Category Archives: Post-18

GLO Discussion Papers February 2018. With GLO Discussion Paper of the Month on Labor Mobility in the US and Europe!!

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers: February 2018

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

Discussion Paper of the Month: February

Jauer, Julia & Liebig, Thomas & Martin, John P. & Puhani, Patrick A., Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006-2016,  GLO Discussion Paper 178, February 2018. Free download.

Abstract: We estimate whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labor market by comparing pre-and post-crisis migration movements at the regional level in both Europe and the United States, and their association with symmetric labor market shocks. Based on fixed-effects regressions using regional panel data, we find that Europe’s migratory response to unemployment shocks was almost identical to that recorded in the United States after the crisis. Our estimates suggest that, if all measured population changes in Europe were due to migration for employment purposes – i.e. an upper-bound estimate – up to about a quarter of the asymmetric labor market shock would be absorbed by migration within a year. However, in Europe and especially in the Eurozone, the reaction to a very large extent stems from migration of recent EU accession country citizens as well as of third – country nationals.

See also a recent debate about internal labor mobility in Europe and Austria.

GLO Discussion Papers of February 2018

183 Evaluating intergenerational persistence of economic preferences: A large scale experiment with families in Bangladesh – Download PDF
by Chowdhury, Shyamal & Sutter, Matthias & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

182 Equilibrium Real Interest Rates, Secular Stagnation, and the Financial Cycle: Empirical Evidence for Euro-Area Member Countries – Download PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Klose, Jens

181 Successful Transition to a Market Economy in Vietnam: An Interpretation from Organizational Ecology Theory – Download PDF
by Tran, Hien Thu & Santarelli, Enrico

180 Overeducation wage penalty among Ph.D. holders. An unconditional quantile regression analysis on Italian data – Download PDF
by Gaeta, Giuseppe Lucio & Lubrano Lavadera, Giuseppe & Pastore, Francesco

179 Data Gaps, Data Incomparability, and Data Imputation: A Review of Poverty Measurement Methods for Data-Scarce Environments – Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh & Jolliffe, Dean & Carletto, Calogero

178 Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006-2016 – Download PDF
by Jauer, Julia & Liebig, Thomas & Martin, John P. & Puhani, Patrick A.

177 Technological catching-up, sales dynamics and employment growth: evidence from China’s manufacturing firms – Download PDF
by Dosi, Giovanni & Yu, Xiaodan

176 Economic Pluralism in the Study of Wage Discrimination: A Note – Download PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

 

Successful GLO team:

GLO Managing Director Matloob Piracha (University of Kent, right) and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University, left).

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Nauro Campos on the Perspectives of Comparative Economics

Nauro Campos has recently been appointed Editor of the prominent research journal Comparative Economic Studies. He is Professor of Economics at Brunel University London and Research Professor at ETH-Zürich. He is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). His main research interests include political economy and European integration. Prof. Campos works with a new Editorial Board. We have asked him about his perspectives for this challenging new role.

GLO: Soviet studies, transition economics, new global challenges: What is Comparative Economics today?

Nauro Campos: Comparative economics is today in the cusp of becoming, once again, a really vibrant and exciting research area. Think of institutions 20 years ago, or economic history 10 years ago, and that gives you an idea where comparative economics is today. The Comparative Economic Studies journal (CES) tries to reflect that. It welcomes both submissions that are obviously comparative and case studies of single countries or of regions. It is looking for papers that investigate how economic systems respond to economic structural changes and crises, whether these are brought about by globalization, demographics, institutions, technology, politics, and/or the environment. CES is an economics journal, but is one that openly welcomes contributions from political scientists, historians and sociologists, to name a few selected disciplines.  In order to accommodate these aspirations, the new Editorial team has broadened the journal’s regional focus and has changed its mission and objectives accordingly.

GLO: Did you change the regional focus of Comparative Economic Studies?

Nauro Campos: Yes. CES is a journal of the Association of Comparative Economic Studies which when it started out, in the Cold War years of the 1960s to 1980s, was mostly concerned with what one may call “issues of the Soviet economy.” After the fall of the Berlin Wall, CES became a crucial outlet for work on the transition away from central planning. It focused on the Central European and the Former Soviet Union countries.  While working hard to maintain this prominent position, the regional focus and scope of CES has now been further enlarged to encompass other areas as well. There is a lot of interest in comparative economics today in European Union as a whole and the journal is very attentive to that. Moreover, the scope has been even further broadened to include studies about Asian, Latin American, and African experiences.

GLO: How will you combine research articles with the mission to connect Comparative Economic Studies to important policy debates?

Nauro Campos: As I said, the new editorial team has made some substantial changes in the mission of the journal as well as on its more specific goals. The overall idea is to move the journal, slowly but surely, towards it becoming an outlet in the mould of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. Think of it as a JEP-style comparative economics outlet; that is what the journal wants to be in the medium-term. We want to publish papers that offer original political economy analysis from a comparative perspective. Papers that are a truly accessible source for state-of-the-art comparative economics thinking. Articles that genuinely encourage cross-fertilization of ideas from various disciplines and that are the forefront of the debate of the directions for future research in comparative studies. But we also want papers that provide materials and insights that become useful and relevant for teaching, for the public policy debate and for the media. This change makes CES quite unique, so we will not be competing with other journals but mostly complementing their work, and the link to policy and to policy debates should become quite natural and hopefully quite strong.

GLO: Thank you very much and good luck with your new venture!

Professor Nauro Campos

Bio note:  Nauro Campos is Professor of Economics at Brunel University London and Research Professor at ETH-Zürich. Previously he taught at the Universities Paris 1 Sorbonne, Newcastle, CERGE-EI and Warwick. He was a Fulbright Fellow at Johns Hopkins and Robert McNamara Fellow. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (Los Angeles) in 1997, where he was lucky enough to learn about institutions from Jeff Nugent and Jim Robinson and (more than) happy to be Dick Easterlin’s RA for three years.

Note: The questions for GLO have been asked by Klaus F. Zimmermann.

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Attention: Abstract Submission Deadline for EBES – GLO – FOM Conference in Berlin is February 28!

The 25th EBES Conference takes place on May 23-25, 2018 in Berlin/Germany. It is jointly organized by the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and hosted by the FOM University of Applied Sciences.

Submission Deadline for Presentation Abstracts is February 28, 2018!

Call for Papers
25th EBES Conference – Berlin
May 23-25, 2018
Berlin, Germany

Jointly organized with the GLO (The Global Labor Organization)
and hosted by the FOM University of Applied Sciences

Deadline: February 28, 2018
You are cordially invited to submit your abstracts or papers for presentation consideration at the 25th EBES Conference. The conference will be jointly organized with the GLO (The Global Labor Organization) and will take place on May 23th, 24th, and 25th, 2018 at the FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin, Germany with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association.
The conference aims to bring together many distinguished researchers from all over the world. Participants will find opportunities for presenting new research, exchanging information, and discussing current issues. Although we focus on Europe and Asia, all papers from major economics, finance, and business fields – theoretical or empirical – are highly encouraged.
Keynote Speakers
  • Prof. Klaus F. Zimmerman, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
  • Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy
  • Prof. Sascha Frohwerk, the FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin, Germany
  • Prof. Ahmet Faruk Aysan, Istanbul Sehir University, Turkey
Board
  • Prof. Jonathan Batten, Monash University, Australia
  • Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.
  • Prof. Peter Rangazas, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, U.S.A.
  • Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.
  • Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy
  • Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 28, 2018. For submission, please visit our website at: http://ebesweb.org/Conferences/25th-EBES-Conference-Berlin/Abstract-Submission.aspx. No submission fee is required. General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org.
Publication Opportunities
  • Qualified papers will be published in the EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review). EBES journals are published by Springer and indexed in the Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index (Thomson Reuters), EconLit, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest, ABI/INFORM, Business Source, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Summon by ProQuest, TOC Premier, Cabell’s Directory, Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, and Google Scholar. There is no submission and publication fee for EBES journals.
  • All accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in the USB.
  • After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fee). This will also be sent to Thomson Reuters in order to be reviewed for coverage in its Conference Proceedings Citation Index. Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, and 17th EBES Conference Proceedings are accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index. 18th and subsequent conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

  • Submission deadline: February 28, 2018
  • Reply-by: March 8, 2018
  • Registration deadline: April 20, 2018
  • Announcement of the Program: April 30, 2018

Contact

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How marriage delays cause earnings increases and what it means for society: Interview with author Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma

The prestigious 2018 Kuznets Prize of the Journal of Population Economics has been awarded to Chunbei Wang and Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma. The prize has been presented at a recent event of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) in Washington DC.
Le Wang, your paper in the Journal of Population Economics (with Chunbin Wang) got the Kuznets Prize 2018. Your research suggests that there is an earnings premium of marriage delays which is larger for females than for males. This causal effect seems to work almost exclusively through more education for both men and women. 
 
GLO: Marrying later generates higher incomes: You say it is “causal”, what does this mean in your context and why is it important?
 
Le Wang: We often observe that people who marry later also earn higher earnings. This positive association, however, may not necessarily imply that delaying marriages would necessarily lead to higher productivity or higher earnings. It may be simply due to the fact that people who delay their marriages may be different from those who do not. For example, people who delay marriages may be more career oriented or motivated, and thus these people are more likely to have higher earnings, whether they delay marriage or not. By “causal”, we mean that we are actually able to isolate the productivity-enhancing effects of marriage delay. This result has important policy implications because if we can somehow “cause” or induce people to delay their marriages, we could increase their earnings.
GLO: What are the policy implications, who can “cause” marriage delays and make couples richer?
 

Le Wang: Government can, for example, institute minimum marriage age laws (the differences in such laws across states were also the reason why we can identify the causal impacts of marriage delay). There are also other examples in which rather than regulating the minimum marriage age, governments can provide incentives for people to marry late. For example, Chinese government implemented the “late marriage leave” that allowed workers who get married at age 25 or older to take a 30-day paid leave when getting married.

GLO: Research in the gender-equality literature argues that the more females work full-time, the lower the gender wage gap. What implications do your findings have for this debate?
 

Le Wang: Much of the gender gap literature has been focused on whether and how human capital characteristics and discrimination can explain the gap. Our results highlight the potential role of family in explaining it. Over the past decades, there have been similar changes in the median age of first marriage between men and women. In light of our findings, such demographic trends could have much greater impacts on women’s earnings, thereby leading to the narrowing gender gap.

GLO Fellow Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma (right) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO President and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics.)
 

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2018 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Chunbei Wang and Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma: How marriage delays cause earnings increases

There is a causal effect of marriage delays on earnings, with a stronger impact for females than for males. This works almost exclusively through more education for both men and women.

2018 Kuznets Prize Awarded to Chunbei Wang and Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma

Chunbei Wang and Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma receive the 2018 Kuznets Prize for their article “Knot yet: Minimum marriage age law, marriage delay, and earnings,” which was published in the Journal of Population Economics (2017), 30(3), pp. 771-804. The annual prize honors the best article published in the Journal of Population Economics in the previous year. The article editor of the paper has been Junsen Zhang (Hongkong University) supported by his team of anonymous referees.

The prize will be given at a dinner event of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) in Washington DC on February 8, 2018. GLO supports the Journal of Population Economics, and the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht), who is also the President of GLO, is presenting the prize.

1  Biographical Abstracts

Chunbei Wang is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Oklahoma and a Fellow at the Global Labor Organization (GLO). Before that, she was an Assistant Professor at Birmingham-Southern College and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She obtained her Ph.D. degree from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2008 and her bachelor’s degree from Jinan University in Guangzhou, China in 2001.

Her research focuses on immigration, entrepreneurship, gender, minorities, and family. Her work has been published in the Journal of Population Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Research in Labor Economics, and Industrial Relations, among others.

Le Wang is Chong K. Liew Chair and Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Oklahoma, as well as a Fellow at Global Labor Organization and IZA. He also serves as an Associate Editor of Econometric Reviews and Journal of Labor Research. He also holds a special term professorship at Jinan University. Prior to joining OU, he has held positions at the University of Alabama, the University of New Hampshire, and University of Minnesota. He was also a Women and Public Policy Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School. He received his Ph.D in Economics from Southern Methodist University in 2006 and his B.A. in International Finance from Jinan University, Guangzhou, China in 2001.

His research focuses on questions in the subfields of microeconomics—labor and demographic economics, development economics and public economics—with a particular emphasis on the development and use of distributional/nonparametric and program evaluation methods to address issues in these areas. His work has been published in journals such as Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Journal of Population Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Econometrics Journal, Economic Development and Cultural Change, Health Economics, and Industrial Relations.

GLO Fellows Chunbei Wang and Le Wang of the University of Oklahoma

 2  Abstract of the Winning Paper

“Despite the historical highs for age at first marriage, little is known about the causal relationship between marriage delay and wages, and more importantly, the mechanisms driving such relationship. We attempt to fill the void. Building on an identification strategy proposed in Dahl (Demography 47:689–718, 2010), we first establish the causal wage effects of marriage delay. We then propose ways to distinguish among competing theories and hypotheses, as well as the channels through which marriage delay affects wages. Specifically, we take advantage of their different implications for causal relationship, across gender and sub-populations. We reach two conclusions. First, we find a positive causal impact of marriage delay on wages, with a larger effect for women. Comparison of IV and OLS estimates suggests that the observed relationship between marriage delay and wages is attributed to both selection in late marriages and true causal effects. Second, we find strong evidence that the positive, causal effects are almost exclusively through increased education for both men and women.”

3  About the Kuznets Prize

The Journal of Population Economics awards the ‘Kuznets Prize’ for the best paper published in the Journal of Population Economics in the previous year. Starting from 2014 the Prize has been awarded annually. Papers are judged by the Editors of the Journal.

Simon Kuznets, a pioneer in population economics, Professor Emeritus at Harvard University and the 1971 Nobel Prize laureate in economics, died on July 10, 1985. Professor Kuznets was born 1901 in Pinsk, Belarus, and came to the United States in 1922. He earned his Bachelor of Science in 1923, a Master of Arts degree in 1924 and his doctorate in 1926, all from Columbia University. During World War II he was Associate Director of the Bureau of Planning and Statistics on the War Production Board, and he served on the staff of the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1927 to 1960. Mr. Kuznets was a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania for 24 years and Professor of Political Economy at Johns Hopkins University from 1954 until he joined Harvard University in 1960. He retired in 1971 and was given the title of George F. Baker Professor Emeritus of Economics. He was a former president of the American Economic Association and the American Statistical Association.

 4  Previous Winners

 The Kuznets Prize has previously been awarded to:

2017: Binnur Balkan (Stockholm School of Economics) and Semih Tumen (Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey) for their article “Immigration and prices: quasi-experimental evidence from Syrian refugees in Turkey,” Journal of Population Economics 29(3): pp. 657-686.

2016: Loren Brandt (University of Toronto), Aloysius Siow (University of Toronto), and Hui Wang (Peking University) for their article “Compensating for unequal parental investments in schooling,” Journal of Population Economics 28: 423-462.

2015: Haoming Liu (National University of Singapore) for his article “The quality–quantity trade-off: evidence from the relaxation of China’s one-child policy”, Journal of Population Economics 27: 565-602.

2014: Paolo Masella (University of Essex) for his article “National Identity and Ethnic Diversity”, Journal of Population Economics 26: 437-454.

Period 2010-2012: Richard W. Evans (Brigham Young University), Yingyao Hu (Johns Hopkins University) and Zhong Zhao (Renmin University) for their article “The fertility effect of catastrophe: US hurricane births”, Journal of Population Economics 23: 1-36.

Period 2007-2009: Makoto Hirazawa (Nagoya University) and Akira Yakita (Nagoya University) for their article ” Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security “, Journal of Population Economics 22: 565-583.

Period 2004-2006: Jinyoung Kim (Korea University) received the Kuznets Prize for his article “Sex selection and fertility in a dynamic model of conception and abortion,” Journal of Population Economics 18: 041-067.

Period 2001–2003: Olympia Bover (Bank of Spain) and Manuel Arellano (CEMFI), for their article “Learning about migration decisions from the migrants: Using complementary datasets to model intra-regional migrations in Spain”, Journal of Population Economics 15:357–380.

Period 1998–2000: David C. Ribar (George Washington University), for his article “The socioeconomic consequences of young women’s childbearing: Reconciling disparate evidence”, Journal of Population Economics 12: 547–565.

Period 1995–1997: James R. Walker (University of Wisconsin-Madison), for his article “The effect of public policies on recent Swedish fertility behavior”, Journal of Population Economics, 8: 223–251.

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The marital satisfaction of differently aged couples: Read a fresh & innovative research paper

How do differently aged couples experience marital satisfaction?  Remarkable findings are derived in the just available and freely accessible lead article in the Journal of Population Economics:

Authors: Wang-Sheng Lee and Terra McKinnish

Deakin University, Australia & University of Colorado, USA, respectively

The marital satisfaction of differently aged couples

Journal of Population Economics (2018), Vol. 31:2, pp 337-362

PDF downloadable for free

GLO Fellow Wang-Sheng Lee is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Deakin University. Wang received his B.A. from Colby, his M.A. from Michigan and his Ph.D. from Melbourne.

GLO Fellow Terra McKinnisch is a Professor in the Department of Economics at University of Colorado Boulder. McKinnisch received her B.A. from University of Richmond, and her MS and her Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University.

The Journal of Population Economics is the leading academic journal in economic demography, the Global Labor Organization (GLO) is one of the organizations supporting the Journal. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal:  “We thank the brilliant authors for an excellent analysis of a very timely question with thought-provoking insights and the article Editor,  Alessandro Cigno, University of Florence, with his anonymous academic referees, for their important work. The study uses the famous and reliable Australian Hilda panel data set administered at The Melbourne Institute, University of Melbourne.”

Here are the core findings:

Both women and men likewise are more satisfied with younger marital partners and less satisfied with older ones. Marital satisfaction for a younger partner which is initially higher than for similar aged couples declines relatively with marital duration and converges within six to ten years of marriage. This is explained by the hypothesis that differently aged couples are less resilient to negative shocks compared to similarly aged couples.

Controversial in the literature – important and open for further debate!

  • The finding that, in the cross-section, both men and women are the most satisfied with younger partners and least satisfied with older partners contradicts much of the existing theoretical and empirical literature on marital sorting and marital age gaps.
  • The results also call into question the preference estimates generated using data from online data and speed-dating events. The fact that both men and women tend to seek dates with similarly aged partners had previously been interpreted as evidence that both men and women prefer similarly aged partner.  Both may actually prefer to seek dates with younger partners but avoid doing so because they know that they would only be successful with low-quality younger partners.

 

GLO Fellow and Editor Cigno (left) and Zimmermann (right)

Access the complete new journal issue:

For the complete new issue of the Journal of Population Economics see the outline and the link to the single articles below:

Journal of Population Economics. Volume 31 Number 2 is now available! Access the articles through the link.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is pleased to present the table of contents alert for a new issue of the Journal of Population Economics. Volume 31 Number 2 is now available online.

Wang-Sheng Lee & Terra McKinnish: The marital satisfaction of differently aged couples

Anne Ardila Brenøe & Ramona Molitor: Birth order and health of newborns

Neeraj Kaushal & Felix M. Muchomba: Missing time with parents: Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson: Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic

Jacobus de Hoop, Patrick Premand, Furio Rosati & Renos Vakis: Women’s economic capacity and children’s human capital accumulation

Gigi Foster & Leslie S. Stratton: Do significant labor market events change who does the chores? Paid work, housework, and power in mixed-gender Australian households

Ildefonso Mendez & Gema Zamarro: The intergenerational transmission of noncognitive skills and their effect on education and employment outcomes

Nora Gordon & Sarah Reber: The effects of school desegregation on mixed-race births

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Thitima Puttitanun: Undocumented youth in limbo: the impact of America’s immigration enforcement policy on juvenile deportations

Louis-Philippe Beland & Bulent Unel: The impact of party affiliation of US governors on immigrants’ labor market outcomes

Journal of Population Economics. Volume 31 Number 2 is now available! Access the articles through the link.

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Nauro Campos (Brunel University London) New Editor of the Research Journal Comparative Economic Studies

Comparative Economic Studies has recently announced the appointment of Professor Nauro Campos (Brunel University London) as the incoming Editor.  Prof. Campos has taken over editorship of the journal from Profs. Paul Wachtel and Josef Brada in January 2018.

Nauro Campos is Professor of Economics at Brunel University London and Research Professor at ETH-Zürich. He is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). His main research interests include political economy and European integration. Congratulations to this appointment!

Prof. Campos has appointed a new Editorial Board for the journal including GLO Fellow François Bourguignon, Paris School of Economics, France, and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University.

New Editorial Board of Comparative Economic Studies

John Bonin, Wesleyan University, USA;  François Bourguignon, Paris School of Economics, France;  Wendy Carlin, University College London, UK;  Fabrizio Coricelli, Paris School of Economics, France;  Paul De Grauwe, London School of Economics, UK; Barry Eichengreen, University of California Berkeley, USA; Saul Estrin, London School of Economics, UK; John Earle, George Mason University, USA; Jeffrey Frankel, Harvard University, USA; Bernard Hoekman, European University Institute, Italy; Beata Javorcik, Oxford University, UK; Scott Gehlbach, University of Wisconsin–Madison, USA; Pauline Grosjean, University of New South Wales, Australia; Iikka Korhonen, Bank of Finland, Finland; Peter Murrell, University of Maryland, USA; Marta Reynal-Querol, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain;  Moritz Schularick, Bonn University, Germany; Enrico Spolaore, Tufts University, USA; Michael Spence, New York University, USA;   Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University & Bonn University, Germany

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Fresh Research on Economic Demography: New Issue of the Journal of Population Economics Available – See Content

Journal of Population Economics. Volume 31 Number 2 is now available! Access the articles through the link.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is pleased to present the table of contents alert for a new issue of the Journal of Population Economics. Volume 31 Number 2 is now available online.

Wang-Sheng Lee & Terra McKinnish: The marital satisfaction of differently aged couples

Anne Ardila Brenøe & Ramona Molitor: Birth order and health of newborns

Neeraj Kaushal & Felix M. Muchomba: Missing time with parents: Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson: Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic

Jacobus de Hoop, Patrick Premand, Furio Rosati & Renos Vakis: Women’s economic capacity and children’s human capital accumulation

Gigi Foster & Leslie S. Stratton: Do significant labor market events change who does the chores? Paid work, housework, and power in mixed-gender Australian households

Ildefonso Mendez & Gema Zamarro: The intergenerational transmission of noncognitive skills and their effect on education and employment outcomes

Nora Gordon & Sarah Reber: The effects of school desegregation on mixed-race births

Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Thitima Puttitanun: Undocumented youth in limbo: the impact of America’s immigration enforcement policy on juvenile deportations

Louis-Philippe Beland & Bulent Unel: The impact of party affiliation of US governors on immigrants’ labor market outcomes

Journal of Population Economics. Volume 31 Number 2 is now available! Access the articles through the link.

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GLO Papers January 2018; GLO has published 175 Discussion Papers Since March 2017

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers: January 2018

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

175 Public Opinion and Immigration: Who Favors Employment Discrimination against Immigrants? – Download PDF
by Cooray, Arusha & Marfouk, Abdeslam & Nazir, Maliha

174 I’m Neither Racist nor Xenophobic, but: Dissecting European Attitudes towards a Ban on Muslims’ Immigration – Download PDF
by Marfouk, Abdeslam

173 The Signal of Applying for a Job Under a Vacancy Referral Scheme – Download PDF
by Van Belle, Eva & Caers, Ralf & De Couck, Marijke & Di Stasio, Valentina & Baert, Stijn

172 Alternatives to Polynomial Trend-Corrected Differences-In-Differences Models – Download PDF
by Vandenberghe, Vincent

171 A fuzzy approach to measuring violence against women and its severity – Download PDF
by Bettio, Francesca & Ticci, Elisa & Betti, Gianni

170 A contribution to the theory of fertility and economic development – Download PDF
by Gori, Luca & Sodini, Mauro

169 Heterogeneous Effects of Credit Constraints on SMEs’ Employment: Evidence from the Great Recession – Download PDF
by Cornille, David & Rycx, François & Tojerow, Ilan

168 What if supply-side policies are not enough? The perverse interaction of exibility and austerity – Download PDF
by Dosi, Giovanni & Pereira, Marcelo C. & Roventini, Andrea & Virgillito, Maria Enrica

167 The Inter-generational Fertility Effect of an Abortion Ban: Understanding the Role of Inherited Wealth and Preferences – Download PDF
by Gutierrezy, Federico H.

166 A Sharing Model of the Household: Explaining the Deaton-Paxson Paradox and Computing Household Indifference Scales – Download PDF
by Gutierrezy, Federico H.

165 If not now, when? The timing of childbirth and labour market outcomes – Download PDF
by Picchio, Matteo & Pigini, Claudia & Staffolani, Stefano & Verashchagina, Alina

164 Financial stress and Indigenous Australians – Download PDF
by Breunig, Robert & Hasan, Syed & Hunter, Boyd

163 Fertility and Population Policy – Download PDF
by Ouedraogo, Abdoulaye & Tosun, Mehmet S. & Yang, Jingjing

162 Returns to Education and Female Work Force Participation Nexus: Evidence from India – Download PDF
by Kanjilal-Bhaduri, Sanghamitra & Pastore, Francesco

Successful GLO team:

GLO Managing Director Matloob Piracha (University of Kent, right) and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University, left).

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REMINDER: Call for Papers on “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market”. Deadline for Research Journal is 31 August 2018

REMINDER: Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market

Submissions will be accepted until August 31, 2018.

Edited by

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA, and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), this project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis.

Despite the enactment, in English speaking countries and the EU, of labor legislation against discrimination in the labor market based on sexual orientation, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) people continue to experience occupational access constraints, lower job satisfaction, wage discrimination (especially gay men), and more bullying and harassment than their heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014; Valfort, 2017).

Studies for the period 1989–2014 suggest that gay men receive lower wages than heterosexual men of comparable education, skills, and experience. For instance, studies find that gay men earn from 4–5% less than heterosexual men in the Netherlands, France, Greece, and the UK and up to 12–16% less in Canada, Sweden, and the US (Drydakis, 2014). Whether wage discrimination against gay men exists in other regions is of great interest and ascertaining this is of importance for policy interventions. In addition, whether wage discrimination lessens over time in response to policy interventions and legislation is hard to determine in the absence of relevant studies. It is not yet clear whether prejudice-based and/or statistical discrimination is the more appropriate framework for the study of labor discrimination against LGBTI people.

The available studies on sexual orientation and job satisfaction highlight that in Australia, Canada, and Greece, both gay men and lesbians experience lower job satisfaction than do their otherwise similar heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014). Because gay and lesbian employees face severe workplace harassment and bullying, these conditions may affect their workplace experience evaluations (Drydakis, 2014). Whether factors other than workplace harassment cause gay and lesbian employees’ dissatisfaction requires examination. Also, for instituting appropriate policy actions, it is important to determine whether these job satisfaction differences suffered by sexual orientation minorities exist in other countries.

In general, the dearth of studies makes it difficult to examine how education, occupation, industrial relations, region, core socio-economic characteristics, personality and mental health traits moderate the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes (Drydakis, 2014). Indeed, although studies suggest that lesbians face prejudice in the labor market, some studies estimate that lesbians earn more than comparable heterosexual women. Lesbians have been found to earn 3% more in the Netherlands, 8% more in the UK, 11% more in Germany, 15% more in Canada, and 20% more in the US. Whether personality characteristics, coping strategies, occupational choices, family structures and/or region positively affect lesbians’ wages is still an open question.

In addition, quantitative research on employment outcomes is scarce for trans people (Drydakis, 2017). A representative study suggests that trans people tend to suffer higher unemployment rates than those reported, in other studies, for the general U.S. population (Leppel, 2016). In addition, the interaction between trans identity, and sexual orientation, and the effects of this on employment outcomes is under-examined (Drydakis, 2017). Whether explicit, legislative employment protection against discrimination on the ground of a trans identity has an effect on employment outcomes has also received little attention (Drydakis, 2017).

Given the aforementioned lack of sufficient literature, the editors welcome empirical papers on labor economics which have a clear and highlighted added value, and solid policy implications, on the following general areas:

  • Testing, in under-examined geographical regions, for wage discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • Empirically testing and disentangling the forms of employment discrimination (i.e. prejudice-based, and/or statistical discrimination) against LGBTI people.
  • Examining the relationship between sexual orientation, personality characteristics, mental health and employment outcomes.
  • Assessing how moderators (i.e. human capital, educational choices, occupations, family structure, industrial relations etc.) affect the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.
  • Testing the relationship between sexual orientation, past/present victimization and labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying the relationship between sexual orientation and job satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the impact of the legal recognition of same-sex couples on labor market outcomes.
  • Evaluating the impact of employment legislation against sexual orientation and trans identity discrimination on labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying employment bias against trans people.
  • Examining the interaction between trans identities, sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.

Submissions will be accepted until the 31th of August 2018. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the forthcoming call on the journal website.

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA and GLO)

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

References:

Drydakis N. (2014). Sexual orientation and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 111. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.111

Drydakis N. (2017). Trans people, well-being, and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 386. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.386

Leppel, K. (2016). The labor force status of transgender men and women. International Journal of Transgenderism,  Vol. 17, No. (3−4), pp. 155−164.

Valfort, M. (2017). LGBTI in OECD countries: A review. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 198, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: 10.1787/d5d49711-en

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Germany, Europe at the Crossroads: German Social Democrats vote for further negotiations about a Grand Coalition

Bonn – Germany. Sunday, 21 January 2018: (An analysis in German.) A narrow majority of 56% of the delegates of the center-left Social Democratic Party (SPD) has agreed to start negotiations about the continuation of the currently ruling “grand coalition” with Merkel’s center-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party. After those negotiations all SPD party members will have to vote on a potential government contract. It therefore will take still substantial time until Germany may return to a stable government. While doing economically very well and being the respected leader of Europe, the continent’s largest economy will  probably be without a formal government for at least half a year since the last elections.

As GLO – President Klaus F. Zimmermann has stated: “Over the last decade, the SPD as a party had failed to identify with the successes of their members in government and to communicate well the value of their achievements to their voters. It remains to be seen how the party leaders will manage this challenge in the future. An unstable and potentially collapsing Europe badly needs a stable Germany.”

GLO President Zimmermann in front of the conference center in Bonn close to river Rhine observing the event.

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REMINDER: Call for Papers on “School to Work Transitions”. Deadline for Research Journal is February 15, 2018

Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower on:

“The School to work transition: Cross-country differences, evolution and reforms“

Edited by Francesco Pastore (University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli” and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO)

PLEASE NOTE: Submissions are invited until February 15, 2018.

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). This project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “School-to-Work Transitions” headed by Francesco Pastore. Interested network members are invited to contribute to both ventures, but the Special Issue is open to submissions from all authors of qualified articles dealing with relevant aspects of the broadly defined topic.

A school-to-work transition (SWT) regime denotes the set of institutions and rules that govern and supervise the passage of young people from school to adulthood. They include the degree of regulation and flexibility of the labour market, but also of the educational and training systems and the provision of employment services (placement and training) to help young people finding a job more easily. The household is also part of the regime, by providing, for instance, financial support during the entire transition and a cushion against the risk of unemployment. The role assigned to each institution within a regime is different from one country to another, so that different SWT regimes can be identified in the world.

A rising interest for the issue of the optimal design and organization of a SWT regime is emerging together with soaring unemployment, especially in Europe and in many developing countries. In some countries, the slowness of the transition is a factor of concern because it persists also during periods of economic boom constraining the ability of the economic system to create all the possible jobs for young people.

A SWT has as its main aim that of filling the gap of work experience of young people with respect to adults. This can be done by resorting to the labor market and by making it more flexible, with the risk that young people fall in the so-called work experience trap (they have education and also general work experience, but firms want job-specific work experience and competences). Alternatively, the education system can give an important contributions by following the dual principle and namely providing at the same time education and training already at school or by developing closer links to the labor market through establishing direct links to the labor market like in the Japanese Jisseki Kankei or by providing efficient and dynamic job placement services and information on vacancies like in Anglo-Saxon systems.

After posing a strong and long-lasting emphasis on labor market flexibility since the mid-1980s, reforms of the SWT regime are focusing on the education system. In Italy, the Buona Scuola reform has changed the mission of an education system which still remains sequential, but providing high secondary school students with compulsory work related learning, based on the Scandinavian model. However, there is still widespread concern that a deeper integration of the education system with the labor market is necessary to increase the chances of young people to find suitable jobs. The European Youth Guarantee is a programme of active labor market policy that the EU Parliament has exported to all of Europe with ups and downs. Recent reforms have regarded also public and private employment services, foreseeing the introduction of a quasi-market organization to make them more efficient.

This special issue aims to inspire the debate on these issues by stimulating the submission of high quality papers on different aspects of the SWT, also not considered in this short abstract. Preference will be given to papers implementing advanced econometric methods and addressing causality issues. We wish for theoretical or empirical papers that include, but are meant not to be restricted in any possible way to such issues as, among others:

  • Cross-country differences in the performance of different SWT regimes;
  • Experience of developing countries;
  • Effectiveness of the German dual system;
  • Effectiveness of the Japanese Jisseki Kankei;
  • Regional differences in the SWT and youth unemployment rate;
  • Impact of the economic and financial crisis on youth labor markets;
  • Definition of new regimes of SWT to accumulate job specific skills;
  • Impact evaluation of recent policy programs for promoting the employment opportunities of young people, such as:
    • recent labor market reforms, e.g. the Jobs Act;
    • apprenticeship legislation;
    • the European Youth Guarantee;
    • the programs of work-related learning;
    • “3+2 reform” of the university system;
    • Implementation of New Public Management principles to universities;
  • Role of public and private employment services;
  • Role of job placement services at high secondary schools and universities;
  • Technical and vocational education and training;
  • Experiences of study and work;
  • Role of the household as a shock absorber and as a disincentive to more active job search.

Submissions will be accepted up until the 15th of February 2018. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the Call on the journal website.

http://www.klausfzimmermann.de/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/20171020_182321-4.jpg

Pastore (left) and Zimmermann discussing the Special Issue project during a joint GLO mission 2017 in Brasov/Romania.

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ASSA Meeting Celebrates Nobel Prize Winners in Economics

The American Economic Association (AEA), in conjunction with 58 associations in related disciplines known as the Allied Social Sciences Associations (ASSA), holds a three-day meeting each January to present papers on general economics topics. The event which is the largest meeting of academic economists in the world typically brings together more than 13,000 individuals from all parts of the world.  ASSA 2018 took place in Philadelphia on January 5 -7.

Many GLO Fellows were at ASSA 2018 to present their work and engage in academic exchange and informal meetings. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht and Bonn University) was also present to discuss and develop GLO issues in many informal meetings and gatherings. One prominent issue of the conference dealt with: Should Economists Make More Use of Direct Data on Subjective Wellbeing?”

The Nobel Laureate Luncheon on Saturday, January 6, was organized in the honor of Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmström. See Bengt Holmström speaking, Oliver Hart right; and from the left: Ben Bernanke, Daron Acemoglu and Olivier Blanchard.

And from the left: GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, Daron Acemoglu, Bengt Holmström, Olivier Blanchard, Luigi Zingales (speaking) and Oliver Hart.

 

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Berlin Conference: EBES-25 is jointly organized with FOM Berlin and the GLO

The 25th Conference of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) will take place on May 23-25, 2018 in Berlin/Germany. It is jointly organized with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and hosted by the FOM University in their Berlin study center. A previous announcement.

Call for Papers

25th EBES Conference – Berlin/Germany

May 23-25, 2018

Jointly organized with the GLO and hosted by the FOM University, Berlin
Submission Deadline: February 28, 2018
www.ebesweb.org

Researchers are cordially invited to submit abstracts or papers for consideration for presentation at the 25th EBES Conference. The event will take place on May 23-25, 2018 at the FOM University of Applied Sciences in Berlin, Germany. It is jointly organized with the GLO (Global Labor Organization) and hosted by the FOM University of Applied Sciences with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association.

The conference aims to bring together many distinguished researchers from all over the world. Participants will find opportunities for presenting new research, exchanging information, and discussing current issues. Although a focus is on Europe and Asia, all papers from major economics, finance, and business fields – theoretical or empirical – are highly welcome.

Keynote Speakers:  Klaus F. Zimmermann and Marco Vivarelli

Board

Prof. Jonathan Batten, Monash University, Australia; Prof. Iftekhar Hasan, Fordham University, U.S.A.; Prof. Peter Rangazas, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, U.S.A.; Prof. Euston Quah, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Prof. John Rust, Georgetown University, U.S.A.; Prof. Marco Vivarelli, Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Italy; Prof. Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, and Bonn University, Germany.

Abstract/Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit abstracts or papers no later than February 28, 2018. For submission, please visit this website: http://www.ebesweb.org/Conferences/25th-EBES-Conference-Berlin/Abstract-Submission.aspx No submission fee is required. General inquiries regarding the Call for Papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org.

Publication Opportunities

Qualified papers are offered to be published in the EBES journals (no submission or publication fees). EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) are published by Springer and indexed in the Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science), EconLit, EBSCO Discovery Service, ProQuest, ABI/INFORM, Business Source,  International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Summon by ProQuest, TOC Premier, Cabell’s Directory, Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, and Google Scholar.

Also all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although the submission of full papers is not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in the USB. After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission or publication fees).

The conference proceedings will also be sent to Thomson Reuters in order to be reviewed for coverage in its Conference Proceedings Citation Index. Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th and 17th EBES Conference Proceedings were all accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index. 16th, 18th and subsequent conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates

Submission deadline: February 28, 2018
Reply-by: March 8, 2018
Registration deadline: April 20, 2018
Announcement of the Program: April 30, 2018

Contact
Ugur Can (
ebes@ebesweb.org)
Dr. Ender Demir (
demir@ebesweb.org)

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GLO at the ASSA Conference in Philadelphia, January 5 – 7, 2018. Meet GLO President Zimmermann.

The American Economic Association (AEA), in conjunction with 58 associations in related disciplines known as the Allied Social Sciences Associations (ASSA), holds a three-day meeting each January to present papers on general economics topics. The event which is the largest meeting of academic economists in the world typically brings together more than 13,000 individuals from all parts of the world.

ASSA 2018 takes place in Philadelphia on January 5 -7.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an international, independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that has no institutional position. The GLO functions as global network and virtual platform for researchers, policy makers, practitioners and the general public interested in scientific research and its policy and societal implications on global labor markets, demographic challenges and human resources.

Many GLO Fellows are at ASSA to present their work and engage in academic exchange and informal meetings. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht and Bonn University) is also present to discuss and develop GLO issues. Those interested to talk can investigate his availability by contacting: klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com

 

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