Category Archives: News

New book on: Formal Labour Market in Urban India. Job search, hiring practices and discrimination

This is a highly insightful book examining the way in which generations old inequalities by caste, ethnicity and religion interact with modern labour markets to reshape the opportunity structures in contemporary India. Its primary strength lies in its careful examination of job search strategies and the processes through which employers choose to interview and hire some candidates while excluding others.

Mamgain, Rajendra P. (2019)
Formal Labour Market in Urban India
Job search, Hiring Practices and Discrimination
New Delhi, India: SAGE Publications.

GLO Fellow: Rajendra P. Mamgain

Rajendra P. Mamgain is Professor of Economics, Giri Institute of Development Studies, Lucknow, India. He is a former Managing Editor of the Indian Journal of Labour Economics and former Director, Indian Institute of Dalit Studies, New Delhi.







Table of Content
Foreword by Sukhadeo Thorat
Preface
Introduction: Labour Market
Employment and Unemployment Situation in Urban India
City-Level Features of Employment and Unemployment
Job Search Methods and Access to Jobs
Job Mobility in Urban Labour Market
Wage Earnings and Inequality
Hiring Practices in Urban Labour Market
Discrimination and Promoting Inclusive Employment Opportunities
References
Index

Summary

This book is  a comprehensive study on the demand and supply dynamics of urban labour markets in India. It presents an in-depth analysis of job search methods, job postings, access to information, job mobility, access to quality employment and hiring practices by employers. The book covers employed as well as unemployed job seekers belonging to different genders and socio-religious groups. It examines the nature and magnitude of discrimination and related consequences on employment, income and social status of labour. It further explains how social networks and employee referrals are critical in job search and job mobility in urban India, thereby undermining the chances of those equally or more competent for a job. The book offers valuable policy suggestions towards inclusive labour market through informational symmetries, education and skill development, and promoting socially inclusive policies by private enterprises.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: Childcare and labor market performance of parents in Vietnam

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that childcare use affects labor market outcomes of parents positively in Vietnam.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 349, 2019

Childcare and Maternal Employment: Evidence from Vietnam Download PDF
by Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Hiraga, Masako & Nguyen, Cuong Viet

GLO Fellow Hai-Anh Dang

Author Abstract: Little literature currently exists on the effects of childcare use on maternal labor market outcomes in a developing country context, and recent studies offer mixed results. We attempt to fill these gaps by analyzing several of the latest rounds of the Vietnam Household Living Standards Survey spanning the early to mid-2010s. Addressing endogeneity issues with a regression discontinuity estimator based on children’s birth months, we find a sizable effect of childcare attendance on women’s labor market outcomes, including their total annual wages, household income, and poverty status. The effects of childcare attendance differ by women’s characteristics and are particularly strong for younger, more educated women. Furthermore, childcare has a medium-term effect and positively impacts men’s labor market outcomes as well.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: Student employment – Does it help with employers?

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that student employment in line with a job candidate’s field of study impress employers decisions positively.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 356, 2019

What do student jobs on graduate CVs signal to employers? – Download PDF
by Van Belle, Eva & Caers, Ralf & Cuypers, Laure & De Couck, Marijke & Neyt, Brecht & Van Borm, Hannah & Baert, Stijn

GLO Fellows Eva Van Belle & Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: Due to the prevalence and important consequences of student work, the topic has seen an increased interest in the literature. However, to date the focus has been solely on measuring the effect of student employment on later labor market outcomes, relying on signalling theory to explain the observed effects. In the current study, we go beyond measuring the effect of student work and we examine for the first time what exactly is being signaled by student employment. We do this by means of a vignette experiment in which we ask 242 human resource professionals to evaluate a set of five fictitious profiles. Whereas all types of student work signal a better work attitude, a larger social network, a greater sense of responsibility, an increased motivation, and more maturity, only student employment in line with a job candidate’s field of study is a signal of increased human capital and increased trainability.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New book on Populism: Bridging the Gaps for a Better World.

The interactions between media, populism and migration are studied in a new Oxford University Press book, now also free access online.

Co-edited by GLO Fellow Martin Ruhs. With chapters of GLO Fellows Martin Ruhs, Philip Martin and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann:

Ruhs, M., Palme, J. and Tamas, K.,
Bridging the Gaps: Linking Research to Public Debates and Policy-making on Migration and Integration
Oxford University Press, Oxford 2019.

Chapter 5: Ruhs, Martin (2019), Independent Experts and Immigration Policies in the UK: Lessons from the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) and the Migration Observatory (MigObs), in: Ruhs, M., Palme, J. and Tamas, K., Bridging the Gaps: Linking Research to Public Debates and Policy-making on Migration and Integration, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2019, pp. 69 – 83.

Chapter 8: Zimmermann, Klaus F. (2019), Gaps and Challenges of Migration Policy Advice: The German Experience, in: Ruhs, M., Palme, J. and Tamas, K., Bridging the Gaps: Linking Research to Public Debates and Policy-making on Migration and Integration, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2019, pp. 111 – 126.

Chapter 10: Martin, Philip (2019), Migration Research and Policy in the United States: Between Admissionists and Restrictionists, in: Ruhs, M., Palme, J. and Tamas, K., Bridging the Gaps: Linking Research to Public Debates and Policy-making on Migration and Integration, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2019, pp. 146 – 165.

ISSUES:

“What is the use of research in public debates and policy-making on immigration and integration? Why are there such large gaps between migration debates and migration realities, and how can they be reduced?”

“Bridging the Gaps: Linking Research to Public Debates and Policy Making on Migration and Integration provides a unique set of studies written by researchers and policy experts who were significantly involved in linking social science research to public policies.”

“Bridging the Gaps argues that we must go beyond the prevailing focus on the research-policy nexus by considering how the media, public opinion, and other dimensions of public debates can interact with research and policy-processes.”

Oxford University Press — OUP Website

Full Table of Contents:

1.       Introduction: Making Linkages Between Research, Public Debates, and Policies on International Migration and Integration – Martin Ruhs, Kristof Tamas and Joakim Palme

Part I: Linking Research, Public Debates, and Policy-Making

2.       Research, ‘Experts’, and the Politics of Migration – Christina Boswell

3.       Research-Policy Dialogues on Migrant Integration in Europe: The Impact of Politicization – Han Entzinger, Peter Scholten

4.       Informing Realities: Research, Public Opinion, and Media Reports on Migration and Integration – Will Allen, Scott Blinder, Rob McNeil

Part II: National Experiences

5.       Independent Experts and Immigration Policies in the UK: Lessons from the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) and the Migration Observatory (MigObs) – Martin Ruhs

6.       The Changing Relationships Between Research, Society and Policy in the Netherlands: Reflections on the WRR ‘Maxima Report’ – Monique Kremer

7.       Investigating Immigration and the Sustainability of the Norwegian Welfare State: The Role of Government Commissions – Grete Brochmann

8.       Gaps and Challenges of Migration Policy Advice: The German Experience – Klaus F. Zimmermann

9.       The Politicization of Evidence-Based Policies: The Case of Swedish Committees – Kristof Tamas

10.   Migration Research and Policy in the United States: Between Admissionists and Restrictionists – Philip Martin

Part III: International Experiences

11.   Understanding the Role of Evidence in EU Policy Development: A Case Study of the ‘Migration Crisis’ – Elizabeth Collett

12.   A Knowledge-Base for the EU External Migration Policy: The Case of the CARIM Observatories – Agnieszka Weinar

13.   Metropolis and Post-Truth Politics: ‘Enhancing Policy Through Research’ – Howard Duncan

14.   More Research and Fewer Experts: Global Governance and International Migration – Katy Long

Part IV: Conclusions, Lessons Learnt and the Way Forward

15. Bridging Research, Public Debates, and Policies on Migration and Integration: Lessons Learnt and Ways Forward – Joakim Palme, Martin Ruhs, and Kristof Tamas

LINK TO THE FULL MANUSCRIPT OPEN ACCESS.

RELATED TO THE POPULISM DEBATE:

In its Winter 2019 issue of “The International Economy”, the Washington DC based magazine of international economic policy, has featured a prominent symposium of views on “Why is Populism on the Rise and What Do the Populists Want?”. Klaus F. Zimmermann contributed to the debate. The link to the full text of the symposium is here. Please find the contribution of Zimmermann also HERE.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: ‘More Children, Happier Families?’

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that more children can enhance elderly parents’ subjective well-being.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 366, 2019

‘More Children, More Happiness?’: New Evidence from Elderly Parents in China – Download PDF
by Gao, Yanyan & Qu, Zhaopeng

GLO Fellow Zhaopeng Qu

Author Abstract: In this paper, we test the conventional wisdom in developing countries of ‘more children, more happiness’ by exploiting the cohort and provincial variations of elderly parents exposed to the one-child policy in China. Using nationally representative survey data from the 2015 China Health and Retirement Longitude Survey, the results from both the ordinary least square and two-stage least square methods find that more children can enhance elderly parents’ subjective well-being (SWB) measured with either life satisfaction or depression mood. The effect is channelled by raising their satisfaction with children and receiving in-kind transfers from children. The heterogeneity analysis also shows that the effect of children on parents’ life satisfaction is heterogenous to sex composition, first-birth gender, and parents’ age. Our study provides new causal evidence of the impact of fertility on elderly parents’ SWB from a developing economy.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on the ‘Immigrant-Native Wage Gap in Germany’

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals a growing gap for both foreigners and naturalized immigrants.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 350, 2019

The Immigrant-Native Wage Gap in Germany Revisited Download PDF
by Ingwersen, Kai & Thomsen, Stephan L.

GLO Fellow Stephan L. Thomsen

Author Abstract: This study provides new evidence on the levels of economic integration experienced by foreigners and naturalized immigrants relative to native Germans from 1994 to 2015. We decompose the wage gap using the method for unconditional quantile regression models by employing a regression of the (recentered) influence function (RIF) of the gross hourly wage on a rich set of explanatory variables. This approach enables us to estimate contributions made across the whole wage distribution. To allow for a detailed characterization of labor market conditions, we consider a comprehensive set of socio-economic and labor-related aspects capturing influences of, e.g., human capital quality, cultural background, and the personalities of immigrants. The decomposition results clearly indicate a significant growing gap with higher wages for both foreigners (13.6 to 17.6 %) and naturalized immigrants (10.0 to 16.4 %). The findings further display a low explanation for the wage gap in low wage deciles that is even more pronounced within immigrant subgroups. Cultural and economic distances each have a significant influence on wages. A different appreciation of foreign educational qualifications, however, widens the wage gap substantially by 4.5 ppts on average. Moreover, we observe an indication of deterioration of immigrants’ human capital endowments over time relative to those of native Germans.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New book on: Global Mobility of Highly Skilled People

The book positions itself within the discussion on high-skilled self-initiated expatriation (SIE): Taking cross-disciplinary approaches; connecting to theories about international migration and mobility; and moving away from the restrictive human resource management discipline, where the concept of SIE was developed.

Habti, Driss and Maria Elo (2019) Global Mobility of Highly Skilled People: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Self-initiated Expatriation. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.
Details and Table of Contents.

Driss Habti is postdoctoral researcher in sociology of migration at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland
Maria Elo is doctor of economics and lecturer in international business and marketing at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

GLO Fellow Driss Habti

Summary: This volume examines self-initiated expatriates (SIEs), the category of highly skilled people whose movement from one country to another is by choice. Although they are not forced to relocate due to work, conflict or natural disaster, their migration pattern is every bit as complex. The book challenges previous theoretical approaches that take for granted a more simplistic view of this population, and advances that mobility of SIEs relates to the expatriates themselves, their conditions and the different structures intervening in their career life course. With their visible increase worldwide, this book positions itself as a nexus for this on-going discussion, while linking self-initiated expatriation to the theoretical landscape of international skilled migration and mobility. Major interests that catch attention are transnational practices, work-related experiences and personal life course, including forms of inequalities in their migration experiences. The book identifies forms and drivers of migratory behaviour and provides an argument concerning the broader processes of mobility and integration. As such, this book constitutes a departure point for future research in terms of theoretical underpinnings and empirical rigor on global highly skilled mobility of SIEs. The collection of empirical case studies offers an insightful analysis for policy makers, concerned stakeholders and organizations to better cope with this form of migration.   

3 of the 13 chapters:

Habti, D. and Elo, M. (2019) Rethinking Self-Initiated Expatriation in International Highly Skilled Migration. In Driss Habti and Maria Elo (eds.), Global Mobility of Highly Skilled People: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Self-Initiated Expatriation (1–37). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Habti, D. (2019). Mapping drivers of Arab highly skilled self-initiated expatriation to Finland: Personal-professional life pendulum. In Driss Habti & Maria Elo (Eds.), Global mobility of highly skilled people-Multidisciplinary perspectives on self-initiated expatriation (pp. 107–145). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Elo, M. and Habti, D. (2019) Self-Initiated Expatriation Rebooted: A Puzzling Reality – A Challenge to Migration Research and its Future Direction. In Driss Habti & Maria Elo (Eds.), Global mobility of highly skilled people-Multidisciplinary perspectives on self-initiated expatriation (pp. 293–304). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Ethnic Identity and Immigrant Employment Outcomes’

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals that multiple cultural identities improve the employment outcomes of migrants and enable better post-immigration policies in France.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 345, 2019

Ethnic Identity and the Employment Outcomes of Immigrants: Evidence from France Download PDF
by Delaporte, Isaure

GLO Affiliate Isaure Delaporte

Author Abstract: The objective of this paper is twofold: first, to determine the immigrants’ ethnic identity, i.e. the degree of identification to the culture and society of the country of origin and the host country and second, to investigate the impact of ethnic identity on the immigrants’ employment outcomes. Using rich survey data from France and relying on a polychoric principal component analysis, this paper proposes two richer measures of ethnic identity than the ones used in the literature, namely: i) the degree of commitment to the origin country culture and ii) the extent to which the individual holds multiple identities. The paper investigates the impact of the ethnic identity measures on the employment outcomes of immigrants in France. The results show that having multiple identities improves the employment outcomes of the migrants and contribute to help design effective post-immigration policies.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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Beyond the Average: GLO DP 322 now published in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization

Children of low-educated parents benefit significantly from the presence of high-educated parental peers of the same ethnicity. GLO Discussion Paper No. 322 just published in JEBO.

Chakraborty, Tanika & Schüller, Simone & Zimmermann, Klaus F.: Beyond the Average: Ethnic Capital Heterogeneity and Intergenerational Transmission of Education, in: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (JEBO), Vol. 163 (2019), pp. 551-569. Published PDF.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 322, 2019

Beyond the Average: Ethnic Capital Heterogeneity and Intergenerational Transmission of Education Download PDF
by Chakraborty, Tanika & Schüller, Simone & Zimmermann, Klaus F.

GLO Fellows Tanika Chakraborty, Simone Schüller & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann

Author Abstract: Estimating the effect of ethnic capital on human capital investment decisions is complicated by the endogeneity of immigrants’ location choice, unobserved local correlates and the reflection problem. We exploit the institutional setting of a rare immigrant settlement policy in Germany, that generates quasi-random assignment across regions, and identify the causal impact of heterogeneous ethnic capital on educational outcomes of children. Correcting for endogenous location choice and correlated unobservables, we find that children of low-educated parents benefit significantly from the presence of high-educated parental peers of the same ethnicity. High educated parental peers from other ethnicities do not influence children’s learning achievements. Our estimates are unlikely to be confounded by the reflection problem since we study the effects of parental peers’ human capital which is pre-determined with respect to children’s outcomes. Our findings further suggest an increase in parental aspirations as a possible mechanism driving the heterogeneous ethnic capital effects, implying that profiling peers or ethnic role models could be important for migrant integration policies.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Immigration and the Well-being of Europeans’

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that the well-being of native Europeans is not affected by increasing immigrant population shares.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 352, 2019

The effect of immigration on natives’ well-being in the European Union Download PDF
by O’Connor, Kelsey J.

GLO Fellow Kelsey J. O’Connor

Author Abstract: Immigration is one of the most debated topics in Europe today, yet little is known about the overall effect of its multiple impacts. The analysis suggests natives need not worry. Increasing immigrant population shares have no statistically significant effects on natives’ well-being in 28 European Union countries over the years 1990- 2017 (EU12) and 2005-2017 (new member states) using macro data aggregated from Eurobarometer surveys. Immigration does not statistically affect natives’ well-being across all scenarios, such as: when observing the raw data or accounting for reverse causality and omitted variables using instrumental variable methods; accounting for whether or not immigrants are from the EU; and for population subgroups, notably the poorly educated and elderly. Refugees also do not statistically affect the well-being of natives. Any negative relations that are observed are not statistically significant and exhibit small magnitudes.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Do Public Pension Benefits Affect Private Household Transfers to the Elderly Parents?’

A new GLO Discussion Paper provides evidence that pension benefits lower the propensity of adult children to transfer income to elderly parents in China, and also finds a small crowding-out effect.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 357, 2019

Do Private Household Transfers to the Elderly Respond to Public Pension Benefits? Evidence from Rural China – Download PDF
by Nikolov, Plamen & Adelman, Alan

GLO Fellow Plamen Nikolov

Author Abstract: Aging populations in developing countries have spurred the introduction of public pension programs to preserve the standard of living for the elderly. The often-overlooked mechanism of intergenerational transfers, however, can dampen these intended policy effects, as adult children who make income contributions to their parents could adjust their behavior in response to changes in their parents’ income. Exploiting a unique policy intervention in China, we examine using a difference-in-difference-in-differences (DDD) approach how a new pension program impacts inter vivos transfers. We show that pension benefits lower the propensity of adult children to transfer income to elderly parents in the context of a large middle-income country, and we also estimate a small crowd-out effect. Taken together, these estimates fit the pattern of previous research in high-income countries, although our estimates of the crowd-out effect are significantly smaller than previous studies in both middle- and high-income countries.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Tax implicit value judgements, redistribution and income inequality’

A new GLO Discussion Paper reveals the drivers of inequality behind tax and transfer policies in the UK.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 359, 2019

The evolution of tax implicit value judgements, redistribution and income inequality in the UK: 1968 to 2015  Download PDF
by van de Ven, Justin & Hérault, Nicolas

GLO Fellow Nicolas Herault

Author Abstract: An issue of interest in the literature that explores the drivers of inequality is the distributional bearing of tax and transfer policy, where an important theme concerns changes in the relative treatment of alternative population subgroups. We develop an empirical approach for quantifying the value judgements implicit in the relative treatment of demographic subgroups by a tax and transfer system. We apply this approach to UK data reported at annual intervals between 1968 and 2015, documenting remarkable improvements in tax and transfer treatment enjoyed by some population subgroups – particularly families with children and age pensioners – relative to the wider population. We show that accounting for the changing value judgements implicit in tax and transfer policy provides a fresh perspective on the evolution of income inequality and redistribution; one that departs from the prevailing view that UK inequality stopped rising from the early 1990s.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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Special Issue of the International Journal of Manpower on ‘Advances on School-To-Work Transitions’

On the joint initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the International Journal of Manpower, Francesco Pastore (University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli” and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and GLO) have edited two special issues of the journal on Advances on School-To-Work Transitions. The project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “School-to-Work Transitions” headed by Francesco Pastore. Part I is now published.

FULL TABLE OF CONTENT AND LINKS:
PART I PUBLISHED AS VOLUME 40, ISSUE 3, 2019.

Francesco Pastore and Klaus F. Zimmermann (2019), “Understanding school-to-work transitions”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 374-378. Pre-publication draft.

Corinna Ghirelli, Enkelejda Havari, Giulia Santangelo and Marta Scettri (2019), “Does on-the-job training help graduates find a job? Evidence from an Italian region”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 500-524.

Simona Demel, Petr Mariel and Jürgen Meyerhoff (2019), “Job preferences of business and economics students”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 473-499.

Irene Selwaness and Rania Roushdy (2019), “Young people school-to-work transition in the aftermath of the Arab Spring”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 398-432.

Paula Rodriguez-Modroño (2019), “Youth unemployment, NEETs and structural inequality in Spain”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 433-448.

Emanuela Ghignoni, Giuseppe Croce and Alessandro d’Ambrosio (2019), “University dropouts vs high school graduates in the school-to-work transition”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 449-472.

Jacek Liwiński (2019), “Does it pay to study abroad? Evidence from Poland”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 525-555.

Gabriella Berloffa, Eleonora Matteazzi, Alina Şandor and Paola Villa (2019), “Gender inequalities in the initial labour market experience of young Europeans”, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 379-397.

Francesco Pastore and Klaus F. Zimmermann

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Birth Weight and Child Cognitive Development’

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that health policies designed to improve birth weight could improve human capital in resource-poor settings.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 358, 2019

Birth Weight and Cognitive Development during Childhood: Evidence from India – Download PDF
by Kumar, Santosh & Kumar, Kaushalendra & Laxminarayan, Ramanan & Nandi, Arindam

GLO Fellow Santosh Kumar

Author Abstract: Health at birth is an important indicator of human capital development over the life course. This paper uses longitudinal data from the Young Lives survey and employs instrumental variable regression models to estimate the effect of birth weight on cognitive development during childhood in India. We find that a 10 percent increase in birth weight increases cognitive test score by 8.1 percent or 0.11 standard deviations at ages 5-8 years. Low birth weight infants experienced a lower test score compared with normal birth weight infants. The positive effect of birth weight on a cognitive test score is larger for boys, children from rural or poor households, and those with less-educated mothers. Our findings suggest that health policies designed to improve birth weight could improve human capital in resource-poor settings.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Technological change and occupation mobility’

A new GLO Discussion Paper deals with technological change and its impacts on labor markets caused by task demand shifts potentially foster horizontal skill mismatches. The study identifies a wage penalty of roughly 12% for horizontally mismatched individuals.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 361, 2019

Technological change and occupation mobility: A task-based approach to horizontal mismatch – Download PDF
by Aepli, Manuel

GLO Affiliate Manuel Aepli

Author Abstract: Technological change and its impacts on labour markets are a much-discussed topic in economics. Economists generally assume that new technology penetrating the labour market shifts firms’ task demand. Given individuals’ acquired and supplied skills, these task demand shifts potentially foster horizontal skill mismatches, e.g. individuals not working in their learned occupations. In this paper, I first analyse the relation between task shifting technological change and individuals’ horizontal mismatch incidence. Second, I estimate individuals’ mismatch wage penalties triggered by this relation. The present paper proposes an instrumental variable (IV) approach to map this mechanism and to obtain causal estimates on mismatch wage penalties. Applying this empirical strategy yields a wage penalty of roughly 12% for horizontally mismatched individuals.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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Call for Contributions: Inaugural Workshop on “Health, Inequality and Behavior” on November 11-13 at Macquarie University, Sydney/Australia.

The Department of Economics at Macquarie University in collaboration with Macquarie University Centre for Health Economy (MUCHE) and Global Labor Organization (GLO) are organizing an international conference entitled the Economics of Health, Inequality and Behavior (WEHIB), to be held in Sydney, Australia over 11-13 November 2019. This multidisciplinary conference aims to foster a series of dialogue among social scientists on the nexus between health, behavior, and inequality across developed and developing societies.

The event is chaired by Kompal Sinha, a Senior Lecturer and HDR Director at the Department of Economics of Macquarie University. Sinha is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics and the GLO Research Cluster Lead for Development, Health Inequality and Behavior. Keynote speakers are Lisa Cameron (University of Melbourne), Andrew Jones (University of York), and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht University).

Call for abstracts, deadline: August 16. More details: CONFERENCE WEBSITE.

Kompal Sinha

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Technology and Employment’

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies the sectoral patterns of job creation and job destruction in order to distinguish the alternative effects of embodied vs disembodied technological change.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 355, 2019

Technology and employment in a vertically connected economy: a model and an empirical test – Download PDF
by Dosi, G. & Piva, M. & Virgillito, M. E. & Vivarelli, M.

GLO Fellows Giovanni Dosi, Mariacristina Piva, Maria Enrica Virgillito & Marco Vivarelli

Author Abstract: This paper addresses, both theoretically and empirically, the sectoral patterns of job creation and job destruction in order to distinguish the alternative effects of embodied vs disembodied technological change operating into a vertically connected economy. Disembodied technological change turns out to positively affect employment dynamics in the “upstream’’ sectors, while expansionary investment does so in the “downstream’’ industries. Conversely, the replacement of obsolete capital vintages tends to exert a negative impact on labour demand, although this effect turns out to be statistically less robust.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Aging and migration. Benefits and Challenges.’

Migrants work and broaden the tax burden and help to adjust in the face of population aging. But they may threaten local social norms and culture when they maintain the culture of their country of origin. The new GLO Discussion Paper debates the balance for aging societies.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 351, 2019

Who is in favor of immigration Download PDF
by Epstein, Gil S. & Katav-Herz, Shirit

GLO Fellows Gil S. Epstein & Shirit Katav-Herz

Author Abstract: Population ageing affects most countries, especially developed ones. The elderly have increased in number as a result of increased longevity and a parallel decline in fertility. This phenomenon is placing an increasing burden on the young to finance intergenerational transfers to the old, which is creating a threat to the stability of the pension system and the long-run viability of society as a whole. One possible solution is to permit more immigration, which will both increase the labor force and broaden the tax base. Increasing immigration has a variety of effects on the local population, which vary according to age and wealth. One of these is the threat to local social norms and culture since immigrants tend to maintain the culture of their country of origin. This effect increases with the number of immigrants and reduces the attractiveness of immigration as a solution to population ageing. This paper examines immigration as a solution to the problem of ageing population, while considering the implication of immigration on social norms.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Child Health Problems and Family Structure’

Does child health affects the stability of families? A new GLO Discussion Paper shows that family structure variables, such as marriage duration, age when last married, the probability of getting divorced, the probability of getting married and the presence of a spouse/partners in the household, experience a notorious trend break over the life cycle when women have babies in their early forties. It hypothesizes that the observed facts are driven by a significant increase in the risk of having a child with health problems when women enter the last decade of their reproductive life.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 354, 2019

Will You Marry Me … if Our Children Are Healthy? The Impact of Maternal Age and the Associated Risk of Having a Child with Health Problems on Family Structure – Download PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

GLO Fellows Federico H. Gutierrez

Author Abstract: Family structure is usually believed to affect children’s human capital. Is it possible that causality goes in the opposite direction? This paper shows that the behavior of family structure variables over the life cycle dramatically changes when women have babies in their forties. These data regularities align with a significant increase in the risk of having a child with health problems when women enter the last decade of their reproductive life. I present a simple theoretical model that provides a common underlying explanation for the data patterns and generates additional testable implications and apply it to data.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: The Economics of Hategoatism Needed.

The GLO Discussion Paper proposes a new term, “HATEGOATISM,” for the simultaneous existence of scapegoatism and dehumanization, and a new Economics of Hategoatism. Currently only one subfield of economics regularly embraces hategoatism, which is Libertarianism.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 365, 2019

The Urgent Need for an Economics of “Hategoatism – Download PDF
by Payson, Steven

GLO Fellow Steven Payson

Author Abstract: The word “scapegoat” is defined as “a person made to bear the blame for others,” and similarly, “scapegoatism” refers to “the act or practice of assigning blame or failure to another, as to deflect attention or responsibility away from oneself” (Collins English Dictionary and Dictionary.com, respectively.) While these definitions do not mention economics specifically, in most cases the blame on the scapegoat is economic in nature. Scapegoatism also provides a convenient, though extremely inferior, substitute for valid analyses of economic problems. Scapegoatism, however, has a partner, dehumanization, which is the process of demonizing certain people as less than human and unworthy of humane treatment. Scapegoatism is not only accompanied by dehumanization, but it is often motivated by it. Thus, “scapegoatism” is a euphemism and it is understudied as a result, because there is no single term of art that combines scapegoatism and dehumanization. This paper offers a solution to this semantic dilemma by proposing the new term, “HATEGOATISM,” for the simultaneous existence of scapegoatism and dehumanization. Only one subfield of economics regularly embraces hategoatism, which is Libertarianism (where the “HATEGOAT” is government workers). Economists must lead by example by combating hategoatism, and that requires cleaning their own house first.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: Fluctuations of uncertainty cause fertility fluctuations.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that an increase in economic uncertainty decreases fertility.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 360, 2019

Economic Uncertainty and Fertility – Download PDF
by Gözgör, Giray & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin & Rangazas, Peter

GLO Fellows Girary Gözgör & Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin

Author Abstract: In this paper, we conduct an empirical study of the effect of uncertainty on fertility. The precautionary motive for saving predicts that an increase in uncertainty increases saving by reducing both consumption and fertility. We use a new measure of uncertainty, the World Uncertainty Index, and focus on data from 126 countries for the period from 1996 to 2017. The empirical findings indicate that uncertainty shocks decrease the fertility rate. This evidence is robust to different model specifications and econometric techniques as well as to the inclusion of various controls.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Hate of foreigners and voting behavior’

Is the voting effect of immigrant presence persistent? A new GLO Discussion Paper suggests that the effect is short-run only.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 364, 2019

Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: The case of Ukip – Download PDF
by Levi, Eugenio & Mariani, Rama Dasi & Patriarca, Fabrizio

GLO Fellows Eugenio Levi & Rama Dasi Mariani

Author Abstract: In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the causal effect of immigrant presence on anti-immigrant votes is a short-run effect. For this purpose, we consider a distributed lag model and adapt the standard instrumental variable approach proposed by Altonji and Card (1991) to a dynamic framework. The evidence from our case study, votes for the UK Independent Party (Ukip) in recent European elections, supports our hypothesis. Furthermore, we find that this effect is robust to differences across areas in terms of population density and socioeconomic characteristics, and it is only partly explained by integration issues.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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New GLO Discussion Paper: Decomposing the gender wage gap in the US.

Gender wage differences are still of much concern, in particular in the United States. A new GLO Discussion Papers adds to our understanding how the gender gap is shaped by multiple different forces such as parenthood, gender segregation, part-time work and unionization.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 363, 2019

The Gender Pay Gap in the US: A Matching Study – Download PDF
by Meara, Katie & Pastore, Francesco & Webster, Allan

GLO Fellows Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster

Author Abstract: This study examines the gender wage gap in the US using two separate cross-sections from the Current Population Survey (CPS). The extensive literature on this subject includes papers which use wage decompositions to divide gender wag gaps into “explained” and “unexplained” components. Problems with this approach include the heterogeneity of the sample data. In order to address the difficulties of comparing like with like this study uses a number of different matching techniques to obtain estimates of the gap. By controlling for a wide range of other influences, in effect, we estimate the direct effect of simply being female on wages. However, to form a complete picture, one should consider that gender wages are affected by a number of other factors such as parenthood, gender segregation, part-time working and unionization. This means that it is not just the core “like for like” comparison between male and female wages that matters but also how gender wage differences interact with other relevant risk factors which are more common for women. That these interactions exist has already been discussed in the literature but evidence that precisely or systematically estimates such effects remains scarce. The most innovative contribution of this study is to do that. Our findings imply that the idea of a single uniform gender pay gap is perhaps less useful than an understanding of how gender wages are shaped by multiple different forces.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

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July 11, 2019: Interview of SPP/Budapest with GLO President Zimmermann on the benefits and challenges of research and teaching in the Hungarian capital.

In the Spring 2019 term, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann has been the George Soros Visiting Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest. On June 28, he terminated this engagement and returned to the headquarters of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) in Bonn, Germany. See for a REPORT. Threatened by the Hungarian government, CEU has now moved its teaching to Budapest. Other Hungarian academic institutions are under monitoring by the Hungarian government.

On July 11, 2019, SSP published an interview with Zimmermann about his time in Budapest and views about the situation. LINK to the SPP website. See also text below.


KFZ

SPP: You have been GSVC at SPP. Why SPP/CEU? What does your stay at SPP/CEU offer to you in terms of research, interaction with SPP faculty and students?

KFZ: I am working on European integration and global migration issues, and have published substantially on the European Union East enlargement and its consequences for the wellbeing of European nations. I have visited Budapest a number of times in my life to interact with Hungarian academic institutions. The CEU has over time become a lighthouse institution for the academic transformation of Eastern Europe. CEU’s academic staff and students are so professional, international, multi-ethnic and multidisciplinary; it is a pleasure to interact and learn. My research benefits from the various discussions I had during the visit – with long-term effects. It therefore has been both a pleasure and a great honor the have been the GSVC.

SPP: You have authored a vast body of academic articles, books, edited volumes. Which finding was the most intriguing one, perhaps changing the way we see some policy problems?

KFZ: Unlike what the public and policymakers often think, labor migration is a coming and going. Scientist have called this circular migration. While the inflow is properly noticed, the outflow is often overlooked. If policymakers wish to stop the inflow through regulations or walls, the outcome may be the opposite of what they intended: Workers stay longer, temporary migrants become even permanent, they bring family, and those unwilling to integrate pass these attitudes to their kids who remain disintegrated in the country. At the end there are more than less migrants and their composition is more troublesome. The better solution is free (and legal) labor mobility, where societies, companies and workers are adjusting according to general rules.

SPP: What policy issues are you working on now, and how do they relate to the European project?

Europe sees a rise in nationalism, avoids necessary reform policies and is afraid about foreigners and migration. People think that the world gets better if they ignore the consequences of demographic shifts, climate change and global conflict. This is a global trend, but Europe risks its well-build institutions which brought wealth, wellbeing and peace. Hence, I am writing about the benefits and conditions of well-designed reform policies, world-wide open labor mobility and a proper refugee policy. Europe will collapse if it fails to deal with those challenges.

SPP: You are one of the most prominent advocates of evidence based policy making. What are the necessary conditions for this to work? What is the role of universities in this?  

KFZ: For such a policy to work, it needs that policymakers are collaborating with scientists. Researchers have to be willing to address pressing societal issues, execute state-of-the-art research and communicate it properly. They have to provide where possible alternative options, so that politicians can optimize with respect to the opinions of their voters. Policymakers need to listen and be willing to give larger weight to long-term efficiency issues over short-term muddling-through concepts focusing primarily on redistribution policies. Universities and research centers are core in this process, and they can only function with academic freedom. If society attempts to control and command research, the price is loss in welfare and wellbeing.

SPP: You know that Lex-CEU effectively expelling CEU from Hungary. HAS is under pressure, and several other universities. Is this a broader trend, and how should societies and academics respond to this?

KFZ: Although in line with many developments in the world suggesting a decline in the acceptance of science in society, these Hungarian experiences are dramatic. They will have huge damaging long-term effects for the Hungarian economy and society, and possibly push the country out of the European Union. This is a divide between the intellectuals and the ordinary person, a divide between brain and heart. Scientists have to go out to convey their findings, but they also need to activate and motivate the hearts. It is important to work on a European identity, not only to show that Europe creates a better economy.

SPP: You have held several professorial positions, the founding director of a prominent research institute, the Institute for the Study of Labor, the president of Germany’s largest think tank DIW, having significant academic and policy impact. From that experience, can you generalize some key lessons for young researchers, but also students, who aspire to have such an impact?

KFZ: Start as an academic, not as a policy advisor. Publish articles in established respected research journals to create an academic reputation. This is your capital as a policy advisor afterwards. Do not become partisan, or you become a politician and not the independent thinker needed. Wait for the time when the problems become so pressing so that your advice is need. This implies patience and the willingness to execute stand-by research. To be effective, seek the traditional and the social media, to achieve a global standing, and be ready to advise key policymakers at the local or national levels. Be willing to accept the huge administrative and psychological burden of directing large research institutions.

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June GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: Mental Health, Schooling and Genetic Predisposition.

Does schooling attenuates the genetic predisposition to poor mental health. The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month of June 2019  provides some empirical support, but the findings are not robust.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: June

GLO Discussion Paper No. 362, 2019

Mental Health, Schooling Attainment and Polygenic Scores: Are There Significant Gene-Environment Associations? – Download PDF
by Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Fletcher, Jason M. & Flores, Carlos A. & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Kohler, Hans-Peter

GLO Fellows Jere Behrman, Carlos Flores and Alfonso Flores – Lagunes

Author Abstract: It is well-established that (1) there is a large genetic component to mental health, and (2) higher schooling attainment is associated with better mental health. Given these two observations, we test the hypothesis that schooling may attenuate the genetic predisposition to poor mental health. Specifically, we estimate associations between a polygenic score (PGS) for depressive symptoms, schooling attainment and gene-environment (GxE) interactions with mental health (depressive symptoms and depression), in two distinct United States datasets at different adult ages- 29 years old in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and 54 years old in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS). OLS results indicate that the association of the PGS with mental health is similar in Add Health and the WLS, but the association of schooling attainment is much larger in Add Health than in the WLS. There is some suggestive evidence that the association of the PGS with mental health is lower for more-schooled older individuals in the WLS, but there is no evidence of any significant GxE associations in Add Health. Quantile regression estimates also show that in the WLS the GxE associations are statistically significant only in the upper parts of the conditional depressive symptoms score distribution. We assess the robustness of the OLS results to omitted variable bias by using the siblings samples in both datasets to estimate sibling fixed-effect regressions. The sibling fixed-effect results must be qualified, in part due to low statistical power. However, the sibling fixed-effect estimates show that college education is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in both datasets.

GLO Discussion Papers of June 2019

364 Hate at first sight? Dynamic aspects of the electoral impact of migration: The case of Ukip – Download PDF
by Levi, Eugenio & Mariani, Rama Dasi & Patriarca, Fabrizio

363 The Gender Pay Gap in the US: A Matching Study – Download PDF
by Meara, Katie & Pastore, Francesco & Webster, Allan

362 Mental Health, Schooling Attainment and Polygenic Scores: Are There Significant Gene-Environment Associations? – Download PDF
by Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Fletcher, Jason M. & Flores, Carlos A. & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Kohler, Hans-Peter

361 Technological change and occupation mobility: A task-based approach to horizontal mismatch – Download PDF
by Aepli, Manuel

360 Economic Uncertainty and Fertility – Download PDF
by Gözgör, Giray & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin & Rangazas, Peter

359 The evolution of tax implicit value judgements, redistribution and income inequality in the UK: 1968 to 2015  Download PDF
by van de Ven, Justin & Hérault, Nicolas

358 Birth Weight and Cognitive Development during Childhood: Evidence from India – Download PDF
by Kumar, Santosh & Kumar, Kaushalendra & Laxminarayan, Ramanan & Nandi, Arindam

357 Do Private Household Transfers to the Elderly Respond to Public Pension Benefits? Evidence from Rural China – Download PDF
by Nikolov, Plamen & Adelman, Alan

356 What do student jobs on graduate CVs signal to employers? – Download PDF
by Van Belle, Eva & Caers, Ralf & Cuypers, Laure & De Couck, Marijke & Neyt, Brecht & Van Borm, Hannah & Baert, Stijn

355 Technology and employment in a vertically connected economy: a model and an empirical test – Download PDF
by Dosi, G. & Piva, M. & Virgillito, M. E. & Vivarelli, M.

354 Will You Marry Me … if Our Children Are Healthy? The Impact of Maternal Age and the Associated Risk of Having a Child with Health Problems on Family Structure – Download PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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Now OUT in the Journal of Population Economics: Internal migration affects the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind in China.

A new study examines how migration of an adult child affects the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind in China. It finds that migration reduces happiness and leads to more loneliness among the elderly.

Read more in:

Juliane Scheffel & Yiwei Zhang: How does internal migration affect the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind? Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 32 (2019), Issue 3, pp. 953-980.

Journal Website. Download PDF of article for free – OPEN ACCESS

GLO Fellow Juliane Scheffel

Author Abstract: The ageing population resulting from the one-child policy and massive flows of internal migration in China pose major challenges to elderly care in rural areas where elderly support is based on a traditional inter-generational family support mechanism. We use data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study to examine how migration of an adult child affects the emotional health of elderly parents left-behind. We identify the effects using fixed effects and IV approaches which rely on different sources of variation. We find that migration reduces happiness by 6.6 percentage points and leads to a 3.3 percentage points higher probability of loneliness. CES-D scores of elderly parents are severely increased pushing average scores close to the cut-off indicating clinical levels of depressive symptoms. As emotional health is a key determinant of the overall health status, our findings have significant impacts on economic development in China.

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Now OUT in the Journal of Population Economics: Your spouse is fired! How much do you care?


Unemployment reduces the life satisfaction of the partner! However, while wives’ life satisfaction does not recover even two years after their partners becoming unemployed, husbands only react to their wives’ joblessness during the first year of unemployment.

Read more in:
Milena Nikolova & Sinem H. Ayhan: Your spouse is fired! How much do you care?
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 32 (2019), Issue 3, pp. 799-844.

Journal Website. Download PDF of article for free – OPEN ACCESS

GLO Fellows Milena Nikolova and Sinem H. Ayhan

Author Abstract: This study is the first to provide a causal estimate of the cross-spouse subjective well-being consequences of unemployment. Using German panel data on married and cohabiting partners for 1991–2015 and information on exogenous unemployment entry due to workplace closure, we show that one spouse’s unemployment experience reduces the life satisfaction of the other partner. The estimated spillover is at least one quarter of the effect of own unemployment and is equally pronounced among female and male partners. In addition, while wives’ life satisfaction does not recover even two years after their partners becoming unemployed, husbands only react to their wives’ joblessness during the first year of unemployment. Our results are insensitive to income controls and the couple’s position in the income distribution, thus reflecting the non-pecuniary costs of unemployment. Although the income loss hardly explains the negative spillover effects of unemployment on spousal life satisfaction, we document large declines in spousal satisfaction with household income and living standards. This finding supports the argument that the costs of unemployment borne by indirectly affected spouses extend beyond the loss of consumption opportunities and might be rather related to social values attached to market work. Being robust to a battery of sensitivity checks, our findings imply that public policy programs aimed at mitigating unemployment’s negative consequences need to target not only those directly affected but also cohabiting spouses.

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June 28, 2019: GLO President returns from Budapest to Bonn

In April – June 2019, Klaus F. Zimmermann has been the George Soros Visiting Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest. On June 28, he terminated this engagement and returned to the headquarters of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) in Bonn, Germany, which he leads as the President. Major activities in Budapest were:

  • June 20: Budapest, Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Research Seminar provided on Global Labor Economics. Report.
  • June 5: Budapest, Hungary. Central European University  (CEU), The Future of Europe after the European Elections, Chair of the Panel with Martin Kahanec (Budapest), Elsa Fornero (Turin) and Jonathan Portes (London). Report.
  • May 8: Budapest. George Soros Public Lecture, Central European University  (CEU), School of Public Policy. Report.
  • May – June: Budapest. Central European University (CEU), School of Public Policy. Lecture on Global Labor Economics for the CEU students. Report.

Forced by the Hungarian government, CEU is moving to Vienna. The Hungarian Academy of Sciences experiences a strict supervision of the Hungarian government. This is a sad development in a country, which was once the window to freedom.

In front of the CEU major building in Budapest:

With Research Assistant Svetlin Iliev at the CEU library (both left) and after the farewell lunch on June 27.

Thanks to a lovely city and its people for a wonderful visit at challenging times.



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Kigali, Rwanda, June 12-14, 2019. GLO Fellows supported as keynote speakers the 4th International Conference of Eastern Africa Business and Economic Watch (4th EABEW-2019)

Theme: “Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation”  
June 12-14, 2019, College of Business and Economics, University of Rwanda, Kigali , and at Hotel NOBLEZA, Kigali
 

  • June 12-14, 2019: Kigali, Rwanda. College of Business and Economics, University of Rwanda and Hotel Nobleza hosted the 4th EABEW Conference (International Conference of Eastern Africa Business and Economic Watch) on “Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation” with GLO support. GLO Fellows Manfred Fischedick, Almas Heshmati, Hans Lööf and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann were among the invited speakers. Almas Heshmati is the academic Lead of the GLO Research Cluster on “Labor Markets in Africa”. GLO Fellow Rama B. Rao , University of Rwanda, was the Chair of the Organizing Committee of the conference.
  • High quality invited and contributed papers in plenary and parallel sessions. Original evidence based theoretical, methodological, empirical research, policy or practice oriented research papers on the theme were presented by researchers, academicians, and industry practitioners in the areas of economics and business management and other interdisciplinary fields.
  • Examine the full program.

Keynote speakers and key organizers (from the right): Rama B. Rao (University of Rwanda and GLO), Manfred Fischedick (Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment & Energy, Germany, and GLO), Hans Lööf (Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and GLO), Benson Honig (McMaster University), Faustin Gasheja (Principal, College of Business and Economics, University of Rwanda ), Almas Heshmati (Jönköping International Business School, Sweden, and GLO), and Klaus F. Zimmermann (Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, and President, GLO, Bonn, Germany).

Keynote speeches were:

Klaus F. Zimmermann: The Value of Global Labor Mobility

Manfred Fischedick: Climate Change and Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation

Hans Lööf: Knowledge Spillover, Innovation and Exporting

Almas Heshmati: Sustainable Development in Rwanda

Benson Honig: Researching the “other”: Successful Approaches and Ongoing Challenges Toward Generalizability

Scenes from the conference at the University of Rwanda (first row on June 12) and in the conference facilities of Hotel Nobleza (second row on June 13 – 14). Second and third picture, person from the right: GLO Fellow Lars Hartvigson (Jönköping University, Sweden).

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (i) in front of the Nobleza conference center, (ii) after his keynote speech with university representative, (iii) discussing on the right and (iv) with the speakers and some participants of the sessions he chaired.

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GLO Fellows met on June 5 at the CEU in Budapest to discuss the future of Europe after the recent elections

Quo Vadis Europe after the European elections? Martin Kahanec and Klaus F. Zimmermann (both Budapest) debated on June 5, 2019 with Elsa Fornero (Turin) and Jonathan Portes (London) the consequences and perspectives for Europe in front of a larger audience assembled at the Central European University in Budapest. Zimmermann, President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), was chairing and moderating the event; Fornero, Kahanec and Portes are GLO Fellows.

The common economic and political development in Europe, in particular labor mobility, labor market reforms, evidence-based policy making and the role of scientists have been key elements of the public debate about the future of Europe. EU-pessimism has become stronger and stronger, and the recent EU elections provide guidance about the potentials for a recovery of the European idea in the face of Brexit and a possible dismantling of European institutions. The panel brought together experienced academic exponents combing research with policy for debate at this critical point of European history.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, George Soros Chair Professor, School of Public Policy, Central European University (CEU), President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), frequent advisor to the EU Commission and European governments and Former President of the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin); Chair & Panelist

  • Populism and anti-globalism is on the rise.
  • Evidence-based policymaking is losing weight.
  • The value of migration and international institutions is questioned.
  • The freedom of academic institutions gets under threat.
  • Scientist are challenged to analyze and to respond to this development when also their insights are ignored.
  • Voters move away from centrist parties, who lose majority.
  • Pro-European liberals and greens become stronger and are now a third force.
  • Anti-parties (anti-Europe, anti-migration) are stronger, but not dramatically.
  • This is all a vote for a revival of the European idea.
  • Facing strong global challenges from Asia, Africa and the USA, Europe needs to stick together and develop from its strength.
  • More Europe not less is needed in the interest of the European nations and its people.
  • This implies re-inventing the European idea and export some of its great institutions: social institutions, education and training and labor mobility.

Elsa Fornero, Professor of Economics, University of Turin, Department of Business and Economics, Scientific Coordinator of CeRP – Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies and Former Minister of Labor, Social Policies and Gender Equality in Italy; Panelist

  • Reforms must live in society with the people – workers, politicians, pensioners, etc. It is not a purely technical problem.
  • We, technocrats, believed in reforms but the society did not accept them. The society misunderstood the policies as austerity measures.
  • Economic models are dealing with prosperity, but real policymaking is about elections, which are always around the corner.
  • The populists saw the weak points of reformists and the discontent of people and exploited them.
  • Labor mobility and work in Europe should be reestablished as a right of the individuals and this should be in the center of the new Europe.
  • We should strengthen the civil society – politicians and the elites should go out and talk to the people.

Martin Kahanec, Professor and Dean of the School of Public Policy, Central European University (CEU), Budapest, and frequent advisor to the EU Commission; Panelist

  • These elections showed the discontent between East and West, South and North, globalists and localists
  • In the 90s the region had a dream – get rid of the Soviets, which unified the societies. And move back to Europe – Schengen, EU, Eurozone, etc. However, after they joined the EU there is a vacuum of dreams. What is our next mission?
  • Although the lowest election participation was in Slovakia, it is a EU positive country.
  • Elites and workers feared migration from outside of Europe. But not internal labor mobility.
  • Internal mobility helps build bridges over the old cleavages, but is also beneficial economically.
  • Europe should have a policy for external migration which tackles the aging population challenge. The EU needs a migration framework, which is economically profitable, but also needs to have control and be predictable.

Jonathan Portes, Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Senior Fellow, UK in a Changing Europe, Department of Political Economy, King’s College London, Former Chief Economist of the UK government, Former Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research; Panelist

  • The long term forces behind Brexit were not migration, but that the EU is not only an economic but also a political project. And the British felt that their positions in the world were threatened. Sentiments in this direction grew after the world economic crisis.
  • The British attitude towards migration has changed after the referendum, becoming more positive. It has to do with a drop in the migration from the EU, and an increase from the outside. The gaps created were filled with workers from outside of the EU, and the need was better understood.
  • The lack of control scared people because they wanted the “right” immigration
  • If one provides a sense of control and of the existing trade-offs, the situation will approve.
  • Thanks to the failure of May we are likely to have a hard Brexit or to reverse the results and stay in the EU. There is no middle ground anymore. Even if in a second vote the result would be “remain” – the issue would not be settled.
  • People thought that Brexit would be easy and not painful; they now realize how wrong they were.
  • If Germany turns into success its refugee immigration, then Germans would send to Europe a tremendously positive example. 

From the left during the panel: Klaus F. Zimmermann, Chair, Budapest and Bonn; Jonathan Portes, London; Elsa Fornero, Turin; and Martin Kahanec, Budapest and Vienna.

After the panel during a joint dinner from the left: The Honorable Tanya Cook, USA; CEU Professor Anil Duman and GLO Fellow; Turin Professor and Former Labor Minister Elsa Fornero; CEU Dean and Professor Martin Kahanec; and Klaus F. Zimmermann, George Soros Chair, CEU, and GLO President.

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28th EBES conference takes place at Coventry/UK on May 29-31, 2019.

May 29-31: Coventry, UK. 28th EBES conference. The Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES) meets with support of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) at the Coventry Business School. For the full program see here.

EBES President Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is also the President of GLO, will open the EBES congress on Wednesday. GLO members are involved in two important conference panel sessions, among others, on Wednesday May 29:

EBES & GLO Panel on “The Future of Europe and Brexit after the EU Election”:

09:30-10:30
Chair & Introduction: Klaus F. Zimmermann, President, EBES & GLO & Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, EBES, GLO, & Istanbul Medeniyet University, Turkey
Matloob Piracha, Director GLO & University of Kent, United Kingdom
Dorothea Schäfer, DIW Berlin, GLO, & Jönköping University, Sweden
Marco Vivarelli, GLO& Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milano, Italy

JOURNAL EDITORS SPECIAL SESSION: How to Publish in WOS Journals?

14:30-15:50
Klaus F. Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Population Economics (SSCI)
David B. Audretsch, Editor-in-Chief, Small Business Economics (SSCI)
Marco Vivarelli, Editor-in-Chief, Eurasian Business Review (SSCI)
Dorothea Schäfer, Editor-in-Chief, Eurasian Economic Review (Scopus & ESCI)

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Budapest June 5, 2019. Public debate at the Central European University about the future of Europe after the European elections.

Quo Vadis Europe after the European elections? Voters moved away from centrists parties, but have stabilized Europe-friendly forces. Is this a new chance for Europe? Is climate change the challenge to develop the joint European vision?

GLO Fellows Elsa Fornero (Turin), Jonathan Portes (London), Martin Kahanec (Budapest) and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (both Budapest and Bonn) debate the consequences and perspectives for Europe.

Time and place: Wednesday, June 5, 2019. 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm. Nador utca 15, Tiered 103. Central European University (CEU), Budapest. The panel debate will be public.

Further details about the event see below.

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GLO President delivered George Soros Lecture on May 8, 2019 at the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest

In a public speech at the Central European University on May 8, 2019, GLO President Zimmermann delivered his George Soros Lecture on “Global Labor Economics: Challenges and Benefits”. Martin Kahanec, Professor, GLO Fellow and Head of the School of Public Policy, was introducing Zimmermann to a larger group of interested participants, and chaired the discussion after the talk. Kahanec and Zimmermann had published various books and articles together dealing with global labor economics, in particular on the consequences of EU enlargement and migration.

Two successful scientists, GLO leaders, co-authors & friends

Klaus F. Zimmermann is the George Soros Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) teaching a student class on Global Labor Economics in the 2019 Spring term. He is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), the Section Chair for Economics, Business and Management of the Academia Europaea, the European Academy of Science, and Professor Emeritus of Bonn University.

Summarizing major aspects from his class, Zimmermann explained in the lecture why global labor economics can contribute forcefully to the wealth of nations. Connecting his work to Adam Smith, he suggested that global labor mobility is the ultimate consequence of the division of work which is the driving force behind economic development and global wellbeing. While most research on global labor economics documents that migration is beneficial for the economy (economic efficiency) and hence the basis of wellbeing of people, he argues that it is necessary to develop multi-ethnic social and cultural identities to make this outcome also socially effective in society.

In its Winter 2019 issue of “The International Economy”, the Washington DC based magazine of international economic policy, has featured a prominent symposium of views on “Why is Populism on the Rise and What Do the Populists Want?”. Klaus F. Zimmermann, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Bonn University Professor and UNU-MERIT/Maastricht affiliated economist, who is currently the George Soros Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, had been asked to contribute to this debate. The link to the full text of the symposium is here. Please find the contribution of Zimmermann also below, which is in close relationship to his George Soros Lecture.

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GLO Director Matloob Piracha speakes on May 6, 2019 at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia on Ethnic Identity and the Labor Market

Invitation to the next seminar in the Centre for Workforce Futures Seminar Series, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, on May 6, 2019.

Topic:                   Ethnic Identity and Immigrants’ Labour Market Outcomes

Speaker:            Dr Matloob Piracha
Venue:                120 Lend Lease Room, 1 Management Drive, Macquarie University NSW 2109
When:                 Monday 6th May 2019
Time:                   2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Abstract:

In this seminar, Dr. Piracha will address the following questions: i) what are the determinants of ethnic identity, and (ii) whether those who identify with the host country culture have a higher probability of getting a job as well as better wages than those who identify more with the culture of their country of origin. The paper will use the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia (LSIA), which consists of data collected for two cohorts of immigrants. The first cohort entered the country in 1993–1995 while the second cohort entered in 2000–2001. The paper will consider what role ethnic identity plays in the labour market integration of immigrants. It will then compare the determinants of ethnic identity of the cohort that entered before the immigration policy change in 1995, when the level of English required in the selective (points-based) system increased, with the one that entered after the change.

Dr Matloob Piracha:

Dr Matloob Piracha is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) at the University of Kent, UK. He has extensive experience of working on migration and related issues and has published a number of papers on the impact of migration on sending and receiving countries as well as on migrants and their left-behind families. Matloob has acted as a consultant or a collaborator for a number of international organisations including the OECD, UK Department for International Development (DfID) and the World Bank. He is also Director of the Global Labour Organisation (GLO), a virtual network connecting eminent scholars and policymakers from around the world.

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GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is George Soros Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest since April 1, 2019.

The Central European University (CEU) has appointed Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is also President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), the George Soros Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of CEU for April-June (Spring Term) 2019. He took residence in Budapest on April 1, 2019 and teaches since then a class in “Global Labor Economics“. He will provide the public George Soros Lecture on “Global Labor Economics: Challenges and Benefits” on May 8, 2019 (see special announcement).

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann (on the morning walk to work)

Budapest has played a particular role in the academic career of Klaus F. Zimmermann. Already early 1984, he received as academic youngster the honor of an invitation to the small-scale Winter Symposium of the Econometric Society, which took place in Budapest guided by Martin Hellwig, Janos Kornai and Jean-Jacques Laffont. In 1990 he came back as the then Secretary of the European Society for Population Economics (ESPE) to speak at the Workshop “Demographic Change and Social Policy” of the demographic institutes of the countries of the Eastern Socialist Block organized by the Hungarian Demographic Research Institute. Its then Director Istvan Monigl had invited Zimmermann and showed him also parts of Hungary in a personal tour. The ambitions of the two men was to initiate soon a big population economics congress in Budapest to foster change, which was achieved in 1993 when the annual ESPE congress took place in the city. Zimmermann came back regularly since then.

While 1984, 1990 and 1993 were visits in periods of change and transition with a high appreciation of freedom, mobility and collaboration, the current visit as a George Soros Chair Professor takes place in a period where free mobility, academic independence and European unity face declining popularity.

Half way to the office in Budapest: In the back the Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Place of Work and Exchange

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GLO Supports World Talent Alliance: Zimmermann Represents his Organization in Hong Kong

Transnational movements of talent have become a key component of economic growth and international relationships. The global movement of talent fosters societal change, generates well-being of the public and promotes peace and development around the world.

On the initiative of Huiyao (Henry) Wang, the President of the Beijing-based Center for China and Globalization (CCG), a large number of participants representing global organizations met in Hong Kong to debate and foster the creation of a World Talent Alliance. The event, organized by the Center for China and Globalization Hong Kong Council, took place on April 10, 2019. Under the direction and leadership of Henry Wang, a larger number of speakers debated the needs and perspectives of global talent flows.

The President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Klaus F. Zimmermann, who is currently the George Soros Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, was participating at the event. While representing GLO, he was given the honor to open the panel debate on the future of talent movements around the world. While being a long-term advocate of regulated (legal), but open global labor flows, Zimmermann explained the large potentials of talented worker flows for global welfare and regional development. He strongly welcomed the Chinese initiative fostered by Henry Wang, which would nicely complement the Chinese Belt & Road project.

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A Second Chance for Europe: German version of the book presented to the public in Berlin on April 5, 2019 by Jo Ritzen

On Friday, 5 April 2019, the Berlin Government Office (Landesvertretung) of the State of North Rhine – Westphalia hosted the launch of the German draft of the book ‘A Second chance for Europe: Economic, Political and Legal Perspectives of the European Union’ was presented by Jo Ritzen.

Jo Ritzen: “Eine zweite Chance für Europa: Wirtschaftliche, politische und rechtliche Perspektiven der Europäischen Union. Königshausen & Neumann, 2019.

The host, Stephan Holthoff-Pförtner, Minister of North Rhine – Westphalia in Berlin, introduced the event, and Christoph Schmidt, President of the RWI Leibniz Institute for Economic Research and Head of the German Council of Economic Experts, provided a keynote speech discussing the challenges for Europe and evaluated the solutions outlined in the book. The detailed agenda can be found here.

Author Jo Ritzen, who is a former Dutch Minister of Education, a former Vice-President of the World Bank and the Past-President of Maastricht University, and has been a Professor of Economics before his remarkable career in politics, is currently working as Honorary Professor of Maastricht University and Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). At the book launch, he was presenting the major contributions of the book, which is based on joint research with a number of GLO Fellows.

In the view of Ritzen, key challenges for Europe are (i) the social market economy, (ii) governance including corruption, (iii) internal and external labor mobility, (iv) the asylum issue, (v) the dept crisis and the Euro, and (vi) the knowledge society. It was common sense among the speakers that more Europe and not less is needed in the future to manage the current and forthcoming challenges.

Also present and contributing his views in a panel discussion after the book presentation were Alexander Kritikos, Research Director of the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW), Professor at the University of Potsdam and GLO Fellow, and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, currently at the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest as the George Soros Chair Professor. Zimmermann is also co-author of two chapters in the book.

Support for the policy proposals of Jo Ritzen

Latest news: The next version of the book, Jo Ritzen announced at the meeting, will be in Spanish.

Relaxed after work: Panelists Zimmermann, Ritzen und Kritikos

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“Why is Populism on the Rise and What Do the Populists Want?”. Experts debate this in the Winter Issue of “The International Economy” magazine.

“What problems are today’s populists seeking to address? Are followers of populist leaders driven by economic insecurity at a time of rising economic inequality and subpar growth, or by a reaction against progressive values, or both?” The International Economy magazine.

In its Winter 2019 issue of “The International Economy”, the Washington DC based magazine of international economic policy, has featured a prominent symposium of views on “Why is Populism on the Rise and What Do the Populists Want?”. Klaus F. Zimmermann, the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), Bonn University Professor and UNU-MERIT/Maastricht affiliated economist, who is currently the George Soros Chair Professor at the School of Public Policy of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, had been asked to contribute to this debate. The link to the full text of the symposium is here. Please find the contribution of Zimmermann also below.

Related to the interactions between media, populism and migration is a new Oxford University book also free access online, to which GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann has contributed a chapter. See:

Martin Ruhs, Kristof Tamas, & Joakim Palme (Eds.):
Bridging the Gaps. Linking Research to Public Debates and Policy Making on Migration and Integration. Oxford University Press. Published online March 28, 2019.

Chapter 8: Klaus F. Zimmermann: Gaps and Challenges of Migration Policy Advice: The German Experience

LINK TO THE FULL MANUSCRIPT OPEN ACCESS.

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Paper submission to Brasov conference on 31 May to June 1, 2019 still possible until April 26.

International Conference„Inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Challenges, measures and solutions” (ISEG 2019).

Place: 31 May-June 1: Brasov, Romania, at the Transilvania University of Brasov.

Organizers: Transilvania University of Brasov; Romanian Academy, Institute of Economic Forecasting; Global Labor Organization (GLO)

Invited Speakers are Filomena Maggino and  Klaus F. Zimmermann.

To participate: Register until April 26 through the conference website and send an abstract asap. CONTACT.

GLO is interested in research papers for a special session related to the Labor Markets of Countries in South East Europe; GLO members who wish to contribute to this are invited to send an abstract by April 20 to Klaus F. Zimmermann. (klaus.f.zimmermann@gmail.com)

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May 23-24, 2019: Bucharest. 5th International Conference on “Recent Advances in Economic and Social Research”

GLO Fellow Adrian Cantemir Calin of the Institute for Economic Forecasting, Romanian Academy, organizes the 5th International Conference on Recent Advances in Economic and Social Research on May 23-24, 2019 at the Romanian Academy in Bucharest. See below for more details.

The conference takes great pride in offering young researcher an opportunity to discuss their work in the current economic context. In this line, the organizers are continuing the tradition of the “young talent” section, aiming to provide a vehicle for scientific dissemination for an even younger audience. Under this section they welcome papers from PhD students, master students and even bachelor students that aim at a career in academic research.

May 25, 2019: FULL PROGRAM OF THE EVENT.

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Guangzhou, China; Jinan University, March 21-22, 2019. IESR-GLO Workshop on ‘Belt and Road’ – Labor Markets. What are the challenges on human resources issues? The exchange has begun.

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann has visited the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), Jinan University in Guangzhou, China, at IESR, Jinan University during 17 – 24 March, 2019. On March 21 – 22, he had organized IESR-GLO Workshop on ‘Belt and Road’ Labor Markets together with GLO Fellow Shuaizhang Feng, the Dean of IESR. The focus of the workshop was China, South Asia and South East Asia. For the workshop program see below. IESR Report LINK WEBSITE.


Shuaizhang Feng, Dean of IESR

March 21st, 2019
9:30-9:40 Welcome remarks by Shuaizhang Feng and Klaus F. Zimmermann
9:40-10:40 Michele Bruni: China and the BRI Countries at a Demographic Crossroad: Labour Market Implications, Challenges and Opportunities
10:40-11:10 Group Picture and Coffee Break
11:10-11:50 Asad Islam: Can Referral Improve Targeting? Evidence from a Training Experiment
11:50-13:50 Lunch
13:50-14:30 Jinseong Park: Parental Wealth, Time to First Job, and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Housing Wealth Shocks in South Korea
14:30-14:50 Coffee Break
14:50-15:30 M Niaz Asadullah: Female Seclusion from Paid Work: A Social Norm or Cultural Preference?
15:30-16:10 Shuaizhang Feng: The Challenge of Internal Migration on China’s Long Term Sustainable Growth

Park, Ouch, Asadullah

Dinner with Associate Dean and GLO Fellow Sisi Zhang (second from right)
GLO Fellows (from left) Xue, Park, Assadullah, Bruni, Ouch, and Islam with Zimmermann

March 22nd, 2019
9:00-9:40 Chandarany Ouch: China’s BRI and Challenges and Opportunities for Cambodia’s Labour Market 9:40-10:20
Sen Xue: Institutional Restrictions on Migration and Migrant Consumption and Savings Response
10:20-10:40 Coffee Break
10:40-11:20 Klaus F. Zimmermann: Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water in Bangladesh: Knowledge and Response
11:20-12:00 Round Table Discussion
12:00-14:00 Lunch

Zimmermann, Ouch & Feng

List of GLO Participants
Michele Bruni: Professor at Centre for the Analysis of Public Policies, University of Modena, Team Leader of EU-China Social Protection Reform Project
Shuaizhang Feng: Professor and Dean of IESR, Jinan University
Asad Islam: Associate Professor of Department of Economics, Monash University
M Niaz Asadullah: Professor, Faculty of Economics and Administration, Univ of Malaya
Chandarany Ouch: Research Fellow, Head of Economics Unit, Cambodia Development Resource Institute
Jinseong Park: Assistant Professor of IESR, Jinan University
Sen Xue: Assistant Professor of IESR, Jinan University
Klaus F. Zimmermann: Professor of Bonn University and UNU-MERIT, President of the Global Labor Organization

Group Photo of the Workshop

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GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann visited IESR in Guangzhou. IESR Dean Shuaizhang Feng appointed Editor of the Journal of Population Economics.

Arriving from Kuala Lumpur, where he had spent time as a Visiting Professor at the University of Malaya, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann arrived on March 17 in Guangzhou, China, to work a full week at the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), Jinan University.

Jinan University (JNU) was founded in 1906 by the Qing government in Nanjing as the first university in China to enroll overseas Chinese students. Now, it is the top university in mainland China for international students and it has fully devoted itself to creating a culture of openness, diversity and creativity among its faculty and students.

The Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) was created in December 2015 by appointing Yangtze River Scholar Professor Shuaizhang Feng appointed as the first Dean. The mission of IESR is to advance policy-oriented economic and social research addressing the most relevant challenges of the modern China. Within a short time, IESR has gained a strong faculty of significant researchers and a global reputation of excellence.

IESR has been an early supporter and collaborator of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and Dean and Professor Shuaizhang Feng is a GLO Fellow of the first hour. During his second visit to IESR, Klaus F. Zimmermann met again with many IESR researchers to discuss their latest research.

Shuaizhang Feng was also recently appointed Editor of the Journal of Population Economics published by Springer Nature. The Journal, the leader of the academic field of Population Economics, is directed by Zimmermann, who is the Editor-in-Chief. Both Feng and Zimmermann had various talks about the further collaborations to strenghten IESR, GLO and the Journal of Population Economics.

At IESR, Zimmermann was working in the Jim Heckman room….

After discussions with visitor Wenkai Sun, Professor & Labor Economist of the Renmin University of China, Beijing, and GLO Fellow. As an Honorary Professor of Beijing University, Zimmermann has frequently visited Beijing.

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GLO President Zimmermann appointed Visiting Professor at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in March 2019. Highlights from the visit.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Professor Emeritus of Bonn University, Co-Director POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, and Honorary Professor Maastricht University, has been appointed Visiting Professor at the Faculty of Economics & Administration of the University of Malaya (UM) for his March visit to Malaysia. He provided academic lectures and debated research issues with colleagues and students. Zimmermann, who is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), introduced this large academic network and promoted the Journal of Population Economics, which he is directing as the Editor-in-Chief. He also discussed research initiatives with GLO Fellow M. Niaz Asadullah, (UM), who is also the GLO South -East Asia Research Cluster Lead.

THE PROGRAM AT UM

  • March 10-17, 2019: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. University of Malaya (UM). Klaus F. Zimmermann has been Visiting Professor at UM. See for the warm welcome with the Dean. The detailed program in Malaysia was as follows:
  • March 12: Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia. Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS).
    Klaus F. Zimmermann provided the public University Silver Jubilee Lecture on “Global Labor Economics: Challenges and Benefits” and a public Seminar on “Publishing in Good Journals”. See for details.
  • March 13: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. University of Malaya (UM). Joint GLO -UM public Seminar on “Introducing GLO –  Pushing the Research Frontier on Labor and Human Resources Issues”. See for more details.
  • March 14: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. University of Malaya (UM). Joint GU- World Bank Research Seminar of Klaus F. Zimmermann on “Economic Preferences Across Generations“. See for more details.
  • March 15: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. University of Malaya (UM). Klaus F. Zimmermann provides a public Seminar on “Publishing in Good Journals”. See for more details.
  • Farewell. See for details.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE VISIT


Arrived at the University of Malaya
University of Malaya
In front of the office

Zimmermann with Dean & Prof. Rohana Binti Jani and his host, GLO Fellow and Prof. M. Niaz Asadullah (left)
Lecturing
Zimmermann Lecture at the Joint UN – World Bank Seminar

UM Faculty and Word Bank Researchers from the left: Nai Peng Tey, Young Eun Kim, M. Niaz Asadullah, Noor Azina Ismail, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Ong Sheue Li, Vijayendra Rao and Lim Kian Ping. After lunch following the UM – World Bank Research Seminar.

UM Faculty of Economics and Administration, ‘his’ Visitor’s Committee. From the left: Pui Kiew Ling, Santha A/P Chenayah @ Ramu (Head of the Department of Economics), Lim Kian Ping, Klaus F. Zimmermann, M. Niaz Asadullah and Ong Sheue Li. After lunch in a great local Malaysian Restaurant celebrating the end of a very successful visit with the team.

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Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) in Kota Kinabalu: GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann delivered public University Silver Jubilee Lecture

March 11 -12, 2019. Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Island of Borneo, Malaysia. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann was visiting the Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) and the Faculty of Business, Economics and Accountancy to celebrate its 25th anniversary. On March 12, he provided the public University Silver Jubilee Lecture on “Global Labor Economics: Challenges and Benefits” and gave a public Seminar on “Publishing in Good Journals”. He was welcomed by a committee consisting of Dean & Associate Prof. Raman Noordin, GLO Fellow Dr. Beatrice Lim and GLO Affiliate & Lecturer Dr. Borhan Abdullah. Beatrice Lim is also a Senior Lecturer and Head of the Human Resource Economics Program of the Faculty. Zimmermann also used the possibility to discuss research and strategic university issues with key officials of UMS and the faculty.

Event banner from the street

About 400 people attended the festive ceremony around the Silver Jubilee Lecture and around 40 stayed to learn and discuss about the art of publishing in good academic journals. The two events were part of a day-long seminar (see below) of the Faculty of Business, Economics and Accountancy on “Global Labor Economics: Challenges and Benefits” with a series of paper presentations of local scholars in the afternoon.

The event was opened and chaired by Professor Dr. Rasid Mail, Deputy Vice Chancelor (Academic & International), and the introductory speech was delivered by Professor Datuk Dr. Kasim Mansur. The session on publishing was chaired by Senior Lecturer Dr. James Eng. A large number of academic staff, including those of other faculties of the university were attending the event and the discussions in the break.

THE PROGRAM

BROAD MEDIA COVERAGE


Welcome by Prof. Dr. Rasid Mail, Deputy Vice Chancelor (Academic & International)
Internal discussion with top faculty and university official
About 400 registered participants.

Dean Noordin, Zimmermann, Deputy Vice Chancellor Mail & Beatrice Lim

Ready to travel: With Dean & Associate Prof. Raman Noordin

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EBES & GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann met EBES activists in Malysia to discuss EBES business issues

Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Bonn University and Maastricht University) is the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the President of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES). EBES and GLO are academic partner organizations with a number of joint activities.

Zimmermann in his role as EBES President is the recent successor of Jonathan A. Batten, currently a distinguished Professor of University Utara Malaysia, who was serving in this function for many years. Batten is also a GLO Fellow.

Noor Azina Ismail, a Professor of Applied Statistics of the University of Malaya, is the local contact for the 30th EBES congress, which will take place on January 8-10, 2020 at the University of Malaya, Faculty of Economics and Administration.

Zimmermann used his visit at UM to meet with Jonathan A. Batten for dinner and with Noor Azina Ismail for lunch to discuss EBES business issues.

Noor Azina Ismail & Klaus F. Zimmermann after lunch.
Klaus F. Zimmermann & Jonathan A. Batten after dinner.

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