Category Archives: News

5 February 2019. GLO Discussion Papers January 2019 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month explores the vote on the Swiss minaret initiative in 2009 as a natural experiment to identify the effect of newly revealed reservations towards immigrants on their location choices. The research finds that the probability of  immigrants to relocate to  a municipality that unexpectedly revealed stronger negative attitudes towards them is significantly reduced in the time after the vote. The effect seems to apply to all immigrant groups – Muslim, non-European and European -, and to be stronger for high-skilled immigrants.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: January

305 The Deterrent Effect of an Anti-Minaret Vote on Foreigners’ Location Choices – Download PDF
by Slotwinski, Michaela & Stutzer, Alois

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                      GLO Fellow Michaela Slotwinski

Abstract: In a national ballot in 2009, Swiss citizens surprisingly approved an amendment to the Swiss constitution to ban the further construction of minarets. The ballot outcome manifested reservations and anti-immigrant attitudes in regions of Switzerland which had previously been hidden. We exploit this fact as a natural experiment to identify the causal effect of negative attitudes towards immigrants on foreigners’ location choices and thus indirectly on their utility. Based on a regression discontinuity design with unknown discontinuity points and administrative data on the population of foreigners, we find that the probability of their moving to a municipality which unexpectedly expressed stronger reservations decreases initially by about 40 percent. The effect is accompanied by a drop of housing prices in these municipalities and levels off over a period of about 5 months. Moreover, foreigners in high-skill occupations react relatively more strongly highlighting a tension when countries try to attract well-educated professionals from abroad. 

GLO Discussion Papers of January 2019

308 Technological Unemployment Revisited: Automation in a Search and Matching Framework – Download PDF
by Cords, Dario & Prettner, Klaus

307 Gender, culture and STEM: Counter-intuitive patterns in Arab society– Download PDF
by Friedman-Sokuler, Naomi & Justman, Moshe

306 Time preferences and political regimes: Evidence from reunified Germany– Download PDF
by Friehe, Tim & Pannenberg, Markus

305 The Deterrent Effect of an Anti-Minaret Vote on Foreigners’ Location Choices – Download PDF
by Slotwinski, Michaela & Stutzer, Alois

304 Tropical Storms and Mortality under Climate Change – Download PDF
by Pugatch, Todd

303 The Post-Crisis Phillips Curve: A New Empirical Relationship between Wage and Inflation  – Download PDF
by Voinea, Liviu

302 Marshallian vs Jacobs effects: which one is stronger? Evidence for Russia unemployment dynamics  – Download PDF
by Demidova, Olga & Kolyagina, Alena & Pastore, Francesco

301 The World at the Crossroad. Demographic Polarization and Mass Migration. Global threat or global opportunity  – Download PDF
by Bruni, Michele

300 The Belt and Road Initiative. Demographic trends, labour markets and welfare systems of member countries  – Download PDF
by Bruni, Michele

299  The unprotecting effects of employment protection: the impact of the 2001 labor reform in Peru – Download PDF
by Jaramillo, Miguel

298  Measuring the Statistical Capacity of Nations  – Download PDF
by Cameron, Grant J. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Dinc, Mustafa & Foster, James & Lokshin, Michael M.

297  Inequality and Welfare Dynamics in the Russian Federation during 1994-2015  – Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Lokshin, Michael M. & Abanokova, Kseniya & Bussolo, Maurizio

296  A Beveridge curve decomposition for Austria: what drives the unemployment rate?  – Download PDF
by Christl, Michael

295 Health, Cognition and Work Capacity Beyond the Age of 50   – Download PDF
by Vandenberghe, Vincent

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org

Ends;

Marco Leonardi on the fate of the Italian labor market reforms & his new book

Marco Leonardi, economic advisor to two prime ministers in the Italian government from 2014 to 2018, has just published a new book on his experience in office during the Italian labor market reforms and the threatened future perspectives of those changes:

The hijacked reforms: why there is no coming back from labor and pension reform. Le Riforme Dimezzate, EGEA 2018 (in Italian).

Italy has passed three important reforms in the past four years—of the labor market, of the pension system and the introduction of a universal measure against poverty. All these reforms are already being undone, and yet this book explains, from the perspective of someone who worked within the Prime Minister’s policy unit, why there should not be any coming back from the main changes in the labor market and in the pension system.  

The author – The book – The Interview

The author

Marco Leonardi

Former Economic Adviser to the Prime Minister of the Italian Government and Full Professor of Economics at the University of Milan, Italy. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and spent visiting periods at MIT, Georgetown and Berkeley. His research interests are in labor economics, inequality and education.

The book

To buy the book

“In this book I describe the birth of labor market reform from within the policy unit of the Prime Minister’s Office. In addition, I discuss two other major reforms undertaken in the past four years: the pension reform and the introduction of a universal measure against poverty. I approach these topics from both the political (how and why certain policy decisions were taken) and the technical perspective. I refer to the many (at times difficult) relations between the government and other administrations, as well as the unions, and the lengthy political and administrative process required to enact a law, from the first parliamentary draft up to the implementation of the software to request the new subsidy online (in the case of the new subsidy for the poor). No law produces real effects until the moment it is “online,” and several steps are required to reach that point. Very often the laws are ineffective because their implementation is flawed, and a policy unit’s job is to drive  the laws through their implementation process.

The most important reform has been the labor market reform (called the “Jobs Act”). This reform is recognized internationally because it was adopted amid the international debate on “flexsecurity” and the increasing protection of the open-ended contract (or single contract).

During the 1990s there was considerable continuity in the employment protection legislation of OECD countries, with one major exception: the deregulation of fixed-term contracts and other non-standard labor relationships. Particularly in Southern Europe, changes in labor market policy consisted mainly of measures aimed at introducing “flexibility at the margin,” that is, making the utilization of non-permanent contracts more loosely regulated while leaving the discipline of permanent employment unchanged. Flexibility at the margin, however, amplified the two-tier nature of labor markets, raising concerns over the risk of labor market “dualism” or “segmentation.” Triggered by these concerns, public opinion and policy-makers have repeatedly stressed the importance of searching for “an appropriate balance between flexibility and security” (the so-called “flexsecurity,” as pointed to by the European Commission in multiple documents).

The Jobs Act marks a stark change with respect to the approach to flexibility at the margin by reducing firing costs for permanent employment and by making them both (a) predictable ex ante and (b) increasing according to the worker’s tenure within the firm. By doing so, the Jobs Act aims at reducing dualism in the labor market, fostering human capital accumulation, increasing job mobility to cope with structural adjustment, and favoring workers’ protection “in the market.”

The most controversial aspect of the reform has certainly been the abolition of the possibility of a worker’s reinstatement (“reintegro”) after illegitimate dismissal for economic motives. This provision is limited to contracts signed after the reform (March 7, 2015) and entails a drastic limitation to the possibility of reinstatement, even in case of disciplinary dismissal. This substantial uniformity of firing costs for both disciplinary and economic cases is necessary to curb the incentive to surreptitiously justify dismissals so that they allow for reinstatement, an outcome that would have certainly increased the number of cases litigated in court. For consistency, the ability to reinstate workers has also been excluded for collective dismissals, as they have in essence an economic motivation. The abolition of the possibility of reinstatement has certainly given birth to a clear-cut reform, a fact that has been welcomed by international investors. Besides the new rules on firing costs, generous employment subsidies were introduced to incentivize the use of open-ended contracts.

Another qualifying aspect of the reform scheme is the introduction of a fast track for the settlement of dismissals (“conciliazione rapida”). The aim is to promote consensual resolution of disputed terminations (as well as other possible disputes). Contrary to other proposals for a “single contract” with increasing firing costs, which would have introduced non-appealable compensation, the reform scheme embraces the fast-track settlement model introduced by the German and French employment protection legislations. The latter, though, are different from the solution adopted in the Italian Jobs Act as they don’t bind the court to award compensation according to a predetermined schedule (which in the Jobs Act amounts to two months for each year of contract tenure, up to a maximum of 24 months).

Unfortunately, this feature of the reform was declared illegitimate after three years, in spring 2018, by the Italian Constitutional Court, and therefore today the reforms are “dimezzate” (or “hijacked”: the title of the book refers to the reversal of many reforms under the new government, of which this case is  among the most serious).

The success of the reform is measured by the reduction of court litigation in cases of dismissal (which was reduced by 80%, but unfortunately began to rise again after the decision of the Constitutional Court), and by the shortening of the amount of time young workers spend in temporary contracts (that is, the average length of the initial part of one’s career regulated by fixed-term contracts) and the resulting share of permanent hiring among total hires. The expected substitution of fixed-term contracts unfortunately has not happened: in 2014, roughly 70% of hiring was through fixed-term contracts, and only 17% open-ended; in 2015 and 2016, the share of open-ended contracts increased considerably, but in 2018, when the generous employment subsidies ended, the share of new hiring in open-ended contracts went back to the 2014 levels.

We made a mistake in allowing the coexistence of a very liberal regime for fixed-term contracts and of the new open-ended contract with increasing protection. Employers are reluctant to hire on open-ended contracts, and if left with the easy outlet of fixed-term contracts, they will not change their preferences. Furthermore, after having established a national system of active labor market policies to favor the reallocation of workers (after 20 years of debate, Italy finally has a national agency and a common measure to manage active labor market policies across 20 regions), we were too slow in the implementation process; as a result, public opinion has become aware of the more liberal regime on firings but not the new policy of support through active labor market policies.

While much of the reform process is now in reversal, when these very incisive labor market reforms were introduced they faced no opposition and Italy enjoyed four continuous years of employment growth (which has now been interrupted under the new government).

Further details of the labor market reforms and my suggestions regarding future action can be found in the interview below. Additional information on some of the other reforms, including pensions, wage bargaining and measures against poverty, can be found in the book, only available currently in Italian.”

The interview

GLO: What were the essential elements of the Italian labor market reforms?

Marco Leonardi: The main policy tools of the Jobs Act (and the main reversals under the new government since June 2018) can be summarized as follows:

First, “Contratto a tutele crescenti,” i.e., the open-ended contract for new hires (from March 7, 2015), which eliminates the possibility of a worker’s reinstatement after illegitimate dismissal for economic motives (the so-called “article 18”)  and embeds increasing monetary compensation in the case of separation. In this respect the Jobs Act marks a stark change with respect to the approach of flexibility at the margin (i.e., the tendency to liberalize the use of fixed-term contracts and leave open-ended contracts untouched by reforms) by reducing firing costs for permanent employment and by making them both predictable ex ante and increasing according to the worker’s tenure within the firm (two months for every month of tenure, starting from a minimum of four months and up to a maximum of 24 months). The Jobs Act is an example of “flexsecurity” in practice: it reduces dualism in the labor market and favors workers’ protection “in the market.”

Recently (in June 2018) the Constitutional Court declared illegitimate the rigid link between tenure and months of compensation in case of illegitimate firing, thus restoring the full discretion of judges in determining  the amount of compensation (this will make firing costs uncertain again and the hiring permanent workers less convenient).

Recently (in June 2018) the Constitutional Court declared illegitimate the rigid link between tenure and months of compensation in case of illegitimate firing, thus restoring the full discretion of judges in determining  the amount of compensation (this will make firing costs uncertain again and the hiring permanent workers less convenient).

Second, restrictions on self-employment arrangements (“co.co.co.,” “co.co.pro.,” etc.) used in the past to hire dependent workers while saving on both firing costs and social security contributions. In the three years during which the reforms were applied (2015–2018) we witnessed an increase in dependent employment and a decrease in the number of self-employed workers (from a record share of 25% of total employment): most of them took up a fixed-term contract but some of them transitioned to an open-ended contract, exploiting the very generous tax break for open-ended contracts activated in 2015 and 2016. Under the new government this trend has been reversed by a combination of three factors: the limits set by the new government on fixed-term contracts; the sentence of the Constitutional Court which has rendered dependent permanent employment contracts less convenient; and new tax breaks exclusively for the self-employed, which will soon cause the composition of employment to revert to a large share of self-employed.

Third, the reform of unemployment benefits, which have been extended both in terms of eligibility criteria and maximum coverage length, and the concurrent reduction of the short-time work compensation scheme that subsidizes employers that reduce hours of work during a temporary period of falling demand. The unemployment benefit reform aims to make benefits more generous and long-lasting and to include those with discontinuous or uneven employment histories. The reform of 2015 extended the benefits period to exactly half the number of weeks of contribution, up to 24 months. Employees can activate their individual right to a benefit if they have contributed for at least 13 weeks over the previous four years; this criterion has significantly relaxed the contributions requirement and has increased the number of potential beneficiaries to more than 95% of the employed population. The current government has not touched the benefits reform, but it has gone back to a generous regime of subsidies for firms that reduce hours of work. A generous short-time work scheme with loose rules on contributions risks keeping “zombie” firms alive for too long and keeping workers attached to them with little incentive to search for a new job.

Finally, fourth: Reform of active labor market policies, with the establishment of a national agency to coordinate the work of the regions (which have the competence over active labor market policies) and of a “re-training and placement voucher” (i.e., a voucher for placement services provided by both public and private operators), which introduces a quasi-market approach in active labor market policies. Unfortunately, the reform of active labor market policies never actually took off. The popular referendum, which should have moved the competence from the regions to the central state, failed, and the regions are jealous of their autonomy, with the result that the performance of the services is very patchy across Italy.

GLO: What are your recommendations for effective and successful labor reform policies?

Marco Leonardi:  Use your political capital fast on your priorities, compensate unpopular reforms with popular ones and spend money to make reforms effective.

First, when you win an election, you may want to use your political capital immediately on your priorities before it is depleted. I think that the absence of strikes during the reform of the labor market was due to the “surprise” effect. Unions were prudent and waited to see what a young new leader of the center-left would bring about. If you aim at important issues (such as removing article 18) you may hope the reforms will endure, but you should expect that the next government will at least want to change the names of things in order to get credit for them.

Second, compensate for unpopular reforms with popular ones. We compensated for firing cost reforms with more unemployment benefits and active labor market policies. Unfortunately, we did not do enough on active labor market policies and we got the timing wrong: active labor market policies should have come prior to firing cost reform, because first you offer the carrot and then the stick and because active labor market policies require a long implementation period and the interaction of various actors: public employment services, the regional governments and private employment agencies.

Third, spend money to make reforms effective. We accompanied the abolition of article 18 with two dedicated measures in the 2015 budget law: (a) a three-year tax break for social security contributions, and (b) a corporate tax (IRAP) cut on labor costs applicable only to permanent contracts. This meant creating a cost wedge between permanent and temporary contracts. Conventional wisdom has it that one of the best ways to make the former more appealing is to make it cheaper than the latter. A generous tax break made a difference by incentivizing the use of permanent contracts and encouraged the perception that the reform was working.

GLO: What is your advice for the current phase of anti-reform sentiments?

Marco Leonardi: There could be two reasons why people seem to be adverse to reforms in many countries. The first might be because the reforms did not work or because they did not work for all in the same way. To make reforms work we need to focus on implementation: you may do less, but what you do must affect people’s lives in a simple way. Politicians often forget that somebody must take care of all the details of the implementation. Let’s take the example of a new measure against poverty for which the beneficiaries must fill in a new request module. Somebody must follow all the administrative processes that bring the law into effect, from the first parliamentary draft up to the implementation of the software to request the new subsidy online. No law produces real effects until the moment it is “online,” and there are several steps that must be taken to achieve this, including the involvement of the many administrations that have to do with the measure at various steps. Very often the laws are ineffective because their implementation is flawed, and a policy unit’s job is to watch over the laws until their implementation is complete.

The second issue regards the distribution of benefits. Many reforms are perceived as targeted at a few people rather than at everyone. In our time, when information is available to everybody through many of the same channels (TV and social media), it is important to stress the redistributive characteristics of all policy measures. In our case, the reform of the labor market occurred concurrently with a significant increase in the number of employed people (probably in part due to the reform itself), and yet people perceived the precariousness of the new jobs that had been created rather than their number. We should have highlighted more the redistributive feature of the reform (more people having a chance to find a job) rather than merely the increase in the number of those employed.

GLO: Thank you very much. (Questions by Klaus F. Zimmermann)

Marco Leonardi & Klaus F. Zimmermann

Ends;

The cold Brexit is most likely to come: What does it mean for the rest of Europe? Martin Kahanec and Klaus F. Zimmermann of GLO analyze the situation.

Stability in a dramatic phase of instability: Theresa May remains Prime Minister in a parliamentary vote the day after she has experienced “the largest defeat for a sitting government in history” on her Brexit deal with the EU in the British Parliament on Tuesday night (January 15, 2019). The country is deeply divided, the political system looks like a lame duck. What are the consequences for continental Europe?

Some people argue that the Brexit situation and the uncertainty will also harm the countries on the European continent. But there are also chances to develop Europe better. Martin Kahanec and Klaus F. Zimmermann have written broadly on European integration and the role of migration. Next to many scientific contributions and policy studies, they have also written some books together on the topic. Their views on the situation are below.

A recent survey among 1,693 adults in the UK has investigated the options for the situation after a rejection of May’s Brexit deal. The “no-deal”, cold Brexit is expected by 35%, while a “second referendum” ranks only third with 21% behind 23% for “don’t know”.

Martin Kahanec is a Professor and Head of the School of Public Policy at the Central European University in Budapest. He is Founder and Scientific Director of CELSI, Bratislava, a Chairperson of the Slovak Economic Association and Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

Klaus F. Zimmermann is Professor Emeritus of Bonn University, Honorary Professor of Maastricht University, the Free University of Berlin and Renmin University of China, Beijing. He is Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

The Views

GLO: Are you surprised about the large rejection of the Brexit deal?

Martin Kahanec: The landslide is perhaps a bit surprising, but there are several well-defined groups who had every reason to vote against the Brexit deal. One group are those, mainly from the Labor camp, who oppose May, or saw a “nay” as the only way to have a second referendum, or both. Among those who wish for a second referendum are probably a good number of conservatives, too. The other group is composed of those, primarily conservatives, who consider it a bad deal, not protecting the UK’s interests adequately. And then there is the DUP, who oppose the Northern Ireland backstop. It is hard to imagine a deal that would be accepted by some majority in the House of Commons and by the 27 EU member states as well, and with May investing very little in cross-party consensus building, the “nay” result was to be expected.

Klaus F. Zimmermann: Yes, this is kind of a Kamikaze behavior, untypical for a Parliament at fairly normal times. It has been know that the British MPs are quite critical about the EU, and the UK was never a friend of a political union in Europe. An acceptance of the May deal with the EU would have finalized the move out on March 29, at least on paper. Once out, one could have acted more radical. Now those responsible have to fear that the potentially large damage of a cold Brexit generates a stronger desire for a second referendum.

GLO: What do you expect to happen now, general elections, a new referendum, a cold Brexit, or else?

Martin Kahanec: I have no crystal ball. I hope for a new referendum, resulting in the UK remaining in the EU. With Corbyn as a staunch Brexiter at the helm of Labor, one important question is what is needed for him to reflect on the preferences of the majority of his party’s constituency, and turn Labor determinedly in favor of Remain. Whereas postponing Brexit by several months can give some time for what I see as forces of reason to take their effects, I am also afraid that a prolonged agony may further deepen the cleavages and sharpen the tensions in the British society, furthering its polarization, and leaving little space for consensus building. But a cross-party consensus, and strong leadership of the Speaker of the House, are very much needed to avoid a crash-Brexit and explore the options for a new deal or a second, possibly binding referendum.

Klaus F. Zimmermann: Now Theresa May wants to speak with all sides among the MPs. This seems a bit too late. Everybody in the Parliament fears general elections, not even the labor party can be sure to win in such a divided situation. The country is split in two nearly equal blocks with opposite positions. It is not even obvious that a second referendum will bring a strong majority for one side. Hence, my best guess is that the outcome is a cold Brexit. However, I think that this would be really a big problem. With such an important decision with very long-term consequences for the well – being of the people it is not a shame to think twice and to correct a mistake.

GLO: What are the consequences for Europe?

Martin Kahanec: On the one hand, the rejection of the deal is a lifeline for Remain hopes. On the other hand, the ultimate outcome is as unclear as ever. This uncertainty is very unhelpful for the European economy. If the UK leaves the EU, the economic consequences for the EU (and even more so for the UK) will be very much on the negative side. In particular, it will be a major challenge for the eastern member states of the EU. Hundreds of thousands of eastern Europeans work in the UK. Some of them will consider returning to their home countries. As they are primarily young, and have acquired many hard and soft skills in the UK, their return would help the labor markets and public budgets back home. However, they would likely be less productive in their home countries than in the UK, and so their incomes would go down. This and the reduced interstate mobility would also decrease productivity in Europe and hurt its capacity to absorb economic shocks. An abrupt return of large numbers of workers to the sending countries could exceed the capacity of their labor markets, social security and health care systems, and social services to absorb them, creating temporary congestion and resulting in tensions between returnees and their compatriots. The UK will also be hurt: it will lose many thousands of skilled, hard working men and women and talented students from eastern Europe. The UK is also a major trading partner and source of investment for the eastern member states. Brexit would significantly reduce the gains from that trade and investment for both parties.

Klaus F. Zimmermann: Never waste a crisis! Europe has better things to do, but forced to adjust there are two potentials: First, in the likely case of a cold Brexit, the damage for the UK will be substantial, and also the remaining EU will suffer. At least Scotland will try to leave the UK and seek to join the EU. This will signal to the 27 member states that it does not pay to leave. Further, it increases the incentives to develop the EU stronger and faster, in particular since the UK was always hesitant about a stronger political and economic integration and can no longer object. Second, if a cold Brexit does not happen because the British MPs fear the consequences, another referendum is likely. It can lead to a “Remain” and start a cultural change in the UK, where the British people better understand the benefits of the larger European Union. The EU could then be more dynamic than it otherwise would have been.

A recent survey among 1,693 adults in the UK has investigated the options for the situation after a rejection of May’s Brexit deal. The “no-deal”, cold Brexit is expected by 35%, while a “second referendum” ranks only third with 21% behind 23% for “don’t know”.

Reference Link.

Ends;

Announcement: 28th EBES Conference in Coventry (UK) in May 29-31, 2019

28th EBES Conference. May 29-31, 2019 in Coventry, United Kingdom
Hosted by the Centre for Financial and Corporate Integrity (CFCI), Coventry University

Interested researchers are cordially invited to submit abstracts or papers for presentation consideration at the 28th EBES Conference in Coventry. It will take place on May 29th, 30th, and 31st, 2019 at Coventry University in Coventry, United Kingdom. The conference will be organized with the support of the Istanbul Economic Research Association and will be hosted by the Centre for Financial and Corporate Integrity (CFCI) in collaboration with the Coventry Business School Trading Floor.

To support the event, the Global Labor Organization (GLO) will organize three invited paper sessions. If you are a GLO Fellow or Affiliate and interested to be be included, please submit the title of a potential contribution to office@glabor.org until February 20, 2019.

Invited Speakers are David B. Audretsch, Marco Vivarelli and  Klaus F. Zimmermann.

David B. Audretsch is a Distinguished Professor at Indiana University, where he also serves as Director of the Institute for Development Strategies. He is an Honorary Professor of Industrial Economics and Entrepreneurship at the WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany and a Research Fellow of the CEPR in London. He has also worked as a consultant to the UN, World Bank, OECD, EU Commission, and U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Prof. Audretsch’s research has focused on the links between entrepreneurship, government policy, innovation, economic development, and global competitiveness. He is co-author of The Seven Secrets of Germany (Oxford University Press) along with several other books. He is co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal and many other journals. He was awarded the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research by the Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum (Entreprenörskapsforum). He has received honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Augsburg in Germany and Jonköping University in Sweden. Prof. Audretsch was also awarded the Schumpeter Prize from the University of Wuppertal in Germany. He has served as an advisory board member to a number of international research and policy institutes, including Chair of the Deutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Berlin(German Institute for Economic Analysis Berlin), Chair of the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft (Foundation for the Promotion of German Science) in Berlin, Germany, and the Center for European Economic Research (Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung) in Mannheim, Germany etc. He has authored numerous papers which were published in prestigious journals such as American Economic Review, European Economic Review, Review of Economics and Statistics, and Journal of Management and his researches have been cited more than 77,000 (Google Scholar). He holds a PhD in economics from University of Wisconsin, Madison in U.S.A.

Marco Vivarelli, Ph.D. in Economics and Ph.D. in Science and Technology Policy, is full professor at the Catholic University of Milano, where he is also Director of the Institute of Economic Policy. He is Professorial Fellow at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht; Research Fellow at IZA, Bonn; Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). He is member of the Scientific Executive Board of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES, Istanbul); member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO, Vienna) and has been scientific consultant for the International Labour Office (ILO), World Bank (WB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the European Commission. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Business Review, Editor of Small Business Economics, Associate Editor of Industrial and Corporate Change, Associate Editor of Economics E-Journal, member of the Editorial Board of Sustainability and he has served as referee for more than 70 international journals. He is author/editor of various books and his papers have been published in journals such as Cambridge Journal of Economics,  Canadian Journal of Economics, Economics Letters, Industrial and Corporate Change, International Journal of Industrial Organization,  Journal of Economics, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Journal of Productivity Analysis, Labour Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Regional Studies, Research Policy, Small Business Economics, Southern Economic Journal, World Bank Research Observer, World Development. His current research interests include the relationship between innovation, employment and skills; the labor market and income distribution impacts of globalization; the entry and post-entry performance of newborn firms.

Abstract/Paper Submission: Authors are invited to submit their abstracts or papers no later than February 28, 2018. For submission, please visit the EBES website at https://www.ebesweb.org/Conferences/28th-EBES-Conference-Coventry/Abstract-Submission.aspx. No submission fee is required. General inquiries regarding the call for papers should be directed to ebes@ebesweb.org.

Publication Opportunities: Qualified papers can be published (after refereeing) in the EBES journals (no submission and publication fees). EBES journals (Eurasian Business Review and Eurasian Economic Review) are published by Springer Nature and indexed by SCOPUS, EBSCO EconLit with Full Text, Google Scholar, ABI/INFORM, ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide, CNKI, EBSCO Business Source, EBSCO Discovery Service, EBSCO TOC Premier, Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate Analytics), International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), OCLC, ProQuest Business Premium Collection, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Turkey Database, Research Papers in Economics (RePEc), Summon by ProQuest, Cabell’s Directory, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory.

Furthermore, qualified papers after review will be recommended to be considered for publication in regular issues of the Journal of Corporate Finance after a review process. However, presentation at the EBES Conference does not guarantee publication in the Journal of Corporate Finance.

Also all accepted abstracts will be published electronically in the Conference Program and the Abstract Book (with an ISBN number). It will be distributed to all conference participants at the conference via USB. Although submitting full papers are not required, all the submitted full papers will also be included in the conference proceedings in the USB. After the conference, participants will also have the opportunity to send their paper to be published in the Springer’s series Eurasian Studies in Business and Economics (no submission and publication fees).

This will also be sent to Clarivate Analytics in order to be reviewed for coverage in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). Please note that the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th and 19th EBES Conference Proceedings were accepted for inclusion in the Conference Proceedings Citation Index – Social Science & Humanities (CPCI-SSH). 18th, 20th and subsequent conference proceedings are in progress.

Important Dates
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 28, 2019
Decision Communicated by: March 8, 2019*
Registration Deadline: April 19, 2019
Announcement of the Program: April 30, 2019
Paper Submission Deadline (Optional): April 19, 2019**
Paper Submission for the EBES journals: July 31, 2019
* The decision regarding the acceptance/rejection of each abstract/paper will be communicated with the corresponding author within a week of submission.
** Full paper submission is optional. If you want to be considered for the Best Paper Award or your full paper to be included in the conference proceedings in the USB, after submitting your abstract before February 28, 2018, you must also submit your completed (full) paper by April 19, 2019.

Contact: Ugur Can (ebes@ebesweb.org); Dr. Ender Demir (demir@ebesweb.org)

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Inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Call for papers for a conference in Brasov/Romania

The Faculty of Economic Sciences and Business Administration within Transilvania University of Brasov, in collaboration with the Institute for Economic Forecasting of the Romanian Academy cordially invites you to submit research papers for presentation and discussions at the third edition of the International Conference „Inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Challenges, measures and solutions” (ISEG 2019). The 2019 event is supported by the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

The conference will be hosted by Transilvania University of Brasov and will be held 31 May-1 June 2019 in the Transilvania University Hall, Street Iuliu Maniu no. 47A, Brasov.

The keynote speakers of the 2019 ISEG conference are:

Klaus F. Zimmermann, President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO); Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University; Honorary Professor, Maastricht University, Free University of Berlin and Renmin University of China, Beijing.

Filomena Maggino, Full Professor at Sapienza University of Rome; Editor-in-Chief of Social Indicators Research (Springer); Counsellor – Prime Minister Office – Italian Government (Conte’s cabinet); Editor-in-Chief of Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-being Research; Past-President of the International Society for Quality Of Life Studies; President of the Italian Association for Quality of Life Studies.

The meeting will be an excellent opportunity for academics, researchers and doctoral students to present new research results and to discuss challenging issues on the topics of conference. The aim of this new series of conferences is to gather research interests and to stimulate collaborative research around actual macro- and microeconomic topics (as suggested below).

Topics:

We are inviting submissions of both empirical and theoretical work that fits into the conference topics. Being a multi- and interdisciplinary conference, we encourage submission of papers in the following broad research areas: economics, finance, marketing and management. Examples of suitable topics:

  • Economic growth and convergence perspectives in the European Union: Measurement methods and new empirical evidence
  • Public and Private Finance Sustainability in the Context of Current Economic Challenges
  • Issues and challenges in the Romanian higher education
  • Challenges and prospects of economic growth in South Eastern Europe
  • New inequalities, multidimensionality and growth pro-poorness
  • Business for sustainable development
  • New approaches in marketing and management

Submission

Deadline for abstract submission is 1st of March, 2019, and for full paper submission is May 15th, 2019. Authors of accepted abstracts will be informed by the 1st of April, 2019.

Please submit your abstracts and full papers through the conference website!

Publication opportunities

All papers must be written and presented in English. A blind review process apply to all submissions. During the conference, one discussant will be assigned to each paper.

Accepted papers will be included in the conference proceedings volume, which will be sent for being indexed by ISI Proceedings volume (CPCI – Conference Proceedings Citation Index) under Clarivate Analytics (or former Thomson Reuters).

Selected papers from the conference may be subsequently published in one of the following journals, subject to the agreement and decision of editors:

Romanian Journal of Economic Forecasting

Journal of Smart Economic Growth

Bulletin of the Transilvania University of Brasov

Registration

The conference fee is 100 euro for each paper. The conference fee must be paid until the 26th of April by bank transfer, according to the indications which will be posted on the conference website. The fee covers the book of abstracts, the attendance certificate, as well as the access to all conference sessions, coffee breaks, lunch and festive dinner.

Best paper award

The “Best Paper Award” is granted to the best paper in the conference. Junior researchers are particularly encouraged to submit papers.

Updated information about the conference program, the organizing and scientific committees, and other related information will be posted on the conference website: http://unitbv.ro/iseg/

For any information related to the conference, please contact us: monica.szeles@unitbv.ro

The Eurasian Economic Review (EAER) seeks to attract high quality research papers in macro labor and on the interrelationships between financial and labor markets

As of January 2019, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER) has a new Editor-in-Chief, Dorothea Schäfer. EAER is one of the flagship journals of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES), which partners with the Global Labor Organization (GLO). Under the leadership of Schäfer, the EAER, while focusing on macro analysis and financial markets, also seeks to attract high quality research papers in macro labor and on the interrelationships between financial and labor markets. Klaus F. Zimmermann (GLO) spoke with Schäfer about her plans.

GLO: In your new role as Editor-in-Chief, where do you see the focus of the EAER under your leadership?

Dorothea Schäfer: The focus of EAER will be on financial markets and applied macro research. The journal has a broad scope in both focus areas. Finance topics may address such issues as financial systems and regulation, corporate and start-up finance, macro and sustainable finance, finance and innovations, consumer finance, public policies within local, regional, national and international contexts towards financial markets, money and banking and the interface of labor and financial economics. Macro economic research includes topics from monetary economics, labor economics, international economics and development economics, preferably but not exclusively, with a link to finance. Typically, the articles published in EAER highlight the economic, political and societal relevance of research results.

GLO: The challenges for the well-being of the world are not smaller today, than after the Great Recession. What can a journal like the EAER contribute to deal with those challenges?

Dorothea Schäfer: Asian countries were exposed to a deep financial crisis 10 years before the Lehman insolvency and had a long way to go before they recovered. Severe deficiencies in financial markets and financial regulations triggered the Lehman failure and the subsequent Great Recession.  Many countries have still not fully recovered and new macro risks from trade wars, Brexit and a general loss of trust have evolved. Financial markets are part of those problems, but will also be part of the solutions. Therefore, understanding financial markets is of ever increasing importance for the well-being of the world. The EAER aims to support building the crucial knowledge by publishing rigorous, high-quality research.

GLO: What kind of papers do you wish to attract for EAER from researcher dealing with human resources issues?

Dorothea Schäfer: Papers dealing with the interaction between labor and financial markets are particularly welcome. But since the Journal has a macro focus in addition to finance articles on labor market issues in general are of interest for the journal.

Short Bio

Dorothea Schäfer, Dr. in Economics and habilitation in Business Economics, Research Director Financial Markets at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Adjunct Professor of Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University (Sweden); Research Fellow of the Center for Relationship Banking and Economics CERBE, Roma, Italy. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Economics Review and a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

Dorothea Schäfer

Head of various research projects, inter alia, funded by the Leibniz Research Alliance Crises in a Globalised World, the Research Foundation of the German Savings banks, German Science Foundation, the EU Commission, the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung and the Stiftung Geld und Währung; Evaluator/reviewer of research programs/proposals for the German Science Foundation (DFG), EU Commission (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships), the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the LOEWE (Initiative for the Development of Scientific and Economic Excellence, State of Hesse).

She has published in Finance Research Letters, European Journal of Finance, Small Business Economics, Journal of Financial Stability, International Journal of Money and Finance, German Economic Review, Economics of Transition, the Journal of Comparative Economics, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics and many other journals. Schäfer gave expert testimonies for the Commission to Review the Financing for the phase-out of nuclear energy in 2015, for the Finance Committee of the German Parliament (Deutsche Bundestag) (2010, 2011, 2012, 2018) and for the Committee on Social Affairs, Health and Sustainable Development, Parliamentary Assembly, The Council of Europe (2012). In 2012, she was also advisor to the Sub-Committee “Policy for a Sustainable Political and Economic Governance” (Nachhaltige Ordnungspolitik) of the Enquete Committee of the German Parliament, “Growth – Prosperity – Quality of Life” (Wachstum Wohlstand Lebensqualität).

In 2001 Schäfer and her co-author Franz Hubert received the Best Paper Award of the German Finance Association and 2002 the Best Paper Award of DIW Berlin. Main research interests are: financial and banking markets, systems and regulation, financial crisis, financial constraints, start-up finance and innovation, finance and labor, sovereign debt and Euro Area, gender and financial markets, household finance, green finance, crowd financing.  Schäfer ranks in the European Union among the top 6% of researcher according to the RePEc ranking analysis in January 2019.

Immigration restrictions lead to cultural separation across generations!

Issue 2019/1 of the Journal of Population Economics is published: Please see for the Table of Content: Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2019

The article in the new issue

Immigration restrictions and second-generation cultural assimilation: theory and quasi-experimental evidence

By Fausto Galli, Giuseppe Russo; pp. 23-51

Abstract

“We study the effects of immigration restrictions on the cultural assimilation of second-generation migrants. In our theoretical model, when mobility is free, individuals with a stronger taste for their native culture migrate temporarily. When immigration is restricted, however, these individuals are incentivized to relocate permanently. Permanent emigrants procreate in the destination country and convey their cultural traits to the second generation, who will therefore find assimilation harder. We test this prediction by using the 1973 immigration ban in Germany (Anwerbestopp) as a quasi-experiment. Since the ban only concerned immigrants from countries outside the European Economic Community, they act as a treatment group. According to our estimates, the Anwerbestopp has reduced the cultural assimilation of the second generation. This result demonstrated robustness to several checks. We conclude that restrictive immigration policies may have the unintended consequence of delaying the intergenerational process of cultural assimilation. “

Read further open access for a short period:

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Kuznets Prize Winner 2019.
The paper is freely downloadable for a short period. The Award Study shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children, a finding which has important policy implications.

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Migration fosters economic adjustment after shocks. European flexibility has increased.

Issue 2019/1 of the Journal of Population Economics is published: Please see for the Table of Content: Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2019

The Lead Article is about:
Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006–2016

Authors: Julia Jauer, Thomas Liebig, John P. Martin, Patrick A. Puhani

Abstract

” We estimate whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labour market by comparing pre- and post-crisis migration movements at the regional level in both Europe and the United States, and their association with asymmetric labour market shocks. Based on fixed-effects regressions using regional panel data, we find that Europe’s migratory response to unemployment shocks was almost identical to that recorded in the United States after the crisis. Our estimates suggest that, if all measured population changes in Europe were due to migration for employment purposes—i.e. an upper-bound estimate—up to about a quarter of the asymmetric labour market shock would be absorbed by migration within a year. However, in Europe and especially in the Eurozone, the reaction to a very large extent stems from migration of recent EU accession country citizens as well as of third-country nationals.”

Read also open access for a short period:

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Kuznets Prize Winner 2019.
The paper is freely downloadable for a short period. The Award Study shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children, a finding which has important policy implications.

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New GLO Research Cluster & Further Country Lead

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) announces a new Research Cluster on Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior and a new Country Lead for Switzerland.

The GLO Research Cluster Lead for Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior is  Kompal Sinha. She is a Senior Lecturer and HDR Director at the Department of Economics of Macquarie University, Australia. Sinha is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics. Her research deals with economic effects of consumer behavior, particularly in the area of health economics and development economics and the impacts on the design of economic policy.

Rainer Winkelmann is the GLO Country Lead Switzerland. He is a Professor of Economics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. He is a prominent researcher in the areas of count data econometrics and the economics of wellbeing. His research paper “Why Are the Unemployed So Unhappy?” (with Liliana Winkelmann) has received nearly 1,900 Google cites; his textbook Econometric analysis of count data many more than 1,500 Google cites. He also joins the Editorial Board of the Journal of Population Economics as an Associate Editor.

Ends;

Editorial Staff News for the Journal of Population Economics: Shuaizhang Feng, Kompal Sinha & Madeline Zavodny join the team. Issue 1/2019 out.

There are some changes in the editorial staff of the Journal of Population Economics. As of January 2019, Madeline Zavodny moved from the position of Associate Editor to Managing Editor joining Michaella Vanore in this role. Last summer, Oded Galor had changed roles from Associate Editor to Editor. The two free positions of Associate Editors are now filled by Shuaizhang Feng of Jinan University and Kompal Sinha of Macquarie University. All those are also GLO Fellows.

Madeline Zavodny is a Professor of Economics at the University of North Florida. Her research concentrates on economic issues related to immigration and the economic and demographic effects of immigration policies. She is a member of the editorial board of the International Migration Review and has served as co-editor of the Southern Economic Journal and a board member of the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in economics from Claremont McKenna College. She has frequently published in journals like the American Economic Review, Demography, Journal of Labor Economics, Health Economics, Journal of Health Economics, International Migration Review, Journal of Population Economics and Journal of Development Economics. See her personal website for further information.

Shuaizhang Feng is a Professor of Economics, and the Dean of the Institute of Economic and Social Research at the Jinan University. He received a Ph.D. in Economics from Cornell University. Before, he was a Professor at the School of Economics, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. His research interest is focused on labor economics and the Chinese economy, including issues relating to human capital, income inequality, migration and the labor market. He has frequently published in journals like the American Economic Review, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Review of Economics and Statistics, and Journal of Population Economics

Kompal Sinha is a Senior Lecturer and HDR Director at the Department of Economics of Macquarie University. She has worked before at the Center for Health Economics, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics and Department of Economics at Monash University. She has received her Ph.D. from the Australian National University. Her research deals with economic effects of consumer behavior, particularly in the area of health economics and development economics and the impacts on the design of economic policy. She has frequently published in journals like Health Economics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, American Journal for Agricultural Economics, Social Science and Medicine, Macroeconomic Dynamics, Review of Income and Wealth and Journal of Biosocial Sciences.

2019 Journal Issues

Issue 2019/1: Is already out! Please see Table of Content: Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2019

The Lead Article is about:
Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006–2016

Issue 2019/2: Will be out in a few weeks. See forthcoming announcements.

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Kuznets Prize of the Journal of Population Economics given at the #ASSA2019 Reception of IESR in Atlanta.

The awarded study receiving the Kuznets Prize shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children. This has important policy implications.

The Kuznets Prize Paper of the Journal of Population Economics in a particular year is selected by the Editors of the Journal among the papers published in the previous year. Then the winners will be presented in a prize ceremony. This time, the winners remained confidential until January 4, 2019. The prize committee for the 2019 award consisted out of Alessandro Cigno, Erdal Tekin, Junsen Zhang and Klaus F. Zimmermann selecting from the 2018 published articles they were in charge of as acting Editors.

Dean Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University, had invited the members of the Global Labor Organizations (GLO) and the Kuznets Prize Ceremony of the Journal of Population Economics as other ASSA 2019 participants to join the reception of the Institute. IESR and GLO are collaborating organizations, and Shuaizhang Feng is a GLO Fellow and Associate Editor of the Journal.

GLO President Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University) and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal had visited Jinan University and IESR in March 2018 for a longer period and a GLO-IESR workshop. He had also presented the Journal in 2018 to various academic events in Beijing, Xiamen and Hongkong to strengthen the already strong contacts to the Chinese research community. A larger number of economists participated, including many Editorial Board Members of the Journal of Population Economics and Kuznets Prize winners of previous years.

Shuaizhang Feng reported about the activities of IESR and the hiring interviews at the ASSA job market and explained the attractive research climate at the Institute. He also warmly welcomed the affiliates of GLO and the Journal of Population Economics. Klaus F. Zimmermann congratulated Feng for the successful development of IESR and the strong research climate and the attractive working conditions he had observed while visiting the Institute in 2018 and met with the very many strong and ambitious researchers.

Zimmermann also welcomed the 2018 Kuznets Prize Winner, Le Wang (University of Oklahoma), who received the award together with Chunbei Wang (University of Oklahoma) for their article:

Knot yet: Minimum marriage age law, marriage delay, and earnings, Journal of Population Economics (2017), 30(3), pp. 771-804.

Both authors had studied and graduated at Jinan University before they came to the United States. Le Wang expressed his gratitude for receiving the Kuznets Prize and explained how it created visibility for his work.

Then the 2019 Kuznets Prize paper was announced. Studying the HIV/AIDS pandemic using national household survey data from 14 sub-Saharan African countries, it suggests that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children. This has important policy implications.

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Abstract: A fundamental question about human behavior is whether fertility responds to disease risk. The standard economic theory of household fertility decision-making generates ambiguous predictions, and the response has large implications for human welfare. We examine the fertility response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic using national household survey data from 14 sub-Saharan African countries. Instrumental variable (IV) estimates using distance to the origin of the pandemic suggest that HIV/AIDS has increased the total fertility rate (TFR) and the number of surviving children. These results rekindle the debate about the fertility response to disease risk, particularly the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and highlight the question of whether the HIV/AIDS pandemic has reduced GDP per capita.

Yoo-Mi Chin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Baylor University with a Ph.D. from Brown University. She is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). Most of her research focuses on the analysis of domestic violence. She has published her previous work in the Journal of Applied Statistics, the Journal of Health Economics, and World Development, among other outlets. Prior to joining Baylor University, she was an Assistant Professor at the Missouri University of Science & Technology.

Nicholas Wilson is a Fellow with the Office of Evaluation Sciences, an Associate Professor of Economics at Reed College and the Chair of the Department of Economics. He is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). His research focuses on fundamental puzzles about human behavior in the context of health, development, and behavioral economics. Prior to joining Reed College, he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley and an Assistant Professor of Economics at Williams College. He has published a larger number of papers in journals including the American Economic Review, Demography, Economics & Human Biology, Journal of Development Economics and Journal of Health Economics.

Yoo-Mi Chin was present at the ceremony and happily took the prize. The large crowd of participants congratulated the prize winners and networked intensively within the remaining reception time.

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson

Yoo-Mi Chin & Klaus F. Zimmermann
Klaus F. Zimmermann & Shuaizhang Feng

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GLO President Zimmermann is also EBES President

As of 1 January 2019, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann also serves as the President of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES). EBES is a non-partisan, scholarly association dedicated to the discussion and publication of business and economics research and aims to advance the economic and business knowledge and the profession. EBES encourages plurality, freedom of expression and multidisciplinary. While the focus of EBES is the Eurasia region, the membership covers all parts of the world. MORE DETAILS.

Zimmermann had received the EBES Fellow Award 2018, was already a member of the Executive Board of EBES and a member of the Editorial Board of one of the EBES Journals, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER, since 2017). In May 2018, EBES and GLO organized a very successful conference together in Berlin. In the summer, both organizations had signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) about establishing a long-term collaboration on educational and research activities. GLO will support paper sessions in the three conferences, EBES is organizing per year. This year, the events will be in Bali, Coventry and Lisbon.

EBES publishes two research journals, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER) and the Eurasian Business Review (EABR). The EABR with GLO Fellow Marco Vivarelli as the Editor-in-Chief just got accepted for inclusion in the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) starting with volume 6, issue 1 in 2016. The editorial team of EAER works with a similar ambition, since January 2019 under the leadership of Dorothea Schäfer as the Editor-in-Chief.

EBES and GLO will both greatly benefit from the collaboration”, argues Zimmermann. “The motives of the two organizations are truly global and with a similar academic spirit, while their various strengths are complementary. I congratulate Vivarelli and his team to the great success and EBES for getting Schäfer for the new role with EAER.”

Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin is the long-term driving force of EBES and one of its Vice-Presidents, Marco Vivarelli the Editor-in-Chief of EABR. Bilgin and Vivarelli are also GLO Fellows; Bilgin is further the GLO Country Lead Turkey and Vivarelli the GLO Cluster Lead ‘Technological Change and the Labor Market’.

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Centre for Workforce Futures, Macquarie University, has joined GLO Network


The Centre for Workforce Futures at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, has joined the network of institutions of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) following intensified research collaborations. Prestigious ARC Discovery Research Grant of the Australian Research Council (ARC) won.

The Centre for Workforce Futures is a collaborative hub connecting researchers from a wide range of disciplines and universities with government, industry, not-for-profit organizations and the broader community to undertake problem-focused research and thought leadership that addresses current and future economic and social challenges relating to work, working people, work organization and employment. Directors are Lucy Taksa and Daryll Hull of Macquarie University.

In November 2017, Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT & President of the Global Labor Organization, GLO) had been a Visiting Professor at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and he has recently affiliated with Macquarie University further by accepting to join the Centre for Workforce Futures as an Associate Member. The Co-Director of the Centre, Lucy Taksa is also a Professor of Management and Associate Dean for Research of the Faculty of Business & Economics at Macquarie University, and a GLO Fellow.

A team of GLO Fellows affiliated with the Centre for Workforce Futures consisting of Chief Investigators Fei Guo, Lucy Taksa, Zhiming Cheng, Massimiliano Tani and Partner Investigators Lihua Liu (University of Southern California) and Klaus F. Zimmermann have recently won a very prestigious ARC Discovery Research Grant of the Australian Research Council (ARC) on “Demographic and Social Dimensions of Migrant Ageing and Wellbeing in Australia”.

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GLO Fellow Alfredo Toro Hardy Explains ‘The Crossroads of Globalization’ from a Latin American Perspective.

In his new book just published in December 2018, Alfredo Toro Hardy, Venezuelan Scholar and Diplomat as well as a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), explains his views about the perspectives of Latin America at the crossroads of globalization. Currently, globalization seems to be in decline all over the globe. However, if the future would see a revival, it seems plausible that Latin America should continue its current pace of following it. However, if globalization would continue to decline, the region would need to find other options. The book evaluates the risks and outlines the options. MORE DETAILS.

Ambassador Alfredo Toro Hardy
Venezuelan Scholar and GLO Fellow

The Preface to the book has been provided by Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is the President of the GLO. He writes in the book:

“As so often in the history of mankind, the fate of globalization is currently at stake. It looks that, again, the world is at a crossroad between development or contraction. The economic and political polarizations within or between countries, the rise of populism and in the number of instable democracies, the tensions resulting from migration, inequality, robotization and the demands of emerging economies like China, India and (perhaps) Brazil require attention. Protectionism, EU-skepticism, nationalism, racism, and rejections of economic multilateralism and multicultural approaches are more and more important again. Only few critical observers of the world are not concerned about the current strength and the unclear directions of the driving forces behind which are only slowly understood.

            Globalization is much more than the persistent global integration of the flow of goods, capital and labor. It also merges cultures and enforces permanent and immediate exchange of knowledge and sentiments. Latin America was once forced into globalization and moved in unprepared, stumbling. It survived by adapting. It is an export-based economy. Moving out is likely to be very costly in economic terms. Is this unavoidable or are there alternatives?

            Globalization, as is widely perceived, mainly benefits liberal democracies. But is this really true? The Chinese pro-globalization strategy certainly questions this position. And if globalization collapses in parts of the world, does it make sense to follow like lemmings. Or is it not better to go on as much as possible, making use of the potentials of globalization? In other words, if the United Kingdom wants Brexit, why should the remaining European Union give up its ambitions?

            Globalization will not end, since economic advantages and constraints will enforce its rise, as it materialized over the entire history of mankind. The rise of homo sapiens over thousands of years has taken place due to a superior brain, excellent language abilities and a tremendous talent to collaborate. But, of course, mistakes of humans as of political and social organizations can cause a break of further globalization for some time. In many ways, the current world is not much more open than it was before World War I. In any case: Those nations and continents ignoring historical lessons will eventually fall behind.

            Alfredo Toro Hardy offers us some advanced training. The author of this book deserves significant attention: After a long and successful career as top diplomat, ambassador and global scholar, he is exploiting his deep knowledge and experience acquired over a worklife to tackle some of the most pressing issues of our time.

            I have had the privilege to learn him and his lovely wife during a joint tenure as a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Resident Scholar in 2017. During this period, we have had many inspiring and fruitful exchanges about the future of our worlds and the challenges of life. I have always been impressed by his deep insights in complex issues and his balanced views on controversial or even explosive topics.

            In his unique way, Alfredo Toro Hardy, develops the perspectives of his continent in this world at the crossroads as the Voice of Latin America. Chapter by chapter, he sharpens our views for the challenges to come and the strengths, Latin America is able to mobilize. What is the right path for the continent? As the author states (p. 388): “Fast moving nations, indeed, appeared to be the better prepared to take advantage from a rapidly moving global market-place.” It is ‘flexibility, stupid’, making the difference. Investing in the technological advances in the fields of knowledge transfer, communications and transportations still make sense. And the continent needs to embrace, not to fight the upcoming digital economy.

            Hence, Alfredo Toro Hardy suggests that (p. 393) “pragmatism, resilience, creativeness, imagination, and the joining together of Latin American forces, will have to guide the region’s actions in the foreseeable future.” This implies to develop the integration of the Latin American markets even further through free trade agreements while keeping open to the global economy, in particular to the European Union. Certainly, institutions like the Inter-American Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Latin America can be instruments to foster the process.

Klaus F. Zimmermann , President of the Global Labor Organization, Professor Emeritus, Bonn University, UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University, Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow 2017″

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers December 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month examines the potentials multiple language skills have for employment and wages in a globalized world. The research finds in the context of an open and multilingual economy that language training improves employability, but the skills are not sufficiently rewarded by higher wages.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: December

Discussion Paper No. 289 Evaluation of Language Training Programs in Luxembourg using Principal StratificationDownload PDF
by Bia, Michela & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Mercatanti, Andrea

GLO Fellow Alfonso Flores-Lagunes

Abstract: In a world increasingly globalized, multiple language skills can create more employment opportunities. Several countries include language training programs in active labor market programs for the unemployed. We analyze the effects of a language training program on the re-employment probability and hourly wages of the unemployed simultaneously, using high quality administrative data from Luxembourg. We address selection into training by exploiting the rich administrative information available, and account for the complication that wages are “truncated” by unemployment by adopting a principal stratification framework. Estimation is undertaken with a mixture model likelihood-based approach. To improve inference, we use the individual’s hours worked as a secondary outcome and a stochastic dominance assumption. These two features considerably ameliorate the multimodality problem commonly encountered in mixture models. We also conduct sensitivity analysis to assess the unconfoundedness assumption employed. Our results strongly suggest a positive effect (of up to 12.7 percent) of the language training programs on the re-employment probability, but no effects on wages for those who are observed employed regardless of training participation. It appears that, in the context of an open and multilingual economy, language training improve employability but the language skills acquired are not sufficiently rewarded to be reflected in higher wages.

GLO Discussion Papers of December 2018

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

289 Evaluation of Language Training Programs in Luxembourg using Principal StratificationDownload PDF
by Bia, Michela & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Mercatanti, Andrea

288 Bounds on Average and Quantile Treatment Effects on Duration Outcomes under Censoring, Selection, and NoncomplianceDownload PDF
by Blanco, German & Chen, Xuan & Flores, Carlos A. & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso

287 Anti-Migration as a Threat to Internationalization? A Review of the Migration-Internationalization LiteratureDownload PDF
by Hatzigeorgiou, Andreas & Lodefalk, Magnus

286 Some unpleasant consequences of testing at lengthDownload PDF
by Brunello, Giorgio & Crema, Angela & Rocco, Lorenzo

285 Does Money Relieve Depression? Evidence from Social Pension Expansions in ChinaDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi & Wang, Tianyu & Busch, Susan H.

284 Media Attention and Choice of Major: Evidence from Anti-Doctor Violence in ChinaDownload PDF
by Bo, Shiyu & Chen, Y. Joy & Song, Yan & Zhou, Sen

283 Elite School Designation and House Prices – Quasi-experimental Evidence from Beijing, ChinaDownload PDF
by Huang, Bin & He, Xiaoyan & Xu, Lei & Zhu, Yu

282 Commuting Patterns, the Spatial Distribution of Jobs and the Gender Pay Gap in the U.S.Download PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

281 The Effect of Self-Employment on Income InequalityDownload PDF
by Schneck, Stefan

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Happy Holidays and MORE from the GLO!

Happy holidays and a great start into an exciting New Year 2019 to all members and friends of GLO! Thanks to a large number of activists, we have made substantial progress in 2018.

I am now writing from the plane on my way to Florida. Earlier next year, I will be at the ASSA meeting in Atlanta. Please try to meet me, if you are there and have issues to discuss. You may wish to send me an email to arrange a meeting there or to just meet me at the Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), Jinan University, on Friday January 4, 2019, from 6pm to 8pm, at Hilton Atlanta 217.

Over the last few weeks, I had the chance to meet and interact with many of you. From November 28 to December 22, I have been in Luxembourg, Darmstadt, Brussels, Kigali, Xiamen, Seoul, and Mumbai for events and conferences. See below some own quick pictures from the tour.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President

Brussels Airport
Real  & Fake Christmas Trees

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Join the Kuznets Prize Ceremony at ASSA 2019 in Atlanta

Those friends of the Journal of Population Economics and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) participating at the ASSA 2019 Atlanta conference are invited to the prominent Kuznets Prize ceremony. It takes part at the Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), Jinan University, on Friday January 4, 2019, from 6pm to 8pm, at Hilton Atlanta 217. The ceremony will start at about 6.30 pm and will take about 15 minutes. The Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics will announce some journal news including the 2019 prize winner(s). Then the award plate is given to the (still confidential) author(s). The 2018 Prize winner Le Wang will be also present; see an interview with him about the last prize paper.

Those planning to attend the reception are invited to register with Jiayu Lin via email: iesr_job@126.com.

The Kuznets Prize ceremony takes place on the invitation of Dean Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), who is also a GLO Fellow. He will introduce the ceremony. The Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO): Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University). IESR has been an early institutional supporter of GLO.

Feng (right) and Zimmermann at IESR
Kuznets Prize Winner 2018 Chunbei Wang & Le Wang, University of Oklahoma

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GLO Discussion Papers November 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) deals with the sources of inequality in East Africa. It concludes that promoting equity in education requires policies that go beyond raising average school quality and should attend to the distribution of school quality as well as assortative matching between households and schools.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: November

Anand, Paul & Behrman, Jere R. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Jones, Sam: 2018. “Inequality of Opportunity in Education: Accounting for the Contributions of Sibs, Schools and Sorting across East Africa,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 270, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE – Download PDF

Abstract: Inequalities in the opportunity to obtain a good education in low-income countries are widely understood to be related to household resources and schooling quality. Yet, to date, most researchers have investigated the contributions of these two factors separately. This paper considers them jointly, paying special attention to their covariation, which indicates whether schools exacerbate or compensate for existing household-based inequalities. The paper develops a new variance decomposition framework and applies it to data on more than one million children in three low-income East African countries. The empirical results show that although household factors account for a significant share of total test score variation, variation in school quality and positive sorting between households and schools are, together, no less important. The analysis also finds evidence of substantial geographical heterogeneity in schooling quality. The paper concludes that promoting equity in education in East Africa requires policies that go beyond raising average school quality and should attend to the distribution of school quality as well as assortative matching between households and schools.

GLO Discussion Papers of November 2018

280 The Financial Decisions of Immigrant and Native Households: Evidence from ItalyDownload PDF
by Bertocchi, Graziella & Brunetti, Marianna & Zaiceva, Anzelika

279 War and Social AttitudesDownload PDF
by Child, Travers Barclay & Nikolova, Elena

278 Younger and Dissatisfied? Relative Age and Life-satisfaction in AdolescenceDownload PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Baert, Stijn

277 Relative Age Effect on European Adolescents’ Social NetworkDownload PDF
by Fumarco, Luca & Baert, Stijn

276 Work Hard or Play Hard? Degree Class, Student Leadership and Employment OpportunitiesDownload PDF
by Baert, Stijn & Verhaest, Diete

275 Industrial relations reform, firm-level bargaining and nominal wage floorsDownload PDF
by Giannakopoulosa, Nicholas & Laliotis, Ioannis

274 Labor supply and the business cycle: The “Bandwagon Worker Effect”Download PDF
by Martín Román, Ángel L. & Cuéllar-Martín, Jaime & Moral de Blas, Alfonso

273 Reaching the Top or Falling Behind? The Role of Occupational Segregation in Women’s Chances of Finding a High-Paying Job Over the Life-CycleDownload PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

272 Arrival of Young Talents: The Send-down Movement and Rural Education in ChinaDownload PDF
by Chen, Yi & Fan, Ziying & Gu, Xiaomin & Zhou, Li-An

271 Family Unification, Siblings, and SkillsDownload PDF
by Duleep, Harriet Orcutt & Regets, Mark

270 Inequality of Opportunity in Education: Accounting for the Contributions of Sibs, Schools and Sorting across East AfricaDownload PDF
by Anand, Paul & Behrman, Jere R. & Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Jones, Sam

269 Trade and capital flows: Substitutes or complements? An empirical investigationDownload PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Domnick, Clemens

268 Son Preference and Human Capital Investment Among China’s Rural-Urban Migrant HouseholdsDownload PDF
by Lin, Carl & Sun, Yan & Xing, Chunbing

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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GLO Discussion Papers October 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

The discussion paper of the month (see below) presents a remarkable review of the growing economic and epidemiologic evidence linking air pollution, cognition performance and real-world decision making. All by a leading expert of the field, GLO Fellow & GLO Cluster Lead Xi Chen. Further, the paper relates to an outstanding GLO workshop in Hong Kong on climate change and human resources consequences.

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: October

Chen, Xi: 2018. “Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision Making,” GLO Discussion Paper Series 266, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE – Download PDF

Abstract: Cognitive functioning is critical as in our daily life a host of real-world complex decisions in high-stakes markets have to be made. The decision-making process can be vulnerable to environmental stressors. Summarizing the growing economic and epidemiologic evidence linking air pollution, cognition performance and real-world decision making, we first illustrate key physiological and psychological pathways between air pollution and cognition. We then document the main patterns of air pollution affecting cognitive test performance by type of cognitive tests, gender, window of exposure, age profile, and educational attainment. We further extend to a review of real-world decision making that has been found to be affected by air pollution and the resulting cognitive impairments. Finally, rich implications on environmental health policies are drawn based on existing evaluations of social costs of air pollution.

GLO Discussion Papers of October 2018

267 New Education Models for the Future of Work ForceDownload PDF
by Pastore, Francesco

266 Smog, Cognition and Real-World Decision MakingDownload PDF
by Chen, Xi

265 Drivers of Labor Force Participation in Advanced Economies: Macro and Micro EvidenceDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

264 A Cohort-Based Analysis of Labor Force Participation for Advanced EconomiesDownload PDF
by Grigoli, Francesco & Koczan, Zsoka & Topalova, Petia

263 Low, High and Super Congestion of an Open-Access Resource: Impact under Autarky and Trade, with Aquaculture as IllustrationDownload PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

262 Brain Drain-Induced Brain Gain and the Bhagwati Tax: Are Early and Recent Paradigms Compatible?Download PDF
by Schiff, Maurice

261 Labor Market and Institutional Drivers of Youth Irregular Migration: Evidence from the MENA RegionDownload PDF
by Dibeh, Ghassan & Fakih, Ali & Marrouch, Walid

260 Public versus Private Sector Wage Gap in Egypt: Evidence from Quantile Regression on Panel DataDownload PDF
by Tansel, Aysit & Keskin, Halil Ibrahim & Ozdemir, Zeynel Abidin

259 Does female breadwinning make partnerships less healthy or less stable?Download PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

258 Marriage Market Signals and Homeownership for the Never MarriedDownload PDF
by Mundra, Kusum & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth

257 Economic impact of STEM immigrant workersDownload PDF
by Baum, Christopher F. & Lööf, Hans & Stephan, Andreas

256 Does Regulation Trade-Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction EngineersDownload PDF
by Rostam-Afschar, Davud & Strohmaier, Kristina

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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GLO intensifies collaborations with Baku: Collaboration contract (MoU) signed and GLO President joins the Advisory Board of IGEP

During his recent visit to Baku/Azerbaijan on 10-13 November 2018, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann, has met Chairman Natig Shirinzade of the Institute of Global Economic Problems (IGEP) and collaborated intensively with him. MORE DETAILS. Shirinzade, who is also a GLO Fellow and the GLO Country Lead Azerbaijan, had organized the meetings of Zimmermann with key representatives from government, academia and business to discuss the global challenges and approaches of the country. MORE DETAILS.

In the light of the great success of the visit and the large potentials, Chairman Shirinzade and President Zimmermann agreed to intensify the relationships between both organizations even further. For this purpose, both signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The MoU expresses that the planned collaborations should advance academic knowledge in both organizations through the encouragement of academic research, the communication among scholars through meetings, the promotion of publication opportunities and by providing networking opportunities for scholars through conferences and other joint activities.

For this purpose, Zimmermann has also accepted to join the IGEP Advisory Board headed by the Honorary Academician Ziyad Samedzade, the Chairman of the Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Committee of the National Assembly (Milli Mejlis). In a festive ceremony, Natig Shirinzade presented Zimmermann the certificate for this appointment, which is signed by him and Ziyad Samedzade.

Over dinner on the previous night, Samedzade, Shirinzade and Zimmermann had discussed further details of the global challenges and found that they largely agree how one needs to approach them.

Shirinzade and Zimmermann after the presentation of the Certificate of the membership in the IGEP Advisory Board.

Relaxation after the hour.

The Honorary Academician Ziyad Samedzade, the Chairman of the Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Committee of the National Assembly (Milli Mejlis) and Chairman of the IGEP Advisory Board with Zimmermann.

Klaus F. Zimmermann: “The exchange with Ziyad Samedzade was a big honor and great pleasure, we have debated and agreed on important issues of the globalized world, the perspectives of our countries, and what we have to do. A truly great man; I am deeply impressed. He found time on the eve of an important budget debate in the parliament to receive me in his office in the National Assembly and to join us for dinner. About his significant intervention in the parliamentary debate in the following morning I read in the media:”

“The activities of the country’s banks once again caused a barrage of criticism. This time, criticism was voiced by the parliamentarians during the discussion of the draft state budget for 2019 at the plenary session of the Milli Majlis (National Assembly). The statement of Chairman of the Parliamentary Committee on Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Ziyad Samadzadeh was especially noteworthy. He stated bluntly: ‘We cannot be satisfied with the activities of banks in Azerbaijan, because their assistance to the real sector is insignificant.’” (MPs attacked banks. Elnur Mammadov in the AZERI DAILY)

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GLO President visits government officials, business and the research community in Azerbaijan

On the invitation of Natig Shirinzade, Chairman of the Institute of Global Economic Problems, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann, has visited Baku, Azerbaijan, on 10-13 November 2018 to discuss research and policy issues and to intensify contacts. Chairman Natig Shirinzade is also a GLO Fellow and the GLO Country Lead Azerbaijan representing GLO. MORE DETAILS.

Organized by Natig Shirinzade (right side of the picture), Zimmermann met with researchers and scientists, representatives from business and government including members from the office of the First Vice President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, the Executive Director of the State Oil Fund and his staff, the Minister of Labor and the Minister of Education with their staff, the Chairman of the Economic Policy, Industry and Entrepreneurship Committee of the National Assembly, and the Deputy Foreign Minister and Founding Rector of the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy (ADA University) with various administrators and professors from ADA University and the Azerbaijan State University of Economics.

The full program on November 12-13, 2018 included the following major program points in this sequence:

The joint initiative of Natig Shirinzade and Klaus F. Zimmermann was broadly covered by the Azerbaijani media:

Left picture: In the middle, Sahil Babayev, Minister of Labor and Social Protection. Right: Natig Shirinzade and Klaus F. Zimmermann

 

Excellent and deep discussions with key staff members of the office of the First Vice President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, First Lady Mehriban Aliyeva: Emin Huseynov (left) and Khalid Ahadov (right). Broad and common understanding about the global human challenges and the large potentials for deeper collaborations between Azerbaijan and Europe.

 

With Shahmar Movsumov as the Executive Director of the State Oil Fund of the Republic of Azerbaijan, the Fund prepares for the future of the country investing resources around the world and supporting the change of the country including activities strengthening infrastructure and human resources. Both Natig Shirinzade and Klaus F. Zimmermann were visiting Shahmar Movsumov and his staff in his headquarter to introduce the respective institutions and to discuss the research needs to deal with the major challenges of the country. Bellow: In the headquarter of the Fund.

 

 

In both ministries, labor and education, the exchange was about the political strategies to deal with the demand for effective government using the instruments of the digital age, establishing the physical and administrative infrastructure needed for the post oil age, the need to strengthen entrepreneurship and the development of skills and education. A particular need was identified in vocational training, where large efforts of both ministries are under way. Zimmermann agreed with ministers Sahil Babayev (labor) and Ceyhun Bayamon (education) that vocational training could be key for the development if combined with proper entrepreneurship and small business. He advertised for the German dual system, knowing the difficulties with an adaption of the model that requires long traditions and the strong support of the business community.

Shirinzade and Zimmermann further met with Ambassador Hafiz Pashayev, Deputy Foreign Minister and Founding Rector of the Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy (ADA University). At the ADA University, they met with him and Fariz Ismailzade (Vice Rector for External, Government and Student Affairs), Elkin Nurmammadov (Dean of the School of Business), Rahman Shahhuseynli (Director of the Office of International Affairs), Kavus Abushov (Assistant Professor, Political Sciences), all ADA University, and Anar Rzayev, Vice-Rector International Relations and Programs of UNEC, the Azerbaijan State University of Economics. Topics discussed included the mission of GLO, the natural role of the country as a geographic, economic and political meeting point between Europe and Asia, and potentials for academic exchange of the universities with Europe. The visit at ADA University ended with a lecture of Zimmermann for ADA students.

Zimmermann speaking at the ADA University Global Perspectives Lecture Series in front of a large audience of interested students.

 

REFERENCES:
Klaus F. Zimmermann et al. (2013). Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training. Foundations and Trends in Microeconomics, Vol. 9, 1-157. now publishers.

Luca Barbone, Martin Kahanec, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Lucia Kureková (2013), Migration from the Eastern Partnership Countries to the European Union — Options for a Better Future, IZA Research Report, No. 55, Bonn. (50 pages)

Martin Kahanec, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Lucia Kureková and Costanza Biavaschi (2013), Labour Migration from EaP Countries to the EU – Assessment of Costs and Benefits and Proposals for Better Labour Market Matching, IZA Research Report, No. 56, Bonn. (164 pages)

On the more touristic side, Zimmermann explored on November 11 and 12 the city of Baku and the environment directed by a strongly motivated team of tourist guide, interpreter and driver. These experiences provided him with deep insides into history, modern developments, challenges and potentials of the country. On November 10, he was visiting modern Baku and enjoyed some of the local culture. On November 10 in the afternoon, he has been in the old city of Baku, and on November 11, among others, in the Gobustan National Park, saw the Petroglyphs and investigated the Zoroastrian temple of Ateshgah (Part III). At the end, he inspected Yanardag, the burning mountain. (The links lead to the four individual reports on Zimmermann’s private website for those interested.)

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Renmin University of China & GLO Conference on the Chinese Labor Market on October 20-21: Program is out!

The School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China (Beijing) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have published the program of their forthcoming  conference on the Chinese labor market. The event will take place on 20 and 21 October 2018 at Renmin University of China, Beijing, in Conference Room 2, Yifu Conference Hall, Renmin University. Program Announcement (Chinese link). Program Flyer

The Renmin University / GLO Conference provides a platform for researchers working on topics related to the Chinese labor market, including migration, discrimination, health and well-being, education, environment, labor market policies. The event is part of the Chinese Labor Market Cluster of GLO headed by GLO Cluster Lead Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton).
————————
Keynote speakers are
Xin Meng (Australian National University & GLO)
Junsen Zhang (Chinese University of Hong Kong & GLO )
Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University & GLO )
————————
Program Committee
Sylvie Démurger (French National Centre for Scientific Research& GLO ), Shuaizhang
Feng (Jinan University & GLO ), Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton & GLO ), Jun
Han (Renmin University of China& GLO)
————————
Organizers:
Corrado Giulietti
(University of Southampton & GLO)
Jun Han (Renmin University of China & GLO)
————————

Entrance to Renmin University

From above: GLO activists Feng, Meng, Zhang, Zimmermann, Giulietti & Han

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How gender and family types shape wealth and homeownership: New book from Palgrave Macmillan

Two Fellows of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have just published a new study on “Wealth and Homeownership: Women, Men and Families” with the prominent publisher Palgrave Macmillan. In this timely book, Mariacristina Rossi and Eva Sierminska analyze the complex relationship between gender, wealth and homeownership. By providing a conceptual framework to insert homeownership and housing decisions within an economic rationale, the authors explore how gender and family types have shaped wealth accumulation and homeownership.​

MORE DETAILS – Content and Order

GLO Fellow Mariacristina Rossi is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Turin, Italy. Her research interests include intertemporal saving and consumption choices, household finance, development and gender economics.


GLO Fellow Mariacristina Rossi

GLO Fellow Eva M. Sierminska is Senior Researcher at the Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Luxembourg. She is a labor economist and has extensive research experience in the area of labor markets, inequality, household finance and population economics.


GLO Fellow Eva M. Sierminska


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GLO – supported scientific conferences and events 2018

REMINDER –  forthcoming events 2018:
(Note that the submission deadline for the Bali EBES 27 conference on January 9-11, 2019 is October 31, 2018!)

 

Past events 2018

 

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Migration and well-being among those left behind: New research from the Journal of Population Economics

New research forthcoming in the Journal of Population Economics finds: Having family members abroad internationally may be associated with greater well-being of those staying behind as one study shows Nikolova, Graham and Ivlevs)! However, it does not hold for the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind in China as other research in the Journal shows (Scheffel and Zhang).

Milena Nikolova, Carol Graham, and Artjoms Ivlevs:

Emigration, remittances, and the subjective well-being of those staying behind

The authors are: Artjoms Ivlevs ( University of the West of England), Milena Nikolova (University of Groningen) & Carol Graham (The Brookings Institution). Milena Nikolova & Carol Graham are also Fellows of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

The paper is open access/freely downloadable and already pre-published online. It is forthcoming 2019 in the Journal of Population Economics.

A Brookings blog has just introduced and detailed the analysis and contribution of the paper: International migration: What happens to those left behind?

Full Abstract:
We offer the first global perspective on the well-being consequences of emigration for those staying behind using several subjective well-being measures (evaluations of best possible life, positive affect, stress, and depression). Using the Gallup World Poll data for 114 countries during 2009–2011, we find that having family members abroad is associated with greater evaluative well-being and positive affect, and receiving remittances is linked with further increases in evaluative well-being, especially in poorer contexts—both across and within countries. We also document that having household members abroad is linked with increased stress and depression, which are not offset by remittances. The out-migration of family members appears less traumatic in countries where migration is more common, indicating that people in such contexts might be able to cope better with separation. Overall, subjective well-being measures, which reflect both material and non-material aspects of life, furnish additional insights and a well-rounded picture of the consequences of emigration on migrant family members staying behind relative to standard outcomes employed in the literature, such as the left-behind’s consumption, income, or labor market outcomes.

Journal of Population Economics

This adds to the literature on the positive impacts of emigrants on families and friends left behind.  See for instance:

Nikolova, Milena, Monica Roman & Klaus F. Zimmermann. Left Behind but Doing Good? Civic Engagement in Two Post-Socialist Countries. Journal of Comparative Economics, 45 (2017) 658–684.

The authors document for two post-socialist states (Bulgaria & Romania) that migration can affect the values and norms of those left behind in the home country and promote more social behavior. See on this paper a recent Gallup Blog. And a related Linkedin blog.

OTHER FRESH MIGRATION RESEARCH FORTHCOMING IN THE JOURNAL OF POPULATION ECONOMICS HAS A DIFFERENT PICTURE:

Juliane Scheffel (Leeds University, Business School, UK)  and Yiwei Zhang (Beijing, China) find that internal Chinese migration has caused reduced happiness and a higher probability of loneliness among elderly parents.

How does internal migration affect the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind?

The paper is open access/freely downloadable and already pre-published online. It is forthcoming 2019 in the Journal of Population Economics.

Full Abstract:
The ageing population resulting from the one-child policy and massive flows of internal migration in China pose major challenges to elderly care in rural areas where elderly support is based on a traditional inter-generational family support mechanism. We use data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study to examine how migration of an adult child affects the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind. We identify the effects using fixed effects and IV approaches which rely on different sources of variation. We find that migration reduces happiness by 6.6 percentage points and leads to a 3.3 percentage points higher probability of loneliness. CES-D scores of elderly parents are severely increased pushing average scores close to the cut-off indicating clinical levels of depressive symptoms. As emotional health is a key determinant of the overall health status, our findings have significant impacts on economic development in China.

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GLO Discussion Papers August 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: August

Drydakis, Nick, 2018. “School-age bullying, workplace bullying and job satisfaction: Experiences of LGB people in Britain,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 237, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Using a data set that contains information on retrospective school-age bullying, as well as on workplace bullying in the respondents’ present job, the outcomes of this study suggest that bullying, when it is experienced by sexual orientation minorities tends to persist over time. According to the estimations, it seems that school-age bullying of LGB people is associated with victims’ lower educational level and occupational sorting into non-white-collar jobs, especially for gay/bisexual men. In addition, the outputs suggest that for both gay/bisexual men and lesbian/bisexual women, school-age bullying is positively associated with workplace bullying and negatively associated with job satisfaction. Additional results suggest a negative association between workplace bullying and job satisfaction. However, the outcomes show a positive association between the existence of an LGBT group in the workplace and job satisfaction.

Image result for Nick Drydakis pictures

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge & GLO) is the Lead of the GLO ClusterGender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes“.

With GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, Nick Drydakis is editing a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market“. For Details. Submissions will be accepted until March 30, 2019.

GLO Discussion Papers of August 2018

242 Unintended Consequences of China’s New Labor Contract Law on Unemployment and Welfare Loss of the WorkersDownload PDF
by Akee, Randall & Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong

241 The labour-augmented K+S model: a laboratory for the analysis of institutional and policy regimesDownload PDF
by Dosi, G. & Pereira, M. C. & Roventini, A. & Virgillito, M. E.

240 Workers’ awareness context in Italian 4.0 factoriesDownload PDF
by Cirillo, Valeria & Rinaldini, Matteo & Staccioli, Jacopo & Virgillito, Maria Enrica

239 From Engineer to Taxi Driver? Language Proficiency and the Occupational Skills of ImmigrantsDownload PDF
by Imai, Susumu & Stacey, Derek & Warman, Casey

238 Returns to higher education subjects and tiers in China – Evidence from the China Family Panel StudiesDownload PDF
by Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei & Zhu, Yu

237 School-age bullying, workplace bullying and job satisfaction: Experiences of LGB people in BritainDownload PDF
by Drydakis, Nick

236 When the market drives you crazy: Stock market returns and fatal car accidentsDownload PDF
by Giulietti, Corrado & Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

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Azita Berar Awad (previously ILO) joins GLO as Policy Director

Azita Berar Awad has been appointed GLO Policy Director of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). She had been previously the Director of the Employment Policy Department of the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Azita Berar Awad has been the Director of the Employment Policy Department of the ILO in the period 2006 – 2017, working for the institution since 1983. In this position, she was responsible for the development of ILO’s approach to promoting full, productive, decent and freely chosen employment. Since employment is one of the four strategic pillars of  ILO‘s decent work agenda, her task was crucial. She was also facilitating broad-based social dialogue processes and extensive capacity-building for employment policy, engaging governments and social partners (employers and workers organizations) in all regions of the world.

See MORE on the Featured Alumna of The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva.

As the GLO Policy Director, Azita Berar Awad will continue her mission to strengthen employment creation around the world by directing policy initiatives of the GLO network. Her rich experience and large network will help GLO to develop further and connect to the relevant international organizations.

Azita BERAR AWAD

GLO Policy Director Azita Berar Awad

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Asian Productivity Organization (APO) workshop on The Impact of Education Policies on National Productivity Growth Completed in Manila/Philippines

Global Labor Organization (GLO) Fellows led the recently completed Asian Productivity Organization (APO) Workshop on the impact of education policies on national productivity growth as experts on labor productivity.

The event took place at the Development Planning Academy (DAP) in Manila (Philippines) on 14 – 17 August 2018. The GLO Lead for South-East Asia, Professor Niaz Asadullah (Malaya University), was joined by three other fellows as resource persons. They were: Dr Chandra Shah (Monash University, Australia), Dr Franceso Pastore (Seconda Università di Napoli, Italy) and Dr Gyuhee Hwang (Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training, South Korea).

The GLO Fellows discussed issues such as dual-track technical and vocational training programs, school to work transition, on the job training programs, modelling future labor demand, the race between man and machine and so on.

Below: GLO Lead for South-East Asia Niaz Asadullah (Malaya University)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: GLO Fellow Franceso Pastore (Seconda Università di Napoli, Italy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: GLO Fellow Chandra Shah (Monash University, Australia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: GLO speakers in debate from the left GLO Fellow Gyuhee Hwang (Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training, South Korea; #2), Pastore (#4), Asadullah (#5) and Shah (#6) .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below: All forum participants. GLO Fellows from the left sitting in the first row: Pastore (#1), Hwang (#2), Shah (#4) and Asadullah (#5).

 

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GLO Discussion Papers July 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: July

Goel, Deepti & Deshpande, Ashwini, 2018. “Social Identity and Perceived Income Adequacy,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 232, Global Labor Organization (GLO). FREE Download PDF

Abstract: Economists are increasingly interested in subjective well-being, but the economic literature on perceptions of income adequacy, which is one of the factors that shapes subjective well-being, is small. Our paper fills this lacuna in the literature. We utilize nationally representative data on perceptions of amounts considered as remunerative earnings from self-employment in India, and examine how these are shaped by social identity, namely, caste. We also investigate if institutional change such as the introduction of an employment guarantee scheme alters these perceptions. Finally, we examine the relationship between caste identity and actual earnings. We find that caste identity does shape both perceptions of income adequacy as well as actual earnings: lower-ranked groups perceive lower amounts as being remunerative, and also earn lower amounts. Further, the employment guarantee scheme alters self-perceptions differentially for different caste groups, but in more nuanced ways than our ex-ante beliefs.

GLO Discussion Papers of July 2018

235 Selling hope? A review of current youth unemployment initiatives in CairoDownload PDF
by Pettit, Harry

234 Defining and Measuring Workforce Development in the United States in a Post-Bipartisan EraDownload PDF
by Holland, Brian

233 Flexible Work Organization and Employer Provided Training: Evidence from German Linked Employer-Employee DataDownload PDF
by Campaner, Annika & Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe

232 Social Identity and Perceived Income AdequacyDownload PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Deshpande, Ashwini

231 Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in DelhiDownload PDF
by Goel, Deepti & Barooah, Bidisha

230 Reflections on wage-settingDownload PDF
by Zimmermann, Klaus F.

229 Will you marry me? It depends (on the business cycle)Download PDF
by Bellido, Héctor & Marcén, Miriam

228 Immigration and the Health of Older Natives in Western EuropeDownload PDF
by Escarce, José J. & Rocco, Lorenzo

227 The Effects of Political Reservations on Credit Access and Borrowing Composition: New Evidence from IndiaDownload PDF
by Ao, Chon-Kit & Chatterjee, Somdeep

226 Self-Employment Can Be Good for Your HealthDownload PDF
by Nikolova, Milena

225 What Women Want (their men to do): Housework and satisfaction in Australian householdsDownload PDF
by Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S.

224 My Choice: Female Contraceptive Use Autonomy in BangladeshDownload PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo

223 The Long-Run and Gender-Equalizing Impacts of School Access: Evidence from the First Indochina WarDownload PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Hoang, Trung X. & Nguyen, Ha

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

 

Submission deadline extended to October 1, 2018: 60th ISLE Annual Conference, 19-21 December 2018, Mumbai, India

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) supports the annual conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) and the associated Indian Journal of Labour Economics. Both are partner institutions of the GLO.

CALL FOR PAPERS

60th ISLE Annual Conference, 19-21 December 2018, Mumbai, India
Conference Flyer ISLE 2018

The 60th Annual Conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) will be held during 19-21 December 2018 in Mumbai, India, organized by the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research (IGIDR). The conference commemorates with the Diamond Jubilee year of the formation of ISLE.  Congratulations from GLO!

Conference Themes
– Emerging Labor Markets and Employment Challenges
– Inequality in Labor Markets and Wellbeing
– World of Work and Women

Submission of Papers:
– Submission deadline:  31 August 2018: EXTENDED TO OCTOBER 1, 2018.
– Submission details: Call for papers

GLO  intends to organize a special GLO session at this conference. Those GLO members interested to contribute to such a session are invited to contact GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com) with ideas or preliminary paper titles.

INDIAN SOCIETY OF LABOUR ECONOMICS (ISLE)   

Ends;

EBES and GLO confirm long-term collaborations between both organizations

On July 15, 2018, representatives of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) about establishing a long-term collaboration on educational and research activities between both organizations. Among other issues, the cooperation will include the exchange of academic documents, the organization of events, joint publications and other means to foster research. For instance, GLO intends to organize sessions at the May 29-31, 2019 EBES conference in Coventry, UK following the very successful experiences of a first joint event organized in May 2018 in Berlin. The MOU has been signed by EBES Vice President Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann.

 

 

 

 

 

Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin (right) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (left) with FOM Head Berlin Manuela Zipperling at the May 2018 joint EBES-FOM-GLO conference in Berlin.

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Challenges for European Integration: Monetary, Fiscal and Labor Issues Discussed at Conference in Linz/Austria

Jens Weidmann of the German Bundesbank provided a keynote lecture. Klaus F. Zimmermann of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) spoke in a panel on social cohesion and labor mobility.

The 45th Economics Conference of the Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB) with the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber (WKO) took place on July 5, 2018 – July 6, 2018 in Linz/Austria.

The event was entitled

“Economic and Monetary Union – Deepening and Convergence”.

The most prominent keynote speaker of the first afternoon was Jens Weidmann of the German Bundesbank followed by three panel sessions. Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University), who is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), spoke about the role of labor mobility for social cohesion.

“Amid formidable challenges, Europe’s future depends not least on the capacity of its economies to converge toward their best performing peers. The conference at the start of the Austrian EU Presidency analyzed which dimensions matter most for the smooth functioning of Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and for the convergence of Central, Eastern and Southeastern European (CESEE) countries. The conference shed light on economic, social and territorial cohesion as enshrined in the EU Treaty. Experts from academia, business and politics debated how to prevent economic dispersion, promote deeper integration and ensure sustainable East-West and South-North convergence. They discussed the viability of the institutional framework, deepening of EMU, assessed the Commission’s recent proposals, looked into EU structural and cohesion policies and explored both the potential and policy challenges for CESEE.”

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Angela Pfister & Thomas Liebig — the panelists on social cohesion and migration.

Angela Pfister works for the Austrian Trade Union Federation (ÖGB).

Thomas Liebig (OECD) is a also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

As Klaus F. Zimmermann argued in his presentation, “Labor mobility is about cooperating in societies or between societies in order to survive and prosper. Hence, migration does not have to be in conflict with social cohesion. Furthermore, it:
►supports the optimal allocation of resources,
►leads to balanced adjustments to asymmetric shocks,
►fights temporary scarcity and deals with shared long-term needs,
►is an indicator of solidarity (see the current “refugee” debate in Europe and the mobility concerns), and
►is of central importance for all countries in the monetary union like the Eurozone.”

Thomas Liebig is co-author of a prominent recent research paper that documents how economies in Europe and the United States have adjusted to asymmetric shocks in the recent Great Recession. It has been the GLO Discussion Paper of the Month in February 2018 and is forthcoming in the Journal of Population Economics.

Jauer, Julia & Liebig, Thomas & Martin, John P. & Puhani, Patrick A., Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006-2016,  GLO Discussion Paper 178, February 2018. Free download.

Abstract: We estimate whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labor market by comparing pre-and post-crisis migration movements at the regional level in both Europe and the United States, and their association with symmetric labor market shocks. Based on fixed-effects regressions using regional panel data, we find that Europe’s migratory response to unemployment shocks was almost identical to that recorded in the United States after the crisis. Our estimates suggest that, if all measured population changes in Europe were due to migration for employment purposes – i.e. an upper-bound estimate – up to about a quarter of the asymmetric labor market shock would be absorbed by migration within a year. However, in Europe and especially in the Eurozone, the reaction to a very large extent stems from migration of recent EU accession country citizens as well as of third – country nationals.

See also a recent debate about internal labor mobility in Europe and Austria.

***********************************************************************
From the program of July 5, 2018:

Keynote lecture:
Deepening EMU – Political Integration and Economic Convergence

Jens Weidmann
President, Deutsche Bundesbank

……….
Panel: Social Cohesion – The Role of Labour Mobility
Chair:
Kurt Pribil
Executive Director, Oesterreichische Nationalbank
Panelists:
Thomas Liebig, Senior Migration Specialist, OECD
Angela Pfister, Economic Expert, Austrian Trade Union Federation (ÖGB)
Klaus F. Zimmermann, President | Professor
Global Labor Organization (GLO) | Maastricht University | UNU-MERIT

………

For a link to the Full Program click Program on this page.
******************************************************************************************

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GLO members visited the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in Uppsala

GLO Fellow Maria Paradiso and Klaus F. Zimmermann, President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) both visited the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in Uppsala to participate at the annual Class Meeting of the section chairs of Social and Related Sciences (Class A2) of the Academia Europea (AE), the European Academy. The Class Meeting discussed nominations for membership and the future academic work of the class.

GLO Fellow Professor Maria Paradiso is Section Chair of the Section Social Sciences of the Academia Europea (AE) and also affiliated with the University of Sannio, Italy.

GLO President Professor Klaus F. Zimmermann is Section Chair of the Section Economics, Business and Management Sciences of the Academia Europea (AE) and also affiliated with UNU-MERIT & Maastricht University, The Netherlands.

After the Uppsala meeting: Maria Paradiso and Klaus F. Zimmermann at Frankfurt airport changing flights. Both had discussed ways to intensify collaborations between their AE Sections and about research related to their joint research area, migration, including GLO business.

The AE is the Academy of Europe, and the sections of Class A2 are (i) Behavioural Sciences, (ii) Social Sciences, (iii) Economics, Business and Management Sciences and (iv) Law with the respective chairs Ulrich Teichler (University of Kassel, representing Peter Scott), Maria Paradiso, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Dagmar Coester-Waltjen (University of Göttingen). The event was led by Class Chair Björn Wittrock  of the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in Uppsala, who also acted as the local host. The Class Meeting discussed nominations for membership and the future academic work of the class.

From the left: Ulrich Teichler, Björn Wittrock, Maria Paradiso, Klaus F. Zimmermann and Dagmar Coester-Waltjen.

From the right: Ulrich Teichler, Dagmar Coester-Waltjen, Maria Paradiso and Klaus F. Zimmermann  in front of the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in Uppsala.

Many prominent GLO Fellows are elected distinguished members of the Acedemia Europaea.

Examples are: Lucian Liviu Albu, Torben Andersen, Graziella Bertocchi, Amelie Constant, Partha Dasgupta, Manfred Deistler, Peter Dolton, Gustav Feichtinger, Stepan Jurajda, Martin Kahanec, Kai Konrad, Andreu Mas-Colell, Peter Nijkamp, Karine Nyborg, Jacques Poot, Mirjana Radovic-Markovic, Nina Smith, Rick van der Ploeg, Thierry Verdier, Reinhilde Veugelers, Marie Claire Villeval, Rainer Winkelmann, and Yves Zenou.

GLO and AE have collaborated in various ways, e.g. supporting Central European University (CEU) in Budapest in 2017.

# I stand with CEU! GLO Fellows and Academicians expressed their solidarity at CEU in Budapest

“The Scientist and Policy Making”: MAE & GLO Economists in Budapest

Central European University (CEU) under threat

 

Over 2015 – 2017, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann had hosted the Social and Related Sciences (Class A2) of the Academia Europea (AE) annual Class Meeting in Bonn, twice at his private home, and 2015 at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

The Section Chairs of Class 2 of the Academia Europaea (AE) met on July 13 – 14, 2015, at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn to discuss joint initiatives including the nominations of new AE members.

Zimmermann_Group_2015_small.jpg

The picture has (from the left) Peter Scott, Antoine Bailly, Anne Buttimer (+), Joseph Straus, Aleksandra Nowak, and Klaus F. Zimmermann representing the sections (i) Behavioural Sciences, (ii) Social Sciences, (iii) Economics, Business and Management Sciences, and (iv) Law.

Ends;

GLO Discussion Papers June 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: June

Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2018. “Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks,” GLO Discussion Paper No. 215, Global Labor Organization (GLO). PDF Free Download. Forthcoming: Journal of Population Economics

Abstract: This paper studies the effects of immigration on the allocation of occupational physical burden and work injury risks. Using data for England and Wales from the Labour Force Survey (2003-2013), we find that, on average, immigration leads to a reallocation of UK-born workers towards jobs characterized by lower physical burden and injury risk. The results also show important differences across skill groups. Immigration reduces the average physical burden of UK-born workers with medium levels of education, but has no significant effect on those with low levels. We also find that that immigration led to an improvement of self-reported measures of native workers’ health. These findings, together with the evidence that immigrants report lower injury rates than natives, suggest that the reallocation of tasks could reduce overall health care costs and the human and financial costs typically associated with workplace injuries.

GLO Discussion Papers of June 2018

222 Ageing, the socioeconomic burden, labour market and migration. The Chinese case in an international perspectiveDownload PDF
by Bruni, Michele

221 Gender and climate change: Do female parliamentarians make a difference?Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Tarverdi, Yashar

220 Unemployment and Marital Breakdown: The Spanish Case – Download PDF
by González-Val, Rafael & Marcén, Miriam

219 Self-employment as a stepping stone to better labour market matching: a comparison between immigrants and natives – Download PDF
by Ulceluse, Magdalena

218 The Role of Human Capital Resources in East African Economies – Download PDF
by Urgaia, Worku R

217 The role of conflict in sex discrimination: The case of missing girls – Download PDF
by Mavisakalyan, Astghik & Minasyan, Anna

216 A parsimonious model of longevity, fertility, HIV transmission and development – Download PDF
by Gori, Luca & Manfredi, Piero & Sodini, Mauro

215 Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks – Download PDF
by Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos

214 R&D, Embodied Technological Change and Employment: Evidence from Spain – Download PDF
by Pellegrino, Gabriele & Piva, Mariacristina & Vivarelli, Marco

M.M. (Magdalena) Ulceluse, PhD

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors:
Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of Groningen. DP@glabor.org

Ends;

 

International Conference in Berlin: Highlights of EBES25 with GLO & FOM in Berlin

The 25th Conference of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) took place on May 23-25, 2018 in Berlin/Germany. It was jointly organized with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and hosted by the FOM University of Applied Sciences in their Berlin study center. During the conference, 316 papers by 525 researchers from 60 countries were presented. The event is part of a long-term partnership of GLO & EBES and GLO & FOM.

THE FULL CONFERENCE PROGRAM CAN BE ACCESSED HERE.

Further information can be found here: Conference call; EBES Fellow Award; GLO Activities.

This post reports some highlights by presenting a few selected pictures.

Welcome! And “Thank You!” for a perfect local organization: Professor and GLO Fellow Manuela Zipperling (Head of FOM Berlin) receives the “EBES thank you plate” presented by Professor and GLO Fellow Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin (Vice President of EBES and Istanbul Medeniyet University, Istanbul) (right) and assisted by GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (left).

GLO President Professor Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, from the left) addressed the large audience, and Manuela Zipperling (Head of FOM Berlin),  Aylin Akin (Assistant Editor of the EBES Journals), Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin (Vice President of EBES and Istanbul Medeniyet University, Istanbul) and Professor and GLO Fellow Kea Tijdens (University of Amsterdam and WageIndicator Foundation).

GLO Fellows Kea Tijdens and Christoph Kannengießer (CEO, German African Business Association), both chairing and speaking at the GLO Policy Panel on: “Mobilizing Human Resources in Africa”.

GLO Fellow Marco Vivarelli (Catholic University of Milan) during his keynote lecture in the keynote session “The Economics of Technology and Employment”).

Klaus F. Zimmermann during his keynote lecture about “Back to Paradise? Technology and Jobs” in the keynote session on “The Economics of Technology and Employment”.

Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin and Professor and GLO Fellow Sascha Frohwerk (FOM University, Berlin, right) after Frohwerk’s keynote lecture in the keynote session on “The Economics of Technology and Employment” receiving a thank you plate.

On Wednesday May 23, the EBES Fellow Award 2018 was given to Klaus F. Zimmermann, Professor Emeritus of Bonn University and Honorary Professor of the Free University of Berlin. He is also Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT and Honorary Professor at Maastricht University and Honorary Professor at Renmin University of China. The award was given to Zimmermann by Marco Vivarelli and Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin.

 

Wonderful emotions at the Wasserwerk Berlin. GLO Reception for all conference participants.

After the hour…. sightseeing tour of conference participants through Berlin by night. Friends Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin (right) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (left) at the Brandenburg Gate.

Aylin Akin (Assistant Editor of the EBES Journals) and Klaus F. Zimmermann as part of the effective EBES team in front of the Brandenburg Gate. Zimmermann is also a member of the Executive Board of EBES and a member of the Editorial Board of the Eurasian Economic Review.

Managing Editor Ender Demir (Istanbul Medeniyet University) of the Eurasian Business Review with Klaus F. Zimmermann in front of the Brandenburg Gate.

The old West Berlin, view on the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church from a prominent event place near-by enjoying free time and drinks after the very successful EBES25 Berlin conference and a great dinner at Gendarmenmarkt.

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Danny Blanchflower joins GLO as additional Research Director

David Blanchflower is the Bruce V Rauner Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, part-time professor at the University of Stirling, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was an external member of the monetary policy committee at the Bank of England from June 2006 to May 2009.

With currently 61.4 K followers on Twitter, Blanchflower is one of the most visible economists of our time in the social media.

Blanchflower is now appointed GLO Research Director dealing with global labor policy issues in advanced economies including happiness research, wage formation and Brexit. He complements GLO Research Director Corrado Giulietti, who focuses on discrimination, migration, China and developing countries.

See his website and follow him on Twitter: @D_Blanchflower

For some of his recent public comments see:

“Brexit has bumped us from the fast lane to the slow lane – experts debate the data”, The Guardian, 28th November 2017

“University vice-chancellors deserve more pay, not less. Here’s why”, The Guardian,  22 November 2017

“The Government’s lack of Brexit plan showed in the Budget”, The Mirror, 22 November 2017

“Can an interest rate rise halt UK inflation? Experts debate the data”, The Guardian, 24 October 2017

“A place in the sun, in Hurricane Alley: was this my worst investment ever?”, The Guardian 22nd September 2017

Ends;

Oded Galor of Brown University becomes Editor of the Journal of Population Economics. Interview with Galor about Unified Growth Theory and journal editing.

On 1 July 2018, Oded Galor becomes Editor of the Journal of Population Economics following Erdal Tekin, who has taken the position of Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management (JPAM) (see for further details). For an interview with Oded Galor see below.

Oded Galor (Herbert H. Goldberger Professor of Economics at Brown University) is the founder of Unified Growth Theory. He has contributed to the understanding of process of development over the entire course of human history and the role of deep-rooted factors in the transition from stagnation to growth and in the emergence of the vast inequality across the globe. He has pioneered the exploration of the impact of human evolution, population diversity, and inequality on the process of development and his interdisciplinary research has redirected research in the field of economic growth to the exploration of the long shadow of history and to the role of biogeographical and demographic forces in comparative economic development.

The Journal of Population of Economics is the top journal in the field of population economics. It is an international research journal that publishes original theoretical and applied contributions on the economics of population, household, and human resources. It is owned by Springer Nature and operates from POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, The Netherlands. It is published in collaboration with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the European Society for Population Economics (ESPE).

The Journal of Population Economics is one of the top ranked Springer Nature journals in economics. In 2017 it has published 40 research papers out of 524 submissions, which implies a 92.4% final rejection rate. Submissions have significantly increased, eg. doubled in the last decade from below 300 to nearly 600 this year. The impact factor has increased from 0.5 in 2007 to an expected 1.3 in 2017. For more details of the actual performance of the journal  see this post and the just published Report of the Editor-in-Chief 2018.

Journal of Population Economics

Number of Submissions to the Journal of Population Economics:

Journal of Economic Growth

Oded Galor is the Founding Editor of the Journal of Economic Growth also owned by Springer Nature and will remain in the position of Editor of this outlet. The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management (JPAM) is the top field journal in public policy and published on behalf of the Association for Public Policy and Management (APPAM). It has been ranked number 21 for 2016 among economics journals by the impact factor (IF: 3.415) with Journal of Economic Growth rank 20 (IF: 3.440) and Econometrica rank 22 (IF: 3.379). Oded Galor and Klaus F. Zimmermann see a large strategic benefit for both the Journal of Economic Growth and the Journal of Population Economics in a close collaboration.

As Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is also the GLO President, stated:

“Oded is a legendary figure, both as top researcher and an admired journal editor. He has already served for decades as Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics and understands the relevance and context of our work. Sandro Cigno, Junsen Zhang, Michaella Vanore and I are very excited to work with him. We all share the same ambitions and the expectations to make the Journal of Population Economics an even more influential academic outlet of the field.”

Interview with Oded Galor

  1. What makes population economics an exciting field of analysis for a leading researcher in the field of economic growth?

Oded Galor: The transition from an epoch of stagnation to an era of sustained economic growth has marked the onset of one of the most remarkable transformations in the course of human history. While living standards in the world economy stagnated during the millennia preceding the Industrial Revolution, income per capita has undergone an unprecedented tenfold increase over the past two centuries, profoundly altering the level and distribution of education, health, and wealth across the globe. The rise in the standard of living has not been universally shared among individuals and societies. Variation in the timing of the take-off from stagnation to growth has led to a vast worldwide divergence in income per capita. Inequality, which had been modest until the nineteenth century, has widened considerably, and the ratio of income per capita between the richest and the poorest regions of the world has been magnified.

Throughout most of human existence, the process of development was marked by Malthusian stagnation. Resources generated by technological progress and land expansion were channeled primarily toward an increase in the size of the population, providing only a glacial contribution to the level of income per capita in the long run. Cross-country technological differences were reflected in variations population densities, and their effect on variation in living standards was merely transitory. In contrast, over the past two centuries, various regions of the world have departed from the Malthusian trap and have witnessed a considerable increase in growth rates of income per capita. The decline in population growth over the course of the demographic transition has liberated productivity gains from the counterbalancing effect of population growth and enabled technological progress and human capital formation to pave the way for the emergence of an era of sustained economic growth.

Thus, the pivotal role of population dynamics in the transition from Malthusian stagnation to sustained economic growth and the emergence of vast inequality across nations, makes the study of population economics central for the understanding of the growth process.

  1. What attracted a leading scholar in the field of economic growth to the Journal of Population Economics?

Oded Galor: In light of the importance of demographic forces in the understanding of the process of development and the vast inequality across the globe, the Journal of Population Economics is in a unique position to make a significant contribution in the understanding of this important relationship.

  1. What kind of research do you wish to attract to the Journal of Population Economics?

Oded Galor: I would like to encourage the submission of research papers that are centered around:

  • The causes and the consequences of the demographic transition
  • Population diversity and economic development
  • Human evolution and the process of development
  • The interaction between population and economic growth
  • Population dynamism in the Malthusian epoch

 

Picture below: Managing Editor Michaella Vanore and Klaus F. Zimmermann working intensively together at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht.

Ends;

Erdal Tekin (American University) leaves position as Editor of the Journal of Population Economics. Followed by Oded Galor of Brown University. Interview with Erdal Tekin about public policy research and journal editing.

On 1 July 2018, Erdal Tekin becomes the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management (JPAM). His role as Editor of the Journal of Population Economics will be taken by Oded Galor. For an interview with Erdal Tekin see below.

Erdal Tekin is a Professor of Public Policy in the School of Public Affairs at American University. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). His research focuses on health economics and the economics of crime.  More information about Erdal Tekin’s research and his other professional activities can be found on www.erdaltekin.com.

The Journal of Population of Economics is the top journal in the field of population economics. It is an international research journal that publishes original theoretical and applied contributions on the economics of population, household, and human resources. It is owned by Springer Nature and operates from POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, The Netherlands. It is published in collaboration with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the European Society for Population Economics (ESPE).

The Journal of Population Economics is one of the top ranked Springer Nature journals in economics. In 2017 it has published 40 research papers out of 524 submissions, which implies a 92.4% final rejection rate. Submissions have significantly increased, eg. doubled in the last decade from below 300 to nearly 600 this year. The impact factor has increased from 0.5 in 2007 to an expected 1.3 in 2017. For more details of the actual performance of the journal  see this post and the just published Report of the Editor-in-Chief 2018.

Number of Submissions to the Journal of Population Economics:

The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management (JPAM) is the top field journal in public policy and published on behalf of the Association for Public Policy and Management (APPAM). It has been ranked number 21 for 2016 among economics journals by the impact factor (IF: 3.415) with Journal of Economic Growth rank 20 (IF: 3.440) and Econometrica rank 22 (IF: 3.379).

Erdal Tekin has served as an Editor for the Journal of Population Economics between 2000 and 2018 together with the acting editors Alessandro Cigno and Junsen Zhang and Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann. For nearly two decades, Erdal Tekin took responsibility for papers dealing with risky behavior, family and labor. Together with the full team, he considerably shaped the profile and extraordinary success of the Journal of Population Economics. He also supported the development of the European Society of Population Economics (ESPE) by contributing to their annual meetings and making the connections to the local team organizing the very successful 2015 annual ESPE congress at Izmir University of Economics, Izmir, Turkey.

As Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is also the GLO President, stated:

“Erdal has been of invaluable help in developing new areas like risky behavior for the journal, ensuring the highest quality standards and always providing the requested team spirit. The remaining editorial team is grateful for his long-term contributions and will miss his advice, ambitions and inspirations. We wish him all the best in his new role as Editor-in-Chief  of this major journal, JPAM.”

The appointment of Oded Galor of Brown University as Editor of the Journal of Population Economics will be detailed in a separate post!

Interview with Erdal Tekin

Questions are by Klaus F. Zimmermann.

  1. What makes policy research so important at this historical time?

Erdal Tekin: The U.S. society and many societies across the globe are facing an increasingly complex set of pressing problems, ranging from climate change and health care to immigration and gun violence.  Unfortunately, we sometimes see that the so-called solutions to these problems are debated or evaluated through the lenses of ideology and faith. These non-scientific approaches both prolong these problems and make any remedial efforts later less likely to succeed and much costlier for the public. This is unfortunate because, thanks to the analytic tools developed by social scientists and the availability of large scale and rich data sources, we are in a position to identify effective and efficient solutions to many of these problems today. What we need is less ideology and more data-driven, evidence based approaches that are formulated based upon on policy research.

  1. What does one learn from journal editing?

Erdal Tekin: Editing a journal is a big job – it is extremely time consuming and comes with tremendous responsibility. But at the same time, it is a very gratifying experience to be at a position where you can have an influence the way in which your discipline evolves.  In my own experience serving as an editor for the Journal of Population Economics for more than eight years, I have learned tremendously from reading hundreds of papers and thousands of referee reports, which has improved my sense of what constitutes good scientific work.  As a result, I believe, or I hope, that I have become a better researcher myself. Editing a journal also forces one to become more disciplined, organized, and patient.

  1. What kind of research do you wish to attract to the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management?

Erdal Tekin: The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management (JPAM) already enjoys a well-deserved reputation of publishing innovative and empirically rigorous research that meets the highest standards of scholarship across disciplines and policy domains.  JPAM is not only the most visible journal in the academic community concerned with issues related to public policy and management, but it is also one of the most prominent journals across all social sciences with respect to its reputation and impact factor. I view it as my utmost critical responsibility to ensure that the journal continues to advance in its current trajectory and solidify its reputation as the “go to” outlet for the very best scientific contributions in public policy and management. Accordingly, a key goal of my editorship would be to continue practices that ensure that priorities of high quality and inclusivity of various disciplines and policy domains are met. The vision of JPAM that I embrace is one that emphasizes high standards, wide visibility and impact, inclusivity, and diversity.

Editorial meeting during the 2015 annual ESPE congress at Izmir University of Economics, Izmir, Turkey. From the left: Sandro Cigno, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Katharina Wetzel-Vandai (Economics Editor of Springer Nature) and Erdal Tekin.

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Publishing frontier research – the Journal of Population Economics. 2018 Report of the Editor-in-Chief available!

Continuing the strong performance of the top journal in population economics. Annual reporting provides details of the success. The journal is global and invites top and innovative submissions of research papers from all over the world.

The Journal of Population of Economics is an international quarterly research journal that publishes original theoretical and applied contributions on the economics of population, household, and human resources. It is owned by Springer Nature and operates from POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, The Netherlands. It is published in collaboration with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the European Society for Population Economics (ESPE).

The Journal of Population of Economics is considered to be the top journal in the field of population economics. Editor-in-Chief is Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, The Netherlands), who is also the President of GLO. He had initiated the creation of ESPE, and was its first Secretary and later ESPE President.

Editors are Alessandro Cigno (University of Florence, Italy), Erdal Tekin (American University, USA) and Junsen Zhang (Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong). Managing Editor is Michaella Vanore (‎Maastricht University, The Netherlands). For the complete Editorial Board see the website. Cigno, Tekin, Zhang and Vanore are also GLO Fellows.

After the Journal of Economic Growth, the Journal of Population Economics is the highest ranked Springer Nature journal in economics. It publishes 40 research papers out of 524 (2017) submissions, which implies a 92.4% final rejection rate. Submissions have significantly increased also in 2018, so that the number of submissions obtained in this year is expected to be close to 600. The 2-Year Impact Factor of Clarivate Analytics (previously Thomson Reuters) for 2016 has been 1.136 (5-Year Impact Factor: 1.846); it is expected to be around 1.3 for 2017.

Number of Submissions to the Journal of Population Economics.

 

Among the submissions in 2017, 47% were from Europe, 22% from North America and 21% from Asia and the Middle East. In terms of online access to articles in 2017, 34% of the visits were from North America, 29% from Europe and 25% from Asia and the Middle East. This documents well the global reach of the Journal of Population Economics.

FOR MORE DETAILS see the new Report of the Editor-in-Chief 2018.

Report Editor-in-Chief 2018

Managing Editor Michaella Vanore and Klaus F. Zimmermann working intensively together at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht.

 

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First Renmin University & GLO Conference on the Chinese labor market in Beijing on 20-21 October 2018. Submission deadline is August 15!

The School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin University of China (Beijing) and the Global Labor Organization (GLO) announce the creation of a new conference series on issues related to the Chinese labor market. The first event will take place on 20 and 21 October 2018 at Renmin University of China, Beijing. Papers or long abstracts should be submitted by 15 August 2018. CONFERENCE FLYER

First Renmin University / GLO Conference
Call for Papers
Renmin University of China, Beijing
20 and 21 October 2018

The Renmin University / GLO Conference aims to provide a platform for researchers working on topics related to the Chinese labor market, including migration, discrimination, health and well-being, education, environment, labor market policies.

The event is organized by the School of Labor and Human Resources at Renmin
University of China and the Global Labor Organization (GLO). It is part of the Chinese Labor Market Cluster of GLO headed by Cluster Lead Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton).
————————
Keynote speakers
Shi Li (Beijing Normal University)
Xin Meng (Australian National University)
Junsen Zhang (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University)
————————
Submissions
Papers or long abstracts should be submitted by August 15 2018 at renmin-glo@ruc.edu.cn

Program Committee
Sylvie Démurger (French National Centre for Scientific Research), Shuaizhang
Feng (Jinan University), Corrado Giulietti (University of Southampton), Jun
Han (Renmin University of China)

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International Summer School on Migration and Asylum joins GLO as institutional supporter. Deadline for next Summer School is June 15, 2018!

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) supports the International Summer School on Migration and Asylum (migrationschool.eu) in Bologna. migrationschool.eu has joined GLO as an institutional supporter.

The International Summer School on Migration and Asylum is a high-level training organized every year in Bologna. The School is organized by the Italian NGO Africa e Mediterraneo with the support of a number of international partners and sponsors.

Starting from 2018, the Summer School focuses on labor market integration of migrants and asylum seekers, exploring this vast topic from several perspectives, such as: analysis and comparisons of current labor integration policies for migrants and refugees in Europe, certifications and recognition of qualifications, migrants’ self-employment and self-enterprise, and more. Lectures and seminars are integrated with field visits and meetings with experts and professionals working in the field, offering contributions and training on how labour integration of migrants and asylum seekers can be translated into practice in different social and economic contexts.

The next International Summer School on Migration and Asylum will be held in Bologna from 9 -14 July 2018.

The deadline for applications is June 15, 2018!                              LINK for Registration

After two successful events, to which around 300 people from more than 40 countries have applied and more than 100 participants were selected, the main focus of this year edition will be the labor integration of migrants and refugees. Participants will be social workers, researchers, students, journalists, members of international organizations and NGOs, national and European public officials, who will have the chance to be involved in moments of training and sharing of experiences, best practices and knowledge on the topic of labor integration of migrants and refugees under the direction of international experts, academics and professionals in the field.

Flyer Summer School 2018 – Labour Integration

Program 2018 of the Summer School.

Faculty

GLO Founding Director Alessio J. G. Brown, Co‐Director of the Centre for Population, Development and Labour Economics (POP) at UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University, is a member of the Scientific Committee of the School. He is also a Speaker on this years program on “Labor Market Integration of Migrants in the European Union”.

From previous event:

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CALL FOR PAPERS: 60th ISLE Annual Labour Conference on 19-21 December 2018 in Mumbai, India

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) supports the annual conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) and the associated Indian Journal of Labour Economics. Both are partner institutions of the GLO.

CALL FOR PAPERS

60th ISLE Annual Conference, 19-21 December 2018, Mumbai, India
Conference Flyer ISLE 2018

The 60th Annual Conference of the Indian Society of Labour Economics (ISLE) will be held during 19-21 December 2018 in Mumbai, India, organized by the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research (IGIDR). The conference commemorates with the Diamond Jubilee year of the formation of ISLE.  Congratulations from GLO!

Conference Themes
– Emerging Labor Markets and Employment Challenges
– Inequality in Labor Markets and Wellbeing
– World of Work and Women

Submission of Papers:
– Submission deadline:  31 August 2018: EXTENDED TO OCTOBER 1, 2018.
– Submission details: Call for papers

GLO  intends to organize a special GLO session at this conference. Those GLO members interested to contribute to such a session are invited to contact GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com) with ideas or preliminary paper titles.

INDIAN SOCIETY OF LABOUR ECONOMICS (ISLE)   

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The Institute of Global Economic Problems in Baku/Azerbaijan joins GLO as institutional supporter. Natig Shirinzade becomes GLO Country Lead Azerbaijan

Chairman Natig Shirinzade of the Institute of Global Economic Problems has recently participated at the GLO-EBES 25 conference on May 23-25, 2018 in Berlin to present a paper on “Migration and Social Mobility within and between Countries and its Economic Consequences in the Period of Globalization”. GLO is the Global Labor Organization, EBES the Eurasia Business and Economics Society. The full program of the conference is found here.

At the Berlin conference, Chairman Natig Shirinzade and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann discussed intensively collaborations between both organizations. Zimmermann accepted an invitation of Chairman Shirinzade to visit Baku and Azerbaijan soon to discuss research and policy projects. Natig Shirinzade has accepted the position of GLO Country Lead Azerbaijan to represent GLO in this country.

The Institute of Global Economic Problems is a non-profit, non-governmental organization founded in Baku, Azerbaijan. Its mission is to provide scientists, political figures and society with true and confident information about the global economic processes, the global social problems, including migration problems, and other problems that affect economic sustainability problems. It aims to organize a live platform for discussions, dialogues, for assisting the exchange of opinions and views. The institute is considering a wide range of cooperation and collaboration with European and World think tanks and institutes. It believes that through tight connections of adequate dialogue between the scientists, organizations, countries and continents it will be able to achieve the goal to help society, the people, to overcome the forthcoming waves of globalization, which undoubtedly will influence everyone. With the help of attracted experts from the fields of sociology and economics, the Institute intends to prepare both theoretical and empirical articles on world social and economic problems.

Chairman Natig Shirinzade (right)and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann on May 25, 2018 in Berlin.

www.globin.org

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GLO Discussion Papers May 2018 & Discussion Paper of the Month

Titles and free access/links to GLO Discussion Papers

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers). Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: May

Nikolova, Milena; Nikolaev, Boris N., Family matters: involuntary parental unemployment during childhood and subjective well-being later in life, GLO Discussion Paper No. 212, May 2018. Free download.

Abstract: We are the first to examine how parental unemployment experienced during early-, mid- and late-childhood affects adult life satisfaction. Using German household panel data, we find that parental unemployment induced by plant closures and experienced during early (0-5 years) and late (11-15 years) childhood leads to lower life satisfaction at ages 18-31. Nevertheless, parental unemployment can also have a positive effect depending on the age and gender of the child. Our results are robust even after controlling for local unemployment, individual and family characteristics, parental job loss expectations, financial resources, and parents’ working time when growing up. These findings imply that the adverse effects associated with parental unemployment experienced at a young age tend to last well into young adulthood and are more nuanced than previously thought.

GLO Discussion Papers of May 2018

213 Microsimulation Analysis of Optimal Income Tax Reforms. An Application to New Zealand – Download PDF
by Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Hérault, Nicolas & Mok, Penny

212 Family matters: involuntary parental unemployment during childhood and subjective well-being later in life – Download PDF
by Nikolova, Milena & Nikolaev, Boris N.

211 Just Like A Woman? New Comparative Evidence on the Gender Income Gap across Eastern Europe and Central Asia – Download PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo

210 National Identity under Economic Integration – Download PDF
by Chiang, Chun-Fang & Liu, Jin-Tan & Wen, Tsai-Wei

209 A nudge to quit? The effect of a change in pension information on annuitization, labor supply and retirement choices among older workers – Download PDF
by Hagen, Johannes & Hallberg, Daniel & Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella

208 The Last of the Lost Generations? Formal and Non-Formal Education in Ghana during Times of Economic Decline and Recovery – Download PDF
by Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Hammer, Jeffrey S.

Successful GLO team:
GLO Managing Director Matloob Piracha (University of Kent, right) and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University, left).

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Understanding the Challenges of the NEW Austrian Government Program. Video Analysis Available

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is commited to evidence-based policy making and global exchange. GLO Fellow Peter Brandner and his independent group DIE WEIS[S]E WIRTSCHAFT has now provided the videos of a series of expert panel events summarizing the core policy areas (i) health, (ii) economics, (iii) education and (iv) migration and integration policy. A number of GLO Fellows including GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann have participated in the analysis. The links to the information and the videos (all in German) are provided below. The videos are just freshly published.

Peter Brandner, Austrian Policy Advisor, University of Vienna and GLO

Die österreichische unabhängige Gruppe DIE WEIS[S]E WIRTSCHAFT macht komplexe Fragen im Sinne evidenzbasierter Politik transparent. Dem diente auch eine Veranstaltungsreihe zum Regierungsprogramm der neuen Österreichischen Regierung mit den Themenbereichen Gesundheit, Wirtschaft, Bildung und Migrations- und Integrationspolitik. Die Videos der Veranstaltungen liegen jetzt vor. Klaus F. Zimmermann, Präsident der Global Labor Organization (GLO), war an der Veranstaltung zur Migrations- und Integrationspolitik im Panel als Akteur beteiligt.

Im Regierungsprogramm 2017-2022 der neuen Österreichischen Regierung ist vieles bloß angedeutet, soll geprüft oder evaluiert werden. Aber auch konkrete Maßnahmen sind erkennbar. In der Veranstaltungsreihe

„Experten bewerten – das Regierungsprogramm auf dem Prüfstand“

organisiert unter der Leitung von GLO Fellow Peter Brandner (Wien) durch

Weis[s]e Wirtschaft

werden wesentliche Politikbereiche aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven kritisch im Lichte evidenzbasierter Politik beleuchtet und diskutiert.

Jetzt wurde das Programm weitgehend durch Videos dokumentiert vorgelegt und auf der Website DIE WEIS[S]E WIRTSCHAFT verfügbar gemacht.

17. Jänner 2018
>> Gesundheitspolitik

29. Jänner 2018
>> Wirtschaftspolitik

14. Februar 2018
>> Bildungspolitik (folgt demnächst)

27. Februar 2018
>> Migrations- und Integrationspolitik
Die Veranstaltung am 27. Februar erfolgte unter Beteiligung von GLO Präsident Klaus F. Zimmermann.

Migrations- und Integrationspolitik im Regierungsprogramm 2017-2022

Der Migrations- und Integrationspanel (von links): GLO Fellow Robert Holzmann, University of New South Wales (Sydney), Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Wien); Ursula Struppe, Dienststellenleiterin Integration und Diversität, Magistratsabteilung 17, Stadt Wien; Andreas Kresbach, Die Weis[s]e Wirtschaft; Klaus F. Zimmermann, Präsident Global Labor Organization (GLO) und Co-Direktor UNU-MERIT, Universität Maastricht; Roland Goiser, Stv. Direktor Österreichischer Integrationsfonds (ÖIF).

Literatur:
Zimmermann, Klaus F., Migrationspolitik im Mediensturm, Wirtschaftspolitische Blätter, 63 (2016), 497-508.
Zimmermann, Klaus F., Evidenzbasierte wissenschaftliche Politikberatung, Journal of Applied Social Science Studies, 134 (2014), 259-270.
Zimmermann, Klaus F., Lobbyisten der Wahrheit, Deutsche Universitätszeitung (DUZ), 3 (2015), 14-15.
Zimmermann, Klaus F., The Core of Global Scientific Policy Advice: op-ed 

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Re: Compliance with GDPR about GLO “Membership”

Dear GLO Fellow or Affiliate:

You have registered yourself at the GLO website through an own account. To comply with GDPR, we herewith remind you about this.

The information you have provided to us is based on this form: https://glabor.org/wp/join/

The key information from this is provided online visible. You can visit, access and change content through your personal account.

You do NOT receive the GLO News regularly through bulk emails, only if we find something VERY IMPORTANT.

Hence, if you wish to receive the GLO News regularly, you need to register separately for the GLO News. We do not want to flood your email account. If we will create other products of the type, we will request separate registrations.

If urgently needed, we will send general emails to all of you to inform you about important developments.

We use the provided information uniquely to identify you as a member of the network, a user of the website and a potential partner for all our announced network activities. By voluntarily registering the account, you are consenting to the storage and use of your data for GLO purposes.

Such purposes are typically listed at the website and include the bio you are providing, events, the GLO DP series, special journal issues and the cluster activities. We make your data visible and usable for others in our all joint interest. We do not give your data away to others in a different way.

You can unsubscribe from our communications through the link at the bottom of every email. Note, however, that by unsubscribing you may miss important information for you.

Please get in touch with me if there is anything unclear or you need further information: klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com

With best wishes

Klaus F. Zimmerman
GLO President

 

 

 

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Re: GLO Compliance with GDPR about GLO “News”

Hello (if you have registered here):

You have registered yourself at the GLO website for receiving GLO News by email. To comply with GDPR, we herewith remind you about this.

You have provided your email address for explicitly this service and we are using it for this purpose only. We hold this information so that you can learn about or participate in GLO activities or learn about the activities of the members and institutions of our network.

We may use your email address in a different context, for instance when you are a GLO Fellow or Affiliate, but then because you have registered separately to become a member.

Since ever, you can always unsubscribe from our communications through the link at the bottom of every email. Note, however, that by unsubscribing you may miss important information for you.

Please get in touch with me if there is anything unclear or you need further information: klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com

With best wishes

Klaus F. Zimmermann
GLO President

  

 

 

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EBES 25 in Berlin honors GLO President Zimmermann for his lifetime contributions to the areas of labor, population economics, and migration.

The 25th Conference of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES)  currently takes place on May 23-25, 2018 in Berlin/Germany. The conference program covers 525 authors from 60 countries of the world with over 300 papers presented. The event is jointly organized with the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and hosted by the FOM University in the Berlin study center. MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE EVENT.

On Wednesday May 23, the EBES Fellow Award 2018 was given to Klaus F. Zimmermann, Professor Emeritus of Bonn University and Honorary Professor of the Free University of Berlin. He is also Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT and Honorary Professor at Maastricht University and Honorary Professor at Renmin University of China.

Previous EBES Fellow Award winners  have been Giovanni Dosi (2017) and M. Hashem Pesaran (2016).

The EBES Fellow Award honors an academician for his lifetime contributions to his field. Zimmermann got the award for his outstanding achievements and invaluable contributions to the areas of labor, population economics, and migration. The award was given in an impressive ceremony with a laudation by Professor Marco Vivarelli, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy in front of over 300 conference participants.

GLO President Zimmermann appreciated the presence of a large number of collaborators, including GLO Fellows Martin Kahanec, Corrado Giulietti, Matloob Piracha, Francesco Pastore, Kea Tijdens, Almas Heshmati, Timan Brück, Milena Nikolova, Olena, Nizalova, Marco Leonardi and Nick Drydakis.

After a long day with a dense academic program, the hundreds of conference participants celebrated with Zimmermann and exchanged their views at the GLO Reception at the fantastic event place Wasserwerk Berlin. Many participants enjoyed the lovely city Berlin until very early in the morning.

 

From the left: Professor Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, Vice President of EBES, Istanbul Medeniyet University and GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann; Professor Marco Vivarelli, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, and GLO.

Zimmermann in front of the Wasserwerk Berlin.

Image result for Bilder Wasserwerk Berlin

Wasserwerk Berlin

 

 

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FOM University and GLO: GLO Fellow Alexander Spermann (Freiburg University) Appointed Professor of Economics at FOM Cologne

Alexander Spermann (University of Freiburg) and prominent German policy advisor, has accepted a position at FOM University Cologne. He was appointed Professor of Economics on May 16, 2018 in a festive ceremony  by FOM Vice-Chancellor Professor Ingrid Eumann at the FOM Cologne Study Center. Spermann will keep his affiliation with the University of Freiburg.

Alexander Spermann is also Fellow of the  Global Labor Organization (GLO). GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University) participated at the appointment ceremony. Zimmermann and Spermann worked together for many years during their tenure at the Bonn – based IZA Institute as Director and Policy Director and published together on minimum wages and the role of unions at the time of digitization.

Professor Alexander Spermann (FOM Cologne, University of Freiburg and GLO) & FOM Vice-Chancellor Professor Ingrid Eumann

The appointment of Professor Spermann deepens the relationship between GLO and FOM. Among others, FOM University Berlin hosts the forthcoming large EBES 25 & GLO congress in Berlin on May 23-25, 2018. FOM University runs 29 study centers all over in Germany and is also very active in China. FOM and GLO prepare a forthcoming conference on climate change in Hong Kong in October 2018.

GLO – President Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht & Bonn Universities) participating at the appointment ceremony in Cologne on May 16, 2018.

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GLO NEWS: Journal of Population Economics, Volume 31 Number 3, now available online!

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) supports the Journal of Population Economics.

We are pleased to distribute the new table of contents alert for Journal of Population Economics, Volume 31 Number 3 in 2018, which is now available online.

Important news

Free Access to the Lead Article

Enjoy 6 weeks free access to first paper in current issue
» Learn more

In this issue

Original Paper

The intergenerational education spillovers of pension reform in China

Cheng Yuan, Chengjian Li & Lauren A. Johnston

FREE ACCESS FOR  SIX WEEKS!

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

Private versus public old-age security

Richard C. Barnett, Joydeep Bhattacharya & Mikko Puhakka

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

Parental retirement timing: the role of unanticipated events in the lives of adult children

Marina Miller, Christopher R. Tamborini & Gayle L. Reznik

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

Why are fewer married women joining the work force in rural India? A decomposition analysis over two decades

Farzana Afridi, Taryn Dinkelman & Kanika Mahajan

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

Does it pay to care? Volunteering and employment opportunities

Stijn Baert & Sunčica Vujić

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

Informal search, bad search?: the effects of job search method on wages among rural migrants in urban China

Yuanyuan Chen, Le Wang & Min Zhang

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

Social networks and the labour market mismatch

Eleni Kalfa & Matloob Piracha

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

The effect of female education on marital matches and child health in Bangladesh

Youjin Hahn, Kanti Nuzhat & Hee-Seung Yang

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

The long-term effects of mistimed pregnancy on children’s education and employment

Cuong Viet Nguyen

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF
Original Paper

The long-term effect of childhood poverty

Rune V. Lesner

» Abstract   » Full text HTML   » Full text PDF

Journal of Population Economics

 

 

 

 

 

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