of Attitudes toward Immigration?
Authors: Odelia Heizler (Tel-Aviv-Yaffo Academic College & GLO), Osnat Israeli

16:40-17:10

10:40-11:10

9:40-10:10

18:40-19:10
Culture Breakers and Policy Implementation——How did China Promote Later Marriage in the 1970s?
Author: Yi Chen (ShanghaiTech University & GLO)

17:10-17:40

11:10-11:40

10:10-10:40

19:10-19:40
Do Good Deeds Really Earn Chits? Evidence from Targeted Poverty Alleviation Information Disclosure and Stock Price Crash Risk
Authors: Yu Zhang (Sun Yat-sen University), Zixun Zhou

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5 -10 minute Q&A.

August 30 (Tuesday)

19:00-22:00 Beijing Time/ 13:00-16:00 German Time/ 12:00-15:00 London Time

Chair: Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

Junsen Zhang
Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon Time
19:00-19:4013:00-13:4012:00-12:40
Keynote Lecture
An Economic Analysis of Fertility in China: Challenges and Policy Recommendations
Junsen Zhang (Zhejiang University & GLO)

19:40-20:10

13:40-14:10

12:40-13:10
Gender Imbalance, Assortative Matching and Household Income Inequality in China
Authors: Chen Huang (University of Southampton), Serhiy Stepanchuk
20:10-20:4014:10-14:4013:10-13:40
Heterogeneous Peer Effects for the Disadvantaged Students
Author: Yi Zhang (IESR, Jinan University)

20:40-21:10

14:40-15:10

13:40-14:10
Migrant Children’s Take-up of Social Health Insurance: Experimental Evidence from China
Authors: Menghan Shen (Sun Yatsen University), Zhiwei Tang, Xiaoyang Ye

21:10-21:40

15:10-15:40

14:10-14:40
A Tale of An Aging Society with Digital Revolution Authors
Authors: Mingxing Huang (Peking University), Xun Li

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5-10 minute Q&A.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University & GLO
Sen Xue, Jinan University & GLO

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-30, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Program & Call for Online Participation.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 30, 2022 through Zoom
  • Theme is Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers are: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

Fifth IESR-GLO Joint Conference Program

August 29 – August 30, 2022

ZOOM Meeting LINK. PLEASE REGISTER NOW!
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81353820206?pwd=WFE5UEphazhETHpUbVlXSGZ1Nk1jQT09

PDF of Program

August 29 (Monday)

15:00-18:00 Beijing Time/ 9:00-12:00 German Time 8:00-11:00 London Time/17:00-20:00 Melbourne Time

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO)

Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon TimeMelbourne Time
15:00-15:409:00-9:408:00-8:4017:00-17:40
Keynote Lecture
Information, Intermediaries, and International Migration
Lisa Cameron (The University of Melbourne & GLO)

15:40-16:10

9:40-10:10

8:40-9:10

17:40-18:10
Do Social Movement Change Empathy Bias? Evidence from Black Lives Matter
Authors: Kaixin Liu (IESR, Jinan University), Ande Shen, Jiwei Zhou, Junda Zhang

16:10-16:40

10:10-10:40

9:10-9:40

18:10-18:40
Does a Tragic Event Affect Different Aspects of Attitudes toward Immigration?
Authors: Odelia Heizler (Tel-Aviv-Yaffo Academic College & GLO), Osnat Israeli

16:40-17:10

10:40-11:10

9:40-10:10

18:40-19:10
Culture Breakers and Policy Implementation——How did China Promote Later Marriage in the 1970s?
Author: Yi Chen (ShanghaiTech University & GLO)

17:10-17:40

11:10-11:40

10:10-10:40

19:10-19:40
Do Good Deeds Really Earn Chits? Evidence from Targeted Poverty Alleviation Information Disclosure and Stock Price Crash Risk
Authors: Yu Zhang (Sun Yat-sen University), Zixun Zhou

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5 -10 minute Q&A.

August 30 (Tuesday)

19:00-22:00 Beijing Time/ 13:00-16:00 German Time/ 12:00-15:00 London Time

Chair: Shuaizhang Feng (IESR, Jinan University & GLO)

Beijing TimeGerman TimeLondon Time
19:00-19:4013:00-13:4012:00-12:40
Keynote Lecture
An Economic Analysis of Fertility in China: Challenges and Policy Recommendations
Junsen Zhang (Zhejiang University & GLO)

19:40-20:10

13:40-14:10

12:40-13:10
Gender Imbalance, Assortative Matching and Household Income Inequality in China
Authors: Chen Huang (University of Southampton), Serhiy Stepanchuk
20:10-20:4014:10-14:4013:10-13:40
Heterogeneous Peer Effects for the Disadvantaged Students
Author: Yi Zhang (IESR, Jinan University)

20:40-21:10

14:40-15:10

13:40-14:10
Migrant Children’s Take-up of Social Health Insurance: Experimental Evidence from China
Authors: Menghan Shen (Sun Yatsen University), Zhiwei Tang, Xiaoyang Ye

21:10-21:40

15:10-15:40

14:10-14:40
A Tale of An Aging Society with Digital Revolution Authors
Authors: Mingxing Huang (Peking University), Xun Li

NOTE: Each presentation consists of 20-25 minute presentation time and 5-10 minute Q&A.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University & GLO
Sen Xue, Jinan University & GLO

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

GLO-EBES events: Report on EBES-40/Istanbul & announcement of EBES-41 in Berlin

EBES-40 in Istanbul took place on July 6-8, 2022 in hybrid mode (see EBES program). GLO had supported the event with two sessions (see program, link to session videos and pictures below). A plenary session was the monthly GLO Virtual Seminar, the second session was on human resources issues with chapters from the Springer Nature Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics.

EBES-41 in Berlin is jointly organized hybrid with GLO in collaboration with FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022. Submission deadline: September 9! Further details.

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (EBES & GLO & UNU-MERIT, The Netherlands & Free University Berlin, Germany). Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics

  • Climate Change in Historical Perspective: Violence, Conflict, and Migration
    Qing Pei* (Education University of Hong Kong and GLO), Yingqi Long (Education University of Hong Kong) and Xiaolin Lin (Education University of Hong Kong)
  • Labor Market Agglomeration Economies
    Shihe Fu (Xiamen University and GLO)
  • Well-being in Old and Very Old Age
    Johanna Hartung* (University of Bonn); Janina Nemitz (Helsana Insurance Company Ltd) and Gizem Hülür (University of Bonn)
  • Earnings Discrimination in the Workplace
    John Forth (Bayes Business School) and Nikolaos Theodoropoulos* (University of Cyprus and GLO)
  • Age at Marriage
    Pavel Jelnov (University of Hannover and GLO)
  • Maternity Leave
    Krishna Regmi (Kennesaw State University) and Le Wang (University of Oklahoma and GLO)

* presenting

GLO Virtual Seminar and Video

GLO Handbook Session and Video

Ends;

Call for contributions: 41th EBES Conference jointly organized hybrid with GLO in collaboration with FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin (Germany), October 12-14, 2022. Submission deadline: September 9!

41st EBES Conference – Berlin will take place on October 12th, 13th, 14th, 2022 in Berlin, Germany with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association. The event is jointly organized in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person) with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and in collaboration with the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

FOM, GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. GLO will provide a number of invited sessions to the program announced in time.

Interested researchers from around the world are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration.

Invited Speakers

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues Cristiano Antonelli, Dorothea Schäfer, Marco Vivarelli and Klaus F. Zimmermann will participate as keynote speakers and/or invited editors.

Cristiano Antonelli holds the chair of Political Economy of the University of Torino. He is Fellow of the Collegio Carlo Alberto where he guides the BRICK (Bureau of Research on Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge) and the Managing Editor of Economics of Innovation and New Technology (since volume 5 1997-1998). His recent books include: Antonelli, C. (2017), “Endogenous Innovation: The Economics of an Emergent System Property”, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar; Antonelli, C. (2018), “The Evolutionary Complexity of Endogenous Innovation. The Engines of the Creative Response”, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar; Antonelli, C. (2019), “The Knowledge Growth Regime: A Schumpeterian Approach” London, Palgrave MacMillan, Antonelli, C. and Colombelli, A. (2022), “The Creative Response: Knowledge and Innovation”, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, Antonelli, C. ed. (2022), Encyclopedia on the Economics of Knowledge and Innovation, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.

Dorothea Schäfer is the Research Director of Financial Markets at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and Adjunct Professor of Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University. She has also worked as an evaluator for the European Commission, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and Chairwoman of Evaluation Committee for LOEWE (Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung Wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz des Bundeslandes Hessen). She managed various research projects supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the EU Commission, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation and the Stiftung Geld und Währung. Her researches were published in various journals such as Journal of Financial Stability; German Economic Review; International Journal of Money and Finance; and Small Business Economics. She is regularly invited as an expert in parliamentary committees, including the Finance Committee of the Bundestag and gives lectures on financial market issues in Germany and abroad. She is also a member of the Editorial Board and Editor-in-Chief of the policy-oriented journal “Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung” and Editor-in-Chief of Eurasian Economic Review. Her research topics include financial crisis, financial market regulation, financing constraints, gender, and financial markets, financial transaction tax.

Marco Vivarelli is a full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics EJournal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as a referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics, Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization, Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, and World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment, and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of EBES; President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (ret.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin, Renmin University of China and Lixin University; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea. Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia; EBES Fellow Award 2018. He has published in many top journals including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. His research fields are population, labor, development, and migration.

Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than September 9, 2022.

For submission, please visit https://ebesweb.org/41st-ebes-conference/41st-berlin-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: October 12-14, 2022
Abstract Submission Deadline: September 9, 2022
Reply-by: September 12, 2022*
Registration Deadline: September 20, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: September 21, 2022
Announcement of the Program: September 26, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): September 21, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: December 9, 2022

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before September 9, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by September 21, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference Link

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-31, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Second Call for Papers Deadline August 14.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 31, 2022 through Zoom
  • Theme is Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers are: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

The event is observed by the Journal of Population Economics.

Submission

  • We welcome papers on topics related to social policies, especially social assistance and its reform experience.
  • Please submit full papers or extended abstracts to https://www.wjx.top/vm/YMFHgNK.aspx
    no later than August 14, 2022 (Beijing Time, GMT+8).
  • The corresponding author will be notified of the decision by August 22, 2022.
  • No submission or participation fee is required.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Sen Xue, Jinan University

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

Reminder: Summer Online Event of the Journal of Population Economics on July 15, 2022. How to participate at all times.

The Journal of Population Economics JOPE Summer Event will take place online on 15 July 2022 (10.30-19.30 CEST Berlin/German time) on the hundredth birthday of Jacob Mincer, hero of labor, household and population economics. A session will reflect on his work. Other sessions report on the highlights of new JOPE articles, including lead paper issues such as religiosity & the U.S. Capitol Riot and topics like abortions, climate & the Covid-19 pandemic, among others…..

The selection of articles presented are from volume 35 issue 3 (July) and issue 4 (October) 2022; issue 4 is released online TODAY.

Participation is open for the public and around the world, starting with participants from Australia and Asia, covering research from Africa and Europe, and ending with work from the US and Latin America. Online conferencing makes this all possible.

  • When? July 15, 2022; 10.30-19.30 CEST Berlin/Germany time. Join full or in parts as of interest.
  • What? An overview of the sessions of the program with access to all JOPE papers is provided HERE.
  • How? Registration Zoom details are available HERE. A further provided click will bring you to the event.

40th EBES Conference: Editors discussed publication issues.

During the EBES 40 Conference (6-8 July 2022) in Istanbul and hybrid, an Editor’s Panel Session on July 6 discussed publication issues in research journals. 4 Editors-in-Chief exchanged views and answered questions from the local and worldwide audience moderated by EBES & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann.

Image

Clockwise from above:

  • Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Population Economics, SSCI Impact Factor (IF) 2021: 4.7
  • Douglas Cumming, Editor-in-Chief, British Journal of Management, IF (2021): 7.5
  • Jonathan A. Batten, Editor, Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions & Money IF (2021): 4.2 & Chief Editor, Finance Research Letters, IF (2021): 9.8
  • Marco Vivarelli, Editor-in-Chief, Eurasian Business Review, IF (2021): 3.6

Ends;

GLO-supported session on “Health” at the forthcoming conference of the Southern Economic Association.

GLO Cluster Lead Kompal Sinha has organized a session on behalf of GLO for the forthcoming conference of the Southern Economic Association, November 19 – 21, 2022.

  • Session title: Health
  • Session Chair: Kompal Sinha, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
  • Section Editor: Kompal Sinha, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia (link)

Session Chair:
Kompal Sinha
PaperSpeakers
Economics of disabilityPresenter: Sophie Mitra, Fordham University, NY. Discussant: TBC
Economics of organ donationPresenter: Julio Elias, Universidad del CEMA, Buenos Aires. Discussant: Bijan J. Borah, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota
Economics of sin taxPresenter: Anurag Sharma, University of New South Wales, Sydney. Discussant: Santosh Kumar, Sam Houston State University, Texas.
Intergenerational health mobilityPresenter: Tim Halliday, University of Hawaii, Hawaii Discussant: Subha Mani, Fordham University, NY.

Ends;

Well-Being 2022: Knowledge for informed decisions. A Conference Report.

The GLO-sponsored conference Well-Being 2022: Knowledge for informed decisions has recently concluded. From June 1st to 4th, approximately 90 speakers from around the world came together in Luxembourg to discuss the quest for better lives.

Hosted by STATEC Research, the organizing team included GLO Fellows Francesco Sarracino and Kelsey O’Connor and was supported by an international Scientific Committee, including among others, GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova (GLO Cluster Lead Happiness) and Stephanie Rossouw.

Participants addressed questions such as: How do we promote well-being? What are the best policies? What is the role for civil society? How can these insights help us to address the environmental, social, and economic challenges of today and the future? Additional topics pertaining primarily to subjective well-being more generally were also presented.

For details, see the program here. For recordings of the main events, see STATEC Research’s YouTube page here

In addition to 26 parallel sessions, the event included: opening remarks from the Minister of the Economy (Franz Fayot); a round table discussion on how policy-makers can integrate the findings from well-being studies (including panelists from Luxembourg, Martijn Burger (Erasmus Happiness Economics Research Organization (EHERO)), Nancy Hey (What Works Centre for Wellbeing), and Katherine Scrivens (OECD)); a presentation of the new PIBien-etre Report about quality of life in Luxembourg, by Serge Allegrezza (Director of STATEC); an opening talk from a civil society activist (author and filmmaker, John De Graaf); a workshop on the World Database of Happiness by its creator Ruut Veenhoven; four keynote speeches by Stefano Bartolini, Andrew Clark, Carol Graham, and Andrew Oswald; and a very lively and fun social dinner.

We encourage you to share widely in hopes that collectively we can turn some of this momentum into change. You can see STATEC Research’s updates, including those pertaining to their seminar series, on their LinkedIn page here.

The Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR), Caritas Luxembourg, and International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS) also sponsored the event. For complete details, see the website https://www.wellbeing2022.lu.

Ends;

Register now to meet authors & editors at the Summer Event of the Journal of Population Economics on July 15, 2022.

The Journal of Population Economics JOPE Summer Event will take place online on 15 July 2022 (10.30-19.30 CEST Berlin/German time) on the hundredth birthday of Jacob Mincer, hero of labor, household and population economics. A session will reflect on his work. Others report on the highlights of new and forthcoming JOPE articles , including lead paper issues such as religiosity & the U.S. Capitol Riot and topics like abortions, climate & the Covid-19 pandemic, among others…..

Participation is open for the public and around the world, starting with participants from Australia and Asia, covering research from Africa and Europe, and ending with work from the US and Latin America. Online conferencing makes this all possible.

Register in time to meet the authors to get informed about new research and to ask questions. Authors will present the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:3 (issue just published) and 35:4 (issue in print, articles published online already) of 2022.

Meet the authors! Talk to the editors! You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: July 15, 2022; 10.30-19.30 CEST Berlin/Germany time. Join full or in part as of interest.
Register in advance for this meeting: EVENT OVER
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing the personal event link. You will then be reminded a few hours before the event starts.

POST EVENT NOTE: Access to Video of the conference.

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Berlin-Germany. Lead papers have 20 min presentation & 10 min for Q&A; regular papers 10 (presentation) and 5 (Q&A).

10:30-10.35 Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief

10:35-12:30 Paper Session I. Chair: Kompal Sinha, Editor

12.30-13.30 BREAK

13:30-15:00 Paper Session II. Chair: Ainoa Aparicio-Fenoll, Associate Editor

15.00-15.15 BREAK

15:15-16:15 Jacob Mincer Centennial. Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief

  • Pedro N. Teixeira, Secretary of State for Higher Education in the Portuguese Government, author of Jacob Mincer. A Founding Father of Modern Labor Economics, Oxford University Press
  • Barry Chiswick, JOPE Advisory Board, former Associate Editor

16.15- 17.15 Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) Progress

  • Progress report: Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief
  • Reflections on publishing: Terra McKinnish, Editor; Alfonso Flores-Lagunes, Editor
  • Q & R with the audience.

17.15-17.30 BREAK

17:30-19:30 Paper Session III. Chair: Madeline Zavodny, Managing Editor

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

JUST RELEASED
CiteScore of JOPE moves up from 3.9 (2020) to 6.5 (2021). LINK
Similar, its Impact Factor is now 4.7 (2021) after 2.8 (2020). LINK

Ends;

The Fifth IESR-GLO Conference (August 29-31, 2022) on Social Policy Under Global Challenges: Call for Papers Deadline August 14.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) at Jinan University and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) are jointly organizing the Fifth IESR-GLO Conference online.

  • Beijing Time August 29 to August 31, 2022 through Zoom.
  • Theme is Social Policy Under Global Challenges
  • Keynote speakers are: Lisa Cameron and Junsen Zhang

The IESR-GLO annual conference is aimed to provide a platform for scholars and experts to exchange ideas on the current pressing economic issues through presentations of high-quality academic papers and policy discussions. Previous IESR-GLO Conferences have covered topics such as the Social Safety Net and Welfare Programs in 2021, Economics of Covid-19 in 2020 and on the labor markets in Belt and Road countries in 2019.

Submission

  • We welcome papers on topics related to social policies, especially social assistance and its reform experience.
  • Please submit full papers or extended abstracts to https://www.wjx.top/vm/YMFHgNK.aspx
    no later than August 14, 2022 (Beijing Time, GMT+8).
  • The corresponding author will be notified of the decision by August 22, 2022.
  • No submission or participation fee is required.

Organizers

  • Institute       for       Economic       and       Social        Research,        Jinan       University, https://iesr.jnu.edu.cn/Home/main.htm
  • Global Labor Organization, https://glabor.org/

Organizing Committee

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Sen Xue, Jinan University

Contact

For inquiries regarding the conference, please contact Sen Xue at sen.xue@jnu.edu.cn. General inquiries regarding the submissions should be directed to iesrjnu@gmail.com.

Lisa Cameron is the James Riady Chair of Asian Economics and Business and a Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. She is an empirical micro-economist whose research incorporates the techniques of experimental and behavioural economics so as to better understand human decision-making. Much of her research focuses on policy evaluation – understanding the impacts and behavioural implications of public policy, with a focus on social and economic issues. She is particularly interested in the welfare of disadvantaged and marginalised groups and the socio-economic determinants of health. Much of her research to date has focused on developing countries, particularly Indonesia and China and she has extensive experience collaborating with agencies such as the World Bank and AusAID (DFAT). Lisa received her PhD from Princeton University in 1996. She was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences in 2013.

Junsen Zhang is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the School of Economics, Zhejiang University. Prof. Zhang is also Emeritus Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research (both theoretical and empirical) has focused on the economics of family behavior, including fertility, marriage, education, intergenerational transfers, marital transfers, gender bias, and old-age support. He also works on family-related macro issues, such as ageing, social security, and economic growth. Using many data sets from different countries (regions), either micro or macro, he has studied economic issues in Canada, the US, the Philippines, Taiwan, Hong Kong, as well as Mainland China. Most of his recent research has been on the economics of the family using Chinese data. He has published over 100 papers in major refereed international journals. Many of them were published in leading economics journals or in leading field journals. According to a ranking by RePEc dated May 2018, Junsen Zhang ranks as the number one economist in the field of the Chinese economy. He was Editor of the Journal of Population Economics from 2001 to 2020 and has been Co-Editor of Journal of Human Resources since February 2019. He was the President of the Hong Kong Economic Association from 2007 to 2011. In 2013, he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

Ends;

GLO sessions at EBES-40 in Istanbul on July 7, 2022

EBES-40 in Istanbul takes place on July 6-8, 2022 in hybrid mode (see EBES program). GLO supports the event with two sessions (local Istanbul time):

Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (EBES & GLO & UNU-MERIT, The Netherlands & Free University Berlin, Germany). Handbook of Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics

  • Climate Change in Historical Perspective: Violence, Conflict, and Migration
    Qing Pei* (Education University of Hong Kong and GLO), Yingqi Long (Education University of Hong Kong) and Xiaolin Lin (Education University of Hong Kong)
  • Labor Market Agglomeration Economies
    Shihe Fu (Xiamen University and GLO)
  • Well-being in Old and Very Old Age
    Johanna Hartung* (University of Bonn); Janina Nemitz (Helsana Insurance Company Ltd) and Gizem Hülür (University of Bonn)
  • Earnings Discrimination in the Workplace
    John Forth (Bayes Business School) and Nikolaos Theodoropoulos* (University of Cyprus and GLO)
  • Age at Marriage
    Pavel Jelnov (University of Hannover and GLO)
  • Maternity Leave
    Krishna Regmi (Kennesaw State University) and Le Wang (University of Oklahoma and GLO)

* presenting

Ends;

Call for papers for special issue on: Faith-based education and development. Deadline October 1, 2022.

GLO Southeast Asia Lead Niaz Asadullah is co-editing a special issue for the International Journal of Educational Development (IJED). The editors are inviting interested authors to submit proposals for review. Prospective authors are also encouraged to make informal queries to guest editors by email. Deadline for full paper submission is 1st Oct 2022. See below for a summary of the call and here for a link to the official call through Elsevier.

Call Details: Faith-based education and development: Opportunities, challenges, and controversies

The special issue explores the possible distinctive contributions, roles, and issues related to faith-based schools and educational actors and how they are situated in contexts.

Guest editors:

TJ D’AgostinoAssistant Professor of the Practice, University of Notre Dame Institute for Educational Initiatives (adagosti@nd.edu)

Niaz AsadullahProfessor of Education Economics, Monash University Malaysia School of Business (niaz.asadullah@monash.edu)

Special issue information:

Faith-based education has long played a vital role in education systems globally. We are seeking manuscripts for a special issue of IJED that explores the possible distinctive contributions, roles, and issues related to faith-based schools and educational actors and how they are situated in contexts. Manuscripts may cover a range of disciplinary perspectives on topics that may include:

  • comparative non-academic outcomes (e.g. civic, etc.);
  • role and contributions to educational development / SGDs, opportunities and challenges of partnering
  • political and legal issues, challenges, and conflicts
  • organizational identity
  • funding models and regulatory approaches
  • benefits or challenges of engaging
  • historical development
  • intersection of social contexts and role / mission

Manuscript submission information:

You are invited to submit your manuscript at any time before the submission deadline of 1st October 2022. For any inquiries about the appropriateness of contribution topics, please contact Professor TJ D’Agostino at adagosti@nd.edu

International migration and the religious schooling of children in the home country: evidence from Bangladesh
Khandker Wahedur Rahman
Published OPEN ACCESS in the Journal of Population Economics.

Ends;

Regulating Abortions in the United States. Report & Video of a Research Meeting of the Journal of Population Economics.

Abortion issues are again on the agenda in may societies around the globe. Academic research can inform the public debate. The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) is a scientific outlet for studying important issues. It has published a larger number of relevant papers recently on this topic. Two new papers studying abortion regulations in the United States were presented on June 1, 2022 open to the public. JOPE Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) has opened the event, and Managing Editor Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida) had chaired the session.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues II (see Abortion Issues I)
Wednesday June 1; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida)

Event Video

Free access to the papers see below.

  • Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)
    Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020

  • Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)
    The Impact of Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers Laws on Abortions and Births

Recently published JOPE abortion research:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Consequences of Abortion Bans in India & Romania. Report & Video: Research event of the Journal of Population Economics.

Abortion issues are again on the agenda in may societies around the globe. Academic research can inform the public debate. The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) is a scientific outlet for studying important issues. It has published a larger number of relevant papers recently. Two new papers on the consequences of abortion bans were presented on May 31, 2022 open to the public. JOPE Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) has opened the event, and Managing Editor Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) chaired the session.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues I (see Abortion Issues II)

Tuesday May 31; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University)

Event Video 

  • Anisha Sharma (Ashoka University, India)
    Unwanted daughters: the unintended consequences of a ban on sex-selective abortions on the educational attainment of women
  • Federico H. Gutierrez (Bates White, previously Vanderbilt University, USA)
    The inter-generational fertility effect of an abortion ban

Free access to the papers see below.

Recently published JOPE abortion research:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Call for conference contributions on Covid-19 Econometrics, London 17-19 December, 2022.

King’s College London, UK. 17-19 December 2022.

On behalf of the GLO, Sergio Scicchitano  (Lead of the Coronavirus GLO Cluster) is organizing the “Session CO551: Covid-19 econometrics” at the 16th International Conference on Computational and Financial Econometrics (CFE 2022).

Ends;

Talk next week to the authors: Research for the Abortion Debate in the Journal of Population Economics. Register for the online workshops on May 31 & June 1.

Abortion issues are again on the agenda in may societies around the globe. Academic research can inform the public debate. The Journal of Population Economics ((JOPE) is a scientific outlet for studying important issues. It has published a larger number of relevant papers recently, which are discussed in the workshops announced below. The events are open to the general public. Use this chance to discuss research findings with the authors. Prior registration to both parts separately is required. JOPE Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) will open the events, and Managing Editors Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) and Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida) will chair the sessions.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues I
Tuesday May 31; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University)

  • Anisha Sharma (Ashoka University, India)
    Unwanted daughters: the unintended consequences of a ban on sex-selective abortions on the educational attainment of women
  • Federico H. Gutierrez (Vanderbilt University, USA)
    The inter-generational fertility effect of an abortion ban

Prior registration required:

  • You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
    When: May 31, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
  • After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Free access to the papers see below.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues II
Wednesday June 1; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida)

  • Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)
    Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020
  • Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)
    The Impact of Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers Laws on Abortions and Births

Prior registration required:

  • You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
    When: Jun 1, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
  • After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Free access to the papers see below.

Forthcoming articles

In print in the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE):

GLO Fellow Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions on aggregate abortion and birth rates in the United States. Specifically, I exploit state and time variation in the implementation of the first targeted regulation of abortion provider (TRAP) law in a state to identify the effects of the laws. I find that TRAP laws are associated with a reduction in the abortion rate of approximately 5% the year the first law is implemented, and an average reduction of 11-14% in subsequent years. There is also evidence that TRAP laws increased birth rates by 2-3%, which accounts for approximately 80-100% of the observed decline in abortion rates.

GLO Fellow Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

Access to more published JOPE research on abortion issues:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

STOREP Covid Special Session. “Covid-19 pandemic and the future of economics and economic systems”.

Sergio Scicchitano (GLO Coronavirus Cluster Lead) organized with Minerva Lab (University La Sapienza of Rome) a session on “Covid-19 pandemic and the future of economics and economic systems” for STOREP, 26-28 May 2022, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy.

Program of the conference:
Economics and the Economic System: The Ecological Transition<br>19th Annual Conference of the Italian Association for the History of Political Economy (STOREP) (editorialexpress.com)

Session 5: [ISSUES](MinervaLab- INAPP) Covid-19 pandemic and the future of economics and economic systems
May 26, 2022 15:00 to 16:30 (Rome time)
The participation free at the link

Session Chair: Sergio Scicchitano, National Institute for Public Policies Analysis (INAPP)

DISTRIBUTIONAL EFFECTS OF THE COVID-19 ON WAGES IN ITALY
By Carmen Aina; Università Piemonte Orientale
Irene Brunetti; INAPP – National Institute for Public Policy Analysis
Chiara Mussida; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
Sergio Scicchitano; National Institute for Public Policies Analysis (INAPP)
presented by: Irene Brunetti, INAPP – National Institute for Public Policy Analysis
Discussant:   Guglielmo Forges Davanzati, Università del Salento

The new industrial revolution: the optimal choice for flexible work companies
By Leonardo Becchetti; University of Rome “Tor Vergata”
Francesco Salustri; Roma Tre & UCL
Nazaria Solferino; UNICAL
presented by: Francesco Salustri, Roma Tre & UCL
Discussant:   Davide Gualerzi, Università di Padova

COVID-19, GENDER AND LABOUR
By Marcella Corsi; Sapienza University of Rome
Ipek Ilkkaracan; Istanbul Technical University
presented by: Marcella Corsi, Sapienza University of Rome
Discussant:   Antonella Stirati, Università Roma Tre

Economics and the Economic System: The Ecological Transition 19th STOREP Annual Conference Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, 26-28 May 2022.

Ends;

Report: GLO Public Lecture on 51 years of Bangladesh’s Development Achievements delivered by Niaz Asadullah.

Dr. Niaz Asadullah (PhD, Oxford), the Global Labor Organization (GLO) Lead of South Asia and Professor of Development Economics, Monash University Malaysia, delivered a public lecture titled “Bangladesh at 51: Achievements, Contradictions, and Challenges”, at North South University (NSU) in Dhaka on April 19, 2022.


The event was jointly organized by the Department of EconomicsSchool of Business & Economics (SBE), NSU, and GLO Southeast Asia Cluster. NSU Young Economists’ Forum (YEF), a student club of NSU affiliated with the Department of Economics, was the youth engagement partner of the event.

In his intriguing and thought-provoking lecture, Professor Niaz demystified Bangladesh’s development achievements since 1970s revisiting trends in a range of indicators across different sectors. He explained that Bangladesh’s social achievements in female schooling, fertility reduction, immunization coverage, contraception usage, and weakening of son preference in fertility are truly exceptional when compared with Pakistan, India and other countries at the same stage of economic development. These cases of ‘positive deviance’ point to a ‘development miracle’ i.e. systematic social progress achieved before Bangladesh’s recent surge in GDP growth.


Professor Niaz however cautioned that the public spendings on education and health as ratios of GDP are among the lowest in the world. If Bangladesh is to emulate the East Asian model of economic growth (e.g. South Korea, Singapore and Malaysia), then a drastic increase in education and health spending is necessary – mega infrastructure projects must be complemented with human capital development for sustainable development. Among other issues, Professor Niaz commented on the sustainability of our current economic progress, highlighting some worrying trends in data on FDI, exports, inequality, military expenditure and state capacity as well as the rise of plutocracy.

The public lecture was followed by a lively Q&A session where participants actively engaged with the speaker asking questions about the future of Bangladesh economy. The event was attended by over 200 students. NSU faculty members, the Chair of the Department of Economics Dr. Asad Karim Khan Priyo, the Dean of NSU SBE Dr. Abdul Hannan Chowdhury, and the Pro-Vice-Chancellor of NSU Dr. M Ismail Hossain were all present in the lecture.

Pro-VC-Sir-Dean-Sir-Eco-Department-Chair-Director-of-Student-Affairs-and Faculty-Members


The event received extensive press coverage in the Bangladeshi media in outlets such as The News Time, The Daily Swadesh PratidinThe Daily Jugantorthe Daily JanakanthaThe Daily Bonik BartaThe Daily Bhorer Kagoj and The Daily Bporikroma.

Ends;

Talk to the authors: Research for the Abortion Debate in the Journal of Population Economics. Register for online workshops on May 31 & June 1.

Abortion issues are again on the agenda in may societies around the globe. Academic research can inform the public debate. The Journal of Population Economics ((JOPE) is a scientific outlet for studying important issues. It has published a larger number of relevant papers recently, which are discussed in the workshops announced below. The events are open to the general public. Use this chance to discuss research findings with the authors. Prior registration to both parts separately is required. JOPE Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) will open the events, and Managing Editors Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) and Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida) will chair the sessions.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues I
Tuesday May 31; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Michaella Vanore (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University)

  • Anisha Sharma (Ashoka University, India)
    Unwanted daughters: the unintended consequences of a ban on sex-selective abortions on the educational attainment of women
  • Federico H. Gutierrez (Vanderbilt University, USA)
    The inter-generational fertility effect of an abortion ban

Prior registration required:

  • You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
    When: May 31, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
  • After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Free access to the papers see below.

JOPE Research Workshop on Abortion Issues II
Wednesday June 1; 4-5 pm CEST (Berlin time) Chair: Madeline Zavodny (University of North Florida)

  • Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)
    Confidential and legal access to abortion and contraception in the United States, 1960-2020
  • Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)
    The Impact of Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers Laws on Abortions and Births

Prior registration required:

  • You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
    When: Jun 1, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
  • After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Free access to the papers see below.

Forthcoming articles

In print in the Journal of Population Economics (JOPE):

GLO Fellow Grace Arnold (Portland State University, USA)

Author Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of supply-side abortion restrictions on aggregate abortion and birth rates in the United States. Specifically, I exploit state and time variation in the implementation of the first targeted regulation of abortion provider (TRAP) law in a state to identify the effects of the laws. I find that TRAP laws are associated with a reduction in the abortion rate of approximately 5% the year the first law is implemented, and an average reduction of 11-14% in subsequent years. There is also evidence that TRAP laws increased birth rates by 2-3%, which accounts for approximately 80-100% of the observed decline in abortion rates.

GLO Fellow Caitlin Knowles Myers (Middlebury College, USA)

Author Abstract: An expansive empirical literature estimates the causal effects of policies governing young women’s confidential and legal access to contraception and abortion. I present a new review of changes in the historical policy environment in the United States that serve as the foundation of this work. I consult primary sources including annotated statutes, judicial rulings, attorney general opinions, and advisory articles in medical journals, as well as secondary sources including newspaper articles and snapshots of various policy environments prepared by scholars, advocates, and government organizations. Based on this review, I provide a suggested coding of the policy environment over the past 60 years. I also present and compare the legal coding schemes used in the empirical literature and where possible I resolve numerous and substantial discrepancies.

Access to more published JOPE research on abortion issues:

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country. Public Speech of Shyamal Chowdhury in Dhaka/Bangladesh on May 12, 2022.

Using data from large-scale experiments with entire families for Bangladesh, the research finds that both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences. Results differ from evidence for rich countries.

Shyamal Chowdhury (University of Sydney) presents the paper in a public speech in the University of Dhaka on May 12, 2022.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 592, 2020 now forthcoming as

Economic preferences across generations and family clusters: A large-scale experiment in a developing country
by
Chowdhury, Shyamal & Sutter, Matthias & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

in: Journal of Political Economy

Free Pre-publication version

GLO Fellows Shyamal Chowdhury and Matthias Sutter & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann

Author Abstract: Our large-scale experiment with 542 families from rural Bangladesh finds substantial intergenerational persistence of economic preferences. Both mothers’ and fathers’ risk, time and social preferences are significantly (and largely to the same degree) positively correlated with their children’s economic preferences, even when controlling for personality traits and socio-economic background. We discuss possible transmission channels and are the first to classify all families into one of two clusters, with either relatively patient, risk-tolerant and pro-social members or relatively impatient, risk averse and spiteful members. Classifications correlate with socio-economic background variables. We find that our results differ from evidence for rich countries.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is favicon_glabor.png

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

Ends;

VIDEO & REPORT: Spring Event of the Journal of Population Economics, 25 April 2022.

Meet the author! The Journal of Population Economics (JOPE) Spring Event took place online on 25 April 2022, 4-6 pm CEST (Maastricht, Dutch time). Authors presented the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:1 and 35:2 of 2022. Sessions were chaired by 4 journal editors. Various members of the JOPE Board present. Intensive discussions with a large audience. High number of participants registered.

Missed the event? Want to study details? Here is the Video of the event. Explore also the links to the papers provided below in the program outline!

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Maastricht-Netherlands

16:00-18:00/4-6 pm: Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann

16:00-16:30/4:00-4.30 pm — Elderly & YouthChair: Kompal Sinha

Havari: Unemployed Youth in Latvia

16:30-17.00/4:30-5.00 pm — Children Chair: Terra McKinnish

Strom: Children & Labor Outcome

17:00-17.30/5:00-5.30 pm — Covid-19Chair: Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

Skoda: Elections & Covid-19

17:30-18.00/5:30-6.00 pm — US ImmigrantsChair: Michaella Vanore

Regets: Immigrant Earnings I
Regets: Immigrant Earnings II

***

Explore the full set of JOPE papers (23 papers): January 2022, issue 1 & April 2022, issue 2

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

TODAY: Meet the author! Spring Event of the Journal of Population Economics, 4-6 pm CEST.

The Journal of Population Economics Spring Event will take place online on 25 April 2022, 4-6 pm CEST (Maastricht, Dutch time). Register in time to meet the authors to get informed about new research and to ask questions. Authors will present the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:1 and 35:2 of 2022.

Meet the author! You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: Apr 25, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUpf-6qpjwsGdEESSI7NncAhQHdcMqT-hf6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing the personal event link.

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Maastricht-Netherlands

16:00-18:00/4-6 pm: Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann

16:00-16:30/4:00-4.30 pm Chair: Kompal Sinha

16:30-17.00/4:30-5.00 pm Chair: Terra McKinnish

17:00-17.30/5:00-5.30 pm Chair: Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

17:30-18.00/5:30-6.00 pm Chair: Michaella Vanore

Explore the full set of JOPE papers (23 papers): January 2022, issue 1 & April 2022, issue 2

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

JUST PUBLISHED
Vol. 35, Issue 3, July 2022: Journal of Population Economics: 15 articles
https://link.springer.com/journal/148/volumes-and-issues/35-3

Ends;

Call for contributions: 40th EBES Conference, Istanbul/Turkey, 6-8 July 2022. Submission deadline for abstracts is May 27!

Interested researchers are cordially invited to submit their abstracts or papers for presentation consideration. The 40th EBES Conference in Istanbul will take place on July 6-8, 2022 in Hybrid Mode (online and in-person). The event is supported by the Istanbul Economic Research Association. GLO & EBES are collaborating organizations; GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES.

Invited Speakers

EBES is pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues Iftekhar Hasan, Narjess Boubakri, Douglas Cumming, Jonathan A. Batten, Marco Vivarelli and Klaus F. Zimmermann will participate as keynote speakers and/or invited editors.

Jonathan Batten is professor of finance and CIMB-UUM Chair in Banking and Finance at the School of Economics, Finance and Banking at the University Utara Malaysia (Malaysia). Prior to this position, he worked at the Monash University (Australia), Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong), and Seoul National University (Korea). He is a well-known academician who has published articles in many of the leading economics and finance journals and currently serves as the Editor of Emerging Markets Review (SSCI), Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions & Money (SSCI), and Finance Research Letters (SSCI). He was also the President of EBES from July 2014 till December 2018. His current research interests include: financial market development and risk management; spread modelling arbitrage and market integration; and the investigation of the non-linear dynamics of financial prices.

Narjess Boubakri is professor of Finance at American University of Sharjah (AUS) (United Arab Emirates) where she joined in 2007. She is currently the Dean of the School of Business Administration at AUS as well. She has taught at Laval University and HEC Montreal School of Business (Canada). She has also several editorial roles at leading journals such as Editor (Finance Research Letters), Co-Editor (Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance), Associate Editor (Journal of Corporate Finance), and Subject Editor (Emerging Markets Review; Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions, and Money; and Journal of International Business Policy). Her papers were published in well-known journals such as Journal of Finance, Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Corporate Finance, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of Accounting Research. Her research has been widely cited (Google Scholar=6,000+). Her research areas are Corporate Governance, Privatization, Corporate Finance, International Finance, Mergers and Acquisitions, Legal and Political Institutions, Lobbying, and Earnings Management.

Douglas Cumming, J.D., Ph.D., CFA, is the DeSantis Distinguished Professor of Finance and Entrepreneurship at the College of Business, Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. Douglas has published over 195 articles in leading refereed academic journals in finance, management, and law and economics, such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Financial Economics, Review of Financial Studies, and Journal of International Business Studies. His work has been cited over 19,000 times according to Google Scholar. He is the Managing Editor-in-Chief of the Review of Corporate Finance (2021-current) and British Journal of Management (2020-current). Douglas has published 21 academic books, including Crowdfunding: Fundamental Cases, Facts, and Insights (Elsevier Academic Press, 2019). Douglas’ work has been reviewed in numerous media outlets, including The Economist, The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker.

Iftekhar Hasan holds the title of university professor at Fordham University, where he also serves as the E. Gerald Corrigan Chair in Finance at the Gabelli School of Business, co-director of the Center for Research in Contemporary Finance, and director of the Ph.D. program. He further serves as a scientific advisor at the Bank of Finland; as a fractional faculty member at the University of Sydney; as a research fellow at the Financial Institution Center at the Wharton School as well as at the IWH Institute in Halle, Germany. He is the managing editor of the Journal of Financial Stability and has served as an associate editor with several other reputed academic journals. Professor Hasan’s research interests are in the areas of financial institutions, corporate finance, capital markets, and emerging economies. He has been involved in numerous academic research grants from different governmental, national, and international science foundations and organizations in the U.S. and abroad. Hasan has more than 375 publications in print, including 16 books and edited volumes, and more than 280 peer-reviewed articles in distinguished academic outlets in finance, economics, international business, management, accounting, operation research, and information systems, including JFE, JFQA, JB, JME, RF, JFI, JMCB, JCF, FM, JBF, JIMF, SMJ, JIBS, HRM, JoM, BJM, JBE, RP, JAR, CAR, RAST, JAPP, JAAF, ABR, MSc, EJOR, and JMIS. Professor Hasan has held visiting faculty positions at several research universities around the world, including the University of Rome, Italy; the University of Strasbourg, France; the University of Carlos III, Madrid; EPFL at Lausanne, Switzerland; the University of Limoges, France; National Taiwan University at Taipei; the University of Romania at Bucharest; Xi’an Jiaotong University, China, the University of Sydney, Australia; and NYU’s Stern School of Business. Professor Hasan has also been a consultant or a visiting scholar for numerous international organizations, including the World Bank, the IMF, the United Nations, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, the Office of the Comptroller of Currency of the U.S. Treasury, the Banque de France, Development Bank of Japan, and the Italian Deposit Insurance Corporation. A Fulbright scholar and a Fulbright selector, Professor Hasan is also a recipient of a “Doctor Honoris Causa” degree from the Romanian-American University in Bucharest.

Marco Vivarelli is a full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics EJournal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as a referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics, Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization, Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, and World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment, and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

Klaus F. Zimmermann is President of EBES; President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (ret.); Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin, Renmin University of China and Lixin University; Member, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, Regional Science Academy, and Academia Europaea. Among others, he has worked at Macquarie University, the Universities of Melbourne, Princeton, Harvard, Munich, Kyoto, Mannheim, Dartmouth College and the University of Pennsylvania. Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Fellow of the European Economic Association (EEA). Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics. Editorial Board of International Journal of Manpower, Research in Labor Economics and Comparative Economic Studies, among others. Founding Director, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); Past-President, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW). Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts; Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank. Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017; Eminent Research Scholar Award 2017, Australia; EBES Fellow Award 2018. He has published in many top journals including Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of the European Economic Association, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Public Choice, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Public Economics. His research fields are population, labor, development, and migration.

Executive Board

Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Free University Berlin
Prof. Jonathan Batten, University Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
Prof. Dorothea Schäfer, German Institute for Economic Research DIW Berlin, Germany
Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than May 27, 2022.

For submission, please visit our website at https: //ebesweb.org/40th-ebes-conference-istanbul/40th-ebes-istanbul-abstract-submission/

No submission fee is required.

General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers can be published in EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) or EBES proceedings books after a peer review process without any submission or publication fees. EBES journals (EABR and EAER) are published by Springer and both are indexed in the SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC WorldCat Discovery Service, ProQuest ABI/INFORM, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, ProQuest-ExLibris Primo, ProQuest-ExLibris Summon, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China, Naver, SCImago, ABDC Journal Quality List, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory. In addition, while EAER is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), EABR is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents / Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Also, all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in a USB.

After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published (after a refereeing process managed by EBES) in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees). This is indexed by Scopus. It will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (Vol. 2), 21st, 24th, and 25th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Other conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Conference Date: July 6-8, 2022
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 27, 2022
Reply-by: June 8, 2022*
Registration Deadline: June 13, 2022
Submission of the Virtual Presentation: June 13, 2022
Announcement of the Program: June 16, 2022
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): June 13, 2022**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: October 15, 2022

* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.

** Completed paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before May 27, 2022, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by June 13, 2022.

Contact

Ugur Can, Director of EBES (ebes@ebesweb.org)
Ender Demir, Conference Coordinator of EBES (demir@ebesweb.org)

Conference Link

2022-23 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS). Deadline for Applications: June 20, 2022.

Global Labor Organization (GLO) invites interested young scholars to apply for participation in the 2022-23 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS). This is the fourth cohort of the successful GLO venture to support career developments of young researchers. It also provides a unique opportunity to interact with the large and very active GLO global research network.

2022-23 GLO Virtual Young Scholars Program (GLO VirtYS)

About GLO: The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is a global, independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that has no institutional position. The GLO functions as an international network and virtual platform for researchers, policy makers, practitioners and the general public interested in scientific research and its policy and societal implications on global labor markets, demographic challenges and human resources. These topics are defined broadly in line with its Mission to embrace the global diversity of labor markets, institutions, and policy challenges, covering advanced economies as well as transition and less developed countries.

Program’s Goal: In the spirit of the GLO Mission, the GLO VirtYS program’s goal is to contribute to the development of the future generation of researchers, who are committed to the creation of policy-relevant research, are well equipped to work in collaboration with policy makers and other stakeholders, and adhere to the highest standards of academic integrity. This goal is achieved through the process of working on a specific research paper within the duration of the program, which is 10 months starting from September 2022.

Program’s Advisory Board:

  • Jan van Ours, Professor of Applied Economics, Erasmus School of Economics Rotterdam, Netherlands, & Professorial Fellow, University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Marie Claire Villeval, Research Professor, CNRS GATE, France
  • Marco Vivarelli, Professor at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milano and Director of the Department of Economic Policy
  • Le Wang, Chong K. Liew Chair and Professor & President’s Associates Presidential Professor, University of Oklahoma, USA
  • Klaus F. Zimmermann, Professor Emeritus, Bonn University, UNU-MERIT & President of GLO

Program’s Activities:

  • Virtual kick-off meeting of all the participants and Thematic Cluster advisors, who will be appointed by the participating Cluster leads to match closely participants’ research interests.
  • One-to-one activities with the Thematic Cluster Advisor will be agreed upon at the beginning of the scholarship period in an Individual Research Plan. These activities at a minimum shall include 2-3 virtual consultations, 1 review round of the completed research work and a discussion of the amendments (if needed) to follow up.
  • Provide a virtual platform for the GLO VirtYS program participants to present their findings and receive feedback from their peers and the GLO wider community.
  • The scholarship will conclude in June 2023 followed by the presentations by the scholars within the GLO-wide seminar series in September 2023, after which the GLO Management Board will make a decision on whether to extend an invitation to the graduate of the GLO Virtual Scholar Program to join the organization as a GLO Fellow, based on the recommendation from their Thematic Cluster Advisors and evaluation of the GLO VirtYS Advisory Board.

Research proposals are invited within one of the following GLO thematic clusters:

  1. Coronavirus
  2. Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior
  3. Economics of Happiness
  4. EU Mobility
  5. Gender
  6. Labor and Wealth
  7. School-to-Work Transition
  8. South-East Asia
  9. Technological Change

Benefits to the GLO VYSP Scholars:

  • No fees: Participation is free for the scholars.
  • All GLO VirtYS program participants will become GLO Affiliates, if they are not already, and receive a GLO Bio page.
  • GLO VirtYS program participants will be listed with pictures on the www.glabor.org website of the program.
  • Feedback on their research from leading researchers in the area of their interest.
  • Networking opportunities with researchers from other countries within the same area and beyond
  • (Priority) access to GLO activities.
  • Interactions with the scholars of the cohort, program’s alumni, and the future cohorts.
  • Opportunity to promote own research via GLO channels.
  • Completed research paper ready for submission to the GLO Discussion Paper series.
  • Possibility of promotion to GLO Fellow after exceptional performance.

Eligibility criteria:

  • Applicant must be either currently enrolled in a doctoral program or be within 2 years after graduation as evidenced by the letter from the degree awarding institution or a degree certificate.
  • Applicant must be at an advanced stage of the analysis of a specific research question within the corresponding GLO Thematic Cluster to which he/she is applying as evidenced by the submitted draft.
  • Applicant must be supported by a letter of endorsement from either one of the GLO Fellows or from the administration of one of the GLO supporting institutions.

How to apply: all application materials have to be submitted online. If there are any questions, please write to virtys@glabor.org.

Selection procedure:

The GLO Virtual Young Scholars will be selected by a Scientific Selection Committee consisting of the GLO VirtYS Program Director, GLO thematic cluster leads participating in the current year, and a member of the GLO Management Board.

The results of the selection will be posted on the GLO site www.glabor.org by July 18, 2022. Scholars will be notified via email. In the 2022-23 academic year we expect to select 5-7 scholars.

The final research paper should be submitted by June 30th, 2023, by 5 pm GMT.

Upon completion of the program and based on the quality of the produced research paper, some of the GLO VirtYS programme graduates may be invited to become GLO Fellows and their paper accepted as a GLO Discussion Paper.

Evaluation criteria for applications:

  1. Research excellence (50 points)
  2. Policy relevance of the research question in a local and/or global context (25 points)
  3. Potential for capacity development (25 points) (preference will be given to the applicants for which the GLO Young Scholars Program can bring the highest capacity development, compared to what the applicant would have achieved without being a GLO Young Scholar)

Application procedure:

Many applicants apply in the last days before the submission deadline. To avoid last minute problems, we ask applicants to apply in advance. Applications received after the deadline or applications that do not meet the requirements set out below will not be accepted.

To apply please complete the online application form with three attachments:

1. Research proposal (maximum 2 pages including references, single-spaced, font size 12) should include the following information:

• Formulation of the problem/ research question.
• Research methodology (data and empirical approach).
• (Potential) Practical/Policy implications.
• Reference list.

2. 2-page CV

3. Transcript from the doctoral program or doctoral degree certificate

4. Letter of endorsement for the candidate and the research proposal from either one of the GLO fellows or from the administration of one of the GLO supporting institutions reflecting on the potential of the candidate to benefit from the Program and the merits of the research proposal.

Featured image: The-Coherent-Team-on-Unsplash

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Reflecting Research on Covid-19. GLO Handbook Session at EBES 39: Video & Report.

The 39th EBES Conference in Rome took place on April 6-8, 2022 including a session on Covid-19 research on April 8. Organizer and Session Chair Sergio Scicchitano, National Institute for Public Policies Analysis (INAPP), was GLO Cluster Lead COVID-19 and Section Editor COVID-19 of the Handbook “Labor, Human Resources and Population Economics”. The presentations in this session refer to the review chapters in the Handbook, which is in production.

Day 3: Friday, April 8 (16:20-18:20 CEST, Rome time): VIDEO of the session

Featured image: fusion-medical-animation-rnr8D3FNUNY-unsplash

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GLO SE Asia to Celebrate 51st Birthday of Bangladesh jointly with North South University

GLO is co-sponsoring a public lecture in Dhaka in collaboration with the country’s leading private higher educational institution — North South University (NSU) — to celebrate the 51st anniversary of Bangladesh. GLO Southeast Asia Lead, Niaz Asadullah, will deliver the lecture entitled “Bangladesh at 51: Achievements, Contradictions, and Challenges”. The main organizer is Department of Economics, School of Business & Economics (SBE) of NSU. The event is also supported by North South University Young Economists’ Forum (YEF) club.

Venue: Auditorium 801, NSU, Bashundhara City, Bangladesh

Date: 19 April 2022

Time: 11:30 am (Dhaka)

Contact of the local organizer: For media and event related queries, please contact HoD (Economics), Professor Asad Priyo (asad.priyo@northsouth.edu) .

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Register: Meet the author! Spring Event on April 25 of the Journal of Population Economics.

The Journal of Population Economics Spring Event will take place online on 25 April 2022, 4-6 pm CEST (Maastricht, Dutch time). Register in time to meet the authors to get informed about new research and to ask questions. Authors will present the highlights of their articles published in issues 35:1 and 35:2 of 2022.

Meet the author! You are invited to a Zoom meeting.
When: Apr 25, 2022 04:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUpf-6qpjwsGdEESSI7NncAhQHdcMqT-hf6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing the personal event link. You will be reminded about this link on April 25 in time.

Program

Presenting authors in bold! Scheduled times all CEST/Maastricht-Netherlands

16:00-18:00/4-6 pm: Welcome: Klaus F. Zimmermann

16:00-16:30/4:00-4.30 pm Chair: Kompal Sinha

16:30-17.00/4:30-5.00 pm Chair: Terra McKinnish

17:00-17.30/5:00-5.30 pm Chair: Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

17:30-18.00/5:30-6.00 pm Chair: Michaella Vanore

Explore the full set of JOPE papers (23 papers): January 2022, issue 1 & April 2022, issue 2

Annual Journal of Population Economics Report 2021: many submissions, fast first decisions, high impact. JOPE EiC Report 2021.

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